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The Religious Affiliation of
Charles Cotesworth Pinckney
a Signer of the U.S. Constitution


Charles Cotesworth Pinckney (also known as Charles C. Pinckney) is regarded as one of the Founding Fathers of the United States of America. He was one of the signers of the Constitution of the United States of America. He was a delegate from South Carolina.

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney was a devout Episcopalian.

He was identified as an Episcopalian by: the Library of Congress and A Worthy Company: Brief Lives of the Framers of the United States Constitution by M. E. Bradford. (Source: Ian Dorion, "Table of the Religious Affiliations of American Founders", 1997).

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney should not be confused with his similarly-named relative Charles Pinckney, who was also a signer of the U.S. Constitution.

From: Robert G. Ferris (editor), Signers of the Constitution: Historic Places Commemorating the Signing of the Constitution, published by the United States Department of the Interior, National Park Service: Washington, D.C. (revised edition 1976), pages 204-206:

Utilizing his exceptional education and continuing the public service of his distinguished parents, planter-lawyer-politician-soldier-philanthropist Pinckney became one of the outstanding men of his time. During the Revolution, he espoused the Whig cause; bore arms during the War for Independence; and ranked among the leaders at the Constitutional Convention. Besides serving in the State legislature, he rendered diplomatic service to the Nation, nad was once the Vice-Presidential and twice the Presidential candidate of the Federalists.

The eldest son of a politically prominent planter and a remarkable mother who introduced and promoted indigo culture in South Carolina, Charles Cotesworth [Pinckney] was born in 1746 at Charleston. Only 7 years later, he accompanied his father, who had been appointed colonia agent for South Carolina, to England. As a result, the youth enjoyed a European education.

Pinckney received tutoring in London, attended several preparatory schools, and went on to Christ Church College, Oxford, where he heard the lectures of the legal authority Sir William Blackstone and graduated in 1764. Pinckney next pursued legal training at London's Middle Temple and was accepted for admission into the English bar in 1769. He then spent part of a year touring Europe and studying chemistyr, military science, and botany under leading authorities.

...1800... That year, he represented the Federalists as the Presidential nominee. But he met defeat...

For the rest of his life, Pinckney engaged in legal practice, served at times in the legislature, and engaged in philanthropic activities. He was a charter member of the board of trustees of South Carolina College (later the University of South Carolina), first president of the Charleston Bible Society, and chief executive of he Charleston Library Society... he died in Charleston in 1825 at the age of 79. He was interred there in the cemetery at St. Michael's Episcopal Church.

Note that numerous sources and authoritative references have been consulted in order to ascertain the religious affiliation of the American Founding Fathers. Note that the excerpts and references mentioned on this page are not the only references used in order to identify this person's religious affiliation.

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Portrait: from Robert G. Ferris (editor), Signers of the Constitution: Historic Places Commemorating the Signing of the Constitution, published by the United States Department of the Interior, National Park Service: Washington, D.C. (revised edition 1976).

Webpage created 19 November 2005. Last modified 20 November 2005.

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