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The Religious Affiliation of U.S. Soldier and War Hero
Hal Moore


From: Catherine M. Barsotti and Robert K. Johnston, Finding God in the Movies: 33 Films of Reel Faith, Baker Books: Grand Rapids, Michigan (2004), page 62:
The film [We Were Soldiers] captures the perspective not only of the charismatic leader, Lt. Col. Hal Moore (a Harvard graduate in international relations, Moore is a family man who is a devout Catholic with an earthly spirituality that will make you smile), but also of his men and their wives and the perspective of the North Vietnamese leaders...

Our country's leaders continue to face world-altering decisions. As faithful Christians we must not cease praying for them. But we must, ourselves, also wrestle with the question of war. If, as the preacher of Ecclesiastes states, there is a time for war, we cannot be arrogant in thinking we know exactly how, when, or where. For he also states in that same breath that there is a time for peace (Eccles. 3:8). Morever, as these movies remind us so eloquently, the "enemy," like us, are created in the image of God (Gen. 1:27).

From: Barsotti and Johnston, page 70:
While most events in the film [We Were Soldiers] actually happened. Wallace [i.e., Randall Wallace, the director] did create some scenes in order to better tell the story. Often he contacted the people involved or their survivors to get ideas consistent with the person's character. One such scene is the chapel scene between Jack Geoghegan and Hal Moore. Wallace consulted Geoghegan's wife because he wanted to give the viewer some idea of this man's Christian commitment.

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