< Return to Religious Affiliation of Comics Book Characters Supreme (Ethan Crane)

The Religious Affiliation of Comic Book Character
Ethan Crane
Supreme
a Superman analog created by Rob Liefeld and reimagined by Alan Moore

From: "Supreme (comics)" page on Wikipedia.org website (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supreme_(comics); viewed 30 May 2007):

Supreme is a fictional superhero created by Rob Liefeld. He was originally a violent, egotistical Superman archetype, but was rebooted by Alan Moore to pay tribute to the classic Silver Age Superman mythos, as guided by Mort Weisinger.

Supreme is also the name of a comic book which lasted 56 issues. Alan Moore started with issue 41 and his run would later be collected as two trade paperbacks by Checker Book Publishing Group: Supreme: The Story of the Year and Supreme: The Return. Moore's work on the series won the 1997 Eisner Award for Best Writer.

Supreme was originally introduced in issue 3 of Rob Liefeld's initial Youngblood limited series as a flipbook story, and he was later spun off into his own series, which Liefeld occasionally worked on. His history varied from story to story; at one point, he was an extremely religious angel of vengeance, who cited Scripture to justify his actions. At other times, Supreme considered himself to be a god, especially after defeating the Norse god Thor and taking his mystical hammer, Mjolnir...

Supreme was eventually given a more comprehensive treatment in The Legend of Supreme, a three-issue miniseries by Keith Giffen and Robert Loren Fleming. In the story, a reporter named Maxine Winslow investigates the "origin story" of Supreme. As the story unfolds, we learn that in 1937, Ethan Crane shot and killed two men in retaliation for the rape of a 15 year-old girl. Crane was subsequently shot by two police officers, but he survived and was sentenced to life in prison. In prison, the government offered him a chance to participate in an experiment to enhance humans, hoping that unlike the six previous guinea pigs, he would survive.

Unfortunately, Crane perished like the others; but unlike the others, he came back to life. The outside world was strange and new to him. Making his way to a church, Crane found sanctuary given by Father Beam, and soon discovered some of his new abilities. He took the name "Supreme," and upon hearing about the ongoing war in Europe, he decided to do his part. Not much was revealed about Supreme's work in World War II, but it is known that he joined the Allies. After the war ended, Supreme felt that he had done his part, playing a good Samaritan to society, and left Earth. In reality, the accidental death of Father Beam at his hands drove him away...

As Supreme fought Thor over the possession of Mjolnir, another character by the name of Enigma acquired another Supreme from an alternate timeline, to be kept in storage in case Supreme was defeated. Supreme did not lose, so the other Supreme was left to his own devices (most importantly in the events of The Legend of Supreme). Supreme eventually appeared to die during an assault on humanity by Lord Chapel, but in actuality, he ended up stranded on an alternate Earth. There, he spent several years until the alternate Supreme originally removed from this reality by Enigma returned and was overpowered by the original Supreme. The original Supreme managed to switch bodies with the alternate Supreme, thus restoring his powers. After various events involving Probe, Supreme's daughter from the future, and Enigma, the original Supreme, the alternate Supreme, Probe, and Enigma all worked together to defeat the evil Norse god Loki, whose machinations had been the cause of the various shifts between realities. In the end of Supreme #40, loose ends had been wrapped up, and, while Probe remained on the alternate Earth, Supreme returned to Earth.

Discussion

From: "Legion of Atheist Super-Heroes" forum discussion, started 17 November 2006 on "Comic Book Resources" website (http://forums.comicbookresources.com/archive/index.php/t-152692.html; viewed 30 May 2007):

ultramandingo
11-18-2006, 12:31 PM

Moore's Supreme (and Tom Strong?) met God, he was a giant floating cigar-chomping Kirby head - Kirbyists?


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Webpage created 30 May 2007. Last modified 30 May 2007.
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