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The Religious Affiliation of Comic Book Character
Shabbas Queen
of The Jewish Hero Corps


Read more about Jewish Hero Corps

From: Alan Oirich, "Hall of Heroes" page on the "Jewish Hero Corps" official website (http://www.jewishsuperhero.com/jhc.htm; viewed 22 April 2006):

Shabbas Queen has an electro-magnetic wand which nullifies or projects electricity, magnetism and gravity. The wand uses an electromagnetic pulse to disable mechanical objects (giving them a "rest") The wand must be recharged for one day in seven.
From: "List of Jewish superheroes" page on Wikipedia.com (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Jewish_superheroes; viewed 22 April 2006):
There also exists a team of Judaicly themed superheroes known as "The Jewish Hero Corps", printed by Leviathan press. They include Menorah Man, Yarmulke Youth, Matzah Woman, Driedel Maidel, Magen David, Minyan Man, and Shabbas Queen. They are not commonly recognized as actual characters primarily because only one issue of the comic is known to have been produced at this time.
From: Jonathan Mark, "Jewish Super Heroes?: New 'comic book' looks to golden age of heroes", published in Jewish World Review, 11 December 1998 / 22 Kislev, 5758 (http://www.jewishworldreview.com/jonathan/mark121198.asp; viewed 22 April 2006):
Maybe the problem, as Lenny Bruce would say, is that comics used to be Jewish and now aren't. The early comic book creators were almost all Jewish, in a world of immigrants: the story of their lives was one of escaping from a destroyed world; fighting in their new world for truth, justice and the American way; having one identity at work and another identity in private. They never forgot where they came from. They never forgot their real names.

That these ideas elude modern comic book writers led Alan Oirich, a comics maven and Orthodox Jew, to create a new comic universe featuring "The Jewish Hero Corps - sort of a Justice League of America except they wait six hours after eating meat before intaking dairy foods.

It's available in most Judaica stores.

But while the comic is old-fashioned in its themes and simplicity, it has high-tech delivery. The comic comes to you on a cd-rom -- both in PC and Mac format -- offering a half-hour story complete with interactive options, a press conference with the superheroes, and four after-story games and puzzles...

And the Jewish superheroes are drawn with classic muscle-rippling panache by Michael Netzer, who used to draw Spiderman, Batman and Wonder Woman before he became Orthodox and moved to Israel...

Remember "Who Framed Roger Rabbit"? Sexy "toon" Jessica Rabbit, with her come-hither eyes and naughty voice, seductively purrs like Bacall-to-Bogie: "I'm not really bad; I'm just drawn that way." But throughout the entire "Jewish Hero Corps," there is nothing like a dame: Dreidel Maidel, Shabbos Queen and Hyper Girl may be as curvy, leggy and perfectly complexioned as Betty and Veronica but they're drawn with the same modest long sleeves and long dresses that you'd see at fervently-Orthodox girl's school.

Are they really so modest in their secret identities or are they just drawn that way? Oirich actually asked artist Netzer to draw Shabbos Queen like the 1965 Supergirl, but with a skirt well below the knees.

From: Leah Finkelshteyn, "Thwak! To Our Enemies", published in Hadassah Magazine, June/July 2003 Vol. 84 No. 10 (http://www.hadassah.org/news/content/per_hadassah/archive/2003/03_JUN/art.htm; viewed 19 June 2007):

...Another new title for kids, The Jewish Hero Corps (Electric Comics, www.jewishsu perhero.com), created by Oirich, will be out in August. The Corps' super team includes Minyan Man, who can duplicate himself 10 times; Kipa Kid, known as the Capped Crusader; and Shabbas Queen, whose wand causes electric objects to "rest"...

"There is a real connection between Jews and comic books for any of a dozen reasons," says Oirich, who is curating an exhibit on the subject with the New York City Comic Book Museum (www.nyccomicbookmuseum.org). "One is historical; another has to do with a...sense of tikkun olam, of what you might call Jewish mythic ideas and feelings that expressed themselves [through superheroes]."


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Webpage created 22 April 2006. Last modified 19 June 2007.
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