Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Christianity, Lusitania

Christianity, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christianity Lusitania 5298 Card, Orson Scott. Xenocide. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 205. "'No, actually,' said Quim. 'This is a group that I never preached to. The fathertrees all talk to each other, so the ideas of Christianity are already everwhere in the world...' "
Christianity Lusitania 5298 Card, Orson Scott. Xenocide. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 246. "I thought you cared about the good of this colony,' said Mayor Kovano.

'I care about the good of all Christians placed under my charge,' said Bishop Peregrino. 'Until thirty years ago, that meant I cared only for the human beings of Lusitania. Now, however, I am equally responsible for the spiritual welfare of the Christian pequeninos of this planet. I send Father Estavao forth on his mission exactly as a missionary named Patrick was once sent to the island of Eire...' "

Christianity Maine 1966 King, Stephen. Hearts in Atlantis. New York: Scribner (1999); pg. 296. "When I finally shambled back to my room, Nate was lying on his bed reading his Bible. That was the last thing he did every night before going to sleep. This was his third trip through what he always called The Word of God, he'd told me. He had reached the Book of Nehemiah. He looked up at me with an expression of calm enquiry--a look that never changed much... tucked into his last Christmas card to me was a photo of his new office in Houlton. In the photo are three Magi standing around a straw-filled cradle on the snowy office lawn. Behind Mary and Joseph you can read the sign on the door: NATHANIEL HOPPENSTAND, D.D.S. "
Christianity Maine 1978 King, Stephen. The Stand. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1978); pg. 41. Pg. 41: "...a small guy with a wiffle haircut and a T-shirt reading JESUS IS COMING & IS HE PISSED. "; Pg. 83: "What as that tune? 'Beautiful Zion'? 'The Fields of My Father's Home'? Sweet Bye and Bye'? Some hymn he rememebered from his childhood, something he associated with full immersion and picnic lunches. But he couldn't remember which one. " [Many other references to Christianity in novel, most not in DB. King calls this a 'dark Christian' novel, and many hail it as one of King's most explicitly Christian works.]
Christianity Maine 1979 King, Stephen. Carrie. New York: Pocket Books (2000; c. 1974); pg. 7. "Yet there had been all these years, al these years of let's short-sheet Carrie's bed at Christian Youth Camp and... "
Christianity Maine 1979 King, Stephen. Carrie. New York: Pocket Books (2000; c. 1974); pg. 16. Pg. 16: "She told Mrs. Bicente, God rest her, that the Lord was reserving a special burning seat in hell for her because she gave the kids an outline of Mr. Darwin's beliefs on evolution... "l; Pg. 18: "And didn't Momma say there would be a Day of Judgment.

(the name of that star shall be wormwood and they shall be scourged with scorpions)

and an angel with a sword?

If only it would be today and Jesus coming not with a lamb and a shepherd's crook, but with a boulder in each hand to crush the laughers and the snickerers, to root out the evil and destroy it screaming--a terrible Jesus of blood and righteousness.

And if only she could be His sword and His arm... and had walked up to the Barker Street Grammar School with her Bible under her arm... " [Many other refs., not in DB. The main character apparently has an Evangelical Christian upbringing.]

Christianity Maine 1979 King, Stephen. Carrie. New York: Pocket Books (2000; c. 1974); pg. 18. "She had never gotten on her knees in a public place again, although she had not told Momma that. Still, the original memory remained, with her and with them. She had fought Momma tooth and nail over the Christian Youth Camp, and had earned the money to go herself by taking in sewing. Momma told her darkly that it was Sin, that it was Methodists and Baptists and Congregationalists and that it was Sin and Backsliding. She forbade Carrie to swim at the camp... "
Christianity Maine 1998 King, Stephen. Bag of Bones. New York: Scribner (1998); pg. 307. "'...There's something wrong with the Jeep's transmission, and the rear axle, as well! I can pay for Ki's last week of Vacation Bible School, I guess...' "
Christianity Maine 1998 King, Stephen. Bag of Bones. New York: Scribner (1998); pg. 334. "'Grampa was awful old,' Ki pinched a couple of fries between her pudgy little fingers. They rose to her mouth, then gloop, all gone. 'He's with Lord Jesus now. We had all about Lord Jesus in V.B.S.'

Yes, Ki, I thought, right now Grampy's probably teaching Lord Jesus how to use Pixel Easel...

'Lord Jesus walked on water and also changed the wine into macaroni.'

'Yes, something like that,' I said. "

Christianity Maine 1999 Hand, Elizabeth. Glimmering. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 32. "...the Fisher of Men Children's Choir. Summer and winter they traveled inland, to Bangor and caribou and Presque Isle... ...even after they sang themselves hoarse at church suppers and Christian Coalition fundraisers, country fairs and weddings, funerals and baptisms...

Jesus is my friend and always will be
Jesus walks beside me every day . . .
" [More.]

Christianity Mali 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 272. "They gave her a deck of cards, and a paperback Bible that had been distributed by the Jehovah's Witness Mission of Bamako in 1992. "
Christianity Mars 2003 Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles. New York: Bantam (2000; c. 1958); pg. 88. "...they hammered together a clean, neat little town by the edge of the stone canals. On Sunday nights you could see red, blue, and green stained-glass light in the churches and hear the voices singing and the numbered hymns. 'We will now sing 79. We will now sing 94.' And in certain houses you heard the hard clatter of a typewriter, the novelist at work; or the scratch of a pen, the poet at work... "
Christianity Mars 2003 Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles. New York: Bantam (2000; c. 1958); pg. 99. "'I suppose you got names for your rockets?'

...'Yes, sir.'

'Like Elijah and the Chariot, The Big Wheel and The Little Wheel, Faith, Hope, and Charity, eh?'

'We got names for the ships, Mr. Teece.'

'God the Son and the Holy Ghost, I wouldn't wonder? Say, boy, you got one named the First Baptist Church?'

'We got to leave now, Mr. Teece.'

Teece laughed. 'You got one named Swing Low, and another named Sweet Chariot?' " [More.]

Christianity Mars 2011 Zubrin, Robert. First Landing. New York: Ace Books (2002; c. 2001); pg. 28. Pg. 28: "McGee would have bet his last dollar she was still a virgin. Unfortunately, the only things she seemed interested in were machinery, baseball, and the King James Bible. Sure, she was of humble origins, a coal-miner's daughter... ";

Pg. 36: "'This is Major Guenevere Llewellyn, the first woman to set foot on another planet. God created the planets and the Earth, and has now seen fit to show us, His chosen creatures, some of His handiwork. The heavens tell the glory of God, says the Good Book, and this place shows us the wonder of His work. Let us give thanks to God for bringing us safely here and ray that we prove ourselves worthy to be the instruments of His divine plan, whatever that may be.'

As Gwen concluded her speech, she glanced momentarily at Rebecca. Townsend noticed the gesture. Was she trying to get a rise out of the secular biologist? " [More about this character, not in DB.]

Christianity Mars 2011 Zubrin, Robert. First Landing. New York: Ace Books (2002; c. 2001); pg. 44. "'The Earth is the only planet with life on it,' said Gwen. 'It says so in the Bible--or didn't you read that at Radcliffe?'

The Bible! It's been four centuries since Kepler; we're on Mars, for crying out loud, and they're still throwing that crap at us! 'That does it!' Rebecca exploded. 'That's the limit! Colonel Townsend, I am the chief science officer on this expedition, and I insist that our scientific agenda be dictated by me and not by some redneck oilfield prospector or a Bible-thumping hillbilly mechanic. I--'

Townsend made a chopping motion with his right arm. 'Dr. Sherman, that will be all. Since you scientists cannot agree on an agenda, I have decided that the first rover sortie will be a photo reconnaissance conducted by Major Llewellyn and Professor McGee...' " [Other refs., not in DB, e.g. pg. 220, 233, 246.]

Christianity Mars 2026 Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles. New York: Bantam (2000; c. 1958); pg. 158. "From the deep freeze he fetched rimed cartons of beans and strawberries, twenty years old. Lazarus come forth, he thought, and pulled out a cool chicken. "
Christianity Mars 2030 Bear, Greg. "A Martian Ricorso " in Tangents. New York: Warner Books (1989; story c. 1976); pg. 115. "I have (as certain passages above might indicate) been thinking about the Bible lately. My old childhood background has been stimulated by the danger and moral dilemmas--hair of the dog that bit me. The maps of Mars, with their Biblical names, have contributed to my thoughts. We're not far from Eden as gliders go. We sit in fabled Moab, above the Moab-Marduk range, Marduk being one of the chief 'baals' in the Old Testament. Edom Crater--Edom means red, an appropriate name for a Martian crater. I have red hair. Call me Esau! "
Christianity Mars 2040 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Red Mars. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 47-48. [Aboard the ship taking the first 100 colonists to Mars.] "One Sunday morning the Christians aboard, numbering a dozen or so, celebrated Easter in the bubble dome. It was April back home, though the Ares' season was midsummer. After their service they came down to the D dining hall for brunch... at first only Maya and Frank heard what John was saying to Phyllis Boyle, the geologist who had conducted the Easter service.

'I understand the idea of the universe as a superbeing, and all its energy being the thoughts of this being. It's a nice concept. But the Christ story . . .' John shook his head.

'Do you really know the story?' Phyllis asked.

'I was brought up Lutheran in Minnesota,' John replied shortly. 'I went to confirmation class, had the whole thing drilled into me.'

Which, Maya thought, was probably why he bothered to get into discussions like this. He had a displeased expression that Maya had never seen before... "

Christianity Mars 2100 Anthony, Piers. Hard Sell. Houston, TX: Tafford Publishing (1990); pg. 88. "'Now the ground floor is devoted to chapels. Every major religion is represented, and there is even a blank champer for atheists, ha-ha. We are non-denominational, of course, but we honor every faith and scoff at none. Your own priest, pastor or rabbi knows he is welcome here. Many services are performed daily for your convenience.' "
Christianity Mars 2100 Anthony, Piers. Hard Sell. Houston, TX: Tafford Publishing (1990); pg. 89. "The lighting was soft, as though dusk were verging: the twilight of a pleasant life, or the pre-dawn of a pleasant after life. Religious-seeming statuary was discretly placed and illumined, but devoid of any specific connotations. The artistic nudes could be considered virgins or mermaids or random art, depending onthe eye of the beholder; the avian representations might be doves of peace or hawks of war or even vague angels. The occasional granite snakes could be clased as refugees from Eden or as Ouroburos: resurrection. Living palms, violets, wheat, passion vflowers, clover and ivy: each might be a symbol, but none had to be symbolic. Some of the abstracts resembled a crucifix from one angle, a Buddha from another, and something suggestive of Mohammedanism from a third--none being certain. Myriad live butterflies fluttered in the gentle breeze, of diverse and exotic species. "
Christianity Mars 2100 Dick, Philip K. The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1964); pg. 142. "'I know what's going to happen, Mr. Mayerson. Barney. I'm not going to convert anyone to Neo-American Christianity; instead they'll convert me to Can-D and Chew-Z and whatever other vice is current, here, whatever escape presents itself. Sex. They're terribly promiscuous here on Mars, you know; everyone goes to bed with everyone else. I'll even try that; in fact I'm ready for it right now--I just can't stand the way things are . . . did you get a really good look at the surface before nightfall?' "
Christianity Mars 2100 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Green Mars. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 6. "The stories Coyote had them read from the Odyssey or the Bible were easier to understand, though unsettling, as the people in them killed each other a lot and Hiroko said it was wrong. Coyote laughed at Hiroko and he often howled for no obvious reason as they read these gruesome tales, and asked them hard questions about what they had heard... "
Christianity Mars 2100 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Green Mars. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 34. "The folks in Christianopolis just told the UN straight out hat they came down here to get out of the net...

'So, anyway. We're making progress. Christanopolis makes light bulbs, and mauss Hyde grows new kinds of plants...' "

Christianity Mars 2101 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Green Mars. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 212. "...dominated by attempts to resolve extreme antinomies. For Descartes it had been mind and body, for Sartre, Freudianism and Marxism, for Teilhard de Chardin, Christianity and evolution--the list could be extended... "
Christianity Mars 2114 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Green Mars. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 332. "...she noted that the people in the water were mostly young natives, from Zygote, Sabishii, New Vanuatu, Dorsa Brevaria, Vishniac mohole, Christianopolis. "
Christianity Mars 2114 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Green Mars. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 371. "Subarashii and Amexx are increasing the number of Transitional Authority troops... They don't seem to know where most of the hidden sanctuaries are, but they're checking hot spots one by one, and they entered Christianopolis, and took it over as a base of operations. There's about five hundred of them, heavily armed and protected from orbit...' "; Pg. 372: "'What happened to the Christians?' Maya asked.

'Some went to Hiranyagarbha. The rest stayed.' "

Christianity Mars 2128 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Blue Mars. New York: Bantam Books (1996); pg. 92. Pg. 92: "I went to Christianopolis [a city or state on Mars] but everyone there had other plans. "; Pg. 99: [List of towns on Mars, labelled "Towns ", included "Christianopolis "]; Pg. 181: "...Michel was reminded of Christianopolis or Hiranyagarba [by the architecture in Marseilles]... "
Christianity Mars 2128 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Blue Mars. New York: Bantam Books (1996); pg. 100. [List of organizations with delegations (of one to ten people) attending the Martian constitutional convention. List includes "Christian Democrats ":] "Politial Parties and Other Organizations
Booneans
Reds
Bogdanovists
Schnellingistas
Marsfirst
Free Mars
The Ka
Praxis
Qahiran Mahjari League
Green Mars
United Nations Transitional Authority
Kakaze
Editorial Board of The Journal of Areological Studies
Space Elevator Authority
Christian Democrats
The Metanational Economic Activity Coordination Committee
Bolognan Neomarxists
Friends of the Earth
Biotique
Separation de l'Atmosphere "
Christianity Mars 2130 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Blue Mars. New York: Bantam Books (1996); pg. 259. "'...Or the people in Christianopolis, they're not Reds, but they said almost the same thing to me, last week. They want to keep the primal landscape of the far south preserved...' "; "The pond in the center of Christianopolis was about three meters deep, and three hundred meters across; this was fine with the Christians, as it gave them a nice park pond... The conference in Christianopolis had been convened to discuss strategies to deal with this [environmental] situation. "
Christianity Mars 2180 Bear, Greg. Moving Mars. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 254. "Religion raised its head, as Christians and Moslems and Hindu factions--long a polite undercurrent in Martian life... saw historic opportunity, and made a rush to the political high ground... The syndic of Cailetet Mars died in 2180... "
Christianity Mars 2250 Dick, Philip K. "Not By Its Cover " in The Golden Man. New York: Berkley (1980; c. 1968); pg. 97. "'It would be an interesting experiment,' Masters said thoughtfully, 'to bind a copy of the Bible in wub-fur.'

'I had that done,' Snead said.

'And?'

'Of course I couldn't take time to read it all. But I did glance over Paul's letters to the Corinthians. It made only one change. The passage that begins, 'Behold, I tell you a mystery--' it set all of that in caps. And it repeated the lines, 'Death, where is thy sting? Grave, where is thy victory?' ten time straight; ten whole times, all in caps. Obviously the wub agreed; that's its own philosophy, or rather theology.' He said, then, weighing each word, 'This basically is a theological dispute . . . between the reading public and the hide of a Martian animal...' " [Also pg. 100]

Christianity Mars 2397 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 468. "In four days many of us will celebrate Christmas. On Earth, that was a time of hope, of the promise of resurrection. Even the atheists among us must feel the power of this particular season and holiday, especially now, for like Christ, we carry the weight of billions on our shoulders; and more, we bear the responsibility of an entire planet's biosphere. We are like children dragged prematurely into parenthood, and the burden is frequently too heavy to stand. "
Christianity Mars 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 146. "...Mars...to Zen Christians returning to Hellas Basin... "
Christianity Maryland 1965 Chayefsky, Paddy. Altered States. New York: Harper & Row (1978); pg. 4. Pg. 4: "He suddenly saw an image of a green veronica, one of those religious handkerchiefs with the face of Christ painted on it, chalk white with little red kewpie spots on the cheeks, a crown of thorns on the brow. In an instant, he saw an infinite expanse of surrealist landscape, stretches of brilliantly white beach on which his naked body lay thickly, blackly outlined in ink. My God, he thought to himself, I'm hallucinating. "; Pg. 6: "He noted that the face of the girl was the face of Jesus Christ, the one on the veronica, but now distorted in sensual pleasure, despite the crown of thorns still on his brow. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Christianity Maryland 1999 Bear, Greg. Darwin's Radio. New York: Del Rey (1999); pg. 209. "'And the other women in the study?'

'Two should reject within a few days, the rest over the next two weeks. I've brought in ministers, a rabbi, psychiatrists, even their friends--as long as they're female. The mothers are deeply unhappy...' "

Christianity Maryland 1999 Bear, Greg. Darwin's Radio. New York: Del Rey (1999); pg. 306. Pg. 306: "'If the president agrees to start a national campaign using RU-486,' Bao said, 'I doubt the CDC will be allowed to remain open in Atlanta. As for Bethesda, it is an intelligent community, but we are still in the Bible Belt. I have already had my house picketed, Christopher. I live surrounded by guards.' "; Pg. 308: "'Maryland's own governor is in this so-called States' Health revolt,' House said. 'I've never seen such fervor in the religious right here.'

'It's pretty much grass roots, not just Christian,' Bao said. 'The Chinese community has pulled in its horns and with good reason. Bigotry is on the rise. We are falling apart into scared and unhappy tribes, Christopher.' " [Other refs. incl. pg. 316.]

Christianity Massachusetts 1997 Lobdell, Scott & Elliot S. Maggin. Generation X. New York: Berkley (1997); pg. 205. "Once, she tumbled through the enormous consciousness of a friend and she was so small in there that she felt as though she were Lucifer falling forever through the depths of Creation. She remembered Dante, the man who had put the story of the fallen angel into words. "
Christianity Massachusetts 1998 Sterling, S. M. Island in the Sea of Time. New York: Penguin (1998); pg. 604. "The full-grown warriors might not want to give up their sky-clan godlets, but he'd bet others in their tribes would--the women, to start with. Nantucket-style Christianity had a lot more to offer them than their own people's faiths; and while they might not convert their husbands, they'd certainly have a lot of influence on their sons. He hid his smile. These people weren't sophisticated enough to see through that sort of gambit--hell, he hadn't been either. Martha an Father . . . Prelate Gomez had come up with it between them. "
Christianity Massachusetts: Boston 1716 Keyes, J. Gregory. Newton's Cannon. New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 12. Pg. 12: "'I'm reading Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners, by Mr. Bunyan,' Ben answered.

'Ah, so The Pilgrim's Progress pleased you, then?'

'Very much, Uncle Benjamin,' Ben pursed his lips. "; Pg. 145: "He looked carefully up and down the street, seeking his foe, his brother's killer, and soon enough found him. Bracewell was still on his horse near the church and square. "

Christianity Massachusetts: Boston 1972 DuBois, Brendan. Resurrection Day. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1999); pg. 67. "'Often during this last tortured decade, I've reflected on a question from the Scripture,' McGovern said. ' 'Which of us, if his son asked him for bread, would give him a stone?' Our sons have asked for jobs--and we've sent them to poisoned lands and sick cities...' "
Christianity Massachusetts: Boston 1999 Hand, Elizabeth. Glimmering. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 97. "Trip's bedside cabinet held furled copies of Guideposts, The Screwtape Letters, a Dorothy Sayers mystery, an Isabel Allende novel, a tiny book of Meditations. The only television was in the common room downstairs, beneath a framed photograph of the president. Another photo showed the Christian Majority Alliance/United We Stand For Freedom. "
Christianity Massachusetts: Boston 2020 Zelazny, Roger. Damnation Alley. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1969); pg. 42. "'The bell drowned his every seventh word, but since he had said his words more than seven times over, nothing was really lost upon the eight steadfast listeners who huddled on the benches before him... His clerical collar was frayed, an there was a bandage about his right hand which seemed dirtier each time that he gestured with it, which was often.

His beard seemed recent, his black suit ancient.

'The marks are upon my body, ___ they tell me my days are ___!' he said, his eyes as dark and moist as the night and the rain, as glistening as the streetlight. 'And I say that it is ___ judgment. We are all of us, ___ and every one of us, man, ___, and child, judged in these, the ___ days, and found to be guilty! ___ is what caused this thing to ___ upon us, you may be sure! ___ and nothing else! You see it ___ day of your lives! And now ___ is angry, my brethren, for the ___ of which we are all mutually ___! You know this! I know it! ___ tells us of these days!...' "

Christianity Massachusetts: Boston 2020 Zelazny, Roger. Damnation Alley. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1969); pg. 42. "'...Can ___ you look about us and fail to ___ that the very words of the ___ are become an actuality in our ___? Of course not! This is because ___ ran like a beast too long, ___ and corrupting, and men turned to ___! No wonder then that the Beast ___, with seven heads and ten horns ___ them, rises up from the ocean, ___ the seven seals have been broken ___ the four horsemen out of the ___, whose names we all know as ___, that dreaded ravener of the countryside! ___, who followeth in the wake of him! ___, who lays his hand upon us! ___, the final, terrible one, who killeth! ___, all of these be here tonight! ___ has judged us, and now only ___ can save us from the awful ___ that lies upon all mankind! Yes! ___ is the answer, my brethren! True ___ may save us still, from the ___ into which will be cast all ___ who bear the mark of the ___ upon their hands and their foreheads! ___ has said so in his holy ___! Can we think otherwise? Can we ___ this?...' "
Christianity Massachusetts: Boston 2020 Zelazny, Roger. Damnation Alley. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1969); pg. 43. "'...You know it in your hearts, ___! Let us join together and ___!'

He bowed his head then, winced as h clasped his hands, and continued to fight with the bell, for he knew that the odds were six to one in his favor.

'How long? How long? Oh my ___!' he cried. 'Until mankind will see the ever-present ___?'

And the heavens were full of signs, cryptic and undecipherable, as the blue lightning stalked from pole to pole.

Wondering, he licked the rain from his lips and swallowed, to ease the dryness of his throat. "

Christianity Massachusetts: Boston 2040 Bova, Ben. Moonrise. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 332. "The North End of Boston... where once a patriot had climbed the Old North Church bell tower to signal Paul Revere. "
Christianity Massachusetts: Boston 2050 Stephenson, Neal. The Diamond Age. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 19. "'You're quick, Hackworth, and I suspect capable of being devious if not for your staunch moral character... Tell me, were your aprents subjects, or did you take the Oath?'

'As soon as I turned twenty-one, sir. Her Majesty--at that time, actually, she as still Her Royal Highness--was touring North America, prior to her enrollment at Stanford, and I took the Oath at Trinity Church in Boston.' " [This is apparently in reference to taking an oath to join the Neo-Victorians.]

Christianity Massachusetts: Nantucket -1250 B.C.E. Sterling, S. M. Island in the Sea of Time. New York: Penguin (1998); pg. 16. "The dome of fire had been there all night, hanging over the town, over the whole island, like the face of angry God. Every church on the island was jam-packed, but at least those people weren't causing any harm and might be doing some good. "
Christianity Massachusetts: Nantucket -1250 B.C.E. Sterling, S. M. Island in the Sea of Time. New York: Penguin (1998); pg. 101. Pg. 101: "'Science has no explanation for this thing that has happened to us,' the clergyman said.

There were over a hundred people listening to the open-air service outside the little church on Milk Street. Normally there wasn't a church on the island that got that many on a Sunday, not on Nantucket, where the biggest congregations were Unitarian and Congregationalist. "; Pg. 102: "'Christ's sacrifice is not yet made. Moses has yet to bring God's holy word down from Sinai to the Jews. We are lost in a world of pagans and devil-worshipers...' "; Pg. 112: "The circle closed in on the little church. A few fights broke out, and ended with more stunned or weeping men and women... Deubel's congregation were hammering on the door and calling on their leader, but the door was locked against them, and the church's windows showed empty and dark. " [More, pg. 101-103, 113-115, etc. Many other refs., not in DB.]

Christianity Massachusetts: Nantucket -1250 B.C.E. Sterling, S. M. Island in the Sea of Time. New York: Penguin (1998); pg. 114. [1] "'The poor man,' a voice said behind him. Cofflin looked back; it was Father Gomez, from St. Mary's.

Cofflin nodded to the priest. 'Excuse me, Father.'...

'The poor deluded man.' Gomez said again, crossing himself, as the blanket-covered body was carried out. Deubel's followers looked at it as it went by, some weeping, some impassive, a few cursing or spitting at the dead cleric who'd left them to face the consequences of his preaching.

'Manichaeism is always a temptation,' Gomez went on. 'Chief Cofflin, I think if I talked to some of these people . . .'

'Do you think it would do any good, Father?' Cofflin asked. He wasn't Catholic himself, but he had a fair degree of respect for the little priest. Certainly he took his job more seriously than some of the other clergy on the island, and he'd been a voice of good sense since the Event. 'They're not exactly of your denomination.'

'We're all Christians, Chief Cofflin,' Gomez said. "

Christianity Massachusetts: Nantucket -1250 B.C.E. Sterling, S. M. Island in the Sea of Time. New York: Penguin (1998); pg. 115. [2] "'What was that . . . Manni-something?' [Manichaeism]

'A perennial heresy--imagining that Satan is as strong a God. Poor Deubel thought that the Incarnation could be halted--which is to say that God's will could be defied. But even Satan is part of God's plan; He is omniscient and omnipotent, or He's not God at all. I don't pretend to understand what's happened to us here, but then there are many things we're not supposed to understand or can't understand. Mystery is at the heart of life. If God makes many worlds, He'll arrange them as he pleases--including when and where to send His son in this one.'

Cofflin looked at him thoughtfully. 'You know, I think it might be a good idea if you did have a talk with these people,' he said. "

Christianity Massachusetts: Nantucket -1249 B.C.E. Sterling, S. M. Island in the Sea of Time. New York: Penguin (1998); pg. 411. [1] "'Thank you,' the Catholic priest said, accepting a cup of sassafras tea. 'You understand, Chief Cofflin, that the division of the Visible Church of Christ has long been a scandal.'

Father Gomez looked tanned and fit; he'd been shoveling salt along with the prisoners he was supposed to rehabilitate . . . had rehabilitated, Cofflin reminded himself. He trusted the little priest's judgment.

So did his colleagues, evidently. The Town Building office held the pastors of the Episcopal and Baptist churches as well, the Congregationalists, the Methodists . . . even the Unitarians. Only the Quakers and Jews were missing, and neither were very common on Nantucket, particularly the former--ironic, since the island had once been a stronghold of Friends. Cofflin looked out the square-paned window for a second... "

Christianity Massachusetts: Nantucket -1249 B.C.E. Sterling, S. M. Island in the Sea of Time. New York: Penguin (1998); pg. 411. [2] "'I know you gentlemen and ladies'--the Congregational minister was a woman--'have been holding a conference.'

'We have indeed,' Gomez said. 'We've been trying to come to some understanding of what God meant by the Event, in a specifically religious sense. Some things are obvious. Questions of episcopacy and papal supremacy are . . . well, completely moot. We think that this means that God is telling us to fall back on the simple wisdom of the early church; wherever two or more of us are gathered in His name, there He is . . . and all believers are one.'

Cofflin nodded. That made sense. For that matter, there'd been something of a religious revival on the island since the Event. Not showy, and there'd never been many fundamentalists here--Unitarians and mainstream Protestants were in the majority, with the Catholics a not ver close second. More people had been showing up of a Sunday, though. "

Christianity Massachusetts: Nantucket -1249 B.C.E. Sterling, S. M. Island in the Sea of Time. New York: Penguin (1998); pg. 412. [3] "The Congregational minister went on: 'At the same time, God is also telling us something by the very fact that it was Nantucket that was thrown in to the sea of time. And not, say, Sicily or an island in Indonesia.

She looked at her colleagues. 'There's a certain balance of denominational forces here that's pretty well unique. And we're in a world where, say, Islam or Buddhism is completely absent, even Zoroastrianism. No other what you might call competing higher religions.'

'So, you're going to unite and form a single church?' he said.

Gomez spread his hands. 'More of a federation.'

'Congratulations . . . but there's no question of a state church. I hope you realize that.'

'Of course.'

'Well, then, what exactly is the point of all this?' Cofflin said. "

Christianity Massachusetts: Nantucket -1249 B.C.E. Sterling, S. M. Island in the Sea of Time. New York: Penguin (1998); pg. 412. [4] "The clerics looked at each other. Gomez cleared his throat and took up the thread: 'Well, Chief Cofflin, you must realize that God is also telling us something by putting us in a world still wholly pagan. Some of it reasonably clean paganisms like . . . Ms. Swindapa's. Others abominations like the Olmec jaguar cult. Obscene by worldly standards, and possibly of demonic inspiration.'

Cofflin nodded grimly. Cultural autonomy be damned, that deserved to be scrubbed off the face of the planet. The problem with eliminating undeserving customs, though, was that it was hard to do without wiping out the people who held them. He was a lot less enthusiastic about that.

'Well, the obvious inference is that God wants His word brought to these people. . . . There are some technical issues to do with the effect of the Incarnation on man's fallen nature, but I wont bother you with that...' "

Christianity Massachusetts: Nantucket -1249 B.C.E. Sterling, S. M. Island in the Sea of Time. New York: Penguin (1998); pg. 413. [5] "'...Basically, we're called to spread the Word, and to do that, we need some help from the government of our new republic here.'

'Oh, Missionaries?'

'Certainly. On a more secular note, conversion will also make trade and other peaceful relations easier.'

'Hmm.' Cofflin pondered. 'What exactly do you have in mind?' "

Christianity Maui-Covenant 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 319. "...the world of Maui-Covenant... without the help of the locals who, in the best Siri tradition, had fought from their motile isles and alongside their dolphin companions until Pax Fleet and Swiss Guard had put their boots down hard. Now Maui-Covenant was being Christianized with a vengeance, the residents of one large continent, the Equatorial Archipelago, and the thousands of migrating motile isles being sent to 'Christian academies' for reeducation. "
Christianity Mercury 1758 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 185. "The Swedish mystic and mineralogist Emanuel Swedenborg wrote one of the first eyewitness accounts of a close encounter of the third kind. In his treatise of 1758, De telluribus... Mercury was inhabited by simple farmers of good character and orthodox Christianity. There were more good Christians on Venus... "
Christianity Metropolis 1993 Stern, Roger. The Death and Life of Superman. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 178. [Superman's funeral] "It was a most ecumenical gathering. there were ministers and priests, rabbis and mullahs, and bishops and monks. Virtually every religion had sent a representative to invoke the deity on behalf of Superman. "
Christianity Metropolis 2020 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 9. Pg. 9: "He said, 'There fell a great star from heaven, burning as if it were a lamp. And I beheld, and heard an Angel saying with a loud voice, 'Woe woe woe to the inhabiters of the Earth.' ' "; Pg. 17: "'Read to me, please, would you, Norman?... Read from The Revelation of Saint John the Divine, would you, Norman?' Weakly, he pressed the little cloth-bound Bible into my hand. 'How about Matthew, or Micah,' I suggested. 'You don't need to hear all that apocalyptic stuff with the--'

...He recited with me as I read: ' 'Seven thunders will utter their voices. And it was given unto him to make war with the saints.' ' " [Many references to Christianity, not in DB. One of main characters is a Protestant pastor.]

Christianity Metropolis 2020 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 18. "'Hear me, Norman. I owe you much, but I have nothing to leave you except insight. 'And I will give power unto my two witnesses,' Norman, do you hear me?' he demanded. 'It is yours to be one of those two. Be my witness, Pastor. It's all in the words of God. It's all there. The end is near! Read the book!'

Eventually the doctor and nurse calmed Wesley down and did not think to throw me out, so I picked up the Bible again and read some more from First Corinthians, a book that was a little less incendiary:

' 'Now this I say, Brethren, that flesh and blood cannot inherit the Kingdom of God. Behold, I show you a mystery; we shall not all sleep but we shall all be changed . . .' '

And Wesley did in fact find sleep and somewhere in the night made the change. I officiated his funeral three days later. There were no relatives, only a few of the good people from the church. "

Christianity Metropolis 2020 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 84. You cannot quit,' he whispered. 'Do you have a mission assigned you by the Author of Creation? Have you stood face to face with God in the inmost chamber of the continuum? Have you been told by the Lord of the Universe what is expected of you?'

And I remembered the seeking of my youth. And I remembered the exultation and then the wave of sudden peace enveloping me when I chose my vocation. And I remembered to whom I answered when I sat in my house and when I walked and when I lay down and when I rose. And I thought of the still, small voice I heard from before I myself could talk and continued to hear; the voice that came from my head or my heart of from somewhere untouchable in my being. And I answered:

'Yes . . .
'. . . I . . .
'. . . have.'

I have not felt so alive since my Ellen had stood at my side to remind me. " [Many other refs. to Christianity in novel, most not in DB.]

Christianity Mexico 1986 Murphy, Pat. The Falling Woman. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 142. "Plaques on the white stone walls depicted Christ's suffering and death... I remembered my mother's contention that Christianity was a religion of human sacrifice and I was inclined to agree. Halfway up the aisle, I paused to look at an elaborately carved statue of the Virgin Mary. Candles burned on a small table before the statue, and the warm air was thick with the scent of incense and burning wax. The candlelight flickered on the Virgin Mary's carved wooden robes.

Mary's hands were spread in acceptance; her mouth was curved in a half smile. But somethiing about her expression seemed wrong to me. The artist who painted her features had tinted her skin several shades darker than the usual anemic white. Her eyes were dark; they caught the shadows. She lacked the delicacy that I had seen in other depictions of the Madonna; her features seemed more Indian than Spanish. She seemed older than the usual pale maiden Mary. Older and wiser. Her smile was knowing. "

Christianity Mexico 1986 Murphy, Pat. The Falling Woman. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 9-10. "...Mexico's Yucatan peninsula... By Mayan reckoning, people settled in this place in the ninth katun. By the Christian calendar, that is about one thousand years before the death of Christ. But the Christian reckoning seems out of place here. Despite the efforts of Spanish friars, Christianity sits ver lightly on the land. " [There are references to Christianity throughout the book, most not in DB. Most are references to Catholicism, the predominant form of Christianity in the Yucatan where this story primarily takes place. "]
Christianity Mexico 2028 Barnes, John. Mother of Storms. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 412. "...There was a little bit of 'Chariots of the Gods' stuff, and for the Christers there was a lot of Quetzalcoatle-was-Jesus stuff...' "
Christianity Mexico 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Forever Peace. New York: Ace Books (1998; first ed. 1997); pg. 96. [Guadalajara, Mexico.] "There were a half-dozen jack shops in a row, offering slightly different adventures from their American counterparts. Be gored by a bull... Perform or receive a sex-change operation, either way. Die in childbirth. Relive the agony of Christ. There was a line for that one; must have been a holy day. Maybe every day's a holy day here. "


Christianity, continued

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