Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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Christianity, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christianity Heao's World 3500 Felice, Cynthia. Godsfire. New York: Pocket Books (1978); pg. 247. Pg. 240: "'Jesus Christ, Adriana!' Joan looked angry enough to hit her. "; Pg. 241: "'The damned, filthy . . . for Christ's sake, why didn't you smash in their skulls while they were sleeping?' Adriana shouted. She was trembling with rage. "; Pg. 247: "'Christ Almighty!' Joan said, climbing down from the aerologger's belly behind me. 'Will you look at the size of that broadsword?' "
Christianity Hegira 4000 Bear, Greg. Hegira. New York: Tor (1989; 1st printed 1979); pg. 9. Pg. 9: "'This is religious inspiration!' Sulay rasped. 'The Heisos Kristos ['Jesus Christs', i.e., Christians] of Mediweva demands that they poison their bodies with infection to see His visions. Absorb this and learn from it. We've met with many people and their religions, but none is more amazing than this.' ";

Pg. 10: "'What can you tell me about Kristians?' [Christians]

'My country had a few, Bey. But I am of the Momad [Muslim] persuasion myself, as you understand, and we avoid intercourse with the unfaithful...'

...'Bey, I could tell you tales my mother told me, but some are very crazy. You might not believe. This Heisos Kristos -- or Yesu as we knew him -- is mentioned in all the Obelisks I have ever known, and his story is always the same.' " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

Christianity Hegira 4000 Bear, Greg. Hegira. New York: Tor (1989; 1st printed 1979); pg. 11. "'Why do they beat themselves for this Heisos?' [Jesus]

'It gives them strength to deny the attractions of the world, Bey. By punishing themselves they hope to distract their attentions from Hegira and focus them on Paradise, or Heaven, which is what their Yesu--surely a great prophet--desired and preached them to do.'

'But Yesu never lived on Hegira.'

'No. It is dogma that no person mentioned on the Obelisks ever lived on Hegira. They were the First-born, Bey.'

...'I can tell you very little about Yesu, Bey,' Barthel said... "

Christianity Hegira 4000 Bear, Greg. Hegira. New York: Tor (1989; 1st printed 1979); pg. 24. "'You sound pious, Fra Bar-Woten. I know you're not. You're ridiculing me.'

'I am sincere. I wish you to join us in our meal.'

'You know I can't eat until the Fast of Francis is over.' "

Christianity Hegira 4000 Bear, Greg. Hegira. New York: Tor (1989; 1st printed 1979); pg. 26. "'And you felt God was punishing you.'

'She was all I loved.'

'It's ridiculous to believe God would punish someone else for your own wrongdoings. That's ego, not Kristianity.'

'I know that.' Jacome-Kiril flushed like an embarrassed child. 'Why did you pull me out of hiding?' "

Christianity Hegira 4000 Bear, Greg. Hegira. New York: Tor (1989; 1st printed 1979); pg. 28. "Barthel was genuinely frightened. The Bey talked nonsense, believing a mad Kristian and thinking a fairy-tale coincidence could point like a bacon! Momad [Mohammed] save them all. " [The narrator speaks from a Muslim perspective.]
Christianity Hegira 4000 Bear, Greg. Hegira. New York: Tor (1989; 1st printed 1979); pg. 42. "'Momad?' Barthel asked. [Muslim]

'No. Not Kristian either. They worship a pantheon not mentioned on the Obelisk...' "

Christianity Hegira 4000 Bear, Greg. Hegira. New York: Tor (1989; 1st printed 1979); pg. 43. "'The Bey knows about its name, Hegira,' Barthel said. 'It refers to the flight of Momad from Mecca, among the First-born. The Qur'an tells many such wonderful tales. Not Yesu [Jesus], not the Lotus Contemplative, nor any other claim that namesake -- not even, pardon my obstinance, Bey -- Eloshim.' "
Christianity Hegira 4000 Bear, Greg. Hegira. New York: Tor (1989; 1st printed 1979); pg. 62. "'Kristians generally object to love,' Barthel told Bar-Woten around a bit of bread.

'Not at all! We object to the profanation of the spiritual body of the woman.'

'I profaned nothing; I exchanged. I did justice by the girl -- so did Barthel, I hope. You should have too...'

'That's barbaric! I was starting to think Ibis must have been civilized...'

Kiril turned to the Khemite. 'You're a Momadan, you should know the Prophet forbids such actions.'

'Then why is Paradise equipped with such pleasured for the faithful? Momad forbade those excesses that would weaken the body and prevent his people from performing their duties on Earth.'

Kiril shook his head 'It is a sin!'

'I don't understand the word,' Bar-Woten said.

'You wouldn't. Not with the conscience of thousands of murders -- how many rapes, how many debauches without payment?' " [Khemites are apparently a sub-sect of Islam in this novel.]

Christianity Hell 1985 Bear, Greg. "Dead Run " in Tangents. New York: Warner Books (1989; story c. 1985); pg. 159. Pg. 159: "'You. Why are you going to Hell?'... 'What did you do?'...

'I loved God. I loved Jesus. But, dear Lord, I couldn't help it. I'm gay. I never had a choice. God wouldn't send me here just for being gay, would he?' ";

Pg. 160: "The young man who was gay took my hand. I felt like pulling away, because I've never been fond of homos. But he held on and he said, 'Thank you. You must be taking a big risk.' "

Christianity Helliconia 4901 Aldiss, Brian W. Helliconia Winter. New York: Atheneum (1985); pg. 249. "The two men contemplated the distance without speaking. Then Trockern said, 'Have you ever thought, master, how phagors vaguely resemble the demons and devils which used to haunt the imagination of Christians?'

'That had not occurred to me. I have always thought of an even older allusion, the minotaur of ancient Greek myth...'

'...Mankind learnt aggression in their wombs. I mean, to use another ancient analogy, humans and phagors are rather Cain and Abel, aren't they? One or other of them has to go . . .' "

Christianity Hungary 1550 C.E. Le Guin, Ursula K. "A Week in the Country " in Orsinian Tales. New York: Harper & Row (1976); pg. 117. "'What do you think?'

'Of the Hungarian nobleman, do you know that story? The one that was taken prisoner of the Turks, and sold as a slave. It was in the sixteenth century. Well, a Turk bough him, and yoked him to a plow, like an ox, and he plowed the fields, driven with a whip. His family finally managed to buy him back. And he went home, and got his sword, and went back to the battlefields. And there he took prisoner the Turk that had bought him, owned him. Took the Turk back to his manor. Took the chains off him, had him brought outside. And the poor Turk looked around for the impaling stake, you know, or the pitch they'd rub on him and set fire to, or the dog, or at least the whip. But there was nothing. Only the Hungarian, the man he'd bought and sold. And the Hungarian said, 'Go on back home. . . .'

'Did he go?'

'No, he stayed and turned Christian. But that's not why I think of it.'

'Why do you?'

'I'd like to be a nobleman' "

Christianity Hungary 2005 Aldiss, Brian. Somewhere East of Life. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (1994); pg. 13. "She concluded by saying, 'Why you draw bad dead things? In those times was such misery here in Budapest. In these times now, everyone makes more money. Christianity and Communism, both is finish, forgotten. God and Marx--gone away!...' " [There are many other references to Christianity throughout the book, not all of them recorded in the Adherents.com database.]
Christianity Hungary 2005 Aldiss, Brian. Somewhere East of Life. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (1994); pg. 24. "He had heard of Frankenstein. It was the other great Chistian myth which puzzled him. This was almost the first time Burnell had ever encountered anyone walking in a cathedral who had never heard of Jesus Christ.

Since the man was interested, Burnell tried to deliver a brief resume on the Savior's life. The heat and darkness confused him. He could not recall how exactly Jesus was related to John the Baptist and the Virgin Mary. Nor could he remember whether Christ was his surname or Christian name. "

Christianity Hyperion 2075 Anderson, Poul. "Scarecrow " in New Legends. Greg Bear (ed.) New York: Tor (1995); pg. 339. "He saw her head shake. 'To a Christian, the only tragedy is damnation.'

He knew she didn't expect he'd burn in hell, though he die in his denial. But suddenly he recognized her fear, that apartness might be eternal.

'I'll think about it,' he promised clumsily, not very sincerely. 'I do respect your faith.'

'And I respect your honesty,' she answered. " [More, including pg. 342, 344-348. Astronauts contemplate teaching apparently sentient robots the word of God.]

Christianity Iceland 1945 Millar, Mark. Ultimates Vol. 1: Super-Human. New York: Marvel Comics Group (2002) [Graphic novel reprint of The Ultimates #1-6]; pg. Chap. 1, pg. 10. Pg. 10: "No, the idots are the people who believe that Captain America garbage you print in your newspapers, Barnes. I mean, where's this super-soldier when we're all getting shot to pieces, huh? Having a beer with Uncle Sam? Chasin' skirt with the Easter Bunny? " [Ref. to Easter]; Pg. 13: Bucky Barnes: "Believe it or not, I used to save him from getting his butt kicked three times a week on our way home from Saint Mary's youth club. " [Referring to his childhood in New York City with Steve Rogers, a.ka. Captain America.]
Christianity Iceland 2004 Dick, Philip K. The Zap Gun. New York: Bluejay Books (1985; c. 1965); pg. 130. "'Can I stop and buy a magazine at the newsrack?'

'Certainly.' The four KVB men steered him to the vast display and watched, like sociologists, as he searched for something to read that might please him. The Bible? he thought. Or perhaps I should try the other extreme.

'How about this?' he asked the KVB men, holding up a comic book printed in cheap, lurid colors. 'The Blue Cephalopod Man from Titan.' As near as he could tell, it was the worst rubbish on sale here at this enormous display counter. "

Christianity Idaho 1930 Boyer, Elizabeth H. "A Foreigner Comes to Reddyville " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 204. Pg. 204: "When I was a young man, I used to herd sheep out to Reddyville for old man Harkness. It was getting close to Christmas time... "; Pg. 209: "According to my calendar, it was the week before Christmas... I thought of my family and I felt a little low in my spirits. I wished with all my heart I could be at home with my mother and my two younger sisters on Christmas Eve. But I was the man of the family now. I'd asked Mr. Harkness to pay my wages of five dollars a week directly to my mother, so she and the girls would have as many of life's needfuls as it would buy.

I didn't have one thing of Christmas in my wagon, so I decided to carve a little manger scene for my little sisters... set to carving a Mary and a Joseph and a baby in the manger. They turned out pretty good, so I went on with a sheep and a donkey... It was Christmas Eve, and I was whittling away at my manger people. "

Christianity Idaho 1930 Boyer, Elizabeth H. "A Foreigner Comes to Reddyville " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 212. "Then he pointed to my little box I kept beside my bed for my pocket watch and my daddy's old worn-out Bible and other things that were important to me. "
Christianity Idaho 1930 Boyer, Elizabeth H. "A Foreigner Comes to Reddyville " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 214. "'Who was he, Mama?' I asked, setting the figure on the table between us. 'Do you really think he was a wise man, traveling to find another Christ-child somewhere on another star?'

'We know there are worlds without number,' said my mother after thinking a moment. 'I find it impossible to stand under the sky and look at the stars and believe that there is no one else in the universe except us.' She tapped the little wise man with her finger. 'He wasn't all that different from us, was he...?'

'No, not so different. But Mama, if he was traveling to some other world, if a Christ-child was born somewhere else, what does it mean? Wasn't our world the first? I never thought it could happen again.'

'Or if the Savior came back again,' said Mama, almost as if she were talking to herself, 'why didn't he come back to our earth? Or is there more than one Savior? How many times, in how many places, has our old familiar story happened?' "

Christianity Idaho 1985 Dick, Philip K. In Milton Lumky Territory. Pleasantville, NY: Dragon Press (1985); pg. 64. "'Who do you represent?' Bruce said, as they shook hands.

'Christian Brothers Brandy,' Lumky said... 'Isn't that a stupid thing to say? This is one of my off-days. It gets me to come in and find nobody around. No wonder there's a recession... but imagine, a liquor company named 'Christian Brothers.' Sort of like the Jesus Christ Firearms Works. I noticed the display in the grog shop across the street. It had never struck me before.' "

Christianity Idaho 1985 Dick, Philip K. In Milton Lumky Territory. Pleasantville, NY: Dragon Press (1985); pg. 81. "'There's no mutual trust anymore. And they call this a Christian civilization. Kids lie about their age, women accuse you of things you haven't done.' "
Christianity Idaho 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 289. Pg. 289: "Her hair was gray and sparse. She was reading by the light of the low sun, squinting at the ricepaper of a King James Bible... There wasn't much to see. A few books, including the dog-eared Bible. A stack of scrapbooks that must have soaked up water at some time in the past--the covers were round, the pages wrinkled. "; Pg. 318: "She went back to the Red Letter Bible her father had given her and read it from Genesis 1:1 to revelation 22:21. The Bible had always been a cornerstone for Miriam. Not because it explained everything, as the TV evangelists alleged. The opposite. She trusted the Bible because it was mysterious. Like life, it was dense and contradictory and resisted interpretation. Rightly so, Miriam thought. How authentic could a book of wisdom be if you understood it at a glance? Wisdom didn't work like that. wisdom was a mountain; you climbed it... " [More, pg. 318-319, 322.]
Christianity Idaho 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 110. "I never could have tried, he realized. It was a bluff. But the God of Wrath didn't know that; unless of course he was omnipotent, as the Christians believe their God to be. "
Christianity Idaho 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 115. "I won't know either way until the time comes, he realized. Like an existentialist, I will infer my state from the actions I perform. Thought follows deed, as Mussolini taught. In Anfang war die Tat, as Goethe says in Faust. In the beginning was the deed, not the word, as John taught, John and his Logos doctrine. The Greekization of theology. "
Christianity Idaho 2047 Bear, Greg. Queen of Angels. New York: Warner Books (1994; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 118. "Lee [the main character's brother] would appreciate Christmas. Last she heard, he was working a Christian commune refuge in Green Idaho. "
Christianity Illinois 1989 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 70. "He had been cast as Billy the orphan who, in the final act, was revealed to be the Christ child come again to check on a family's charity. Baedecker's father had written from Camp Pendleton to say that it had been the most colossal case of miscasting in the history of the theater. "
Christianity Illinois 2001 Bradbury, Ray. From the Dust Returned. New York: HarperCollins (2001); pg. 117. "No need, boy.' The father of all darkness spoke. 'Listen, now, let me provide the history of the rising tide of disbelief. The Judeo-Christian world is a devastation. The burning bush of Moses will not fire. Christ, from the tomb, fears to come forth should he be unrecognized by doubting Thomas. The shadow of Allah melts at noon. So Christians and Muslims confront a world torn by many wars to finalize yet a larger. Moses did not walk down the mountain for he never walked up. Christ did not die for he was never born. All this, all this mind you, is of great importance to us, for we are the reverse side of the coin tossed in the air to fall heads or tails. Does the unholy or holy win...' " [More, pg. 118, 174, 184.]
Christianity Illinois 2001 Bradbury, Ray. From the Dust Returned. New York: HarperCollins (2001); pg. 118. "'But yes,' said Father in his ancient shroud. 'Once the war was simply between Christians and Muslims and ourselves. As long as they believed in their sermoned lives, and disbelieved in us, we had more than a mythical flesh. We had something to fight for to survive. But now that the world is filled with warriors who do not attack, but simply turn away or walk through us, who do not even argue us as half unreal, we find ourselves weaponless...' "
Christianity Illinois 2010 Bury, Stephen. Interface. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 158. "A plywood sign marked the entrance to town:

WELCOME TO TUSCOLA
ATTEND OUR CHURCHES "

Christianity Illinois: Chicago 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 31. "'I must say,' Rebecca began, using all her skills to modulate and control her tone. 'I am surprised to see you here. Bearding me in my own den, as it were.'

'You are the second person to make that reference in as many hours,' Diana said. 'But it is my understanding Daniel was cast into the lion's den by his enemies. I do not wish to be your enemy.'

'It is my understanding.' She talks of the bible as though it were just a collection of stories that she hasn't bothered to learn properly yet.''I'm afraid there is not much choice, there, Diana,' Rebecca said, again putting extra emphasis on the name. 'Unless you have come here to tell me you renounce this paganism, this heresy you preach?'

'I preach no heresy,' Diana said. "

Christianity Illinois: Chicago 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 33. "Diana's dark eyebrows rose. 'Why? Is it necessary that your gods be so much beyond you as to be unknowable?'

'Oh, I know my God, Diana. I know Him very well. And He is with me always, here, out there--' she gestured toward the broad expanse of window '--everywhere. He is in every blade of grass, every raindrop. He is in the hearts and minds and souls of those who love and worship Him. The Universe is His work, His canvas, and I am a part of it.'

'I see that you are sincere, and I admire your conviction,' Diana said... 'but how does this conflict with what I know to be true? There are countless legends of the Creation, and I know they cannot all be correct, so I choose to see them as a mosaic, each telling a small part of the greater story. Do you know see that your God is a part of this?' "

Christianity Illinois: Chicago 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 32-33. "'One does not 'talk' with our Heavenly Father, or His Son. Not in the way you mean, at any rate. I pray, as all good Christians pray, and I believe my prayers are heard and answered.'

Diana frowned. 'I understand that is the way your faith operates, but I find it difficult to comprehend. How are you supposed to believe in these gods of yours if you have never met them, never even seen them?'

'. . . these gods of yours . . .' The contempt in her tone! Is it just me, hearing it, or is she really dismissing God and Jesus, the Word, the Truth, so blatantly?'I don't have to meet them to know they are real.' Rebecca allowed her lip to curl in a deprecating sneer. 'Perhaps it is your so-called 'gods' who are the lesser, the unbelievable ones, since you have met them, have talked with them. I think I would have a great deal of difficulty believing in so mundane, so accessible a god.' "

Christianity Illinois: Chicago 2020 Tucker, Wilson. The Year of the Quiet Sun. New York: Ace (1970); pg. 218. "But the station had a resident... A resident... who had repaired the fence and hung out the talismen to keep the survivors away, a resident chrisian who had dug a graveand erected a cross above it. "
Christianity Illinois: Chicago 2100 Dickson, Gordon R. Necromancer. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1962); pg. 82. "But it was a somewhat changed version of one of the old north-of-England corpse chants, sung at wakes with the corpse under the table and a dish of salt on its breast. It was a ritual with its roots going back beyond Christianity to the ancient Celts, to a time when small dark men... "
Christianity India 1000 C.E. Anthony, Piers & Alfred Tella. The Willing Spirit. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 102. "'...a certain amount of asceticism and concern with the afterlife may help to temper the corrupting influences of wealth and materialism. but even while our eyes seek the heavens, our feet should remain earthbound. Recall that the Muslim conquests took place at a time when our people were steeped in the supernatural. When the sultan's armies sacked our villages and killed and enslaved our people, little resistance was offered...' "
Christianity India 1000 C.E. Anthony, Piers & Alfred Tella. The Willing Spirit. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 128. "...sleek helmets from Persia with colored pates that gave them the look of Christian monks.. "
Christianity India 1848 Moore, William. Bayonets in the Sun. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978; first pub. 1974); pg. 19. Pg. 19: "'The chap meant to have you, Joe,' Private Hacken told his comrade as he galloped alongside. 'if I hadn't put my sword through 'im you'd be making excuses at the bleedin' Pearly Gates by now.' "; Pg. 31: "He helped his father to run Sir Ephraim's home farm, three miles from Cleadon Grange, and although he had been schooled by the Rector he'd had little opportunity to develop conversation. " [Some other refs., not all in DB.]
Christianity India 1848 Moore, William. Bayonets in the Sun. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978; first pub. 1974); pg. 66. "It was his duty, he considered, as a Christian and as a produt of Harrow and Oxford, to bring the benefits of Western civilisation to the multitudes of India. "
Christianity India 1848 Moore, William. Bayonets in the Sun. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978; first pub. 1974); pg. 75. "The Reverend Barnabas Wilmot paused and savoured his drink for a moment. Really it was too early for claret but...

'The Lod' (Mr. Wilmot always referred to the Deity in this clipped manner as it helped hm to cut down the time spent in delivering his rare sermons) 'may have made us all equal. I dn't dny it. In His sight, my love, we are no doubt even as a humble sweeper -- an Untouchable. However, in His infinite wisdom, He has created stations for us all in this worldly life. It behoves us as true Christians to maintain them, if you see what I mean, Sarry.' " [Some other refs. to this character, not in DB.]

Christianity India 1890 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "The Sign of Four " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1890); pg. 235. "'Listen to me, sahib,' said the taller and fiercer of the pair, the one whom they called Abdullah Khan. 'You must either be with us now, or you must be silenced forever. The thing is too great a one for us to hesitate. Either you are heart and soul with us on your oath on the cross of the Christians, or your body this night shall be thrown into the ditch, and we shall pass over to our brothers in the rebel army. There is no middle way. Which is it to be--death or life? We can only give you three minutes to decide, for the time is passing, and all must be done before the rounds come again.'
Christianity India 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 63. Pg. 63: "'Then my father had an idea. For eight years I had gone halftime to the Christian Agricultural Academy in Durgalpur. The school was sponsored by the very rich Mr. Debee of the Bengal Cattle Insemination Centre. It was a small school. We had few books and only two teachers...' "; Pg. 64: "'...Even Mr. Debee, who in his pre-Christian days had sworn to Gandhiji that he would humbly work for our villages and have his ashes spread on the main path of Anguda...' "
Christianity India 1978 MacLean, Katherine. "Night-Rise " (published 1978) in The Norton Book of Science Fiction (Ursula K. Le Guin & Brian Atterbery, editors). New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1993); pg. 380. "'It is the same Christ,' said the tall one. 'Christ and Krishna died to also show us the way to die. Our service is to him and all mankind. We serve anyone who comes to us for help.' " [Many other refs. not in DB.]
Christianity India 1989 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 21. In Benares/Varanasi: "'This is the holiest spot in the world,' said the guide... 'Holier than Mecca. HoliEr than Jerusalem. Holier than Bethlehem or Sarnath. It is the holiest of temples where all Hindus . . . after bathing in the holy Ganges . . . wish to visit before they die.' " [Many refs., not in DB.]
Christianity India 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 334. "More people live in this one country, India, than lived in the whole world only three or four centuries ago. More people live here today than lived in the entire history of the world up to the time of Christ. All the history of the Bible and the Iliad and Herodotus and Gilgamesh and everything that had been pieced together by archaeologists and anthropologists, all of those human relationships, all those achievements, could all have been played out by the people we're flying over right now, with people left over...

And what am I doing? Riding along on a machine that would have given that old prophet Ezekiel a heart attack before he could even write about seeing a shark in the sky. Sister Carlotta used to joke that Battle School was the wheel in the sky that Ezekiel saw in his vision. So here I am, like a figure out of some ancient vision, and what am I doing? "

Christianity India 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 335. "Sister Carlotta liked to quote from another biblical git--vanity, vanity, all is vanity. There is nothing new under the sun. A time to scatter rocks and a time to gather rocks together.

Well, as long as God didn't tell anybody what the rocks were for, I might as well leave the rocks and go get my friend, if I can. "

Christianity India 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 343. "'Sister Carlotta saved his life today,' said Bean. 'The last thing she asked me was to leave vengeance to God.'

'Do you believe in God,' asked Suriyawong, surprised.

'More and more,' said Bean. 'And less and less.' "

Christianity India: Bombay 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 34. "...when he happened to espy the splendid pagoda on Malabar Hill, and was seized with an irresistible desire to see its interior. He was quite ignorant that it is forbidden to Christians to enter certain Indian temples, and that even the faithful must not go in without first leaving their shoes outside the door. It may be said here that the wise policy of the British Government severely punishes a disregard of the practices of the native religions. " [Few refs. to Christianity in novel, except in Chapter 27, which deals entirely with a single Christian denomination (the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints).]
Christianity India: Calcutta 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 79. "Many are called, few are chosen the priest had said in what I had taken as a deliberate parody of the tiresome prattle of the Christian missionaries who wandered the plazas near the Maidan. But what if it meant... "
Christianity India: Calcutta 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 92. "'Were these Muslims or Christians?' asked Sanjay. His pencil was poised.

' 'Hindus, most likely, who knows?' the intern spat. 'The crematoria do not wish to have unpaying customers...' "

Christianity Indiana 1958 Knight, Damon. "Thing of Beauty " in The Best of Damon Knight. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976; c. 1958); pg. 122. "Some church group in Indiana, they wanted sample sketches. "
Christianity Indiana 1965 Clarke, Arthur C. & Gentry Lee. Cradle. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 42. "Over a pizza dinner the night before the game, Edith frequently insulted Joanna and Vernon both ('Miss Betty Crocker--Go-Team-Go' and 'Onward Christian Soldiers,' God's on Our Side') and Duane did nothing to intercede... " [More, specifically about Vernon and his family's Presbyterian church, pg. 39-42. Some refs. under 'Presbyterian. Also pg. 181-183.]
Christianity Iowa 1989 Denton, Bradley. Buddy Holly Is Alive and Well on Ganymede. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1991); pg. 87. "'You are an adult,' Mama said, but in a tone of voice that meant Like Hell You Are. 'You have a child. It is time you took responsibility. Out of respect for your father's feelings, I tolerated you under our roof. But your father was a more generous Christian than you had a right to expect, and he's gone now, God bless him. You can go to work and take care of yourself...' "
Christianity Iowa 1989 Nasir, Jamil. "The Nomalers " in Writers of the Future: Volume V (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1989); pg. 35. "... hymnal... a hymn called 'Rivers of Their Blood.' The first verse went:

We will swim in
Rivers of their blood,
We will soar in
Regions of the sun,
We will show them
What is meant to be.
We will drown them
In righteousness' sweet sea.

I got up and walked as fast and quietly as I could in the direction of my room... I started to hurry in the other direction, but stopped myself. I was these folks' lawyer, for God's sake. If they wanted to practice bizarre religions, I should be glad. I would just go up and ask whoever was there to show me the bathroom. I started up the stairs. "

Christianity Iowa 1989 Nasir, Jamil. "The Nomalers " in Writers of the Future: Volume V (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1989); pg. 34-35. "One hallway showed a small, plain chapel with pews and an altar below a crucifix flanked by candles. For no particular reason, I went in.

The crucifix was carved wood, and there was something strange about it: as I got closer I saw that the figure of the Messiah was dressed in farm boots, overalls, and a hat. The face was thin, with a long perpendicular nose, eyes so close together they looked crossed, buck teeth jutting at different angles between thing lips. Underneath the crucifix was a plaque: 'Jacob John Nomaler, Murdered January 9, 1919.' That gave me a funny feeling. I backed away, backed into the first row of pews so hard I sat down. A hymnal lay open on the pew, a rough, hand sewn book crudely printed. It was open to a hymn called 'Rivers of Their Blood.' "

Christianity Iowa 1996 Rusch, Kristine Kathryn. "Faith " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 213. "'...I'm going to watch soap operas, read books, take shopping trips, and never go to church again.'

She spat the last five words out. They hit me with a force of tiny bullets. 'You went to church a lot?'

'I lived in church,' she said. 'We went from congregation to congregation. He was always looking for someone who believed.'

'What about the ministers? The priests?'

Her smile had no warmth. 'They were the first to catch on. In 1980, we sat in a Congregationalist Church in Cedar Rapids...' " [More refs., not in DB.]

Christianity Iowa 1996 Rusch, Kristine Kathryn. "Faith " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 214. "'I can't understand why they believed in the first place. I mean, couldn't they see how he was? The Bible says God created man in His own image.'

The interview was a bust, but I had my pie to finish and she was strangely compelling. 'What about Christ?'

'Jesus? The boy did more harm than good. His father even let him die a nasty death--you know how people strangle on the cross, don't you?--and the kid forgave him. He never saw his father clearly. I wonder if any of us does.' "

Christianity Iowa 2030 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 23. "One windy Saturday... Abraham took a New Testament from the metal night-table by his bed and asked Daniel to read aloud to him from the beginning of John. All the while he read Daniel kept wonderin gwhether his father were developing into some kind of religious fanatic, and when he told Milly about it that night she was even more alarmed. They were both certain he was dying... Milly and Daniel needn't have worried. Abraham did not become an undergoder [fervent conservative Protestant], and after a few failed dialogues he didn't even try to talk about whatever it was that had got him going on the subject of Jesus. "
Christianity Iowa 2030 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 28. Pg. 28: "For all right-thinking Iowans the Twin Cities were Sodom and Gomorrah. "; Pg. 38: "With his own children he liked to thikn of himself as a kind of Solomon, stern but munificent... " [Many other refs. to Christianity, not all in DB. See also all refs. to listed under 'Marble Collegiate Church', plus pg. 67-69 (Bible, Christmas, St. Paul, etc.), 79, 84-90 (Christmas, carols, Nat'l Council of Churches), 94, 111 (Iowa Council of Churches), 202 (Old Testament name), 209, 214, 237, 260, 276-279, 319-322, 326, 330 ( "the Anti-Christ ")]
Christianity Iowa 2030 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 79. "There was, however, one major stumbling-block to believing in the old-fashioned, Christian type of soul. Namely, that while fairies were aware of fairies in exactly the way that people are aware of each other, by the senses of sight and hearing and touch, no fairy had ever seen a soul... "
Christianity Ireland 800 C.E. Card, Orson Scott. Xenocide. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 246. "...I send Father Estavao forth on his mission exactly as a missionary named Patrick was once sent to the island of Eire. He was extraordinarily successful, converting kings and nations. Unfortunately, the Irish church didn't always act the way the Pope might have wished. There was a great deal of--let us say it was controvresy between them. Superficially it concerned the date of Easter, but at heart it was over the issue of obedience to the Pope. It even came to bloodshed now and then. But never for a moment didn anyone imagine it would have been better if St. Patrick had never gone to Eire. Never did anyone suggest that it would be better if the Irish had remained pagan.' "
Christianity Ireland 2030 Hogan, James P. Entoverse. New York: Ballantine (1991); pg. 81. "'Except, maybe one place,' Gina said, making it sound like an afterthought.

'Uh?' Hunt returned abruptly from his thoughts.

'If my reading of history is right, there was one place where Christianity might have hung on long after it was stamped out across the rest of Europe,' Gina said.

'Where?'

'Ireland.'

'Hunt's eyebrows lifted in surprise. 'Begorrah!' he exclaimed.

Gina went on. 'Even the Irish aren't told the true story. They're taught that Saint Patrick converted the island in the fifth century, and they've remained staunchly faithful ever since.'

'That's what I always thought, too,' Hunt said. 'Not that it's a subject I've ever had much reason to get involved in, especially.'

'They didn't ally with the Roman Church until the sixteenth century--more than a thousand years later; and that was only as a gesture of defiance against the English after Henry VIII broke away...' "

Christianity Ireland 2030 Hogan, James P. Entoverse. New York: Ballantine (1991); pg. 82. "'...Roman Catholicism became a symbol of Irish nationalism. What Saint Patrick brought was Christianity.'

'You mean the original?'

'Something a lot closer to it, anyhow. And it flourished because it fitted with the ways of the native culture. It spread from there through Scotland and Europe into northern Europe. But then it collided with the institutionalized Jevlenese counterfeit being pushed northward, and it was destroyed. The first papal mission didn't reach England until a hundred sixty-five years after Patrick died.'

'How do you know all this?'

'My mother's side of the family comes from Wexford. I go there for vacations and lived there for a while once.'

'When did Patrick die?' Hunt asked...

'In the fifth century. He was probably born in Wales and carried across by pirates.' " [More, pg. 82-83.]

Christianity Ireland 2050 Scarborough, Elizabeth Ann. Last Refuge. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 198. "'...I've been a little bit of everything, to tell you the truth. In the beginning I may have been one of the Tuatha de Daman, then on of the sidhe, the fairy folk, and later on I was a Druid. Oh yes, quite a few lifetimes at it till along come the Christians. Well, I didn't jump back into the religious side at once but was a harper and a harper's son, and a shanachie, carrying the old tales down, till in one life I switched over to Christianity and became a priest. I was a bit of a rabble rouser in that life, so in the very next one I was a Protestant minister...' " [Some other refs., not in DB, but most religious refs. in book are to Buddhism. Very few refs. to Christianity.]
Christianity Israel 1 C.E. Kidd, Kathryn H. The Innkeeper's Daughter. Greensboro, NC: Hatrack River (1990); pg. 34. "'Mary!' Joseph called softly. 'Our visitor has brought swaddling clothes. Are you ready to show your child?'

By the dim lamplight, Deborah could see a beautiful little boy nestled into the crook of his mother's arm. 'What is his name?' she asked as she approached Mary and her baby.

'His name is Jesus, and you're the first person other than Joseph and myself who has seen him.' Taking the strips of cloth from Deborah, Mary smiled at the baby as she wrapped them tightly around his body.

In the dim light of the cave, with sheep and goats and the family cow milling around behind her, Deborah imagined the baby was smiling back. "



Christianity, continued

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