Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Christianity, galaxy

Christianity, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christianity galaxy 22995 Benford, Gregory. Foundation's Fear. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 183. "'And myths. Those who rise from the dead. Vampires. Mummies. They're always evil.'

'No exceptions?'

Yugo nodded. 'Dors pulled some really old ones out for me. There was that ancient martyr--Jesu, wasn't it?'

'Some sort of resurrection myth?'

'Dors says Jesu probably wasn't a real person. That's what the scattered ancient texts say. The whole myth is prob'ly a collective psychodream. You'll notice, once he was back from the dead, he didn't stay around very long.'

'Rose into heaven, wasn't it?'

'left town in a hurry, anyway. People don't want you around, even if you've beaten the Reaper.' "

Christianity galaxy 23000 Bear, Greg. Foundation and Chaos. New York: HarperCollins (1998); pg. 196. "'...Voltaire flew away in disgust, across the Galaxy, leaving me here, to contemplate all I had learned. Now comes your time of Trial, and I fear you risk a darker despair than the time at Gethsemane for our Lord.' "
Christianity galaxy 32072 Sheffield, Charles. Tomorrow and Tomorrow. New York: Bantam (1998; c. 1997); pg. 287. "The possible arrival of the Shiva took on the overtones of ancient myth. In his mind the final confrontation became Armageddon, Ragnarok, Dies Irae, the Fimbulwinter, the Last Trumpet. It would never happen. They would never come.

Until, suddenly, they did. "

Christianity galaxy 33989 Harrison, Harry. The Stainless Steel Rat Wants You. New York: Bantam (1979); pg. 150. "'...The orders will be issued by the Morality Corps top executive. At the present time the top executive is Jay Hovah.'

'I am Jay Hovah,' the newcomer said... " [Word play on 'Jehovah.']

Christianity galaxy 33995 Harrison, Harry. The Stainless Steel Rat Gets Drafted. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 1. Pg. 1: "All the good advice I had given myself down through the years, the even better counsel The Bishop had given me, all forgotten. All wiped away by sudden impulse. "; Pg. 2: "...to be deeper in register than my own, as though The Bishop were speaking. The thought was his, the words might very well be his. I held on, though I didn't really know why. "; Pg. 7: "...a planet with the interesting name of Bit O' Heaven... "[some other refs. to this planet]; Pg. 125: "That is a rough planet, and no place for an old man like The Bishop. " [These really aren't references to Christianity. Although the title is largely of Christian origin, the man known as 'The Bishop' is really the main character's recently killed mentor-in-crime (a term used on the book jacket).]
Christianity galaxy 40000 Reynolds, Alastair. "Galactic North " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 103. "AD CIRCA 40,000... Conjoiners boarded the Hirondelle and invited Irravel into the Hope: The hollowed-out chambers of the rock were Edenic to her children, after all the decades of subjective time they'd spent aboard since last planetfall. "
Christianity galaxy 1000004000 Anderson, Poul. Genesis. New York: Tor (2000) [Book jacket:] "Astronaut Christian Brannock has lived to see artificial intelligence develop to a point where a human personality can be uploaded into a computer, achieving a sort of hybrid immortality. He welcomes that because the technology will make it possible for him to achieve his dream and explore the stars.

A billion years later, Brannock is dispatched to Earth to check on some strange anomalies. While there, he meets Laurinda Ashcroft, another hybrid upload. Brannock and Laurinda join forces and investigate Gaia, the supermind dominating the planet, and learn the truth of her shocking and terrifying secret plans for Earth. " [Main character's name is 'Christian.']

Christianity Ganymede 2300 Benford, Gregory. Against Infinity. New York: Timescape Books (1983); pg. 198. "Piet said soothingly, 'I urge you to think of this again, once you are through this first reaction. Consider--you are a Christian, are you not? Our files indicate so. Consider how closely linked the idea of preservation, of arising again in a similar but transmuted form--how closely linked this is in your culture. It is the Christian vision of resurrection and salvation. Also, it is the image of horror at the walking dead, the zombie. Try to think of it in the positive sense, if you can...' "
Christianity Ganymede 2300 Benford, Gregory. Against Infinity. New York: Timescape Books (1983); pg. 205. "The man he had known so little would lie now in this place far beyond the moon of Islam and the cross of Rome and the hammer of Marx, in a territory open and without plan, beyond man and his encasing theories, his filters, beyond the closed rooms of the civilized mind. "
Christianity Georgia (country) 1575 C.E. Aldiss, Brian. Somewhere East of Life. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (1994); pg. 149. "It was more than a mere work of art. Its significance was that it marked a link between the Vatican and Eastern Orthodoxy at a time when the Popes had officially interdicted the Eastern religions. This reinforced the local value of the Madonna ikon; for the conversion of Georgians to Christianity, generally dated from the fourth century AD, marked their turning away from Islam and toward Europe. The ikon was a blessed sign, arriving at a time when Islam was about to draw its veil across the region. "
Christianity Georgia (country) 1999 Bear, Greg. Darwin's Radio. New York: Del Rey (1999); pg. 19. [Examining mass graves, apparently of people killed by Communists, the character compares the atrocity to history mentioned in the Bible.] "'These women were shot in the stomach,' she said. Kill all the firstborn children. Furious monsters. 'Monsters.' She clamped her teeth. "
Christianity Georgia (country) 2005 Aldiss, Brian. Somewhere East of Life. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (1994); pg. 74. "He chuckled. 'The Georgians have long prided themselves on being the southernmost outpost of Christianity. Just a few miles south of Ghvtixmshobeli, it's Islam. So this little church is something of an outpost.' "
Christianity Georgia (country) 2005 Aldiss, Brian. Somewhere East of Life. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (1994); pg. 92. "'...It is vital for us, for West Georgia Republic... Georgia men under present rule and Muslim Azerbaijan make great misfortune for us... We are Christian people many centuries' "
Christianity Georgia (country) 2005 Aldiss, Brian. Somewhere East of Life. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (1994); pg. 112. "'...Oh, yes, they pretend Christianity, but those decades under Communism have perverted their faith.' "
Christianity Georgia (country) 2005 Aldiss, Brian. Somewhere East of Life. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (1994); pg. 126. "He declared that with such weapons Georgia had defended the Christian faith against heathen enemy over many centuries. "
Christianity Georgia (country) 2005 Aldiss, Brian. Somewhere East of Life. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (1994); pg. 131. "King Zrze had granted the church many hectares of land. The Communists had curtailed the land to a mere hectares; the rest of the old church lands, cultivated for centuries by Christian and Muslim, had become wilderness. "
Christianity Georgia, USA 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 157. "...and a portable signboard on which someone has spelled out this tripartite message: DEER PROCESING / FATBACK / JESUS SAVES. "
Christianity Georgia: Atlanta 2067 Bishop, Michael. Catacomb Years. New York: Berkley (1979); pg. 252. "Not one of my better-received analogies. Johan, Michael and Gabriel, Casta, Newlyn and Alex.. "
Christianity Georgia: Atlanta 2067 Bishop, Michael. Catacomb Years. New York: Berkley (1979); pg. 328. Pg. 328: "The Awakening of the Buddha, Prometheus on the Rock, Christ in His Passion--those are galvanizing mythopoeic images. "; Pg. 365: "In the home of a young married couple whose hospitality derives in part from the young man's mistaken belief that you know something he doesn't and in part from the young woman's rigorous apprehension of her Christian duty? What's happened to your pride, old man. How can you impose and be imposed upon in these petty and undignified ways? "; Pg. 371: "'Gnosticism,' Julian put in, 'was an early Christian heresy.' "
Christianity Germany 1893 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 135. "'...But you are not the Hermann Goring who was born in Marienbad Sanatorium at Rosenheim in Bavaria on January 12, 1893. You are not the Hermann Goring whose godfather was Dr. Hermann Eppenstein, a Jew who converted to Christianity...' "
Christianity Germany 1969 Thayer, Douglas. "Opening Day " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1969); pg. 21. Pg. 21: "I still wanted to see the big mule-deer bucks jump out of the oak brush ahead of the line... But then I hadn't expected to have absolute control over my emotions just because while I was on my mission in Germany I had decided to stop hunting. When I got married and had sons, I didn't want them to hunt, but I knew that it wouldn't be easy for me to stop killing birds and animals. "; Pg. 22: "I had been home from Germany four days, and while I was gone I had decided to quit hunting. Two years of knowing that I would probably be drafted and sent to Vietnam, hearing the older Germans talk about World War II, and every day preaching the gospel of Christ changed me. I felt guilty because of all the rabbits, pheasants, ducks, geese, and deer I had killed... To kill was to deny the influence of the Holy Ghost, which I wanted to continue to develop. " [More. Other references to Christianity throughout story, not in DB.]
Christianity Germany 1969 Thayer, Douglas. "Opening Day " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1969); pg. 24. "They [people in Germany] wanted to know how there could be a God that let such terrible things happen, and I told them that it wasn't God that caused wars but men. If all mankind would just live the gospel of Christ there wouldn't be any more wars. I wanted to get a doctorate in sociology so that I could teach at B.Y.U. and help people to live together in peace and harmony. "
Christianity Germany 2001 Stroyar, J.N. The Children's War. New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 982. "'I think the idea of the crucifixion was that God understands our suffering.'

'That strikes me as a convenient man-made fiction. It would serve well to tell the oppressed that they are doing something noble and, see, look, your God did it as well!'

'Don't you think that's a bit cynical?'

...'Forgive me if I don't believe in the basic good nature of all humans. I found absolutely no nobility or piety in suffering.'

'But you wouldn't have, since you didn't believe.'

'That's right, I don't believe. Not in that. But if I had believed, I don't think I would have found comfort in knowing that somebody else suffered. I didn't want anybody else to feel what I felt! And if I were to believe that Christ's suffering was voluntary, well, that I find utterly abhorrent.'...

'There's the resurrection.' " [More discussion between Peter and his girlfriend, Zosia, who is a Catholic Christian. Some other refs., not in DB, e.g. pg. 23.]

Christianity Germany 2096 Sterling, Bruce. Holy Fire. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 101. "'...But you know Aquinas, and I mean this: You're a dog. I know you're a dog. It's not any secret. But truly--and I mean this from the bottom of my heart--I feel happier on your show than I would on anyone else's.]'

The audience applauded politely.

'[That's very sweet of you,]' the dog said, wagging his tail. '[I appreciate that more than I can say. Nadja, tell us a little about this business on-set with Christian Mancuso. What was that all about?]' "

[The brackets in the above passage are part of the original text. The enhanced dog, named Aquinas, and the character named 'Christian,' are both major characters in the book. Christian, especially appears and is referred to frequently. Although they have very Christian names, to don't appear overtly connected to Christianity in any religious sense.]

Christianity Germany, East 1760 Vonnegut, Kurt. Slaughterhouse-Five. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1969); pg. 22. "Now, in 1760, Dresden underwent siege by the Prussians... Many of the paintings had been transported to the Konigstein, but some were seriously injured by splinters of bombshells,--notably Francia's 'Baptism of Christ.' Furthermore, the stately Kreuzkirche tower, from which the enemy's movements had been watched day and night, stood in flames. It later succumbed... "
Christianity Germany, East 1985 Golden, Christopher. X-Men: Codename Wolverine. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1998); pg. 93. "The Franzosischer Dom had been a beautiful church, before World War II. It faced another, the Deutscher Dom, across the Platz der Akademie, which had sustained nearly as much damage. Both churches had been built in the eighteenth century, but air raids had scarred them forever. Or, at least, until the DDR got around to fulfilling its promises to reconstruct the churches. "
Christianity God-Does-Battle 2113 Bear, Greg. Strength of Stones. New York: Warner Books (1991 revised ed.; copyright 1981, 1988) "The far-flung children of Abraham had their decade of unbridled fervor, and they paid for it. Marginally united by a world turning to other religions and against them, Jews, Christians and Moslems ratified the Pact of God in 2020. They desperately harked back to the ages past to find common ground. Having spoiled their holy lands, there was no place where they could unite geographically.

In the last years of the twenty-first century, they looked outward. The Heaven Migration began in 2113. After decades more of persecution and ridicule, they pooled their resources to buy a world of their own. That world was renamed God-Does-Battle, tamed by the wealth of the heirs of Christ, Rome, Abraham and OPEC.

They hired the greatest human architect to build their new cities for them. He tried to mediate between what they demanded, and what would work best for them.

He failed. "

Christianity God-Does-Battle 3451 Bear, Greg. Strength of Stones. New York: Warner Books (1991 revised ed.; copyright 1981, 1988); pg. 6. "With the help of the finest architect humanity had ever produced, Robert Kahn, Jeshua's ancestors had built the cities that made them as comfortable as possible... It had been a proud day when the first cities were opened. The Christians, Jews, and Moslems of God-Does-Battle could boast of cities more spectacular than any that Kahn had built elsewhere, and the builder's works could be found on a hundred worlds. " [Other refs. to Judaism, Islam and Christianity throughout novel, most not in DB.]
Christianity God-Does-Battle 3451 Bear, Greg. Strength of Stones. New York: Warner Books (1991 revised ed.; copyright 1981, 1988); pg. 33. "'But why?' his father asked. 'Because of our degraded state as humans? Remember, it was the Habirus and Catholics--then Jews and Christians--who commissioned Robert Kahn to build the cities for God-Does-Battle and to make them pure cities for the best of mankind, the final carriers of the flame of Jesus and the Lord. We were self-righteous in those days and wished to leave behind the degraded ways of our neighbors. How was it that the best were cast out?'

'Hubris,' chuckled a Catholic. 'A shameful thing, anyway. The histories tell us of many shameful things, eh, lad?' "

Christianity God-Does-Battle 3451 Bear, Greg. Strength of Stones. New York: Warner Books (1991 revised ed.; copyright 1981, 1988); pg. 38. "'Simply put. One of the original directives of the city was that socially destructive people--those who did not live their faith as Jews or Christians--would be either reformed or exiled. The cities were constantly aware of human activity and motivation. After a few decades they decided everybody was socially destructive in one way or another.'

'We are all sinners.' "

Christianity God-Does-Battle 3460 Bear, Greg. Strength of Stones. New York: Warner Books (1991 revised ed.; copyright 1981, 1988); pg. 58. "That was before trade restrictions had tightened between Christians, Jews, and the few Moslem communities. "
Christianity God-Does-Battle 3562 Bear, Greg. Strength of Stones. New York: Warner Books (1991 revised ed.; copyright 1981, 1988); pg. 139. Pg. 139: "It was obviously the city of Fraternity, and from this direction he could make out--with some difficulty--the abstracted portrait of Saint Thomas Aquinas in the central tower. "; Pg. 167: "'...Fraternity's towers carried portraits of Christ, Aquinas and George Pearson.'

'Who was Pearson . . . and Aquinas?' Arthur asked.

'Aquinas was a philosopher on old Earth. Pearson was the man who negotiated for the purchase of God-Does-Battle.' Kahn remembered the monumental arguments they had had. Pearson had appointed himself shepherd to all the Jews, Christians and Moslems on God-Does-Battle. " [Many refs. to Christianity throughout this novel, most not in DB.]

Christianity God-Does-Battle 3562 Bear, Greg. Strength of Stones. New York: Warner Books (1991 revised ed.; copyright 1981, 1988); pg. 172. "Reah's Temple... Next to the building was a pillar about twenty meters high, topped by a bronze statue of a woman in a straight dress.

'Do they worship her?'

'No, no!' Ascoria said. 'To the Habirus [Jews], she's a prophet, and the Moslems believe she's a saint, as do the Christians...' "

Christianity God-Does-Battle 3562 Bear, Greg. Strength of Stones. New York: Warner Books (1991 revised ed.; copyright 1981, 1988); pg. 194. "Kahn suspected--since he felt more than just a twinge of it himself--that the ruling figures had regarded the situation as fitting and just. Jews, Christians had not been looked upon with good will on Earth and elsewhere for some time. "
Christianity God-Does-Battle 3562 Bear, Greg. Strength of Stones. New York: Warner Books (1991 revised ed.; copyright 1981, 1988); pg. 195. "'I am Matthew, son of Reah! My mother was Moslem, raped by pagans, killed by an apostate Jew-Christian!...' "
Christianity God-Does-Battle 3562 Bear, Greg. Strength of Stones. New York: Warner Books (1991 revised ed.; copyright 1981, 1988); pg. 227. "'Earth. It goes around the pole star. So now al the Moslems know where Mecca is, and all the Christians and Jews know where Jerusalem is, and they can all point up there.' "
Christianity Gotham 1955 Levitz, Paul; Joe Staton and Bob Layton. "From Each Ending . . . A Beginning! " in Batman in the Seventies, (Michael Wright, ed.) New York: DC Comics (1999; story first pub. in DC Super-Stars #17, January 1977); pg. 100-101. [Pages 100 is a splash page showing the wedding of Bruce Wayne and Selina Kyle in a Christian church, one which looks more Episcopalian than anything, judging from the dress of the priest performing the ceremony, and the type of cross that is on the attached bookmark on the Bible he reads from. The front of the church is shown in one panel on page 101.] Pg. 101: "It was the supreme social event of the 1955 season . . . Gotham millionaire Bruce Wayne was marrying Selina Kyle--once known as the Catwoman--while the world wondered why. " [Another panel on page 102 shows the outide of the large, stately stone church in downtown Gotham.] Pg. 102: "So they were married that summer afternoon: For better, for worse . . . in sickness and in health . . . till death do them part! " [Pg. 109: Selina Kyle's grave is shown: a large stone cross is her gravestone.]
Christianity Gotham 1975 O'Neil, Dennis. "This One'll Kill You, Batman " in Batman in the Seventies, (Michael Wright, ed.) New York: DC Comics (1999; story first pub. in Batman #260, January-February 1975); pg. 126-127. [Bruce Wayne attends a funeral in a Christian church for Dr. Hamish.]
Christianity Greece 1997 Preuss, Paul. Secret Passages. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 63. "The Catastrophe... In that Royalist adventure, Smyrna was burned to the ground, thirty thousand Greeks were slaughtered, and a quarter of a million swam for their lives. Six months later, the Great Exchange: a third of a million Greek Muslims were sent to Turkey; a million Turkish Christians arrived in Greece.' "
Christianity Greece 1997 Preuss, Paul. Secret Passages. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 131. "'Do you imagine that life as better then?'

'Yes. No priests to grab everything.'

Pendlebury laughed. 'No Christian priests. Christians, Romans, ancient Egyptians, any variety one can name, priests will grab what they can. Occasionally go good purpose, one must admit.' "

Christianity Greece 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 52. "'It's the only way to keep us safe,' Father said. 'Once we're going at lightspeed, it'll seem like a couple of years to us, while decades pass on Earth. By the time we reach the other planet, everybody who wants us dead will be dead themselves.'

'Like Joseph and Mary taking Jesus into Egypt,' said Mother.

'Exactly,' said Father.

'Except they got to go back to Nazareth.' "

Christianity Greece 2200 Zelazny, Roger. This Immortal. New York: Ace Books (1966); pg. 113. "'...but then I went and got born on Christmas and that sort of clinched things.'

'What is wrong with being born on Christmas?'

'The gods, according to local beliefs, deem it a bit presumptuous. For this reason, children born at that time are not of human blood. They are the brood of destroyers, the creators of havoc, the panickers of man. They are called the kallikanzroi... so they left me on a hilltop, to be returned.'

'What happened then?'

'There was an old Orthodox priest in the village. He heard of it and went to them. He told them that it was a mortal sin to do such a thing, and they had better get the baby back, quick, and have it ready for baptism the following day.'

'Ah! And that is how you were saved, and baptised?'

'Well, sort of... They came back with me... but they insisted I wasn't the same baby they'd left there. They'd left a dubious mutant and collected an even more doubtful changeling... got another Christmas child in return...' "

Christianity Greece 2200 Zelazny, Roger. This Immortal. New York: Ace Books (1966); pg. 113-114. "'And you were baptised . . .?'

'Well, sort of half-baptised.'

'Half-baptised?'

'The priest had a stroke at my chrestening. Died a little while later. He was the only one around, so I don't know that I got the whole thing done proper.'

'One drop would be sufficient.'

'I suppose. I don't really know what happened.'

'Maybe you had better have it done again. Just to be safe.'

'No, if Heaven doesn't want me then, I'm not going to ask a second time.' "

Christianity Greece 2200 Zelazny, Roger. This Immortal. New York: Ace Books (1966); pg. 5-6. "'You know that children born here on Christmas are of the kallikanzaroi blood,' she said, 'and you once told me tht your birthday--'

'All right!'

It had struck me that she was only half-joking. Knowing some of the things one occasionally meets in he Old Places, the Hot Places, you can almot believe in myths without extra effort--such as the story of those Pan-like sprites who gather together every spring to spend ten days sawing at the Tree of the World, only to be dispersed by the rining of the Easter bells... Cassandra and I were not in the habit of discussing religion, politics, or Aegean folklore... " [Some other refs. to Christianity, not all in DB.]

Christianity Greece: Crete 1921 Preuss, Paul. Secret Passages. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 65. "...who had crept into the chapel of Ayia Kyriaki after midnight, Christmas night of 1921, and scraped the eyes out of the fresco of the Virgin and saved the scrapings I her kerchief and then walked barefoot in the snow that covered the cobbled street of the village... "
Christianity Greece: Crete 1997 Preuss, Paul. Secret Passages. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 23. "In this place Julius Caesar had established an outpost of Rome; four centuries later Rome still ruled the west, and a Christian bishop had built his palace here. From the compost of ancient walls and paving stones and trash heaps and bone pits rose the massive piers which supported the medieval structure over their heads. " [Also pg. 54, 60, 65-66, more. See some other refs. under 'Greek Orthodox'.]
Christianity Greece: Crete 1997 Preuss, Paul. Secret Passages. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 44. "...with oil sketches of Byzantine churches and blue seas hanging on the whitewashed walls. "
Christianity Greece: Crete 1997 Preuss, Paul. Secret Passages. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 89. "'His grandmother is the witch who made my brother blind.'

'That is ignorant, un-Christian superstition. You may not say such things in this room' "

Christianity Grenada 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 144. "'You can't attack Singapore!' Laura said. 'More killing can't help you!'

'We are not Christs or Gandhis,' Andrei said. He spoke slowly. 'This is terrorism...' "

Christianity Guatemala 1986 Harper, Leanne C. "Blood Rights " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 75. "Ix Chel, the Old Woman, was the moon goddess. The old ones' gods were ugly, not like the Virgin Mary or Jesus or even God in the Church where he had been raised. "
Christianity Guatemala 1986 Harper, Leanne C. "Blood Rights " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 90. "Akabal was again mixing Maya and Spanish in a speech that centered on Xbalanque and his 'mission.' Akabal had taken what Xbalanque had said to him and linked it to a Christian second coming and the end of the world as prophesied by ancient priests. "
Christianity Guatemala 1986 Harper, Leanne C. "Blood Rights " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 91. "...he swore to all the deities he recognized, Mayan and European, Jesus, Mary, and Itzamna... "
Christianity Guatemala 1994 Harper, Leanne C. "Paths of Silence and of Night " in Wild Cards: Book II of a New Cycle: Marked Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Baen (1994); pg. 148. "'Ah heah one a those fugitives is a devil-worshipper.' Crypt Kicker spoke, although it was difficult to understand more than every other word with the Texas accent and what sounded like a cleft palate birth defect. 'Witches can't be suffahed to live. Bible says so.'

The other two men were silent. Neither could think of a reply. "

Christianity Guatemala 1994 Harper, Leanne C. "Paths of Silence and of Night " in Wild Cards: Book II of a New Cycle: Marked Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Baen (1994); pg. 167. "'Heathens. Idolaters. The Bible says you have to die.' It spoke, but the words were barely intelligible. It dragged itself toward them slowly and inexorably. " [More.]
Christianity Guatemala 2025 Shepard, Lucius. "Fire Zone Emerald " in Future on Fire (Orson Scott Card, ed.) New York: Tor (1991; story copyright 1987); pg. 96. "'You remind me of my ol' lieutenant,' said Mathis. 'Man used to tell me I's crazy, and I'd say to him, 'I ain't ordinary crazy, sir. I'm crazy-gone-to-Jesus.' And I'd 'splain to him what I knew from the light, that we's s'posed to build the kingdom here. Place where a man could live pure. No machines, no pollution.' "
Christianity Guernsey 1944 Allred, Lee. "The Greatest Danger " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 201. "'...Probably also why religion has always fascinated me so.'

'I'm having a rather difficult time picturing you as a priest.'

Verwoerd laughed. 'Actually, before the war--Kaiser's war--well, I intended to become a theologian.'

'Then the war changed all that?'

'Not in any way you imagine. Living, if you can call it that, in the trenches in the Dardanelles changed my intentions, true: it intensified them. Somehow the idea of somebody somewhere having the answers seemed more precious to me than any pearl of great price.' "

Christianity Guernsey 1944 Allred, Lee. "The Greatest Danger " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 206. "Then, spontaneously, before services were even finished, someone in the crowd started singing 'God Save the King.' The audience picked it up. Then, once the anthem was finished, they began singing Rule Britannia. "
Christianity Haiti 2016 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. Crescent City Rhapsody. New York: Tor (2001; c. 2000); pg. 91. "and came back out dripping and cool with her head empty as a Tuesday church. "
Christianity Haiti 2048 Bear, Greg. Queen of Angels. New York: Warner Books (1994; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 374. "They carried the limp man into the bone church of John D'Arqueville.

The pret' savan--advisor on church matters to the town's official houngan... followed them down the middle aisle between pews to a double altar--stripped pillar beside life size crucifix--at the front of the church.

The crucifix looked ancient, a dark wooden T supporting a black Jesus in muscle knotted agony. Bright blood from the crown of thorns stood out against the ebony black of the face; around the base of the cross twined a vivid green serpent, black tongue frozen in a sinister dart. "

Christianity Haiti 2048 Bear, Greg. Queen of Angels. New York: Warner Books (1994; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 376. "'Archangels. Loa of the New Pantheon,' Soulavier said. 'I went to this church as a boy, when it was new. John D'Arqueville wished to reunite the best elements of African religion and catholic christianity, to reshape Vodoun. His vision did not spread far from Terrier Noir, however. This church is unique.' "
Christianity Haiti 2200 Zelazny, Roger. This Immortal. New York: Ace Books (1966); pg. 34. "Various Christian saints peered from behind unfathomable expressions at the bright hearts and cocks and graveyard crosses, flags, machetes and crossroads... " [describing a vodoun ceremony]
Christianity Hawaii 1866 Simmons, Dan. Fires of Eden. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1994); pg. 88. Pg. 88: "...the twins were never called by their Christian names since it was such a chore to tell them apart... ";

Pg. 90: "'Sort of makes you wonder why the heathens didn't surrender and convert to Christianity even before the first missionaries arrived, doesn't it?' drawled Mr. Clemens...

'You are no friend of the church here, are you, Mr. Clemens?'

My uninvited guest companion smoked for a moment in what may have been meditative silence. 'What church is that, miss Stewart?'

'The Christian church, Mr. Clemens.' I was soggy and sore, in no mood for what may have passed for banter in Missouri or California.

'Which Christian Church is that, Miss Stewart? Even here, the heathen have so many to choose from.' " [More.]

Christianity Hawaii 1866 Simmons, Dan. Fires of Eden. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1994); pg. 163. "...to even more famous Reverend 'Father' Lyman of Hilo. Even I had heard of Mr. Coan during my sojourn in Hilo: the amazing pastor has--not once but several times--made the 300-mile circumnavigation of the island by foot and canoe, establishing outrider churches as he did so, baptizing, by his own count, some 12,000 adults and 4,000 infants into the Universal Church. In light of this, the native' loyalty had all been turned toward the Reverend Coan and his successors, boding hard times for the simple white-washed church of the more severe ('less liberal' were Mrs. Stanton's words) preachings of Reverend Whister. After ten months of laboring in the baptismal vineyards, Reverend Whister and his supporters had managed to save only a single Hawaiian soul--and even he had backslid upon the celebration of some pagan holiday and had to be excommunicated by a disappointed Reverend W. "
Christianity Hawaii 1887 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. The Bones of Time. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 34. "His name was Akamu. Hawaiian, he had told her proudly, for Adam. One of the first things the missionaries had done when they arrived was promptly biblicize Hawaiian names. "
Christianity Hawaii 1994 Simmons, Dan. Fires of Eden. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1994); pg. 151. "The philosophers were put off by the mythopoeic mind-set that had preceded them--that is, the Christian and Judaic--but they labored to return to an essentially pagan point of view.' "


Christianity, continued

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