Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Christianity, galaxy

Christianity, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christianity galaxy 2732 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 37. "I feel something . . . not yet remorse . . . at my sin of falsifying the evidence on the Armaghast dig. But, Edouard, Your Excellency, if the artifacts had indicated the presence of a Christ-oriented culture there [on the planet Hyperion], six hundred lightyears from Old Earth, almost three thousand years before man left the surface of the homeworld. . .

Was it so dark a sin to interpret such data in a way which could have meant the resurgence of Christianity in our lifetime?

Yes, it was. But not, I think, because of the sin of tampering with the data, but the deeper sin of thinking that Christianity could be saved. The Church is dying, Edouard. And not merely our beloved branch of the Holy Tree, but all of its offshoots, vestiges, and cankers. The entire Body of Christ is dying as surely as this poorly used body of mine... "

Christianity galaxy 2732 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 56. [On the planet Hyperion.] "Their reaction to the cross certainly suggested that I had encountered a group of survivors of a once Christian colony--Catholics?--even though the data in the comlog insisted that the dropship of seventy colonists who had crashed on this plateau four hundred years ago had only Neo-Kerwin Marxists, all of whom should have been indifferent if not openly hostile to the old religions.

I considered dropping the matter as being far too dangerous to pursue, but my stupid need to know drove me on. 'Do you worship Jesus?' I asked.

Their blank expressions left no need for a verbal negative.

'Christ?' I tried again. 'Jesus Christ? Christian? The Catholic Church?'

No interest.

'Catholic? Jesus? Mary? St. Peter? Paul? St. Teilhard?... You follow the cross?' I said...

All three looked at me. 'We belong to the cruciform,' said Alpha. "

Christianity galaxy 2733 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 12. [Aboard the starship Yggdrasill, en route to the planet Hyperion.] "To the Consul's left sat Father Lenar Hoyt, a priest of the old-style Christian sect known as Catholic. " [Many other references to Christianity in this book, almost all referring directly to Catholicism, and most not in DB.]
Christianity galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 58. "'Genetically, you are fully human,' said Gladstone.

it was not a question. I did not respond.

'Jesus Christ was said to be fully human,' she said, 'And also fully divine. Humanity and Godhead at intersection.'

I was amazed at her reference to that old religion. Christianity had been replaced first by Zen Christianity, then Zen Gnosticism, then by a hundred more vital theologies and philosophies. Gladstone's homeworld was a repository for discarded beliefs and I assumed--and hoped--that neither was the CEO. 'If he was fully human and fully God,' I said, 'then I am his antimatter image.'

'No,' said Gladstone, 'I would imagine that the Shrike your pilgrim friends are confronting is that.' "

Christianity galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 67. "'What makes it hard for our cold muse to find us? We can watch our friend decompose while we wait. How long did [Father] Dure's tale say i took for one of the Bikura to rejoin the flock after death interrupted their grazing?'

'Three days,' says the Consul.

'Of course. How could I forget? How wonderfully fitting. New Testament-wise. In the meantime, maybe our Shrike-wolf will carry off a few of this flock. Do you think the padre would mind if I borrowed one of his cruciforms just in case? I mean, he has a spare . . .' "

Christianity galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 107. "Tyrena Wingreen-Feif laughed and turned to the man in red and black to her right. 'Monsignor, your church . . . Catholic, early Christian isn't it? . . . don't you have some delightful old doctrine about mankind achieving a more exalted evolutionary status?'

We all turned to look at the small, quiet man in the black robe and strange little cap. Monsignor Edouard, a representative of the almost-forgotten early Christian sect was now limited to the world of Pacem and a few colony planets... "

Christianity galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 150. "Gladstone had read Weintraub's book, The Abraham Dilemma, in which he analyzed the relationship between a God who demanded the sacrifice of a son and the human race who agreed to it. Weintraub had reasoned that the Old Testament Jehovah had not simply been testing Abraham, but had communicated in the only language of loyalty, obedience, sacrifice, and command that humankind could understand at that point in the relationship. Weintraub had dealt with the New Testament's message as a presage of a new stage in that relationship--a stage wherein mankind would no longer sacrifice its children to any god, for any reason, but where parents . . . entire races of parents . . . would offer themselves up instead... Finally, Weintraub had dealt with refusing all sacrifice, refusing any relationship with God except one of mutual respect and honest attempts at mutual understanding. He wrote about the multiple deaths of God and the need for a divine resurrection... " [More.]
Christianity galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 290. "--Part of the human-created Trinity is hiding out in the Web?

--The Web or elsewhere.
"
Christianity galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 301. "'There is an ancient heresy . . .'

'Yes,' I said. 'The Socinian Heresy. I heard Father Dure explain it to Sol Weintraub and the Consul. But what difference does it make how this . . . power . . . evolved, and whether it's limited or not. If Ummon is telling the truth, we're dealing with a force that uses quasars for energy sources. That's a God who can destroy galaxies, gentlemen.'

'That would be a god who destroys galaxies,' said Dure. 'Not God.'

I heard his emphasis clearly. 'But if it's not limited,' I said. 'If it's the Omega Point of total consciousness you've written about, if it's the same Trinity your church has argued for and theorized about since before Aquinus . . . but if one part of that Trinity has fled backward through time to here . . . to now . . . then what?' " [More.]

Christianity galaxy 2786 Clarke, Arthur C. The Songs of Distant Earth. New York: Ballantine (1986); pg. 115. "With tears in their eyes, the selection panels had thrown away the Veda, the Bible, the Tripitaka, the Qur'an, and all the immense body of literature--fiction and nonfiction--that was based upon them. Despite all the wealth of beauty and wisdom these works contained, they could not be allowed to reinfect virgin planets... "
Christianity galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 130. "'...the participation of a revealed God in the workings of life and the universe . . . this dates back to Judaism--that's the forerunner of the old Christian religions that were the forerunners of both Mahmetism and Deseretism... The participation of God. Even Christianity, which arose from Judaism, believed in a god who cared, who gave his son up to save those who believed... Jesus of Nazareth walked into the Temple of the old Jews, which had taken forty-six years to build, and said that, if the Jews razed it, he would rebuild it in three days . . . according to the old scriptures, he really referred to the temple of his body, which, in the Christian tradition, God resurrected in three days . . . and on three occasions after that he showed himself to his disciples. "
Christianity galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 325. "'There isn't anyone like your son, Sister Myra, and I share your prayer that the Lord will keep and preserve him.' Except even the old Christian god had only raised one son from the dead. "
Christianity galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 380. "All too often men claim. What matters a claim to the Lord? You have claimed you do the will of the Lord when you slaughter others. An older prophet said to consider the beam in your own eyes before the mote in your brother's. "
Christianity galaxy 2891 Barnes, John. Sin of Origin. New York: Congdon & Weed (1988); pg. 19. "...the secretary, engrossed in something called Boy's Christian Adventures didn't look up. " [There are many references to Christianity throughout book, usually in reference to Catholics, and usually using the term 'Christian.']
Christianity galaxy 2891 Barnes, John. Sin of Origin. New York: Congdon & Weed (1988); pg. 30. Pg. 25: "'...citizenship in the Christian Commonwealth...' "; Pg. 30: "'And you ran to the Christian worlds?' "
Christianity galaxy 2891 Barnes, John. Sin of Origin. New York: Congdon & Weed (1988); pg. 60. "'...And our missionary efforts were relatively more successful this time than usual. If anything, Christianity seems to be unusually attractive to Randallans.' "; "Most worlds had many faiths, of course, but the Church generally classified them by the dominant type. Innocent worlds, of course, were off limits--but there was no evidence to argue that this planet was still in a state of original grace. That distinction had been made only twice, and the requirements were stringent--no observable violations of any basic moral principles by any of the intelligent species. That left Unenlightened, Pagan, Infidel, and, technically, Visited. "
Christianity galaxy 2891 Barnes, John. Sin of Origin. New York: Congdon & Weed (1988); pg. 66. "'Or a basis of common culture that will help them join the rest of the Christian Commonwealth,' he replied. 'And of course, if you asked a theologian, he might point out that they benefit by not going to Hell. I'm afraid it pretty much depends on where you're standing--which is what we used to call the First Law of Xenics...' "
Christianity galaxy 2891 Barnes, John. Sin of Origin. New York: Congdon & Weed (1988); pg. 102. "He had pretty much resigned himself to that--getting a form of Christianity reasonably adapted to the culture, history, and biology of Randall was a job for the specialists from the Archbishopric, who preffered to work with a population whose conversion was well underway. "
Christianity galaxy 2902 Barnes, John. Sin of Origin. New York: Congdon & Weed (1988); pg. 147. "...he was rumored to be the main Terran advistor behind the Christian Liberals, just as Andros Kanegawa was supposed to be behind the much smaller Traditional Royalist Party... The Christian Freedom Party had several minor Terran technicians... '...My allegiance is pledged to the High Kings... I would serve them best as a Christian Liberal...' "
Christianity galaxy 2981 Anthony, Piers. Blue Adept. New York: Ballantine (1981); pg. 137. "It was Heaven. Literal, picturebook Heaven. The floor was made of soft white sponge contoured to resemble clouds; smaller clouds floated above, and on them winged babies perched, playing little harps. The front gate was nacreous: surely genuine pearl. Lovely music played softly in the background: angelic hymns.

An angel spied them and strode forward, his great wings fluttering. He wore a flowing robe on which a golden letter G was embroidered. 'Ah, new guests of the Lord. Have you renounced all worldly sins and lusts?'

Neither Stile nor Sheen could think of a suitable spot rejoinder. They stood there--while the pursuing androids hove into sight.

'Here now! What's this?' the angel cried. 'You soulless freaks can't come in here!'

The androids backed away, disgruntled...

Now there was a voice from another cloudbank. 'What is the disturbance, Gabriel?' a woman called.

'We have visitors,' the Angel Gabriel called back. " [More, not in DB, pg. 137-143.]

Christianity galaxy 3000 Bear, Greg. Legacy. New York: Tor (1995); pg. 116. "'There was a small group of people, years ago, that kept a secret vigil. They call themselves Adventists. They were waiting for someone from the Hexamon to arrive.'

'Sounds Christian,' I said.

' 'Advent' means the coming of something big, something momentous. Nothing to do with Christians. Not all of them made their views known...' "

Christianity galaxy 3000 Freireich, Valerie J. Impostor. New York: Penguin Putnam (1997); pg. 62. Pg. 62: "'I'm Christian, Researcher. We're tolerated here in the Emirates, more so than in the Harmony, but I walk a thin line. Helping you will do nothing important for me. And you're being watched.' ";

Pg. 68: "'...Perhaps he can eventually be convinced of the truth of the teachings of the Prophet, God's blessings and peace be on him. My own distant ancestors were Christian.' "

Christianity galaxy 3000 Greeley, Andrew M. The Final Planet. New York: Warner Books (1987); pg. 84. Pg. 6: "...like the monastery greenhouse at Easter. "; Pg. 241: "between Christmas and Easter. "; Pg. 84: "'Then without reflection he muttered the age-old Gaelic benediction. 'Jesus and Mary and Brigid be with this house.'

'Who are they?' Marjetta demanded.

'Ah, holy people.'

'What does that mean?'

'Well, special friends of God.'

'I see,' but in the darkness she sounded like the did not. 'Your god has special friends?'

'Well, kind of. We pray to Him through them. We sort of hope they'll use their influence with Him.'

'How consoling. A kindly god then?'

'Sometimes too kindly by half. Won't leave us alone. Head over heels with us. If you take my reasoning.'

'Extraordinary. And yet somehow not unreasonable. I should like someday to know more about him...' " [Many refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]

Christianity galaxy 3000 Greeley, Andrew M. The Final Planet. New York: Warner Books (1987); pg. 238. "There was a certain logic to the system, once you admitted the basic premise that sex interfered with responsible human living. Concentrate it all in two bashes every year, enough for reproduction (more than enough, considering the antichildren bias of the planet) and for sexual release, and sedate citizens mentally and physically to repress it the rest of the time. Logical system, but mad premise--not completely unknown in the rest of the galaxy, or even in the history of Christianity, for that matter. " [This is the only place where the words 'Christianity' or 'Christian' are actually used, although Christian themes and institutions permeate the entire novel.]
Christianity galaxy 3000 Saberhagen, Fred. Berserkers: The Beginning. New York: Baen (1998; c. 1967, 1979); pg. 377. "ALBERT BALL
WILLIAM AVERY BISHOP
RENE PAUL FONCK
GEORGES MARIE GUYNEMER
FRANK LUKE
EDWARD MANNOCK
CHARLES NUNGESSER
MANFRED VON RICHTHOFEN
WERNER VOSS.

They were English, American, German, French. They were Jew, violinist, invalid, Prussian, rebel, hater, bon vivant, Christian. Among the nine of them they were many other things besides. Maybe there was only the one word--man--which could include them all. "

Christianity galaxy 3000 Simmons, Dan. "Remembering Siri " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1983); pg. 116. "The last time I saw Siri she was 70 standard years old. She was 70 years old and still she had never: traveled offworld, used a comlog,... heard of Zen Christianity, or... "
Christianity galaxy 3017 Niven, Larry & Jerry Pournelle. The Mote in God's Eye. New York: Simon and Schuster (1974); pg. 172. "'Well, you're on,' Chaplain Hardy thought to himself... Except for conducting the Sunday worship services he had deliberately stayed to his cabin during most of the expedition. "
Christianity galaxy 3017 Niven, Larry & Jerry Pournelle. The Mote in God's Eye. New York: Simon and Schuster (1974); pg. 319. "'And you have nothing like Christianity?' Potter demanded.

'No. We've had prophecies of a Savior who'd end the Cycles...' "

Christianity galaxy 3039 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Akima's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 76. "When Ishaq and his father had shared mint tea and baklava or other pastries, Mohammed often played soothing music, classical pieces from old Earth composers. His favorite had always been Mozart and they would sit together and play Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, The Marriage of Figaro, The Abduction from the Seraglio, his Requiem mass. The Magic Flute, or one of Mozart's other symphonies. With a lump in his throat, Ishaq remembered his father telling him that he believed Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was the best the Human race had to offer when it came to music... Ishaq guessed it on the third try, a brief passage from the 'Kyrie' of Mozart's Requiem. Appropriate, a requiem for planet Earth. " [A 'mass' is a Christian piece.]
Christianity galaxy 3043 Perry, Steve & Dal Perry. Titan A.E.. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 194. "There was an odd apparatus on a huge table. Rack after rack of containers and vials surrounded the table. Curious, Cale picked one up.

'DNA coding--Mammal, Tursiops Truncatus. The Bottle-nosed Dolphin.'

He was silent for a second.

'Akima--these are--will be--animals.'

She read some of the other containers. 'Leopard, Elephant, Butterfly . . . looks like a regular Noah's ark here.'

'Who?'

'Never mind, it's from an old legend about a transport ship full of animals.' "

Christianity galaxy 3050 Niven, Larry & Jerry Pournelle. The Gripping Hand. New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 178. "'...Tonight we will create the infidel least likely to be welcome aboard a teeny spacecraft with Trader Horace Bury.We will give him the following characteristics... Anglo-Saxon. Christian. An Empire Navy man...' "
Christianity galaxy 3099 Simmons, Dan. Endymion. New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 14. "'Yes,' I said, 'I know the penalty for a murderer executed without converting. But I have this--' I tapped the cortical come-along now permanently attached to my temple. 'I don't need a cruciform symbiote embedded in me to put me in a deeper slavery.'

Father Tse pulled back as if I had slapped him. 'One mere lifetime of commitment to Our Lord is not slavery,' he said, his stutter banished by cold anger. 'Millions have offered this before the tangible blessing of immediate resurrection in this life was offered. Billions gratefully accept it now.' He stood up. 'You have the choice, my son. Eternal light, with the gift of almost unlimited life in this world in which to serve Christ, or eternal darkness.'

I shrugged and looked away. " [Many refs. to Christianity throughout novel, primarily to the nearly completely dominant Catholic Church. Most refs. not in DB.]

Christianity galaxy 3099 Simmons, Dan. Endymion. New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 52-53. "'Most people I knew were Zen Christians... More Zen than Christian, of course, but not too much of either, actually. Personal pilgrimages were fun. Places of power, finding one's Baedecker point, all of that crap...' "
Christianity galaxy 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 37. "..white Christmas lights running back and forth on the ceiling... Today the cabaret theater was empty, the Christmas lights dark. " [Many other refs. to Christianity throughout novel. See refs. under 'Catholic' and 'Christianity - born-again.]
Christianity galaxy 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 97. "People traveled between worlds in the Pax--millionaires mostly, businesspeople and adventurers willing to spend months in cryogenic sleep and years of time-debt traveling by Mercantilus transport between the stars, smug in their cruciform certainty that job and home and family would be waiting in their steady-state Christian universe when they returned--but it was rare, and no one traveled between worlds without money and Pax permission. Two minutes after I sauntered into this cafe or bar or restaurant or whatever it was, someone would probably call the local police or the Pax military. Their first search would show me crossless--a heathen in a born-again Christian universe. "
Christianity galaxy 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 635. "Oh, Jesus God, God of Moses, Allah, dear Buddha, Zeus, Muir, Elvis, Christ . . . if any of you exist or ever existed or retain a shred of power in your dead gray hands . . please let me die now. "
Christianity galaxy 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 162-163. "Father Clifton ignored my sarcasm. His brow was wrinkled with what could only be worry--although for my fate or for my eternal soul, I was not sure which. Perhaps for both. 'For Christians,' he began and paused a moment. 'For Christians, such an execution is punishment, some discomfort, perhaps even momentary terror, but then they mend their ways and go on with their lives. For you . . .'

'Nothingness,' I said, helping him end his sentence. 'The Big Gulp. Eternal darkness. Nada-ness. I become a worm's casserole.'

Father Clifton was not amused. 'This does not have to be the case, my son.' "

Christianity galaxy 3200 Simak, Clifford D. Project Pope. New York: Ballantine (1981); pg. 22. "'...No one outside Vatican [Vatican-17, a distant planet] really seems to know what is going on. One story has it that the robots are trying to build an infallible pope--an electronic pope, a computer pope. There appears to be an idea that the project is an outgrowth of Christianity, an Old Earth religion.'

'We know what Christianity is,' Jill said. 'There still are a lot of Christians, perhaps more than ever before. True, Christianity no longer looms as important as it did before we began going into space. This, however, is a relative thing. The religion is still as important as ever, but its seeming importance has been diluted by the many other faiths that exist in the galaxy...' "

Christianity galaxy 3200 Simak, Clifford D. Project Pope. New York: Ballantine (1981); pg. 79. "'Vatican [Vatican-17, a distant planet] isn't what it sounds like. Not what we think it is. Because of the terminology--Vatican, Pope, cardinals...--the easy assumption is that it's basically Christian. Well, it's not all Christian. There is much else to it. Just what that much else is I don't know, but you gain the impression that there are an awful lot of things. At one time, it may have been basically Christian; that's all [they] had when they came out from Earth. But the robots have found so much else, so many hints of so much else, that it's no longer entirely Christian... Mary is a human and she found a Christian concept--'

'That doesn't follow,' said Tennyson. 'Not all humans are Christians. I think only a small percentage of them are. I'm not sure I'm Christian, nor, I think, are you. Perhaps at one time our ancestors were...' "

Christianity galaxy 3200 Simak, Clifford D. Project Pope. New York: Ballantine (1981); pg. 80. "'But many of us have a Christian heritage, whether we're actually Christians or not. It does'nt make any difference whether we are or not. In many of us, the old way of Christian thinking still hangs on. Look, we still use Christian swear words--hell and Christ and God and Jesus. Thos words roll easily and naturally off our tongues.'

Tennyson nodded soberly. 'Yes, I can see how the robots might think we were, in our hearts, still Christian. Not that it's a bad thing being Christian.'

'Of course not, Jason. But when mankind began leaving Earth, they lost a lot, or shed a lot, along the way. A lot of us don't know what we really are.' "

Christianity galaxy 3200 Simak, Clifford D. Project Pope. New York: Ballantine (1981); pg. 112. "'Many of our people in the more humble posts--the farm workers, the gardeners, the woodsmen, the laboring brothers, even many of the monks--are very simple souls. With them the basic idea of Christianity, although somewhat faded, nevertheless is a rather powerful force. They do'nt understand Christianity, of course, but even back on Earth, a thousand years ago, many people who prided themselves on being Christian may have understood it even less... We know there is at least a second universe and perhaps a third and fourth... We we know that if there is a Heaven... it necessarily must be more than a simple Christian Heaven, or a Happy Hunting Ground...' "
Christianity galaxy 3200 Simak, Clifford D. Project Pope. New York: Ballantine (1981); pg. 231. "'Do you happen to be Christians?'

'That is a question we have discussed among ourselves.' said Jill. 'We are not certain exactly what we are. The two of us happen to have Christian roots. Which is no more than to say that our culture is not Jewish or Moslem or any of the many faiths developed by mankind.' "

Christianity galaxy 3200 Simak, Clifford D. Project Pope. New York: Ballantine (1981); pg. 232. "'...There are many who still regard this as a holy place and a holy venture. The terms were used out of the great respect and perhaps even a love of Old Earth Christianity. Despite the fact our founders were denied the privilege of becoming communicants, they still held their love of the ancient faith.' "
Christianity galaxy 3300 Brin, David. Heaven's Reach. New York: Bantam (1998); pg. 93. "'Uh, noble lineage?'...

'Of course. You are from Earth! Blessed home of Moses, Jesus, Buddha, Muhammed, Tipler, and Weimberg-Chang!...' "

Christianity galaxy 3300 Brin, David. Heaven's Reach. New York: Bantam (1998); pg. 354. "'There is a reward that awaits the worthy,' the missionary continued, intoning with a remote, pontifical voice. 'It was alluded to by your own saints and prophets, long ago. By Jesus and Isaiah and Mohammed and Buddha . . . in fact, by all the great sages of your blessed-curse race...' "
Christianity galaxy 3418 Panshin, Alexei. Star Well. New York: Ace Books (1978; c. 1968); pg. 1. "To history buffs, the year was 4171 A.U.C. To Christians, it was 3418. To Moslems, it was the middle of the year 2882. But by common reckoning, the year 1461. "
Christianity galaxy 3418 Panshin, Alexei. Star Well. New York: Ace Books (1978; c. 1968); pg. 21. "Mithra was worshiped six centuries before the founding of Rome, and he has had his ups and downs ever since. He was Son of the Sun, and bon of a virgin on the 25th of December. But then, so was everybody else. He died for the sins of all mankind and was reborn at the spring equinox. That's standard, too, as are the rest of the clutch: baptism, communion, and the promise of eternal life... Mithraism spent more than fifteen hundred years underground or as a minor element in other religions before its modern revival in the schisms of schisms and the loss of belief that ruined Christianity for a thousand years. "
Christianity galaxy 3419 Panshin, Alexei. The Thurb Revolution. New York: Ace Books (1978; c. 1968); pg. 83. "Daisy Bell Rise Up and Tell the Glory of Emmanuel had been raised in a Christian family, but she had left her family, her religion and the bulk of her name for the altogether unprepossessing man she had married and followed from planet to planet, job to job, life to life. Life with Caspar was consistently interesting, and she thought he was sexy. "
Christianity galaxy 3419 Panshin, Alexei. The Thurb Revolution. New York: Ace Books (1978; c. 1968); pg. 208. "'Of course,' said the plonk. 'The eye of God knows all.'

'Are you really God?' Dreznik asked from his swaying ropes.

'Of course,' said the plonk. 'I am the Lord, thy God. Whoever believes in me shall not perish, but have everlasting life.'

'Really?'

'Do you doubt the word of God?'

'No, no,' said Dreznik. 'I believe. I do believe.'

'Do you really?' asked the plonk. "

Christianity galaxy 3500 Drake, David. Igniting the Reaches. New York: Ace Books (1994); pg. 29. Pg. 28-29: "'Missed us, by the mercy of God,' Ricimer said, and there was no blasphemy in his tone.

...'On the bridge, the men at the forward attitude controls were bellowing 'Onward Christian Soldiers' in surprisingly good harmony. ";

Pg. 30-31: "A Molt stumbled off the ramp and bumped a guard. 'God damn your crinkly soul to Hell!' shouted the spacer...

Piet Ricimer grabbed the crewman by the collar and jerked him backward. 'You!' Ricimer said. 'If I hear you blaspheme that way again, you'll swab out all three holds alone! Do you think God no longer hears us because we're off Venus?'

'Sorry, sir,' the sailor muttered... " [Also, explicitly Christian profanity on pg. 81, 175, 196.]

Christianity galaxy 3502 Drake, David. Through the Breach. New York: Ace Books (1995); pg. 134. Pg. 134: "Stephen breathed in gasps. Dole whuffed, 'Christ's blood!' as his boot slipped. "; Pg. 138: "'It's against God and nature to see women pretending to be men.'

...I turned. The women watched with a mixture of anger and loathing. Patten wore a crucifix around her neck. I jerked it with my left hand, breaking the thin silver chain. 'We're not mutineers,' I said, 'we're from Venus. And we're Christians.' " [Other refs. to Christians, but not by name. See also pg. 195, 234, 282.]

Christianity galaxy 3509 Clarke, Arthur C. The Songs of Distant Earth. New York: Ballantine (1986); pg. 231. "'When the vocal line begins, it's as if I'm seeing something that really exists. I'm standing in a great city square almost as large as St. Marks or St. Peters...' "
Christianity galaxy 3585 Clarke, Arthur C. The Songs of Distant Earth. New York: Ballantine (1986); pg. 202. "He let his eyes wander to the glade outside the library window and the silent--yet so eloquent!--hulk of the Mother Ship looming above it. Here human life began on this planet; no wonder it often reminds me of Eden. And am I the Snake, about to destroy its innocence? But I won't be telling a girl as clever as Mirissa anything she doesn't already know--or guess. "
Christianity galaxy 4000 Benford, Gregory. Furious Gulf. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 229. [Actual year unknown.] "Instantly there flooded into his idling mind a shotgun blast of names, titles, all tinged with faint echoes of silvery memory. Tombs of Ishtar. Grand Palace. Altars of Innocence... Pinnacle Prime. Dassadummakeag. Ever-rest. Pike's Pyramid. Isis. Mount Olive. DoDeDeed. Angry Sink. "
Christianity galaxy 4000 The Conqueror's Child. Charnas, Suzy McKee. New York: Tor (1999); pg. 390. Pg. 67: "He wouldn't be the first, Christ knows. "; Pg. 248: "For an instant he thought he might be wrong, that it was someone else--who, Christ-God-son?--a trap of some kind? "; Pg. 251: "By Christ-God-son, she would piss herself with shock when she saw him! "; Pg. 390: "Here he faltered, groaned, 'Christ-God-son,' in a tone of exhausted loathing... " [Similar utterances, pg. 174, maybe elsewhere.]
Christianity galaxy 4004 Drew, Wayland. The Master of Norriya in The Erthring Cycle (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (c. 1986); pg. 577. "'You know about the Abbreviators, those whose job it was to place abstracts and summaries and synopses... Two pages became the measure. In their hands, everything became two pages long. The Bible, The Tempest, The Republic, Paradise Lost. "
Christianity galaxy 4100 Weber, David. Echoes of Honor. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1998); pg. 81. "A small pennon--a triangle of maroon and gold bearing the opened Bible and crossed swords that were the Protector's emblem, starched-stiff in the wind of its passage... " [Just a few refs. to Christianity in novel--perhaps all explicit refs. are in DB, and these appear to be associated with Catholicism.]
Christianity galaxy 5000 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Telling. New York: Harcourt (2000); pg. 110. "What was it they held sacred? She kept looking for the core of the matter, the words at the heard of the Telling, the holy books to study and memorize. She found them, but not it. No bible. No koran. Dozens of upanishads, a million sutras. Every maz gave her something else to read. "
Christianity galaxy 5298 Card, Orson Scott. Xenocide. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 429. "'Even the martyrs of Christianity and Islam were willing to accept rewards in heaven for their sacrifice,' said Valentine. "
Christianity galaxy 7000 Aldiss, Brian W. Helliconia Winter. New York: Atheneum (1985); pg. 233. "Nobody worked at desks. Desks were extinct. It might have been supposed that these people were always on holiday, or perhaps that they inhabited some rather spartan version of the Garden of Eden. Such was not the case. "
Christianity galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. 497. "...the religious beliefs dominant in the Imperium up to the time of Maud'Dib [include] The so-called Ancient Teachings--including... the Navachristianity of Chusuk... "
Christianity galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. 500. "The O.C. Bible... revisions leaned on accepted symbolisms (Cross, Crescent, Feather Rattle, the Twelve Saints, the thin Buddha, and the like)... "
Christianity galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. xxi. [Definitions in 'Terminology of the Imperium'] "ORANGE CATHOLIC BIBLE: the 'Accumulated Book,' the religious text produced by the Commission of Ecumenical Translators. It contains elements of most ancient religions, including the Maometh Saari, Mahayana Christianity, Zensunni Catholicism and Buddislamic traditions. " [bold added to emphasize applicable segments]; [There many references to Christianity in this book, most not in DB.]
Christianity galaxy 22995 Benford, Gregory. Foundation's Fear. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 70. Pg. 69: "'Poet, tragedian, historian.' He leaned forward and with a wicked wink whispered, 'I style myself Voltaire. Freethinker. Philosopher King.'

'Besides the King of Heaven and His son, I call but one man King. Charles VII of the House of Valois. And I'll call you Arouet until my royal master bids me do otherwise.'

'My dear pucelle, your Charles is dead.'

...'An insistence I most dearly paid for,' she retorted, remembering how the bishops badgered her about her male attire... "; Pg. 70: "'Christianity, France itself, is founded on--'

'If chastity were practiced in France as much as it's preached, the race would be extinct.' " [Apparently a simulation based on Voltaire's Candide is being played. More, not in DB.]

Christianity galaxy 22995 Benford, Gregory. Foundation's Fear. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 113. "He quoted, with some liberty, that pleasure-hating Christian, Paul: 'When I was a child, I spoke as a child, thought as a child, behaved as a child. But when I became a woman, I put away manly things.' "


Christianity, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus
Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.