Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Christianity, France

Christianity, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christianity France 1850 Bradbury, Ray. "Madame et Monsieur Shill " in Driving Blind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 152. "Bent, as if in prayer, she seemed not to notice their tracing her profile... "
Christianity France 1916 Anthony, Patricia. Flanders. New York: Ace Books (1998); pg. 12. "Into the silence, Sergeant Riddell said, 'Never you mind, boys. I've walked through gas, 'aven't I? And Lieutenant McPhearson, too. I can tell you the masks work. Captain Miller may be a Jew, but don't let that worry you, either. You'll see. when the time comes, he'll stand shoulder to shoulder with us, stout as any white Christian officer.'

It fair shook me. A Jew. Now I understood why I never see Miller with the other brass. And why, when he was looking for company, he only found me. "

Christianity France 1916 Anthony, Patricia. Flanders. New York: Ace Books (1998); pg. 18. "How many picturesque churches can you pass without them looking the same?... Poplar-bordered lanes. Churchyards with their dead sleeping under tapestries of pink winecups...
Christianity France 1916 Simmons, Dan. "The Great Lover " in Lovedeath. New York: Warner Books (1993); pg. 220. "Perhaps he will be doomed to live until morning and even beyond, although why such pain is inflicted on any living thing is quite beyond me. It makes Christ's so-called agony on the cross a petty thing. " [Some other refs., not in DB.]
Christianity France 1942 Lee, Stan & Stan Timmons. The Alien Factor. New York: ibooks, inc. (2002; c. 2001); pg. 214. "'...Your planet knew of the greatness being restored here? Long ago, let me surmise, you came to Earth. It was the pure days that Nietzsche writes of, in antiquity, when you were called gods. And then Judaism and Christianity infected the planet, glorifying the weak at the expense of the strong.' " [Philosophy of Nietzsche be espoused here by a Nazi.]
Christianity France 1975 Dick, Philip K. The Simulacra. New York: Random House (2002; c. 1964); pg. 163. "Glumly, he scratched a few notes on the rise of the French Christian-Fascist Party of 1975. "
Christianity France 1977 Merle, Robert. Malevil. New York: Simon and Schuster (1973; original French ed. pub. 1972); pg. 22. "'I'll bet you don't even know your ten commandments,' Meyssonnier said scornfully.

'I bet I do then,' Peyssou retorted.

He stood up, as though he were at catechism class, and began reciting them full tilt, but he came to a dead stop after the fourth. He was hooted down and collapsed onto his stool again covered in shame. " [Many refs. to Christianity throughout book, mostly to Catholicism, mostly not in DB.]

Christianity France 1977 Merle, Robert. Malevil. New York: Simon and Schuster (1973; original French ed. pub. 1972); pg. 53. "...when Peyssou asked me what the news was about Birgitta, and when he would be seeing that strapping lass again. 'At Easter. At Easter, eh?' Peyssou said. "
Christianity France 1977 Merle, Robert. Malevil. New York: Simon and Schuster (1973; original French ed. pub. 1972); pg. 152. "I turned to look at her over my shoulder. 'Where did who come from?'

'Cain's wife!'

We all looked at one another puzzled.

'Perhaps the Lord had made another Adam and Eve somewhere else,' Colin suggested.

'No, no, of course He hadn't,' Meyssonnier said, as ever a stickler for orthodoxy. 'If He had, then the book would say so.'

'So she was his sister then?' Colin said.

'Whose sister?' Peyssou asked, leaning forward and staring into Colin's face.

'Cain's sister.' "

Christianity France 1977 Merle, Robert. Malevil. New York: Simon and Schuster (1973; original French ed. pub. 1972); pg. 173. "We at least knew through Boudenot the postman what their name was: Wahrwoorde. No name for Christians, everyone agreed. Boudenot used to say that the father was a 'savage,' but not poor, far from it. "
Christianity France 1977 Merle, Robert. Malevil. New York: Simon and Schuster (1973; original French ed. pub. 1972); pg. 529. "...his ground for complaint.... There were three kinds:... I had profaned the sanctity of the Christian religion by having myself elected priest by my servants and by conducting them, with them, a parody of the rites and sacraments of the Church... "
Christianity France 1977 Merle, Robert. Malevil. New York: Simon and Schuster (1973; original French ed. pub. 1972); pg. 533. "The words were greted with a storm of booing, and Judith, suddenly remembering her Christian Radical days, began yelling at the top of her voice, 'Nazi! S.S!' And Marcel, I noticed, wa not trying anywhere near as hard to restrain her as he had been earlier...

I stood up and said loudly, 'I demand the right to speak.'

'Granted,' Herve said immediately with relief.

'What?' Fulbert cried, rounding on Herve in fury, 'you are allowing that wretch to speak? That false priest! That enemy of God! You cannot be serious! I've just sentenced him to death!' "

Christianity France 1977 Merle, Robert. Malevil. New York: Simon and Schuster (1973; original French ed. pub. 1972); pg. 537. "'That is precisely what confession has become here in La Roque, in the hands of that Nazi there!'

'Silence, woman!' Fulbert said, turning toward her. 'You are a rebel against religion, a madwoman, and a bad Christian.'

'You should be ashamed,' Marcel cried at that, leaning forward... 'You should be ashamed talking like that to a woman, and to a woman much better educated than you are too. She even corrected you the other day about the stupid mistakes you made about Jesus' brothers and sisters.' "

Christianity France 1977 Merle, Robert. Malevil. New York: Simon and Schuster (1973; original French ed. pub. 1972); pg. 550. "'...And what is she exactly, anyway, that woman?' he said suspiciously. 'A so-called Socialist?'

'Not at all! She's a Christian Radical.'

His face cleared. 'Ah, that's not so bad. I've always got on quite well with that kind of Catholic. They are idealists,' he added with half-concealed contempt. "

Christianity France 1995 Powers, Tim. Earthquake Weather. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 121. "...around the corner from the Church of St. Sulpice... finally tripped him up on the Quai Saint Michel pavement by the river... "
Christianity France 2050 Wolfe, Gene. "The Fifth Head of Cerberus " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1972); pg. 368. "...I had noticed that each column was carved with a word... and that the paving stones of the courtyard were mortuary tablets like those set into the floors in some of the old French churches, with my own name and a different date on each. "
Christianity France: Paris 1738 Suskind, Patrick. Perfume: The Story of a Murderer. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1986; c. 1985); pg. 14. "To be sure, he would never go so far as some--who questioned the miracles, the oracles, the very truth of Holy Scripture--even though the biblical texts could not, strictly speaking, be explained by reason alone, indeed often directly contradicted it. He preferred not to meddle with such problems, they were discomfiting for him... has still not been uprooted a good thousand years after the firm establishment of the Christian religion! And most instances of so-called satanic possession or pacts with the devil proved on closer inspection to be superstitious mummery. " [More. Many refs., not in DB.]
Christianity France: Paris 1738 Suskind, Patrick. Perfume: The Story of a Murderer. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1986; c. 1985); pg. 77. "...for later advancement as a member of your guild and for your standing as a man, a man of honor, a dutiful subject, and a good Christian. I am prepared to teach you this lesson at my own expense. "
Christianity France: Paris 2369 Smith, Dean Wesley & Kristine Kathryn Rusch. The Soldiers of Fear (Star Trek: TNG/Invasion! #2). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 135. "'These creatures,' he said, 'formed the nightmares of my childhood. Paris is full of their images. They grace buildings in the form of gargoyles, fill the Louvre in medieval paintings, are shown being vanquished in the stained glass of ancient churches. We would return after a visit to that city, and I would dream of gargoyles climbing off buildings, swarming the streets, and coming to get me...' "
Christianity galaxy 1367 C.E. Banks, Iain M. Consider Phlebas. New York: St. Martin's Press (1987); pg. 447. "Appendices: the Idiran-Culture war

The following three passages have been extracted from A Short History of the Idiran War (English language/Christian calendar version, original text 2110 AD, unaltered), edited by Parharengyisa Listach Ja'andeesih Petrain dam Kotosklo. The work forms part of an independent, non-commissioned but Contact-approved Earth Extra-Information Pack.) "

Christianity galaxy 1943 Lewis, C.S. Out of the Silent Planet. New York: Simon & Schuster (1996; c. 1943); pg. 68. "Did people in Thulcandra not know that Maleldil the Young had made and still ruled the world? Even a child knew that. Where did Maleldil live, Ransom asked.

'With the old One.'

And who was the Old One? Ransom did not understand the answer. He tried again.

'Where was the Old One?'

'He is not that sort,' said Hnohra, 'that he has to live anywhere,' and proceeded to a good deal which Ransom did not follow. But he followed enough to feel once more a certain irritation. Ever since he had discovered the rationality of the hrossa he had been haunted by a conscientious scruple as to whether it might not be his duty to undertake their religious instruction; now, as a result of his tentative efforts, he found himself being treated as if he were the savage and being given a first sketch of civilized religion--a sort of hrossian equivalent of the shorter catechism. It became plain that Maleldil was a spirit without body, parts or passions. "

Christianity galaxy 1943 Lewis, C.S. Perelandra. New York: Simon & Schuster (1996; c. 1943); pg. 91. "'...I might say, borrowing language which will be more familiar to you, the Holy Spirit.'

'Now what exactly do you mean by that?' asked Ransom.

'I mean,' said Weston, 'that nothing now divides you and me except a few outworn theological technicalities with which organised religion has unhappily allowed itself to get incrusted. But I have penetrated that crust. The Meaning beneath it is as true and living as ever. If you will excuse me for putting it that way, the essential truth of the religious view of life finds a remarkable witness in the fact that it enabled you, on Malacandra, to grasp, in your own mythical and imaginative fashion, a truth which was hidden from me.'

'I don't know much about what people call the religious view of life,' said Ransom, wrinkling his brow. 'You see, I'm a Christian. And what we mean by the Holy Ghost is not a blind, inarticulate purposeiveness.' " [Many other Christian refs., not in DB.]

Christianity galaxy 1992 Adams, Douglas. Mostly Harmless. New York: Ballantine (2000; c. 1992); pg. 64. "Way off in some indistinguishable distance--was it a mile or a million or a mote in his eye?--was a stunning peak that overarched the sky, climbed and climbed and spread out in flowering aigrettes, agglomerates, and archimandrites. "; [Footnote explaining last three terms:] "An ornamental tuft of plumes "; "A jumbled mass "; "A cleric ranking below a bishop "
Christianity galaxy 1992 Anthony, Piers and Philip Jose Farmer. The Caterpillar's Question. New York: Ace Books (1992); pg. 117. "His project was, in some ways, equal to God's creation of the world. But God took four days just to make the heavens and the earth and divide the waters from the dry land and make plants and then the animals. The work assigned by the AI [Agents of the Imago] to one puny Earthman had to be done in three days.

The big difference, aside from the Power demanded, was that God knew how to go about doing what must be done. " [More.]

Christianity galaxy 2007 Haldeman, Joe. The Forever War. New York: Avon Books (1997; first ed. 1975); pg. 101. [The soldiers, from 1990s Earth, use Christian-based profanity frequently in book. A few examples are provided here.] Pg. 101: "'...ramming the portal planet with the Anniversary at light speed.' Jesus Christ. "
Christianity galaxy 2049 Blish, James. A Case of Conscience. New York: Ballantine (1979; c. 1958); pg. 72. "'...and I include you, Paul, for despite your tricks and your agnosticism you still subscribe to the Christian ethical doctrines enough to be put on the defensive when you flout them...' "
Christianity galaxy 2049 Blish, James. A Case of Conscience. New York: Ballantine (1979; c. 1958); pg. 70-71. "'...How does it happen that the Lithians not only have no deviates... but that the code they live so perfectly is, point for point, the code we strive to obey? If that just happened, it was by the uttermost of all coincidences. Consider, please, the imponderables involved. Even on Earth we have never known a society which evolved independently exactly the same precepts as the Christian precepts--by which I mean to include the Mosaic. Oh, there were some duplications of doctrine, enough to encourage the twentieth century's partiality toward synthetic religions like theosophism and Hollywood Vedanta, but no ethical system on Earth that grew up independently of Christianity agreed with it point for point... not Islam, not the Essenes--not even these, which influenced or were influenced by Christianity, were in good agreement with it in the matter of ethics.

'And yet here on Lithia, 50 light-years away from Earth... What do we find? A Christian people...' "

Christianity galaxy 2049 Blish, James. A Case of Conscience. New York: Ballantine (1979; c. 1958); pg. 70-71. "'...And yet here on Lithia, 50 light-years away from Earth and among a race so unlike man as man is unlike the kangaroos, what do we find? A Christian people, lacking nothing but the specific proper names and the symbolic appurtenances of Christianity. I don't know how you three react to this, but I found it extraordinary and indeed completely impossible--mathematically impossible--under any assumption but one...'

...'How a man can stand 50 light-years from home in deep space and talk such parochial nonsense is beyond my comprehension.'

'Parochial?' Ruiz-Sanchez said... 'Do you mean that what we think true on Earth is automatically made suspect just by the fact of its removal into deep space? I beg to remind you, Paul, that quantum mechanics seem to hold good on Lithia, and that you see nothing parochial about behaving as if it does... If I believe in Peru that God created... the universe, I see nothing parochial in my continuing to believe it on Lithia...' "

Christianity galaxy 2049 Blish, James. A Case of Conscience. New York: Ballantine (1979; c. 1958); pg. 73-74. "One begins with belief: 'I think that all people ought to be equal before the law.' That is a statement of faith, nothing more. Yet Lithian civilization is so set up as to suggest that one can arrive at such basic axioms of Christianity and of Western civilization on Earth as a whole, by reason alone--in the plain face of the fact that one cannot. One rationalist's axiom is another one's madness. "
Christianity galaxy 2075 Anthony, Piers. Faith of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (10th printing 1986; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 75. "'There is little in your philosophy to which I take exception,' Brother Paul said. 'My sect [Holy Order of Vision] honors the Bible, but also respects the texts of other religions, such as the Buddhists and the Moslems and the Confucians...' "
Christianity galaxy 2075 Anthony, Piers. Vision of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (1985; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 3. "'Yes,' Brother Paul agreed, surprised. 'I was partially blind for several days, because, they said, I had stared into the sun too long. I think it was more subtle than that; my namesake the Apostle Paul was similarly blind after his conversion. Perhaps the drug and my general condition complicated it. The Holy Order of Vision took care of me...'

Lee smiled, grasping the concept. 'As the Apostle Paul joined the Christians he had persecuted--'

'So I joined the Order I had wronged,' Brother Paul agreed. 'In the process I became a Christian in the truest sense. I regred exceedingly that Sister Beth had to die in order to facilitate my conversion... The Apostle Paul made Christianity what it is, to a considerable extent. He opened it up to the gentiles. That seemingly minor though controversial change made all the difference.' " [Book contains many other references to Christianity, most not in DB.]

Christianity galaxy 2075 Card, Orson Scott & Kathryn H. Kidd. Lovelock. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 24. [Year is estimated.] "'After all, Jesus himself chose not to cheat death,' Irene added.

Irene had meant this innocently--hadn't she tied her life to Jesus?--but again, Carol Jeanne interpreted her words as criticism. 'We aren't cheating death, Irene.' Her voice sounded hesitant and unconvincing. 'My life will be no longer than yours. It will only seem longer to me because you could have gone with me and you didn't.' " [This is a reference to time dilation a colony ship. There are many other references to Christianity throughout book, as it takes place mostly within a liberal Protestant community aboard a colony ship. The principle human character is a Catholic who has married into a Episcopalian family. Not all refs. in DB.]

Christianity galaxy 2075 Card, Orson Scott & Kathryn H. Kidd. Lovelock. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 67. [Year is estimated.] "People were still flowing into the village church that faced the twon square; the funeral hadn't started yet. The closer we got to the church, the more it looked like a parody of the ones in New Hampshire. The inflatable church had an inflatable steeple, as functionless as the steeples back home. A lot of trouble had been taken to make Mayflower as homelike as possible... "
Christianity galaxy 2075 Card, Orson Scott & Kathryn H. Kidd. Lovelock. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 71. [Year is estimated.] "The minister bowed his head for a moment... 'But enough of my humble words.' His tone had changed. He was through with the ministerial part, and now he was master of ceremonies. 'I will speak of no particular creed or doctrine. Odie Lee lived as a Christian--an exemplar of Christianity at its best--but she belonged to all of us in the Ark, Christian. . .' The words pagan, heathen, heretic, and infidel no doubt crossed his mind. '. . . non-Christian. Now it's time to let the people who lived her spread the word about Odie Lee. Form a line here, to the left of the podium. Take your turn. Everyone who wants to speak will have a chance.' "
Christianity galaxy 2075 Card, Orson Scott & Kathryn H. Kidd. Lovelock. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 75. [Year is estimated.] "'It's like they say in the Good Book. 'Ashes to ashes. . .'

I accessed my computer files under Bible, and I didn't find 'ashes to ashes' anything. But it was hardly surprised. Christians will say any old thing and if they claim it's in the Bible, everyone nods wisely and accepts every word of it. That's because nobody reads the book. They believe it--but they leave it unstudied and unread. Of course, there are scientists like that, too--the ones who accept the orthodoxy of the past without ever looking at the evidence themselves. "

Christianity galaxy 2075 Card, Orson Scott & Kathryn H. Kidd. Lovelock. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 51-52. [Year is estimated.] "We were in a village in ourselves, no matter that officially she was going to belong to an arbitrary clumping of effete Christians called Mayflower Village. She would be a Catholic among Congregationalists, I a low-order primate among Presbyterians... "
Christianity galaxy 2075 Card, Orson Scott & Kathryn H. Kidd. Lovelock. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 62-63. [Year is estimated.] "Penelope looked disgruntled; then she swelled up importantly and took a deep breath. 'Well, I'll have to tell you about it myself. First of all, we're Presbyterians here.'

'Mamie sniffed. 'There's not a Presbyterian in the bunch of us.' she said. 'I'm Congregationalist, and Stef and Red and the girls are Episcopalian...'

'Mayflower is a compromise, Mother.' Red said it patiently, as if he had explained it a hundred times before... Mamie had insisted on living among Christians. Her brand of Christians, of course--or as close to her brand as she could get.

...Penelope smiled, too... 'We're pretty open-minded here. Presbyterians are tolerant folks. All religions are the same, anyway, as long as they're Christian. In fact, we even have three Jewish families who live with us, because Bethel Village is too Orthodox for them and there are also some Mormons...' "

Christianity galaxy 2084 Disch, Thomas M. "Things Lost " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 597. "The technics of the factory differ only in magnitude from the technics of the laboratory, and the ship's plant is so abundantly supplied with genies that my supervisory visits have taken on the tone already of church-attendance, a moral rather than a practical necessity.

As an administrator I have also a non-priestly function: I am training two other crew-members as replacements... "

Christianity galaxy 2100 Bear, Greg. Anvil of Stars. New York: Warner Books (1992); pg. 128. "'Falling, falling. Into the bright basement of Wormwood, around the furnace, a hundred million kilometers from Nebuchadnezzar, silent as a ghost... " [This star or planet is named after the Biblical figure Nebuchadnezzar. Many other refs. to this place.]
Christianity galaxy 2100 Bear, Greg. Anvil of Stars. New York: Warner Books (1992); pg. 229. "'Is Jesus Christ the son of the Most High?' Michael Vineyard asked.

'Yes,' Rosa said, her smile broadening. 'We are all its children. Christ must have felt the warmth like a fusion fire, even more strongly than I do. It glows from his words and deeds. The Buddha also felt the warmth, as did Muhammad . . .' "

Christianity galaxy 2100 Le Guin, Ursula K. "Nine Lives " in Nebula Award Stories Five (James Blish, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1972; 1st ed. 1970; story c. 1969); pg. 62. [Clones] "Love your neighbor as you love yourself . . . That hard old problem was solved. The neighbor was the self: the love was perfect. "
Christianity galaxy 2100 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 39. "'And when he pointed out the logical deduction from that--'So, you see, most of your body--all the oxygen and carbon and nitrogen and calcium and everything--all of it was once inside a star'--they said respectively, 'Oh, wow!' and 'Yuk! But that isn't in the Bible, is it?'

Viktor grinned at them. 'The Bible is one thing,' he told them, in full lecturing swing, 'Science is another. Even scientists think about Heaven and Hell, though...' "

Christianity galaxy 2100 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 39-40. "'...Even scientists think about Heaven and Hell, though. Did you ever hear of a man named Arthur Eddington [a Quaker]? Well, he was the first one to figure out what the temperature inside the core of a star had to be in order to cook all those heavier elements out of hydrogen. Only when he published his figures some other scientists told him he was wrong, because it wasn't hot enough to do the job. So Eddington told them to go look for a hotter place.'

He looked at the uncomprehending faces expectantly. 'It was a kind of way of telling them to go to Hell,' he explained.

'Oh,' Billy said, deciding to laugh.

'Dr. Sorricaine?' Freddy said. 'Hell's hot like Wanda says, isn't it? So if we get frozen that can't be Hell, can it?' "

Christianity galaxy 2100 Russell, Eric Frank. "Allamagoosa " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1955); pg. 71. [Year estimated.] "'...All we need do is concoct an imposing allamagoosa and tell him it's the offog.'

'Holy Moses!' said Burman, fervently.

'Let us not rely on the dubious assistance of Biblical characters,' McNaught reproved. 'Let us use the brains that God has given us. Get a grip on your soldering-iron and make a topnotch offog by six tomorrow evening. That's an order!' "

Christianity galaxy 2100 Russell, Eric Frank. "Plus X " in Analog: Readers' Choice: Vol. 2 (Stanley Schmidt, ed.) New York: David Publications (1981; story copyright 1954); pg. 97. [Year indeterminate.] "By exercise time Leeming had decided that it would be helpful to have a gadget. A crucifix or a crystal ball provides psychological advantages. His gadget could be of any shape, size or design, made of any material, so long as it was obviously a contraption. "
Christianity galaxy 2102 Heinlein, Robert A. Starship Troopers. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1959); pg. 7. "'Five minutes for the Padre,' he stated. Some of the boys dropped out of ranks, went over and knelt in front of Migliaccio [the Catholic chaplain], and not necessarily those of his creed, either--Moslems, Christians, Gnostics, Jews, however wanted a word with him before the drop, he was there. "
Christianity galaxy 2103 Heinlein, Robert A. Starship Troopers. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1959); pg. 192-194. "'Easter Nine,' he agreed. 'Decibels?' "; Pg. 193: "'It seems to center about Easter Ten, Captain...' "; Pg. 194: "'Mr. Rico, you are not to attack at or near Easter Ten...' " [Etc.]
Christianity galaxy 2150 Pohl, Frederik. "Hatching the Phoenix " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 226. [Year estimated. Passage refers to a computer AI based on Hypatia of Alexandria.] "'You were supposed to be beautiful, too,' I reminded her. 'And you died a virgin anyway.'

'By choice, Klara. Even that old Hypatia didn't care much for all that messy meat stuff. And I didn't just die. I was brutally murdered. It was a cold wet spring in A.D. 450, and a gang of those damn Nitrian monks tore me to shreds because I wasn't a Christian. Anyway,' she finished, 'you're the one who picked my identity. If you wanted me to be someone else, you could have given me a different one.'

She had me grinning by then. 'I still can,' I reminded her. 'Maybe something like Joan of Arc?'

She shuddered fastidiously at the idea of being a Christian instead of a gods-fearing Roman pagan and changed the subject. 'Would you like me to put a call through to Mr. Tartch now?' "

Christianity galaxy 2150 Rosenberg, Joel. Hero. New York: Penguin Books (1990); pg. 149. "The buildings were mainly two-story, of weather-darkened stucco, although a four-story red brick building dominated the middle of what was probably the town square. At the edge of town stood a tall, white spire topped by an elongated pyramid. Ari thought he saw a flash of light from an opening in the pyramid, but he wasn't sure.

Ari made a note. FLASH OF LIGHT IN PYRAMID AT R 030 DEG. DX 1200 METERS? BINOCS?

Galil nodded, and crossed out PYRAMID, substituting CHURCH STEEPLE.

ALREADY NOTED. Galil added. OVERT OP. WHAT FIRE PRIORITY YOU GIVE IT?

Ari shrugged. MEDIUM. CAN'T MOVE. BEFORE ASSAULT THO. "

Christianity galaxy 2150 Williams, Walter Jon. Angel Station. New York: Tor (1989); pg. 9-10. [Year is estimated] "Wherever there were shooters and systers, wherever people lived in the Now, there lived also the zone with which they lived in symbiosis, where they were both fed and eaten... on Angelica Station, it was called the Fringe... The main street had no name, being the only one... Crowded against it were the small operators that made their living from the commerce of shooters and systers: margin banks, trading companies, gene banks, small casinos, bars, hookshops, missions for Jesus Rice or the Mahayana Buddha, eateries, cosmetic surgeries, pawnshops... "
Christianity galaxy 2175 Anderson, Poul. Fleet of Stars. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 295. "'...What Gautama Buddha, Plato, Jesus, oh, many human philosophers and prophets, what they spoke off...' "
Christianity galaxy 2198 Panshin, Alexei. Rite of Passage. New York: Ace Books (1973; first ed. 1968); pg. 205. "He said, 'Have you ever heard the Parable of the Good Samaritan?'

'Yes,' I said. I've always read a lot.

'The point of the story be that at times good will come even from low and evil men. But there be books that say the story has been changed. In the true version, the man by the road been the Samaritan, as bad a man as ever been, and the man that rescued him did good even to such a one. You may be of the Ships, but I don't like to see children hurt. So I treat you as the Samaritan been treated.' "

Christianity galaxy 2200 Aldiss, Brian. "Steppenpferd " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001; c. 2000); pg. 137. "Father Erik Predjin walked out of the dormitory into the early light. In a short while, the monastery bell would toll and his twelve monks and as many notices would rise and go into the chapel for First Devotions. Until then, the little world of the island was his. Or rather, God's. " [Other refs. throughout story, not in DB. Religion is a central theme in this story set in a monastery on another planet. The story contemplates various issues of theology, the nature of God, etc.]
Christianity galaxy 2200 Anderson, Poul. Starfarers. New York: Tor (1998); pg. 133. [Year is estimated, and based on subjective time for this crew on a time-dilated ship.] "Mokoena knelt in prayer of her own. From a simulation of stained glass above the altar in the little Christian chapel, Jesus smiled down at her. She whispered not to him but to the spirits of her kinfolk, should they survive and remember her, using the dear tongue of her childhood. "
Christianity galaxy 2200 Anderson, Poul. Starfarers. New York: Tor (1998); pg. 134. [Year is estimated, and based on subjective time for this crew on a time-dilated ship.] "Shelves held a few mementos from planets where he had walked, together with a codex Spanish Bible... He sat at the desk, beneath a small ancient crucifix... "
Christianity galaxy 2200 Anthony, Patricia. Conscience of the Beagle. New York: Ace Books (1995; co. 1993); pg. 18. "'Marvin--The Chosen of God, that is--we grew up together. Used to make spitballs in elementary school before he got called to the ministry. Old Marvin, the spitball king. He hates when I tell that story, just hates it. But still, he made me Minister of Science, didn't he? It's because I know where all the spitballs are buried.' "
Christianity galaxy 2200 Clarke, Arthur C. "The Star " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1955); pg. 128. "I know how it must have blazed low in the East before sunrise, like beacon in that Oriental dawn.

There can be no reasonable doubt: the ancient mystery is solved at last. Yet--O God, there were so many stars you could have used.

What was the need to give these people to the fire, that the symbol of their passing might shine above Bethlehem? " [The entire story is about a space mission that finds the remnants of the actual Star of Bethlehem, which went supernova eons ago. The narrator is a Jesuit priest. Other refs. to Christianity not in DB or under 'Catholic - Jesuit']

Christianity galaxy 2200 Dick, Philip K. "Rautavaara's Case " in I Hope I Shall Arrive Soon. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1985; c. 1980); pg. 154. "The Figure stood behind the three of them. It was Christ.

'Look,' she said to Travis and Elms.

Both men looked.

The Figure wore a traditional white robe, sandals; his hair was long and pale with what looked like moonlight. Bearded, his face was gentle and wise. Just like in the holo-ads the churches back home but out, Agneta thought. Robed, bearded, wise and gentle and his arms slightly raised. Even the nimbus is there. How odd that our preconceptions were so accurate.

...'This is a great opportunity. I mean, how many people have seen Christ? I mean, it is Christ. You are Christ, aren't you?' he asked the Figure.

Christ said, 'I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life. NO one can come to the Father except through me. If you know me, you know my Father too. From this moment, you know him and have seen him.' "

Christianity galaxy 2200 Dick, Philip K. "Rautavaara's Case " in I Hope I Shall Arrive Soon. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1985; c. 1980); pg. 155. "'There,' Elms said, his face showing happiness. 'See? I want it known that I am very glad of this occasion, Mr.--' He broke off. 'I was going to say, 'Mr. Christ.' That's stupid; that is really stupid. Christ, Mr. Christ, will you sit down? You can sit at my console or at Ms. Rautavaara's. Isn't that right, Agneta? This here is Walter Travis; he's not a Christian, but I am; I've been a Christian all my life. Well, most of my life. I'm not sure about Ms. Rautavaara. What do you say, Agneta?'

...To him, Elms said, 'He's going to judge us.'

Christ said, 'If anyone hears my words and does not keep them faithfully, it is not I who shall condemn him, since I have come not to condemn the world but to save the world; he who refused me and refuses my words has his judge already.' " [Extensive other Christian refs., not in DB. Christ is a major character in the story.]

Christianity galaxy 2200 Drake, David. The Voyage. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 14. Pg. 14: "Warson laughed as he picked up the phone. Ned heard him say, 'Pancahte Expedition, the Lord Almighty speaking.' "; Pg. 37: "'His uncle,' Toll said. 'Remember Sangre Christi?' "
Christianity galaxy 2200 Drake, David. The Voyage. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 374. "The chapel was quiet. There were three closed pews in front for members of the Doormann family and six open rows behind for their retainers. Light streamed through stained-glass windows illustrating Old Testament scenes. The building was bowered in trees. The light--equal to north, south, and through the east-facing rose window over the door--was artificial.

A pair of folding trestles waited before the altar, but the coffin wasn't on them yet. The small door to the side behind the pulpit was open. Ned pushed through it.

He was in what would normally be a changing and storage room for the chapel staff. To the right was a staircase leading up to the choir loft. On the floor, Lendell Doormann grinned from the clear-topped casket the Swift's crew had built on Wasatch 1029 and rebuilt on Dell...

'Sir!' the woman shouted. 'I'm the Dean of Chapel! What are you doing?' " [Small amount of other material in this scene regarding the chapel, the coffin.]

Christianity galaxy 2200 Silverberg, Robert. Starborne. New York: Bantam (1997; co. 1996); pg. 132. "'Mouth-to-mouth resuscitation? Marcus is really dead and he's going to stay that way. He can't be fixed, not by me, not by Leon if I bring him back up there, not by Jesus Christ himself. Believe me.' There's Jesus Christ again, Huw thinks. The old myths keep surfacing. Something about this planet makes you want to invoke divine aid, it would seem. 'Or Zeus, for that matter,' Huw says, still angry, angry at the year-captain, at Marcus, at himself, at the universe. "
Christianity galaxy 2200 Silverberg, Robert. Starborne. New York: Bantam (1997; co. 1996); pg. 209. "'And names and identities,' says Elizabeth. 'Gabriel, Michael, Raphael, Azrael. God's lieutenants.'

'I don't know that they're really angels,' Noelle says. 'That was just the word we all started to use for them.' " [More about angels, pg. 209-219, etc.]

Christianity galaxy 2235 Asimov, Isaac. Nemesis. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 1. "A small star, pinkish-red, the color of blood and destruction, and named appropriately.

Nemesis!

Nemesis, the Goddess of Divine Retribution.

He thought again of the story he had once heard when he was young--a legend, a myth, a tale of worldwide Deluge that wiped out a sinful degenerate humanity, leaving one family with which to start anew.

No flood this time. Just Nemesis.

The degeneration of humanity had returned and the Nemesis that would be visited upon it was an appropriate judgment. It would not be a Deluge. Nothing as simple as a Deluge. "

Christianity galaxy 2250 Dick, Philip K. A Maze of Death. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1970); pg. 107. Pg. 107: "'...There is a higher God.' He eyed her. 'What do you think about that?' he asked, a little timidly.

'I think it's wonderful,' Susie said, with enthusiasm. 'It must be so great to have trances and perceive what you perceive. You should write a book saying that what Specktowsky says is wrong.'

'It's not wrong,' Tony said. 'It's transcended by what I see. When you get to that level, two opposite things can be equal. That's what I'm trying to reveal.'

'Couldn't you reveal it tomorrow?' she asked...

'I'm a prophet,' Tony said. 'Like Christ or Moses or Specktowsky. I will never be forgotten.' ";

Pg. 108: "'Okay,' she said, 'turn this into a stone.' She had found a loaf of bread... 'Can you do that?'

Solemnly, he said, 'The opposite of Christ's miracle.' " [He does it.]



Christianity, continued

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