Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Christianity, Australia

Christianity, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christianity Australia 2025 Egan, Greg. "Cocoon " in Isaac Asimov's Detectives (Gardner Dozois and Sheila Williams, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1994); pg. 74. Pg. 74: "A hundred or so leather-clad women--on noise-enhanced--electric motorbikes went riding past in a crucifix formation, behind a banner which read DYKES ON BIKES FOR JESUS. I recalled the small group of fundamentalists I'd passed earlier, their backs to the parade route lest they turn into pillars of salt, holding up candles and praying for rain. ";

Pg. 75: "'How can I be a traitor? What is there to betray? Dykes on Bikes for Jesus? The William S. Burroughs Dancers?' "

Christianity Australia 2050 Egan, Greg. Permutation City. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 19. Pg. 19: "All were classified as 'Junk'; there was nothing from anyone she knew--and nothing remotely like an offer for paid word. Camel's Eye, her screening software, had identified six pleas for donations from charities (all worthy causes, but Maria hardened her heart); five invitations to enter lotteries and competitions; seven retail catalogues... " [Many other refs. to the 'Camel's Eye' program, whose name is taken from a verse in the Bible.]
Christianity Australia 2061 Turner, George. Drowning Towers. New York: William Morrow (1987); pg. 3. [Title note: Drowning Towers was first published in Great Britain in 1987 as The Sea and Summer by Faber and Faber Limited.] Pg. 3: "There were not many such days, even in midsummer, and the southern wind would bring a chill before nightfall. Enjoy while you may, he thought, snatch the moment. And if that edged a little too close to hedonism for a practising Christian, so be it. He believed in the forgiveness of sin rather than the possibility of his own perfection. "; Pg. 5: "The historian was amused. 'The Christians are a punctilious lot, always polite but conscious of sanctity--not plainly apart but not wholly of the common herd... Do you wonder? Anyone who thinks he can draw a line between good and evil is at best mistaken, at worst demented. The Christians as I understand them want to save mankind from sin without first understanding either sin or mankind.' " [Many other refs. not in DB.]
Christianity Australia 2100 Lawson, Chris. "Written in Blood " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 211. "He sighed. 'Zada, it is hard to understand, but many people hate us for no reason other than our faith. I have never killed or hurt or stolen from anyone in my life, and yet people hate me because I pray in a church with a crescent instead of a cross.' "
Christianity Australia 2100 Lawson, Chris. "Written in Blood " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 213. "It is my favorite parable from Islam, and is as important in its way as Jesus' Sermon on the Mount. "
Christianity Australia: Canberra 2437 Bester, Alfred. The Stars My Destination. New York: Berkley Publishing (1975; c. 1956); pg. 138. "At one side, they saw the top of a cellar window brightly illuminated and heard the muffled chant of voices: 'The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want . . .'

'Cellar Christians!' Foyle exclaimed. He and Robin peered through the window. Thirty worshippers of assorted faiths were celebrating the New Year with a combined and highly illegal service. The twenty-fourth century had not yet abolished god, but it had abolished organized religion.

'No wonder the mouse is man-trapped,' Foyle said. 'Filthy practices like that. Look, they've got a priest and a rabbi, and that thing behind them is a crucifix.'

'Did you ever stop to think what swearing is?' Robin asked quietly. 'You say 'Jesus' and 'Jesus Christ.' Do you know what that is?'

'Just swearing, that's all. Like 'ouch' or damn.' '

'No, it's religion. You don't know it, but there are two thousand years of meaning behind words like that.' "

Christianity Australia: Canberra 2437 Bester, Alfred. The Stars My Destination. New York: Berkley Publishing (1975; c. 1956); pg. 139. "Robin joined him in the living room, trembling. The Cellar Christians were pouring up into the house somewhere, emitting the sounds of martyrs.

'Wait here,' Foyle grunted. He accelerated, blurred through the house, located the Cellar Christians in poses of frozen flight, and sorted through them. He returned to Robin and decelerated.

'None of them is Forrest,' he reported. 'Maybe he's upstairs...' "

Christianity Austria 1937 Dunn, J. R. "Long Knives " in Writers of the Future: Volume III (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 157. "He was relieved at five and drove back into the city proper [Vienna], toward the tower of St. Stephen's that loomed over all. "
Christianity Azerbaijan 1990 Anderson, Jack. Zero Time. New York: Kensington Publishing (1990); pg. 76. "Azerbaijan at the time was in the grip of one of its periodic pogroms, during which the numerically superior Azerbaijanis... slaughtered the minority Christian Armenians. The violence was concentrated in Sumgait, one of many mixed-population cities in Azerbaijan... "
Christianity Benin 1999 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 68. "Beninia... Est. pop. (1999) 870,000. Port Mey (127,000)... 30% Xian, 30% Muslim, 40% misc. pagan. "
Christianity Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 10. "To his left, resting on a low table adjacent to a flat padded hassock, a copy of the Koran bound in green leather and tooled by hand with golden Arabic script listing the nine-and-ninety honourable names of the Almighty.

To his right, a prie-dieu in a traditional Beninian carved ebony, facing a wall on which hung a crucifix. The victim nailed to the wood as dark as the wood itself... He turned on his heel, removed the crucifix from its peg, and snapped it across. the crucified one fell to the floor and he ground the doll-shape underfoot.

He dragged from the wall each in turn of the masks. He tore away the coloured straw hair from them... "

Christianity Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 357. "'...and like I said the day you arrived they [Shinka] swallowed up the Holaini and the Inoko and Kpala immigrants. . . . Shall I tell you something you really won't believe?... Laying out that corpse and painting its face white reminded me. The first Christian missionary had a trading post not far from Port Mey, an outstation for Fernando Po? There's a marker on the site you could go and look at if you have the time. Anyway, this friar did a very un-Christian thing. He went out of his mind and drowned himself after he'd been here seven years. He was convinced he'd been trapped by Satan. He'd learned enough Shinka to start preaching, and started off with some of the parables and highlights of the gospel, and to his dismay the people he talked to said no, you've got that wrong, it wasn't anyone far away called Jesus but our own man Begi who did that...' "
Christianity Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 448. "'In my country,' Jogajong said, 'a man who thinks like you goes voluntarily to join his ancestors. Or used to in the old days. Now, the usurper Solukarta has copied your Christian habits and closed that way of escape. Which is a reason we have so many muckers, I think.' "
Christianity Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 480. "'A number of conflicting rituals have been found associated with the standard landmark-events: birth, puberty, marriage, bearing and fathering of children, sickness and death. Some are of local origin while many others can be assigned to Muslim or Christian influence...' "
Christianity Benin 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 481. "'...The elaborate familial terms of aboriginal Shinka are giving way to a simplified pattern probably related to the English and much influenced by missionary teaching...' "
Christianity Betelgeuse: Dismal 2400 Zelazny, Roger. "The Dismal Light " in Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983; story c. 1968); pg. 66. [Year estimated.] Pg. 65: "It wasn't until much later that afternoon, as I drew bead upon a rearing water snake and heard a voice say, 'Hold your fire,' and i did, that I realized just how petty I might have been.

The snake slowly lowered its great bulk and slithered past me. I didn't turn away. I couldn't. It was so long and kept slithering by, and I kept wondering, but i couldn't turn around...

'...Did you find what you were looking for in your garden?' ";

Pg. 66: "'I met a nice girl I'd like to tell you about. . . .' I said, and I did, while we walked.

And the snake followed after, and he wouldn't turn it away. He brought it aboard, its bulk coiled about the cabin, and he took it along, out of that lopsided Eden. I'll never forget that he did that, either. "

Christianity Brazil 1986 Leigh, Stephen. "The Tint of Hatred " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 129. "...Rio... Through the narrow alleys between buildings she could glimpse the old landmark, Corcovado, the gigantic statue of Christ the redeemer atop a central peak of the city. Corcovado was a reminder of how the Wild Card had devastated this country... No one knew which disgruntled ace was responsible for Corcovado. One morning the figure of Christ had simply 'changed,' as if the rising sun were melting a wax figurine. Christ the Redeemer became a joker, a misshapen, hunchbacked thing, one of his outstretched arms gone completely, the other twisted around to support the distorted body. Father Squid had celebrated mass there yesterday; two hundred thousand people had prayed together under the deformed statue. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Christianity Brazil 1991 Young, Margaret Blair. "Outsiders " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1991); pg. 295. [At a Portuguese training program in Alta, Utah.] "In the cafeteria was a huge image of the Cristo--Jesus beckoning, arms outstretched against the sea, unrecoverd from crucifixion. 'Come on in,' he seemed to say. 'To my arms. To Brazil.' The picture took up half the wall. " [Other refs. to Christianity throughout story, not in DB.]
Christianity Brazil 1998 Chiang, Ted. "Story of Your Life " in Starlight 2 (Patrick Nielsen Hayden, ed.). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 264. "I'd done plenty of fieldwork before, in the Amazon, but it had always been a bilingual procedure: either my informants knew some Portuguese, which I could use, or I'd previously gotten an introduction to their language from the local missionaries. "
Christianity Brazil 1998 Friesner, Esther M. "Brown Dust " in Starlight 2 (Patrick Nielsen Hayden, ed.). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 177. "'Santos, what do you see?'

'The white Christ.' The boy shrugs his shoulders... 'What else can you see from everywhere in Rio?' " [Many other refs. to Christianity, in the form of Brazilian Catholicism, in story, not in DB.]

Christianity Brazil 2010 Anthony, Patricia. Cradle of Splendor. New York: Ace Books (1996); pg. 96-97. Pg. 96: "Flavio walked into a neighboring lighted doorway, leaving Roger standing in the dark living room. Uncomfortable, Roger looked around. Framed Sacred Heart on the wall next to a glow-in-the-dark cross. Woven rug, swaybacked sofa... "; Pg. 97: "'See? A heaven on earth, Doctor: Christ on the wall and Presidente Ana on TV.' " [Despite taking place in near-future Brazil, there are very few references to Christianity in general or Catholicism in this book. There are, however, frequent occurrences of Christian-based profanity.]
Christianity Brazil 2045 Wilson, Robert Charles. Memory Wire. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 32. Pg. 32: "...and the statue dominating the mountaintop had been his first signal that he was entering strange territory: this weatherbeaten Christ, granite eyes unfocused, hands raised in mute blessing over a city as big as the horizon. Seeing it again, Keller felt his fingers tighten against the armrests. "; Pg. 34: "...and through the window Keller once more confronted the Christ of Corvocado Mountain across the blue angle of the bay.

This country made you, the statue seemed to say. This country is your mother and your father. "

Christianity Brazil 2045 Wilson, Robert Charles. Memory Wire. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 50. "It was a peasant's religion, wildly syncretic; they believed in sacred jaguars, the divinity of Christ, the imminent arrival of fleets of flying saucers. "
Christianity Brazil 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 77. "'I'm a mammal,' said Bean. 'I try to live forever whether I actually want to or not.'

'You're a child of God, so you care what happens to his children whether you admit it to yourself or not.'

It was not her [Sister Carlotta's] glib response that bothered him, because he expected it--he had provoked it, really, no doubt (he told himself) because he liked the reassurance that if there was a God, then Bean mattered to him. No, what bothered him was the momentary darkness that passed across her face. A fleeting expression, barely revealed... Something that I said made her feel sad. And yet it was a sadness she wants to conceal from me. What did I say? That I'm a mammal? She's used to my gibes about her religion. That I might not want to live forever? Perhaps she worries that I'm depressed... " [Many other Christian refs., esp. to the Catholic nun Sister Carlotta and her conversations with Bean, throughout novel, most not in DB.]

Christianity Brazil 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 79. "He got nowhere when he tried to discuss it with Sister Carlotta.

'I can't argue with you so I don't know why you bother. I only know that I won't help you plot his assassination.'

'You don't consider it self-defense?' said Bean. 'What is this...?'

'It's my faith in Christ,' said Carlotta. 'Love your enemy, do good to those who hate you.'

'Well, where does that leave us? The nicest thing we could do for Achilles would be to post our address on the nets and wait for him to send someone to kill us.'

'Don't be absurd,' said Carlotta. 'Christ said to be good to your enemies. It wouldn't be good for Achilles to find us, because then he'd kill us and have even more murders to answer for before the judgment bar of God. The best thing we can do for Achilles is to keep him from killing us. And if we love him, we'll stop him from ruling the world while we're at it, since power like that would only compound his opportunities for sin.' "

Christianity Brazil 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 79. "'Why don't we love the hundreds and thousands and millions of people who'll die in the was he's [Achilles] planning to launch?'

'We do love them,' said Carlotta. 'But you're confused the way so many people are, who don't understand the perspective of God. You keep thinking that death is the most terrible thing that can happen to a person, but to God, death just means you're coming home a few moments ahead of schedule. To God, the dreadful outcome of a human life is when that person embraces in and rejects the joy that God offers. So of all the millions who might die in a war, each individual life is tragic only if it ends in sin.' "

Christianity Brazil 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 80. "'...each individual life is tragic only if it ends in sin.'

'So why are you going to such trouble to keep me alive?' asked Bean, thinking he knew the answer.

'You want me to say something that will weaken my case,' said Carlotta. 'Like telling you that I'm human and so I want to prevent your death right now because I love you. And that's true. I have no children but you're as close as I come to having any, and I would be stricken to the soul if you died at the hands of that twisted boy. But in truth, Julian Delphiki, the reason I work so hard to prevent your death is because, if you died today, you would probably go to hell.'

To his surprise, Bean was stung by this. He understood enough of what Carlotta believed that he could have predicted this attitude, but the fact that she put into words still hurt. 'I'm not going to repent and get baptized, so I'm bound to go to hell, therefore no matter when I die, I'm doomed,' he said. "

Christianity Brazil 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 80. "'I'm not going to repent and get baptized, so I'm bound to go to hell, therefore no matter when I die, I'm doomed,' he said.

'Nonsense. Our understanding of doctrine is not perfect, and no matter what the popes have said, I don't believe... that God is going to damn for eternity the billions of children he allowed to be born & die without baptism. No, I think you're likely to go to hell because, despite all your brilliance, you are still quite amoral. Sometime before you die, I pray... that you will learn that there are higher laws that transcend mere survival, & higher causes to serve. When you give yourself to such a great cause... then I will not fear your death, because I know that a just God will forgive you for the oversight of not having recognized the truth of Christianity during your lifetime.'

'You really are a heretic... None of those doctrines would pass muster with any priest.' " [A Catholic nun here expresses some of author's LDS beliefs.]

Christianity Brazil 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 94. "He knew that [Sister] Carlotta loved him but she loved Jesus more and anyway, she was old and thought of him as a child. "
Christianity Brazil: Nova Roma 1983 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 10: "Betrayal ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Dec 1983); pg. 10. [Rahne, a Scots Presbyterian, talks with Roberto, a Catholic from Brazil.] Rahne: "I'm ashamed, Roberto. 'Tis na' Dani I've been thinking about--but myself. I said such hateful things t' Sam, t'day. I meant them, too. An' I blasphemed as well... No matter how neatly Senator Gallio tried to explain it away. " [Senator Gallio paraded Rahne through the streets of Nova Roma as a goddess, claiming that she is a living goddess, the direct descendant of Caesar and Romulus and Remus.] Rahne: "I wonder sometimes why God hasn't already struck me dead. T' burn in Hell--forever--Oh, Roberto, I'm so afraid! "; Roberto: "Rahne, what these Romans believe is their business. God can see into your heart and soul. If your beliefs aren't shaken, then you've nothing to fear. "; Rahne: "But that's just it--they are! Roberto, I like being a wolf more than being a girl--an' I like it more an' more each day! "; Roberto's thoughts: "What can I say to her, how can I help-- "
Christianity Brazil: Rio de Janiero 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 12: "Sunstroke ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Feb 1984); pg. 3. Roberto, to his father, as they sit in his father's office, which overlooks the Corcovado: "I remember you perching me on your knee, up on Corcovado--beneath the Christ statue--and waving your hand across the city--telling me how, one day, all we beheld would be mine. "
Christianity Brazil: Rio de Janiero 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 12: "Sunstroke ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Feb 1984); pg. 11. "Nearby, Rahne Sinclair steps hesitantly--almost fearfully--into a church... "; Rahne's thoughts: "If Reverend Craig saw me now, he'd have a fit. To him, Catholics are agents of the devil. But we all b'lieve in God, an' read the same Bible--an' I can find no Scots Presbyterian cairk in the city--an' I so need t' pray. Surely the Lord won't mind which house I pray in, so long as it's to him. " [Rahne kneels in prayer.] "Will he listen, though? I'm a wee slip of a girl, prob'ly of no account to the likes of him. An' for all I've done-- for what I am--my soul's prob'ly already been sentenced to be cast down into Hell. Oh, Lord, is that true? Am I damned? 'Tis na' my fault I'm what I am, why must I be punished for it? Why've I become a wicked, spiteful person, hurting those who never did me any harm? Because of me, Amara an' her dad were nearly killed an' their city enslaved. "
Christianity Brazil: Rio de Janiero 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 12: "Sunstroke ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Feb 1984); pg. 11. [Rahne is kneeling in prayer in a Catholic church.] Rahne's thoughts: "I... love Sam Guthrie, but he does na' love me. 'Tis Amara he truly cares for, I saw it in his eyes the moment they met--an' I hated her for it. Now, my best friend, Dani spends most of her time with Amara. She's forgotten me. They call me their friend but I wonder if they mean it. P'rhaps they care not a whit for me, as me... but only for the mutant shapeshifter, the were-beat I can become--Wolfsbane. "
Christianity Briar Patch 2375 Dillard, J. M. Star Trek: Insurrection. New York: Pocket Books (1998). Based on the movie; story by Rick Berman & Michael Piller; screenplay by Michael Piller.; pg. 169. "A few hours ago, they had entered a part of the trail flanked on either side by towering peaks, so beautifully carved by wind and sand Picard was reminded of his homeland's great Gothic cathedrals. Now dawn was peering through the latticework, over the tops of stones, turning the rock from black to aubergine to purple-brown. Behind them, a long line of Ba'ku with occasional pack animals trailed, in a scene reminiscent of the biblical exodus . . . though Picard remarked to himself grimly, that one had not taken place in Paradise. "
Christianity California 1938 Delacorte, Peter. Time On My Hands. New York: Scribner (1997); pg. 158. Pg. 158: "I knew that [Ronald] Reagan's father was a problem drinker, that his mother was an evangelical Christian who strongly disapproved of liquor, and that Reagan rarely if ever drank alcohol. "; Pg. 260: "...or did he fear that good Christian Nelle would look askance at Lorna's and my sinful relationship? "
Christianity California 1953 Dick, Philip K. Mary and the Giant. New York: Arbor House (1987); pg. 16. Pg. 16: "But from her grandfather--now dead, now buried in Forest Slope Chapel Cemetery in San Jose...

'Want to hear what morons people are? Here's a letter from somebody in Los Gatos saying that Malenkov is the Antichrist, and God will send angels to destroy him.' "; Pg. 149: "'...you were like... When I was very little . . . the picture of God in Sunday school. Only you don't have a long beard.' ";

Pg. 180: "'Some of the nicest people in the world strung Jesus up on the cross.'

Mary Anne murmured: 'What does that mean?'

'I mean, Nitz is a nice guy, but he has certain preconceptions and ideas. And he wants certain things like everybody else does...' ";

Pg. 226: "Turning on her bench, Mary Anne saw the slope of Telegraph Hill and the tower at its top: Coit Tower, like a pre-Christian column. "

Christianity California 1963 Benford, Gregory. Timescape. New York: Simon & Schuster (1980); pg. 144. "At the top of one student essay on Kafka and Christ she had written 'King Kong died for our sins?' Gordon wondered what it meant. "
Christianity California 1963 Dick, Philip K. Radio Free Albemuth. New York: Arbor House (1985); pg. 38. "he held a piece of paper toward me, for me to see. 'This is a sign they showed me several times, two intersecting arcs arranged--well, you can see. It's a little like the Christian fish sign, the side of the fish with the arcs forming its body. The interesting thing is, if an arc intersects once--' " [More about Christianity, pg. 40-41, 56, 68, 84-85, 89, 82-93, 115, 133-139, 211, other.]
Christianity California 1963 Dick, Philip K. Radio Free Albemuth. New York: Arbor House (1985); pg. 41. "'...In the book of Acts in the Bible, other races recognized what the apostles were saying, in their own tongues, at Pentecost, when the Spirit first descended on them. Glossolalia isn't nonsense; it's foreign tongues you never knew. The Spirit brings them to your heads so you can preach the gospel to every nation. It's generally misunderstood. I thought it was gibberish until I researched it.' " [More.]
Christianity California 1967 Freedman, Nancy. Joshua Son of None. New York: Delacorte Press (1973); pg. 87. "For the Kelloggs it was Easter; for him, the Passover. " [Other refs., not in DB, e.g. pg. 100. Also, many refs. specifically to Catholicism.]
Christianity California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 26. "'There's something in the Bible about falling sparrows,' Kevin said. 'About his eye being on them. That's what's wrong with God; he only has one eye.'

'Did God win in the battle at Kursk?' I said to Sherri. 'That must be news to the Russians, especially the ones who built the tanks and drove them and got killed.'

Sherri said patiently, 'God uses us as instruments through which he works.' " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

Christianity California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 33. "In Mircea Eliade's book Myth and Reality one chapter is titled, 'Time Can Be Overcome.' It is a basic purpose of mythic ritual and sacrament is to overcome time. Horselover Fat found himself thinking in a language used two thousand years ago, the language St. Paul wrote. Here time turns into space. Fat told me another feature of his encounter with God: all of a sudden the landscape of California, U.S.A., 1974 ebbed out and the landscape of Rome of the first century C.E. ebbed in. He experienced a superimposition of the two for a while, like the techniques familiar in movies. In photography. Why? How? God explained many things to Fat but he never explained that, except for this cryptic statement... "
Christianity California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 40. "Who had built the prison--and why--he could not say. But he could discern one good thing: the prison lay under attack. An organization of Christians, not regular Christians such as those who attended church every Sunday and prayed, but secret early Christians wearing light gray-colored robes, had started an assault on the prison, and with success. The secret, early Christians were filled with joy. " [More, pg. 40-41. Many other refs., incl. pg. 45 (Bible), 48 (Holy Spirit), 51 (Paul of Tarsus; Simon Magus), 52 (Jesus, Mark), 54 (Nag Hammadi), 56 (Genesis), 58 (New Testament, Paul), 59 (1 John 3:1-2), 65-66, 76-77, etc.]
Christianity California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 112. "Being eclectic in terms of his theology, Fat listed a number of saviors: the Buddha, Zoroaster, Jesus and... Muhammad "
Christianity California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 161. "'The Friends of God formed originally in Basel. Finally we entered Germany and the Netherlands. You know of Meister Eckehart, then.'

'He was the first person to conceive of the Godhood in distinction to God. The greatest of the Christian mystics. He taught that a person can attain union with the Godhead--he held a concept that God exists within the human soul!' "

Christianity California 1972 Dick, Philip K. "The Android and the Human " in The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1972); pg. 126. "...when asked some ultimate question such as, 'Why is there water?', prints out First Corinthians. " [Also, pg. 150, 159-162.]
Christianity California 1972 Dick, Philip K. The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1972); pg. 196. "On Easter Sunday a bunch of us had moved a huge lumber pile of lumber... "
Christianity California 1975 Dick, Philip K. "Man, Android and Machine " in The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1975); pg. 207. [St. Paul quoted. More, pg. 209.]
Christianity California 1975 Dick, Philip K. "Man, Android and Machine " in The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1975); pg. 228. Pg. 228: "Studying the Bible, along with this Qumran personality, Brady finds that the New Testament is in cypher. The Qumran personality can read it. 'Jesus' is really Zagreus-Zeus, taking two forms, one mind, the other utterly powerful, on which his followers can draw when in need. "; Pg. 229: "...which the early Christians sought for, and hid from the hated Romans... We are speaking here of the mystery religions, all of them, including Christianity. " [More, not in DB.]
Christianity California 1975 Dick, Philip K. "Man, Android and Machine " in The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1975); pg. 228. "Christianity is a later form of the worship of Dionysos, refined through the strange and lovely figure of Orpheus. Orpheus, like Jesus, is real only in the sense that Dionysos is becoming socialized; born here as a child of another race, not a human one but a visiting race, Zagreus has had to learn by degrees... "
Christianity California 1975 Dick, Philip K. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. New York: Timescape Books (1982); pg. 8. Pg. 8: "They [Sufis] teach that the essence of God isn't power or wisdom or love but beauty. That's a totally new idea in the world, unknown to Jews and Christians. I am neither. "; Pg. 11: "So much for spiritual things. So much for aspirations. He sought Jesus. Moreover, he sought what lies behind Jesus: the real truth. Had he been content with the phony he would still be alive. There is something to ponder. Lesser people, accepting falsehood, are alive to tell about it; they did not perish in the Dead Sea Desert. The most famous modern bishop of modern times bit the big one because he mistrusted Jesus. There is a lesson there. So perhaps I have enlightenment; I know not to doubt. I know, also, to take more than two bottles of Coca-Cola with me when I drive out into the wastelands, ten thousand miles from home... It's fine for locating Portsmouth Square but not so fine for locating the genuine source of Christianity, hidden from the world these twenty-two hundred years. "
Christianity California 1975 Dick, Philip K. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. New York: Timescape Books (1982); pg. 12. "That is how you calculate wisdom: by who pays. I teach this. I should instruct the Sufis, and the Christians as well, especially for the Episcopalian bishops with their funds. Front me a hundred bucks, Tim. Imagine calling the bishop 'Tim.' Like calling the pope 'George' or 'Bill' like the lizard in Alice. I think Bill descended the chimney, as I recall. It is an obscure reference... " [Extensive references to Christianity throughout novel, not in DB. The central character is an Episcopalian bishop.]
Christianity California 1975 Dick, Philip K. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. New York: Timescape Books (1982); pg. 80. "'...They ate anokhi and they drank anokhi and, as a result, they became anokhi. They became God Himself.'

'Which is what Christianity teaches,' I said, 'regarding the Mass.'

'There are parallels found in Zoroastrianism,' Tim said. 'The Zoroastrians sacrificed cattle and combined this with an intoxicating drink called haoma. But there is no reason to assume that this resulted in a homologizing with the Deity. That, you see, is what the Sacraments achieve for the Christian communicant: he--or she--is homologized to God as represented in and by Christ. Becomes God or becomes one with God, unified with, assimilated to, God. An apotheosis, is what I'm saying. But here, with the Zadokites, you get precisely this with the bread and the drink derived from anokhi... "

Christianity California 1975 Dick, Philip K. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. New York: Timescape Books (1982); pg. 166. "Fate, I thought. Predestination; doctrine of the church, based on Augustine and Paul. Tim had once told me that Christianity as a Mystery Religion had come into existence as a means of abolishing the tyranny of fate, only to reintroduce it as predestination--in fact, double predestination: some predestined to hell, some to heaven. Calvin's doctrine. "
Christianity California 1977 Niven, Larry & Jerry Pournelle. Lucifer's Hammer. Chicago, IL: Playboy Press (1977); pg. 60. "Henry Armitage was a TV preacher... Matthew was Henry's favorite Gospel; and of all the Bible, that was his favorite text. Were these not the times Christ spoke of? The signs were all present in the world. " [This character, and his end-of-the world preaching in association with an impending comet collision with the earth, feature prominently in this book. Not all references are recorded in the Adherents.com database.]
Christianity California 1977 Niven, Larry & Jerry Pournelle. Lucifer's Hammer. Chicago, IL: Playboy Press (1977); pg. 407. [The characters are discussing a somewhat renegade group formed by the Christian televangelist after the comet strikes the Earth and causes massive devastation and disruption of society. Most of the rest of the novel deals with conflict between the characters and the New Brotherhood Army.] "'...This was the group he'd joined. According to Jerry, it was him who put new life into Armitage. I don't know if any of that's true. I do know that just after Jerry hooked up with him, Armitage ran into the cannibal band, and now it's calling itself the New Brotherhood Army, and it's led by the Angels of the Lord... these who were spared for the work are the Angels of the Lord. They can do no wrong. Murder and cannibalism are something they do when they must, and it doesn't stain their souls. Armitage urged us to join the Angels.' "
Christianity California 1981 Dick, Philip K. Dr. Bloodmoney. New York: Bluejay Books (1985; c. 1965); pg. 7. "He thought of customers whom he had talked to returning to buy, al of them perhaps today, his book of sales running over, like that cup in the Bible. "
Christianity California 1981 Dick, Philip K. Dr. Bloodmoney. New York: Bluejay Books (1985; c. 1965); pg. 29. "...this was the day the First Couple was being fired off. However, it was too late now not to remember. She liked to think of them as that, the first couple . . . like something out of a sentimental, old-time, science-fiction story. Adam and Eve, once over again, except that in actuality Walt Dangerfield was no Adam; he had more the quality of the last, not the first man, with his wry, mordant wit... "
Christianity California 1981 Dick, Philip K. Dr. Bloodmoney. New York: Bluejay Books (1985; c. 1965); pg. 41. "Now Connie was leaning over the slumped, twitching figure in the center of the cart. 'Hoppy, what's the light from? Is it God?' She laughed nervously. 'You know, like in the Bible. I mean, is it true?'

Hoppy said mumblingly, 'Gray, darkness. Like ashes...' "

Christianity California 1981 Dick, Philip K. Dr. Bloodmoney. New York: Bluejay Books (1985; c. 1965); pg. 50. "If he can go into a trance and see the reincarnation then he can see everything because what else is there? But I don't believe in that Eastern stuff anyhow, he said to himself. I mean, that isn't Christian. "
Christianity California 1981 Dick, Philip K. Dr. Bloodmoney. New York: Bluejay Books (1985; c. 1965); pg. 80. "They'll have to declare a national emergency and get the Red Cross and Army... " [Red Cross also mentioned pg. 92.]
Christianity California 1981 Dick, Philip K. Dr. Bloodmoney. New York: Bluejay Books (1985; c. 1965); pg. 226. "'You have a preacher, here?' the Negro said to Stockstill.

To Gill, Stockstill said rapidly, 'He's sick, Andy. We've got to get him out of here. Give me a hand.'

'Sure,' Gill said...

'The high-altitude bombs which I set off in 1972,' Bluthgeld was declaring, 'find reinforcement in the present at, sanctioned by God Himself in His wisdom for the world. See the Book of Revelations for verification.' He watched Stockstill and Gill approach. 'Have you cleaned yourselves?' he asked them. 'Are you prepared for the judgment which is to come?' " [Some other refs., incl. pg. 278.]

Christianity California 1981 Dick, Philip K. The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1981); pg. 235. "As I told you on the phone, Laura, I'm sending you a copy of my new novel The Divine Invasion (under separate cover). The new novel that I just finished is the third and presumably final novel of the Valis trilogy. The topic of the trilogy is Christ; it is a study of the essence of Christ, what the term means, and how Christ is encountered and--in a certain real sense--brought into being. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Christianity California 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 46. "'I can make an ex with the best of 'em. Just you watch.' He put a big capital X at the bottom of the form, studied it as if it might turn into a flaming character with messianic implications, a symbol sacred and daunting. 'That's a chil,' he said. 'The first letter of Christ.'

Lia ignored the messianic implications of his comment. " [Other refs. to Christianity in book. Not all in DB, but all that mention Christianity by name are thought to be.]

Christianity California 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 95. "He saved money, but he didn't use it to build an investment power base. In many ways he was like the servant in Jesus' parable who accepted a gold coin from the nobleman, hid it in a handkerchief, and, when the master returned from his journey, gave this same coin back to him.

'And you do you know what the nobleman said to his servant?' asked Miss Grace

Lone Boy had heard this passage preached from a Catholic pulpit here in LaGrange--but the end of the parable escaped him.

Miss Grace remembered for him. 'He said, 'To everyone who has, more will be given; but the one who does not have, even the little that he has will be taken away from him.' '...

'...Good capitalists are kinder than Jesus' nobleman, and it's my desire to help you. However, God helps those who help themselves, and so does the American free-enterprise system.' "



Christianity, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus
Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.