Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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Christian Fundamentalist, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christian Fundamentalist USA 1999 Hand, Elizabeth. Glimmering. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 273. "'Was she--is she someone you knew from--uh, well, your church?'

'My church?' Trip's laughter died... 'No. She wasn't exactly a church-going girl. I mean, I extremely doubt she was saved or anything like that. She was foreign, for one thing. Russia or someplace, I forget.'

'But--so you want to save her?' Martin fought a faint unease, almost disgust--Fundamentalists!--that immediately gave way to guilt. 'That's, uh, thoughtful.'

'No, I don't want to save her. I just want to--to see her again. That's all.'

...Martin's heart clenched. He tried desperately to think of something to say, something that might redeem the moment, save him from looking pathetic as he sat there staring at this boy as though he thought he were the Rapture, the last best hope of sunrise. " [More.]

Christian Fundamentalist USA 1999 Hand, Elizabeth. Glimmering. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 343. "'No He's not a terrorist. I mean, he's not a member of Blue Antelope--he hates Fundamentalists, but I'm sure he knows about the attack. His work, recording all the extinctions, donating all that money to the Noah Genome Project--he may not belong to Blue Antelope, but he believes in them...' "
Christian Fundamentalist USA 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 290. "'...Meanwhile the President waffles. He must be worried about the reaction of his fundamentalist supporters if he should take action against a city of Saints, people who are only acting out the beliefs held by the 80 million Americans who claim to have had personal messages from God in the last year...' "
Christian Fundamentalist USA 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 274. "A nearly fatal blow had been dealt Soviet genetics when in the 1930s Stalin decided that modern Mendelian genetics was ideologically unsuitable, and decreed as scientifically orthodox the crackpot genetics of a politically sophisticated agriculturalist named Trofim Lysenko... Something similar had happened, but abortively, in the U.S., where for theological reasons attempts had been made to prevent public school students from learning about evolution, the central idea of modern biology. The issue was clear-cut, because a fundamentalist interpretation of the Bible was widely held to be inconsistent with the evolutionary process. Fortunately for American molecular biology, the fundamentalists were not as influential in the U.S. as Stalin had been in the Soviet Union. "
Christian Fundamentalist USA 1999 Willis, Connie. "Newsletter " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 220. "Either the Freedom Against Faith people protest the Nativity scene or the fundamentalists protest the elves... "
Christian Fundamentalist USA 2002 Sawyer, Robert J. Hominids. New York: Tor (2002); pg. 149. "But Laurentian University, small as it was, had a rape-crisis center, too. The sad truth was that every university needed to have one; she'd heard there was even one at Oral Roberts University. "
Christian Fundamentalist USA 2005 Gibson, William. Virtual Light. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 209. "Yamazaki cut the set off. Dr. Kutnik would arrange Shapely's release from prison as an AIDS research volunteer under Federal law. The Sharman Group's project would be hindered by fundamentalist Christians objecting to the injection of 'HIV-tainted' blood into the systems of terminally ill AIDS patients. As the project foundered, Kutnik would uncover clinical data suggesting that unprotected sex with Shapeley had apparently reversed the symptoms of several of her patients. There would be Kutnik's impassioned resignation... "
Christian Fundamentalist USA 2010 Willis, Connie. "Samaritan " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1979); pg. 224. "The liberal churches had flirted with the idea of unification for more than twenty-five years without getting more accomplished than a few statements of good will. Then the Charismatics had declared the Rapture, and the churches had dived for cover right into the arms of ecumenism.

The fundamentalist Charismatic movement had gained strength all through the eighties. They had been committed to the imminent coming of the End, with its persecutions and Antichrist. On a sultry Tuesday in 1989 they had suddenly announced that the End was not only in sight, but here, and that all true Christians must unite to do battle against the Beast. The Beast was never specifically named, but most true Christians concluded he resided somewhere among the liberal churches. There was fervent prayer on Methodist front lawns. Young men ranted up the aisles of Episcopal churches during mass. A great many stained glass windows... were broken. A few churches burned. "

Christian Fundamentalist USA 2020 Kress, Nancy. "Inertia " in The Aliens of Earth. Sauk City, Wisconsin: Arkham House Publishers (1993; 1st pub Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact, January 1990); pg. 167. [Year is estimated.] "...he talks about the latest version of martial law, about the failure of the National Guard to control protestors against the South American war until they actually reached the edge of the White House electrowired zone; about the growing power of the Fundamentalist underground that the other undergrounds--he uses the plural--call 'the God gang.' He tells us about the industries losing out steadily to Korean and Chinese competitors, the leaping unemployment rate, the ethnic backlash, the cities in flames. Miami, New York, Los Angeles--these had been rioting for years. Now it's Portland, St. Louis, Eugene, Phoenix, Grand Rapids burning. "
Christian Fundamentalist USA 2024 Ellison, Harlan. "A Boy and His Dog " in Nebula Award Stories Five (James Blish, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1972; 1st ed. 1970; story c. 1969); pg. 37. "There were only a couple of hundred downunders in what was left of the U.S. and Canada. They'd been sunk on the sites of wells or mines or other kinds of deep holes. Some of them, out in the west, were in natural cave formations... Southern Baptists, Fundamentalists, lawanorder goofs, real middleclass squares with no taste for the wild life. And they'd gone back to a kind of life that hadn't existed for a hundred and fifty years. They'd gotten the last of the scientists to do the work, invent the how and why, and then they'd run them out. They didn't want any progress, they didn't want any dissent, they didn't want anything that would make waves. they'd had enough of that. The best time in the world had been just before the First War, and they figured if they could keep it like that, they could live quiet and survive. Sh--! I'd go nuts in one of the downunders. "
Christian Fundamentalist USA 2025 Stapledon, Olaf. Last and First Men. Los Angeles: Jeremy P. Tarcher, Inc. (1988; first published 1930); pg. 38. [Year is estimated.] "The most dramatic feature of American thought in this period was the merging of Behaviorism and Fundamentalism, a belated and degenerate mode of Christianity. Behaviorism itself, indeed, had been originally a kind of inverted puritan faith, according to which intellectual salvation involved acceptance of a crude materialistic dogma, chiefly because it was repugnant to the self-righteous, and unintelligible to intellectuals of the earlier schools. The older Puritans trampled down all fleshly impulses; these newer Puritans trampled no less self-righteously upon the spiritual cravings. But in the increasingly spiritistic inclination of physics itself, Behaviorism and Fundamentalism had found a meeting place... "
Christian Fundamentalist USA 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. 29. "'Just tell me if it's true that Baptists don't believe in evolution.'

'Some do, some don't,' said Pam. 'I do. I'm not a strict Fundamentalist, I know Adam and Eve and the Flood and all that are myths. But I believe in Jesus, and I do believe in being born again. Are you sorry you asked me to dinner?' "

Christian Fundamentalist USA 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. 232. "'Quoting some passage from Exodus about whosoever lieth with a beat--pardon me, Humphrey. It makes me so mad I could just die! Tonight he'll be somewhere in Kentucky--Carrollton, I think--and tomorrow right at the First Baptist Church in Bethlehem, and then Saturday at that little church above Milton... I suppose he'll be spreading that kind of dirt every time he preaches... Do you thin he really believes that there's anything going on between Humphrey and me? That's crazy! Doesn't he know anything?'

'I don't know what-all he knows. I think he's just seizing an opportunity to get people all riled up and emotional. It makes for a successful revival anyway--lots of people are coming forward.' Her tone was scornful; this was religious Fundamentalism of a considerably more primitive sort than her own. "

Christian Fundamentalist USA 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. 159-160. "The Fundamentalism puzzled him and made him nervous, once it was clear that Pam really believed some personal version of what Liam--raised without religious instruction, apart from that acquired by osmosis at his two Quaker schools--couldn't help viewing as a lot of primitive horsesh--. On the other hand, surprisingly enough, it didn't actually seem to get in the way. Otie Bemis's performance had infuriated him, but Pam's family and their friends had acted as if they found the sermon as offensive as he had. What she'd explained about her conversion experience was actually quite interesting. And he'd enjoyed singing the rousing hymns, so much jollier and less finicky than the pieces by Mozart and Schubert that Jeff always used to be practicing. "
Christian Fundamentalist USA 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. 232-233. "...Fundamentalism of a considerably more primitive sort than her own.

Liam perked up. 'Coming forward?'

...'At the altar call, to profess they want to be saved.'

Before they could wander off the subject, Pam jumped in again. 'So does he really think the Hefn are the Antichrist, or is he just saying that too?'

'Well, he's saying it, that's for sure... You know, I don't think it's a bit scriptural. The Antichrist is supposed to rise up from among the people, like Hitler did--there's n way to read the Bible to make it sound like he come from outer space. Everybody's just mad at the Hefn on account of the Delta Queen incident...' "

Christian Fundamentalist USA 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. 29. "'Just tell me if it's true that Baptists don't believe in evolution.'

'Some do, some don't,' said Pam. 'I do. I'm not a strict Fundamentalist, I know Adam and Eve and the Flood and all that are myths. But I believe in Jesus, and I do believe in being born again. Are you sorry you asked me to dinner?' "

Christian Fundamentalist USA 2031 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Chronoliths. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 150. "According to the fundies, Kuin is the Antichrist; all you can do is say your prayers and wait for the Rapture. "
Christian Fundamentalist USA 2032 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 23. "I couldn't help wondering, though, whether these people, with their crosses, had some connection with my current least favorite presidential candidate, Texas Senator Andrew Steele Jarret. It sounds like the sort of thing they might do--a revival of something nasty out of the past. Did the Ku Klux Klan wear crosses--as well as burn them? The Nazis wore the swastika, which is a kind of cross, but I don't think they wore it on their chests... So now we have another group that uses crosses and slaughters people. Jarret's people could be behind it. Jarret insists on being a throwback to some earlier, 'simpler' time. Now does not suit him. Religious tolerance does not suit him. The current state of the country does not suit him. He wants to go back to some magical time when... safety... depended on completing the same religious rituals and stomping everyone who was different. There was never such a time in this country. "
Christian Fundamentalist USA 2032 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 23. "Jarret supporters [Christian fundamentalists] have been known, now and then, to form mobs and burn people at the stake for being witches. Witches! In 2032! A witch, in their view, tends to be a Moslem, a Jew, a Hindu, a Buddhist, or in some parts of the country, a Mormon, a Jehovah's Witness, or even a Catholic. A witch may also be an atheist, a 'cultist,' or a well-to-do eccentric. "
Christian Fundamentalist USA 2032 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 84. "Here are some of the things Jarrett said back when he was shouting rom his own Church of Christian America pulpit. I have copies of several of his sermons on disk.

'There was a time, Christian Americans, when our country ruled the world,' he said. 'America was God's country and we were God's people and God took care of his own. Now look at us. Who are we? What are we? What foul, seething, corrupt heathen concoction have we become?

'Are we Christian? Are we? Can our country be just a little bit Christain and a little bit Buddhist, maybe? How about a little bit Christian and a little bit Hindu? Or maybe a country can be a little bit Christian and a little bit Jewish? How about a little bit Christian and a little bit Moslem? Or perhaps we can be a little bit Christian and a little bit pagan cultist?'

And then he thundered, 'We are God's people, or we are filth!...' "

Christian Fundamentalist USA 2035 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 247. "Each city had a big Christian American church and several affiliated organizations... '...You're honest people. If anyone says otherwise, attack their credibility. Accuse them of being secret cultusts, witches, Satanists, thieves, Whatever you think will endanger your accusers the most, say it! Don't just defend yourselves. Attack. And keep attacking...' "
Christian Fundamentalist USA 2044 Sterling, Bruce. Distraction. New York: Bantam (1998); pg. 198. "'Of course they are. Scientists fight like crazed weasels. Look at your own history at the lab! When Douglas got this place built, he had to cash in a lot of favors. He needed the Christian fundie vote before he could build a giant gene-splicing lab in the East Texas Bible Belt. That's hwy the Collaboratory used to have its own Creation Science department. That setup lasted six weeks! There were fistfights, riots, and arson! They had to call in the Texas Rangers to restore order.'

'Oh, the creation-science problem wasn't all that bad.'

'Yes it was! Your little society has blocked out that memory because it was so embarrassing. That wasn't half of it...' "

Christian Fundamentalist USA 2045 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 351. "We've also been laughed at, argued with, booed, and threatened with hellfire--or gunfire. But Jarret's kind of religion [Christian fundamentalism] and Jarret himself are getting less and less popular these days. Both, it seems, are bad for business, bad for the U.S. Constitution, and bad for a large percentage of the population. They always have been, but now more and more people are willing to say so in public. The Crusaders have terrorized some people into silence, but they've just made others very angry. "
Christian Fundamentalist Washington, D.C. 1994 Williams, Walter Jon. "Feeding Frenzy " in Wild Cards: Book II of a New Cycle: Marked Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Baen (1994); pg. 240. "An inspiring vista, truly. And absolutely perfect, because anyone on the sloping hills had a perfect view of Leo Barnett.

Barnett, an old preacher who couldn't resist a grave side service and a chance to give a homily to the cameras.

Well done, thou good and faithful servant. Barnett's words echoing Herzenhagen's thought. "

Christian Fundamentalist Wisconsin 1963 Simak, Clifford D. Way Station. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Robert Bentley, Inc. (reprinted 1979; copyright 1963); pg. 41. "The Fishers were... a truly shiftless outfit... Although, when one considered it, they were not bad neighbors. They tended to their business and never bothered anyone except that periodically they went around, the whole lot of them, distributing pamphlets and tracts through the neighborhood for some obscure fundamentalist sect that Ma Fisher had become a member of at a tent revival meeting down in Millville several years before. "; [Pg. 17: The father, Hank Fisher, comes looking for his teenage deaf-mute daughter, who ran away after he beat her with a bullwhip for helping a racoon.]
Christian Fundamentalist world 1996 Fry, Stephen. Making History. New York: Random House (1996); pg. 359. "'Yeah, but I haven't told you about Microsoft and Rupert Murdoch and fundamentalists and infant crack addicts with Uzis...' "
Christian Fundamentalist world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 27. "His first and most imitated fabrication was a work of pseudo-archaeology, Atlantis: The Antediluvian World (1882), in which he argued 'that the description of this island given by Plato is not, as has been long supposed, fable, but veritable history,'... In short, all recorded history is in error, except for Plato and the Book of Genesis. (Even in 1882, Donnelly knew that the best way to pitch a flaky theory is to connect it with a tenet of fundamentalist faith. If you can believe in Noah's ark, why not Atlantis?' "
Christian Fundamentalist world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 70. Pg. 70: "Meanwhile, Poe himself points, with a loud shriek and rigidly outstretched arm, to the oldest and clearest precedent of all, Paul's First Epistle to the Corinthians, Chapter 15, verses 50 to 55: " [These verses are quoted in their entirety.]; Pg. 71: "That passage is one among a few crucial biblical texts that are the basis, among fundamentalist millenarians, for the notion of the Rapture: that moment, according to believers, prior to the more dire events of the Apocalypse, when the faithful are lifted up, en masse and all at once, into the sky, to greet the Messiah and share with him a ringside view of the prophesied and inevitable end of 'the Late Great Planet Earth.'

This notion is something of a theological novelty. Since Augustine's time, when it had already begun to appear that the Second Coming might still be a long time coming, theologians have tended to look on the apocalyptic prophecies of Revelations with an allegorical eye. " [More, pg. 70-72.]

Christian Fundamentalist world 1999 Morrow, James. "Diary of a Mad Deity " in Bible Stories for Adults. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1996); pg. 203. "November 19, 1999

Voices chatter within me, a cacophony of failed communication and successful disgust. My liberals scream at my conservatives. My racists spew epithets at my minorities. My fundamentalist Protestants condemn my Catholics to hell. "

Christian Fundamentalist world 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 307. "Meanwhile, Christian fundamentalists were scouring the Bible, looking for bits of scripture that could be bent to this occasion. Others were invoking predictions by Nostradamus. "
Christian Fundamentalist world 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 59. "'Rather painfully, we managed to digest Darwinian evolution so far as physical attributes were concerned within half a century of the initial controversy. (I say 'we', but if you're a bible-thumping fundamentalist I expect you at ths point to take the book by one corner at arm's length and ceremonially consign it to the place where you put most sensible ideas, along with everything else you decline to acknowledge the existence of, such as mainly [crap].) "
Christian Fundamentalist world 2011 Baxter, Stephen. Manifold: Time. New York: Ballantine (2000); pg. 309. "Wayne Dupree [the Texan] had, it turned out, come from an extremist Christian group who believed the Blue children were the spawn of Satan, or some such, and so required destruction. He had gotten himself into the center on a fake resume and references from other members of his cult group: credentials that, Maura agreed, the most minimally competent vetting process should have weeded out. " [More.]
Christian Fundamentalist world 2020 Heinlein, Robert A. Friday. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1982); pg. 105. "'Worse are some religious fanatics calling themselves the Angels of the Lord. Their so-called program is a mindless collection of anti-intellectual slogans and vicous prejudices. They cannot succeed but their doctrines of hate can easily set brother against brother, neighbor against neighbor. They must be stopped.' "
Christian Fundamentalist world 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. 14. "The Catholic Church joined forces with religious fundamentalists worldwide--quite a few Scofield College faculty members had gotten into that at--to challenge the Hefn, and, through them, their bosses the Gafr, over the issue of global infertility; but this had been without effect. "
Christian Fundamentalist world 2030 Gibson, William. Neuromancer. New York: Ace Books (1984); pg. 61. "Nine different police departments and public security agencies were absorbing the information that an obscure subsect of militant Christian fundamentalists had just taken credit for having introduced clinical levels of an outlawed psychoactive agent known as Blue Nine into the ventilation system of the Sense/Net Pyramid. Blue Nine, known in California as Grievous Angel, had been shown to produce paranoi and homicidal psychosis in eighty-five percent of experimental subjects. "
Christian Fundamentalist world 2030 Gibson, William. Neuromancer. New York: Ace Books (1984); pg. 134. "'Mine. Shot 'em at the S/N Pyramid, last time we went down the well. She was that close, and she just smiled, so natural. And it was bad there, Lupus, day after these Christ the King terrs put angel in the water, you know?' " [This refers to Christian fundamentalist terrorists putting a dangerous psychoactive drug in the water supply.]
Christian Fundamentalist world 2033 Asimov, Isaac. "Little Lost Robot " in The Complete Robot. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1982; c. 1947); pg. 351. [Year est.] "'I would like to explain that bid. I hadn't been aware that Dr. Calvin was unacquainted with the situation. I needn't tell you, Dr. Calvin, that there has always been strong opposition to robots on the Planet. The only defense the government has had against the Fundamentalist radicals in this matter was the fact that robots are always built with an unbreakable First Law--which makes it impossible for them to harm human beings under any circumstance.' "
Christian Fundamentalist world 2035 Asimov, Isaac. "The Evitable Conflict " in The Complete Robot. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1982; c. 1950); pg. 453. "'...Oh, and first, have you heard of the 'Society for Humanity'?'

'Umm, yes. They are an outgrowth of the Fundamentalists who have kept U. S. Robots from ever employing positronic robots on the grounds of unfair labor competition and so on. The 'Society for Humanity' itself is anti-Machine, is it not?'

'Yes, yes...' "

Christian Fundamentalist world 2040 Zelazny, Roger. "Home is the Hangman " in Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983; story c. 1975); pg. 108. [Year estimated.] "'Nothing that simple, that obvious. Times have changed since the Good Book was written, and you can't hold with a purely fundamentalist approach in complex times. What I was getting at was something a little more abstract. A form of pride...' "
Christian Fundamentalist world 2050 Charnas, Suzy McKee. "Listening to Brahms " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000); pg. 27-28. "Some of the younger Kondrai have begun harking back to this sort of life, trying to create the same conditions in the cities, which is ridiculous. These youngsters act as if it's something absolutely basic they have to try to hang on to in the face of an invasion of alien ways. Earth ways.

This is obviously a backlash against the effects of the Retrieval Project. I keep an eye on developments. It's all fascinating and actually creepy. To me the backlash is reminiscent of those fundamentalist-nationalist movements--Christian American or Middle-Eastern Muslim or whatever--that made life such hell for so many people toward the end of our planet's life. But if you point this resemblance out, the anti-Retrieval Kondrai get furious because, after all, anything Earth-like is what they're reacting against. "

Christian Fundamentalist world 2050 Zelazny, Roger. "Home is the Hangman " in Analog: Readers' Choice: Vol. 2 (Stanley Schmidt, ed.) New York: David Publications (1981; story copyright 1975); pg. 197. "'If I were a preacher,' I said, 'I would have to point out that there is no biblical injunction against it--unless you've been worshipping it on the sly.'

He shook his head.

'Nothing that simple, that obvious, that explicit. Times have changed since the Good Book was written, and you can't hold with a purely Fundamentalist approach in complex times. What I was getting at was something a little more abstract...' "

Christian Fundamentalist world 2110 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 10. "No wonder that, even now, most of mankind could still not believe that it was the instrument of doom. Or, as the Chrislamic Fundamentalists were calling it, 'The Hammer of God.' "
Christian Fundamentalist world 2114 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Green Mars. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 444. "On Earth... Christian, Muslim, and Hindu fundamentalists were all making a vice of necessity and declaring the longevity treatment the work of Satan; great numbers of the untreated were joining these movements, taking over local governments and making direct, human-wave assaults on the metanational operations within their reach. "
Christian Identity Movement California 2005 Gibson, William. Virtual Light. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 272. "'We had Revealed Aryan Nazarenes, up in Oregon,' she said. 'First Church of Jesus Survivalist. As soon shoot you as look at you.'

'Bad news,' Rydell agreed, the RV cresting a little ridge there, 'those kind of Christians . . .' "

Christian Identity Movement California: Los Angeles 1974 Disch, Thomas M. Camp Concentration. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1968); pg. 141. "The Reverend Augustus Jacks, formerly of Watts, continues to enjoy his extraordinary popular success in the Lost Angeles area. National television networks still refuse Jacks permission to broadcast the 'Address to a White Conscience' that catapulted the former evangelical minister to overnight fame, on grounds that it is 'inflammatory.' Their refusal has not prevented most of the nation from having already had an opportunity to hear the address, either on the radio or over local, unaffiliated television stations. The sophomore from the University of Maryland who tried last week to set fire to Jacks' $90,000 Beverly Hills home has consented to accept Jacks' offer of legal aid, after receiving a visit from the Negro minister in his cell in the Los Angeles county prison. "
Christian Identity Movement USA 1988 Godwin, P. Waiting for the Galactic Bus. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 36. "'What is this White Jesus nonsense?' he [Yeshua] implored of Barion once. 'They've spent two thousand years turning me into something out of Oxford or a Tennessee Bible college. Both my parents were Hebrews, I look like an Arab, spent all my life in the desert and if they let me into one of their nice 'white' restaurants at all, I'd get the table by the kitchen door. What do these people want?' "
Christian Identity Movement USA 1988 Godwin, P. Waiting for the Galactic Bus. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 68. "'No.' Roy groped for the nearest part of Charity to hang on to. 'My White Christian God--'

'Oh, shut up. Where do you think my authority comes from?'

Roy found a vestige of his courage. 'You ain't no Christian, never were. You look like a lousy Jew.' "

Christian Identity Movement USA 1988 Godwin, P. Waiting for the Galactic Bus. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 90. I mean was she Aryan?'

'One hunnert percent pure White American Aryan like me. The purest.' "

Christian Identity Movement USA 1988 Godwin, P. Waiting for the Galactic Bus. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 90. "'I mean was she Aryan?'

'One hunnert percent pure White American Aryan like me. The purest.' "

Christian Identity Movement USA 1988 Godwin, P. Waiting for the Galactic Bus. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 102. "I didn't make the rules about what's nice and what ain't just I'm a White Christian and that's the way things are. "
Christian Identity Movement USA 1988 Godwin, P. Waiting for the Galactic Bus. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 122. "'The most reclusive of all Below Stairs citizens, Judas has always been distrusted by the popular vote, particularly the Christian Identity groups and the Paladins, who consider him a dangerous adversary...' "
Christian Identity Movement Utah: Salt Lake City 2005 Gibson, William. Virtual Light. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 323. "Shapely's murder, some said sacrifice, had taken place in Salt Lake City. His seven killers, heavily armed [Christian] fundamentalists, members of a white racist sect driven underground in the months following the assault on the airport, were still imprisoned in Utah, though two of them had subsequently died of AIDS, possibly contracted in prison, steadfastly refusing the viral strain patented in Shapely's name. "
Christian Science California 1971 Matheson, Richard. Bid Time Return. New York: Viking Press (1975); pg. 27. "I remember, at college, that my landlady (the local Christian Science practitioner and all of eighty-seven herself) took care of a ninety-six-year-old woman for whom she'd worked in the pat. This older woman, Miss Jenny, was completely bedridden. She was paralyzed... "
Christian Science California 1971 Matheson, Richard. Bid Time Return. New York: Viking Press (1975); pg. 47. "'And love, most sweet.'

What does that remind me of?

A Christian Science hymn. Except the words are : 'And life, most sweet, as heart to heart, speaks kindly when we meet and part.' "

Christian Science California: Los Angeles 1971 Matheson, Richard. Bid Time Return. New York: Viking Press (1975); pg. 12. [Aboard the Queen Mary.] "More memorabilia. Dominoes. Dice in a leather cup. A mechanical pencil. Books for religious services; Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, Mormon, Christian Scientist--that old, familiar book. I feel as though I were an archaeologist excavating in a temple. "
Christian Science California: San Francisco 2036 Besher, Alexander. Mir: A Novel of Virtual Reality. New York: Simon & Schuster (1998); pg. 217. "Dorje replied, 'We're just here to say a prayer or two. We won't interfere, I promise.'

'Last time we had some Christian Scientists trying to sabotage the equipment. We had to call in the police and the fire department to make sure everything was okay. It's a strict city ordinance. This is an FTZ--a fundamentalist-free zone. No monkey business allowed or we get busted, got it?' "

Christian Science Canada 2010 Willis, Connie. Doomsday Book. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 261. "'No. I think it's much more likely that Badri caught it from someone at that dance in Headington. There may have been New Hindus there, or Earthers, or someone else who doesn't believe in antivirals or modern medicine. The Canadian goose flu of 2010, if you'll remember, was traced back to a Christian Science commune...' "
Christian Science galaxy 2075 Anthony, Piers. Faith of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (10th printing 1986; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 186. "Mrs. Ellend of the Church of Christ: Scientist, perhaps the oldest member of this audience. "
Christian Science galaxy 2075 Anthony, Piers. Faith of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (10th printing 1986; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 227. "He had to form a new self-image within her to make her believe that her illness was an illusion to be banished, that she, like Christian Scientists, could conquer--if she had faith.

And--she healed. Her fever dropped, her tension eased, and she awoke. "

Christian Science galaxy 2075 Anthony, Piers. Vision of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (1985; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 25. "After a moment, the Reverend continued: 'We had not intended to send Brother Paul into full Animation at once. He was only experimenting in the fringe zone. Two Watchers remained outside: Mrs. Ellend and Pastor Runford.'

'The Christian Science Monitor and the Jehovah's Witness Watcher,' Therion remarked. No one laughed.

'Three more were placed within the Animation zone,' Siltz continued. 'A Mormon, a disciple of the Horned God, and a seeker of the Nine Unknown Men. We deemed this sufficient representation for our purpose, this diversity of faiths...' "

Christian Science galaxy 2075 Anthony, Piers. Vision of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (1985; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 37. "'Family quarrels are the worst kind,' Mrs. Ellend said. 'We must apply scientific criteria to the problem.' " [There are many other references to Mrs. Ellend, a Christian Scientist character in the book, and to Christian Science, most not in DB.]
Christian Science galaxy 2075 Anthony, Piers. Vision of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (1985; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 236. "'But the Pyramid is Matter,' Mrs. Ellend protested. 'The realm of the real is Spiritual, not Material. Matter is an error of statement. All disease is illusion; Jesus established this fundamental fact when he cast out devils and made people well.' "
Christian Science galaxy 2075 Anthony, Piers. Vision of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (1985; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 31-32. "Please, Pastor Runford, " Mrs. Ellend said gently. "Truth is the still, small voice of scientific thought. Heaven represents harmony, the divine Science interprets the principle of heavenly harmony. In Revelation we are told: 'And there appeared a great wonder in heaven; a woman clothed with the sun, and the moon under her foot, and upon her head a crown of twelve stars.' We must always seek to ward off Malicious Animal Magnetism, called MAM. The great miracle, to human sense, is divine Love. The goal can never be reached while we hate our neighbor of whatever faith-- "

"What's wrong with profane Love, ma'am? " Therion demanded. He was evidently a born heckler... Brother Paul, though genuinely interested in the views of the others, wished [Therion] would shut up... He had... read some of the writings of Mary Baker Eddy, founder of the Christian Scientists, and had been impressed with the sensible nature of her remarks.

Christian Science galaxy 2374 de Lancie, John & Peter David. I, Q (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 115. "Instead, the only response he got was blank stares and confused looks. And then the Vulcan, with the air of authority that only Vulcans can lend to a pronouncement, said, 'There is nothing wrong. None of this . . . is happening.' If Mary Baker Eddy had heard him, she would have risen from the grave and kissed that Vulcan on the lips. "
Christian Science Illinois 1989 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 22. [Principia College is described here.] "'High places do that,' he said. 'There's a place I like to visit--a little Christian Science college--way out in the boonies on the Illinois side of the Mississippi River, not far from St. Louis. The campus is right on the bluffs near the river. There's a tiny chapel right near the edge, and you can walk out on some ledges and see halfway across Missouri.'

'Are you a Christian Scientist?'

The question and her expression were so serious that Baedecker had to laugh. 'No,' he said, 'I'm not religious. I'm not . . . anything.' He had a sudden image of himself kneeling in the lunar dust, the stark sunlight a benediction. "



Christian Science, continued

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