Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Chinese, Alabama

Chinese, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Chinese Argo 2179 Sawyer, Robert J. Golden Fleece. New York: Time Warner (1990); pg. 8. Pg. 8: "...and giant I-Shin Chang, chief engineer, clad in one of those specially tailored denim jumpsuits he required to accommodate his four arms. Chang had been off working on his secret project... "; Pg. 60: "Far off, clad in dirty coveralls, was Chief Engineer I-Shin 'Great Wall of China' Chang, working on a large cylindrical device. " [Chang, one of novel's main characters, is Chinese. Many refs. to him throughout novel, not in DB, but the few refs. to his ethnicity by name are in DB.]
Chinese Argo 2179 Sawyer, Robert J. Golden Fleece. New York: Time Warner (1990); pg. 107. "...others in their native tongues: Algonquin, Esperanto, French, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Kurdish, Mandarin... "
Chinese Arizona 1991 Fillerup, Michael. "Lost and Found " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1991); pg. 203. Pg. 203: "...they were runes, Chinese cuneiform, hapless kid scribble... "; Pg. 204: "...Kung Fu kicks... "
Chinese Asia 1940 Lupoff, Richard (writing as Ova Hamlet). "God of the Naked Unicorn " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 312. "...teeming hordes of heathen Chinese... "
Chinese Asia 1980 Tucker, Wilson. The Year of the Quiet Sun. New York: Ace (1970); pg. 240. "The re-elected President and his Congress declared war on the Chinese Peoples' Republic in the week following his inauguration, after having waged an undeclared war since 1954... He was compelled to send troops to Korea, to counteract renewed hostilities there, but lost them all when the Chinese and the Mongolians overran the peninsula and ended foreign occupation. " [Other refs., not all in DB.]
Chinese Asia 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 228. "'Daddy... believed that the Untied States... was the city of God on Earth. He volunteered to fly in Korea because he figured that Red Chinese would swamp that peninsula and take Japan and all of Indochina if we didn't stop them there...' " [Other refs. not in DB.]
Chinese Australia 2041 Turner, George. Drowning Towers. New York: William Morrow (1987); pg. 29. "...we were unaware of having been born into what an old Chinese curse considered 'interesting times'.

...So let the Veets and Chinks and Indons have it. No place for a white man. " [Also pg. 129.]

Chinese Australia 2051 Egan, Greg. Permutation City. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 258. "Ditto for those who'd turned up as 'Searle's Chinese Rooms': huge troupes of individual humans (or human-shaped automatons), each carrying out a few simple tasks, which together amounted to a complete working computer. "
Chinese Australia 2200 Arnason, Eleanor. A Woman of the Iron People. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 336. "I knew nothing about the religious beliefs of the ancient Chinese, except what I had read in books or heard when I did a study of the Chinese community in Melbourne. "
Chinese Australia 17050 Smith, Cordwainer. Norstrilia. Framingham, MA: NESFA Press (1994; c. 1964, 1968); pg. 41. "Old Australia--the fabulous continent of Old Earth now covered by the rains of the abandoned Chinesian cityworld of Aojou Nanbien--had in its prime been broad, dry, open, beautiful... " [Although the book draws heavily on the author's first-hand experience with Chinese politics, and his expertise as a professor of Asian history, 'Chinese' is mentioned by name only here and pg. 192.]
Chinese Austria 1998 Baur, Markus. "Hunting the Snark " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 307. "...yes, one of the two trailing girls could be Chinese: round face, dark hair perhaps an epicanthic fold... "
Chinese Battle School 2119 Card, Orson Scott. Ender's Shadow. New York: Tor (1999); pg. 209. "'Forget it, Fly,' said Hot Soup--Han Tzu, leader of D toon. " [This Chinese character is prominent in the novel, but nothing is said about his ethnicity.]
Chinese Belize 1991 Foster, Alan Dean. A Call to Arms. New York: Ballantine (1991); pg. 146. "...as he ate lunch in a bad Chinese restaurant... "
Chinese Brazil 1973 Watson, Ian. The Embedding. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1973); pg. 36. Pg. 36: "Chinese weapons "; Pg. 102: "...breaking Chinese codes... "; Pg. 170: "'...Did you know that in ancient Chinese legends the tapir was said to be an animal that feeds on dreams?...' " [Other refs., incl. pg. 227-230]
Chinese Brazil 2045 Wilson, Robert Charles. Memory Wire. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 40. Pg. 40: "...bureaucrats in boxlike Chinese automobiles... "; Pg. 141: Chinese lanterns
Chinese Brazil 2045 Wilson, Robert Charles. Memory Wire. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 112. "One of them had angled past the Earth when the Chou Dynasty was succeeding the Shang and the Assyrians were marching into Babylon (A few neolithic American tribes actually saw the craft in its looping polar orbit: a star of many colors. The observant Babylonians were preoccupied; the Chinese were in the wrong place.) It was a divided and primitive world--still is, Teresa thought distantly... "
Chinese British Columbia 2000 Faerber, Jay. "X-Men Movie Prequel: Wolverine " in X-Men: Beginnings, Vol. 1. New York: Marvel Comics (2000); pg. 10. [Logan finds Natsu Teshima for the first time.] "'*Thank you.*'

'*You're welcome.* Hunh. Didn't even know I could speak Chinese.'

'Oh, I speak English, too.' " [Editor's note about the foreign language phrases: "Translated from the Chinese ". The second main character and female lead in this story is Chinese. She appears throughout most of story. Only refs. to 'Chinese' by name are in DB.]

Chinese British Columbia: Vancouver 2000 Faerber, Jay. "X-Men Movie Prequel: Wolverine " in X-Men: Beginnings, Vol. 1. New York: Marvel Comics (2000); pg. 18. "The Chinatown section of Vancouver, later that night.

'Anything look familiar?'

'Not really. Should it?'

'Maybe. Thought that since you're Chinese, being here might trigger some memories.'

'Sorry to disappoint you, Sherlock, but nothing so far.' "

Chinese British Columbia: Vancouver 2000 Faerber, Jay. "X-Men Movie Prequel: Wolverine " in X-Men: Beginnings, Vol. 1. New York: Marvel Comics (2000); pg. 30. "'Here's what we know. You'd infiltrated the criminal organization of a gangster known as Kohama. You were in deep, deeper than we've ever had anyone. But then you vanished. When you missed your last two check-ins, we put out a bulletin. That's why the police were after you.'

'Okay, it's starting to make sense now. Some Japanese men came after me. They must've been working for Kohama. " [Apparently the 'bad guys' chasing Natsu and Wolverine on previous and subsequent pages throughout much of story are Japanese, although they didn't particularly appear that way. What is never explained is why a Chinese cop is being used to infiltrate a Japanese crime syndicate. But then, her name seems rather Japanese--Natsu Teshima--although she is specifically identified as Chinese. Other refs., not in DB.]

Chinese Brunei: Brunei Town 2035 Sterling, Bruce. "Green Days in Brunei " in Future on Fire (Orson Scott Card, ed.) New York: Tor (1991; story copyright 1985); pg. 325. Pg. 325: "Brunei Town the sultanate's capital, had a hundred thousand citizens: Malays, Chinese, Ibans, Dayaks, and a sprinkling of Europeans... Kyocera had sent Turner Choi... a twenty-six-year-old Chinese-Canadian CAD-CAM engineer from Vancouver. "; Pg. 327: "For days, Turner had snooped around down on the waterfront, with its cubbyholed rows of Chinese junkshops. "; Pg. 334: "'You look rather like a Chinese Keith Richards.' "; Pg. 341: "'I haven't heard from you in two years! You're not mad that I splut, huh?... It wasn't that you were Chinese, okay? I mean, you're about as Chinese as maple syrup, right?...' " [Many other refs., not in DB. The main character is Chinese.]
Chinese California 1896 Matheson, Richard. Bid Time Return. New York: Viking Press (1975); pg. 178. "During that period, several Chinese kitchen workers passed by, talking in their native language. "
Chinese California 1980 Knight, Damon. Beyond the Barrier. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1980; c. 1964); pg. 41. "Naismith saw an icon, a bronze Chinese dragon, a plastic windup toy... "
Chinese California 1981 Dick, Philip K. Dr. Bloodmoney. New York: Bluejay Books (1985; c. 1965); pg. 31. "Right this moment she could imagine Bruno with a prescription for some pill which stimulated the cortex or suppressed the diencephalon; in any case the modern Western equivalent for contemporary Chinese medicine would be in action, altering the metabolism of Bruno's brain, clearing away the delusions like so many cobwebs... "
Chinese California 1985 Bear, Greg. Blood Music. New York: Arbor House (1985); pg. 33. "...a decayed Chinese Kwan-Yin statue carved from a seven-foot teak log. His father--simply 'Frank' in all conversations--had brought the statue back from Taiwan after a merchant marine tour; it had scared three-year-old Vergil half to death. "
Chinese California 1985 Bear, Greg. Blood Music. New York: Arbor House (1985); pg. 67. "Vergil Ulam was turning into a galaxy.

How would it feel to be topped off with a trillion Chinese? He grinned in the dark, and almost cried at the same time. What Vergil had inside him was unimaginably stranger than Chinese. Stranger than anything Edward--or Vergil--could easily understand. " [May be some other refs., not in DB.]

Chinese California 1989 Willis, Connie. "At the Rialto " in Impossible Things. New York: Bantam (1994; story copyright 1989); pg. 436. "...Grauman's Chinese Theatre "
Chinese California 1994 Dick, Philip K. A Scanner Darkly. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1977); pg. 199. "'The kissy-facy!' the Chinese girl howled at him; beside her another girl flapped her arms and bulged her cheeks, plop-plop. 'Here!' the Chinese girl howled, swiveled around to jut her rump at him... " [More. Also pg. 201.]
Chinese California 1995 Powers, Tim. Earthquake Weather. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 107. "'A querulous old woman, in this case--the same party that's behind the Chinese I Ching, according to her.' "
Chinese California 1995 Powers, Tim. Earthquake Weather. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 189. "...which was the Vietnamese Tet festival and the Chinese New Year. The Year of the Dog was ending, the Year of the Pig due to start on the first of February... " [Also pg. 198, 212, 214, 221, 246, 254, 259, 333, 373, etc.]
Chinese California 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 355. "'--how the Chinese can do so much damage in California!... And there's often a piece about damage done by Chinese infiltrators in California. But if Americans are either like you, or like English people, then the Chinesea re like what we see on television, with their funny eyes and different skins, why can't you recognise and catch them?' "
Chinese California 2027 Robinson, Kim Stanley. The Gold Coast. New York: Tor (1995; c. 1988); pg. 147. Pg. 147: "Pretty primitive stuff, opium... didn't he Chinese who built the California railroads use this stuff? No wonder there are no more railroads. "; Also: Hong Kong; [Also pg. 196.]
Chinese California 2047 Bear, Greg. Queen of Angels. New York: Warner Books (1994; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 90. "...California's southern coastline... Chinese and Korean colonies come too late to buy extravagant land... " [Other refs. not in DB.]
Chinese California 2160 Dick, Philip K. The Game-Players of Titan. Boston, MA: G. K. Hall (1979; c. 1963); pg. 6. Pg. 6: "'Even if it were me, it wouldn't be my fault; it's the Red Chinese. I hate them.' ";

Pg. 8-9: "'But it was your military weapon,' the vug protested.

'No, not ours. The Red Chinese.'

The vug did not grasp the distinction. 'In any case...' ";

Pg. 31: "As a matter of fact, Pete Garden had never had any luck; in all the world he had no progeny. The goddam Red Chinese, he said to himself... "

Chinese California: Hollywood 1955 Bradbury, Ray. A Graveyard for Lunatics. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1990); pg. 13. -
Chinese California: Hollywood 1955 Bradbury, Ray. A Graveyard for Lunatics. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1990); pg. 116. "'...and premiere it at Grauman's Chinese...' "
Chinese California: Los Angeles 1972 Ellison, Harlan, ed. Again, Dangerous Visions. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 136. [Introduction to "Time Travel for Pedestrians " by Ray Nelson] "...the Philip K. Dick story because it postulated God as a Chinese Communist... "
Chinese California: Los Angeles 1980 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 26. "...had made the difficult transition to talking pictures only to die of throat cancer three months after his first talkie opened at Graumann's Chinese Theater. "
Chinese California: Los Angeles 1986 Bear, Greg. The Serpent Mage. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1986); pg. 72. Pg. 72: "Its fare was not Chinese food, but nouveau French... "; Pg. 149: "Chinese paper lanterns "
Chinese California: Los Angeles 1993 Shiner, Lewis. Glimpses. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 31. "In the morning I cruised through Hollywood and saw the sign on the hill and Grauman's Chinese. "
Chinese California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 40. "On the south side of the street stood a new McDonald's restaurant that looked like an incongruously space-age Grecian temple, but at least the Chinese Theater was still there in all its battered black and red byzantine splendor at Highland. "
Chinese California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 52. "...though the air smelled of fried rice and sesame oil from a Chinese restaurant across the street. " [Other Chinese refs, pg. 71, 105, 107-108, 169, 307, etc.]
Chinese California: Los Angeles 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 39. Pg. 39: "In the evening, a reception [for the aliens] was held at Mann's Chinese Theatre, with a select gust list. "; Pg. 48: "It contained a black-and-white photograph of Kelkad making his foot impressions at Mann's Chinese Theatre. " [This theatre also mentioned pg. 142-145.]
Chinese California: Los Angeles 2000 Cooper, Bernard. "Hunters and Gatherers " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000; c. 1995); pg. 34. Pg. 34: "At a restaurant supply store near Chinatown, they bought a garlic press... "; Pg. 40: "Crumpled McDonald's bags and a few empty soft-drink cans littered the floor. "
Chinese California: Los Angeles 2005 Gibson, William. Virtual Light. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 16. "Wellington Ma was Chinese, lived in Los Angeles... " [Other refs. not in DB.]
Chinese California: Los Angeles 2005 Gibson, William. Virtual Light. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 48. "There were two other people sharing the house, three if you counted the Chinese girl out in the garage (but she had her own bathroom in there). "; Pg. 51: "last week's People. The magazine belonged to Monica, the Chinese girl in the garage. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Chinese California: Los Angeles 2023 Platt, Charles. The Silicon Man. Houston, TX: Tafford Pub. (1993); pg. 24. "...wallscreens blaring sales messages in Japanese, English, Korean, and Chinese. " [Also pg. 246.]
Chinese California: Los Angeles 2047 Bear, Greg. Queen of Angels. New York: Warner Books (1994; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 5. "The small jade colored arbeiter--a Chinese model purchased after her last temp mandated ramp in salary... "
Chinese California: Los Angeles 2047 Bear, Greg. Queen of Angels. New York: Warner Books (1994; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 58. "The hellcrown was not an expendable Hispaniolan import; it was custom fine machinery, perhaps Chinese. "
Chinese California: San Francisco 1869 Bethke, Bruce. Wild Wild West. New York: Warner Books (1999); pg. 18. "From the slums of San Francisco's Chinatown came the hand that went into the sleeve and emerged as a shakoken palm-heel strike. "
Chinese California: San Francisco 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 106. [Chapter 25] ...and upon the side-walks, not only Americans and Europeans, but Chinese and Indians... The lofty tower of its City Hall overlooked the whole panorama of the streets and avenues, which cut each other at right-angles, and in the midst of which appeared pleasant, verdant squares, while beyond appeared the Chinese quarter, seemingly imported from the Celestial Empire in a toy-box. Sombreros and red shirts and plumed Indians were rarely to be seen; but there were silk hats and black coats everywhere worn by a multitude of nervously active, gentlemanly-looking men. Some of the streets-- especially Montgomery Street, which is to San Francisco what Regent Street is to London, the Boulevard des Italiens to Paris, and Broadway to New York...
Chinese California: San Francisco 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 22. Pg. 22: "'Look at this! Look at this!' He had crumbs in his sparse black beard, he brought his dinner to the Morning Call in a sack. 'Didn't come in five minutes ago, or I'm a Chinaman.' "; Pg. 34: "A Chinaman in a conical straw hat walked by, carrying two crates hanging from a pole over his right shoulder. Roosevelt approved of Chinese industriousness, but wouldn't have minded seeing all the Celestials gone from the West. They don't fit in, he thought: too different from the Americans. "
Chinese California: San Francisco 1906 Baker, Kage. "Son Observe the Time " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 573. "I was grateful that I was not required to brave the Chinese labyrinth of Waverly Place, but my associate Pan had certain business there amongst the Celestials. " [Also pg. 615.]
Chinese California: San Francisco 1955 Dick, Philip K. The Broken Bubble. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 87. "'They should have told me it [the apparently Navajo-made necklace] wasn't Chinese,' she said. 'It was a Chinese store; the man was Chinese.' "
Chinese California: San Francisco 1955 Dick, Philip K. The Broken Bubble. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 139. Pg. 139: "'Let's go have dinner in Chinatown.' The restaurants there were cheap and the food was good. 'You could mayb have some tea.' "; Pg. 140: "'The Chinese waiter cleared the dishes away and brought a fresh enamel pot of tea. Beyond the curtains customes and waiters stirred and made sounds; Art listened amiably.

...'I always like Chinatown. but you shouldn't have brought me here.'

'Why?' he said.

'You shouldn't try to take me anywhere, Art.' She smiled. 'You have a crush on me, don't you? But I'm too old. One of these days Bob and I'll be married.' "

Chinese California: San Francisco 1972 Dick, Philip K. The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1972); pg. 100. Chinatown [Other refs., not in DB.]
Chinese California: San Francisco 1977 Leiber, Fritz. Our Lady of Darkness. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1977); pg. 76. Pg. 76: "...when a portly Chinaperson upon being properly supplicated with the ritual formula of numbered block and lot... "; Pg. 133: China; Chinese woman; Pg. 134: Chinese apparel [More, pg. 133-137, 167, 170, etc.]
Chinese California: San Francisco 1977 Leiber, Fritz. Our Lady of Darkness. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1977); pg. 92. "My current eear-friend-secretary-playfellow-cohousekeeper-cum-moon-goddess is North Chinese... "
Chinese California: San Francisco 1991 Blaylock, James P. The Paper Grail. New York: Ace Books (1991); pg. 12. "The limousine crept along through the San Francisco traffic, down Grant Street, through Chinatown toward North Beach. " [Other refs., not in DB, incl. pg. 13.]
Chinese California: San Francisco 1995 Foster, Alan Dean. The Dig. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 18. "...northwest San Francisco, proximate not to power brokers and politicos but to panhandlers, prostitutes, tourists, illegal immigrants, and the best Chinese food in North America. "
Chinese California: San Francisco 1999 King, Stephen. Hearts in Atlantis. New York: Scribner (1999); pg. 463. "...the red sneakers with the Chinese symbols on them. " [Some other refs. not in DB.]
Chinese California: San Francisco 2000 Knight, Damon. Rule Golden in Three Novels. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1954); pg. 69. "The first shipload of Chinese arrived in San Francisco on the 16th. "
Chinese California: San Francisco 2015 Russo, Richard Paul. Subterranean Gallery. New York: Tor (1989); pg. 99. Pg. 99: "Rheinhardt walked along the crowded sidewalk on Stockton Street, through the heart of Chinatown. A block over on Grant, the main tourist run, he might have blended in, but here he was one of the few non-Chinese in sight... "; Pg. 100: "Mounted on the building was an enormous reproduction of a photograph of six lynched Asians--two Japanese and four Chinese. All six had been hung by their feet... Two different white supremacist groups had claimed responsibility...

Chinese pharmacy... windows covered with Chinese ideographs... " [More, pg. 99-105.]

Chinese California: San Francisco 2036 Besher, Alexander. Mir: A Novel of Virtual Reality. New York: Simon & Schuster (1998); pg. 113. [Headline] "GANG OF CHINESE GRANNIES ROBS B OF A COLUMBUS BRANCH IN BROAD DAYLIGHT "

A daring robbery was committed in broad daylight at the Columbus Street branch of the Bank of America yesterday... a group of six senior citizens, ranging in age from 72 to 93. All suspects were residents of the On Lok Nursing Home located on Lower Broadway... The gang was finally cornered when they ran into the Sun Moon Chinese bakery on Vallejo Street... " [More, pg. 113-114. Many other Chinese refs. not in DB. A considerable section takes place in Chinatown.]

Chinese California: San Francisco 2036 Besher, Alexander. Mir: A Novel of Virtual Reality. New York: Simon & Schuster (1998); pg. 179. "...they're Chinese--old family, very respectable. And being Chinese, they're very superstitious--definitely into feng shui, you know what that is?... Anyway, the Chinese family visits the grave every weekend. it's their mother that's buried there. They leave flowers and everything. "
Chinese California: San Francisco 2151 Carey, Diane. Broken Bow (Enterprise). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 64. "Archer suspected it was being taught at the Customs Center, kind of like bowing in Japan or a lei in Hawaii. 'I especially liked the Chinese food. Have you ever tried it?'

Handing off articles from the packing box on top of the desk, Archer shrugged. 'I've lived in San Francisco all my life.'

Of course, San Francisco had a Chinese restaurant on every third corner, just like any other American city...

'Anatomically, you humans are somewhat simplistic,' Phlox said, probably not realizing he was being insulting. 'But what you lack biologically, you make up for with your charming optimism. Not to mention your egg drop soup...' "



Chinese, continued

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