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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Catholic - Knights of Columbus, New Mexico: Atocha

Catholic - Knights of Columbus, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Catholic - other MadredeDios 3099 Simmons, Dan. Endymion. New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 172. "...provincial world of MadredeDios. Almost everyone on the sparsely populated stone-and-desert world was Catholic, but not Pax born-again Catholic. The de Soya family had been part of the break-away Mariaist movement and had left Nuevo Madrid more than a century earlier hen that world had voted to join the Pax and have all its Christian churches submit to the Vatican. The Mariaists venerated the Holy Mother of Christ more than Vatican orthodoxy allowed, so young Federico had grown up on a marginal desert world with its devout colony of sixty thousand heretical Catholics who, as a form of protest, refused to accept cruciform. "
Catholic - other MadredeDios 3099 Simmons, Dan. Endymion. New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 174. "Maria's Sacrament of the Cross was scheduled for ten p.m. She died suddenly at 8:45 p.m. By the rules of the Church and the laws of the Pax, someone who suffered braindeath before receiving the cross could not be revived artificially to receive it.

Instead of being furious or feeling betrayed by his new Church, Federico's father took the tragedy as a sign that God--not the God he had grown up praying to, the gentle Son infused with the universal female principles of the Holy Mother, but the fiercer New and Old Testament God of the Universal Church--had punished him, his family, and the entire Mariaist world of Llano Estracado... " [Some other refs. about these Mariaist Catholics, not in DB.]

Catholic - other MadredeDios 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 14-15. Pg. 14-15: "On the desert world of MadredeDios, on the high plateau called the Llano Estacado because of the atmosphere generator pylons crisscrossing the desert in neat ten-kilometer grid intervals, Father Federico de Soya prepared for early morning Mass.

The little desert town of Nuevo Atlan held fewer than three hundred residents--mostly Pax boxite miners waiting to die before traveling home, mixed with a few of the converted Mariaists who scratched out livings as corgor herders in the toxic wastelands--and Father de Soya knew precisely how many would be in chapel for early Mass: four... ";

Pg. 58: "...delegates from the Dominicans, the Jesuits, the Benedictines, the Legionaries of Christ, the Mariaists, the Salesians, and a single delegate standing for the few remaining Franciscans. "

Catholic - other New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 51. "Loren drove into Las Animas, then slowly down the cracked surface of Cedar Street. He passed a little adobe chapel, its windows and doors painted blue to symbolize devotion to the Virgin. A miniature house of worshpi built on someone's front lawn, marking the meeting place of a few families who had come from northern Mexico to work in the mines during the Depression. Ostensibly Catholic--Bob Sandoval would have called them heretics--they belonged to some small divergent sect that had gotten thrown out of Spain in the 1600s. Another of Atocha's forty-one Welcoming Churches. "
Catholic - other United Kingdom: England 1976 Amis, Kingsley. The Alteration. New York: Viking Press (1976); pg. 3. "Not far from them, a third man held himself rigid out of a desire not to give the smallest grounds for offence to those many of his neighbours who made no attempt to conceal from him their often hostile curiosity. The Archpresbyter of Arnoldstown was the first holder of this office ever to have crossed the threshold of St George's, and there was some resentment at the admission of a Schismatic eminence--in plainer terms, a surpliced heretic--to today's ceremony. At his side, Cornelius van der Haag, New Englander Ambassador to the court of St Giles, had become too far immersed in the music to stir. [Some other refs. to 'heretics' in novel.]
Catholic - Pentecostal world 2060 Russell, Mary Doria. The Sparrow. New York: Ballantine (1996); pg. 49. "The Society of Jesus rarely attracted mystics, who generally gravitated to the Carmelites or the Trappists, or wound up among the charismatics. "
Catholic - Syro-Malankara United Kingdom: England 1982 Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. v. [Acknowledgments.] "I have also drawn upon materials from the Syro-Chaldean liturgies, including the Holy Orbana of St. Seraphion... "
Catholic - Trappist Alabama 1974 Disch, Thomas M. Camp Concentration. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1968); pg. 3. "I had thought (I had convinced myself) that coming here [to Springfield prison] voluntarily would be little different from joining a Trappist monastery, that my deprivations would easily be bearable if freely chosen. One of my regrets as a married man has always been that the contemplative life, in its more rarefied aspects, has been denied me. I fancied asceticism some rare luxury, a spiritual truffle. Ha! "
Catholic - Trappist Kentucky 1968 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 112. "Raised a Catholic in Louisville, Kentucky, Vear also sometimes find himself comparing Von Braunville [on the moon] to Gethsemani, the monastery near Bardstown, Kentucky, where the Trappist writer and monk Thomas Merton spent most of his adult life. "
Catholic - Trappist Luna 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 115. "What was it that Thomas Merton had said on this point? Another racute observation. Vear finally recalls it: 'And to be unknown to God is altogether too much privacy.' Exactly. You want solitude, a chance to reflect, but you don't want your retreat from others to deprive you of the company of God. That's not privacy, that's the ultimate loneliness, absolute desolation. "
Catholic - Trappist Thailand 1968 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 116. "Still, '68 was the year that it all went off the rails, and that was the year that Thomas Merton died, too. In December. After the national elections. He accidently electrocuted himself with a fan after taking a shower in a cottage near Bangkok; he'd been touring the Far East discussing monasticism and meditation with the Dalai Lama and other Buddhists. Vear had always considered Merton's death--for so searching and holy a man--ludicrous, a vaudeville jape unworthy of God. But here above Von Braunville, he begins to regard it as a mercy. Maybe the Holy Spirit had been whirling in the blades of the defective fan, breathing grace upon Merton even as the fan--a fan, for Christ's sake--shocked him to the roots of his being. "
Catholic - Trappist USA 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 137. "'Sir, I'd hoped to finish out my second tour and then to resign my commission. For a long time now, it's been in the back of my mind to become a religious in a holy order.'

'A religious?'

'A monk. Like St. Francis of Assisi. Like Thomas Merton. A religious, sir.' "

Catholic - Trappist USA 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 235. "'As for Merton,' the dwarf continues, 'well, that's flattering, I guess. Seriously flattering. But so what if we both died when we were fifty-three? Coincidence. Stupid coincidence. All Merton and I ahvein common is our unshakable faith that the Transcendent exists and that It'll talk to you if you ever decide you're worth the effort. And that's about it. That and a quest to understand whatever... we're being handed when the Transcendent finally deigns to speak.' "
Catholic - Trappist USA 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 242. "'And Major Vear? He's on my side because he hates our drift to totalitarianism and admires the late Trappist monk Thomas Merton...' "
Catholic - Trappist world 1968 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 116. "How a mercy? How a gift of grace?

Well, Merton had fought the good fight--for justice, for peace, for the greater glory of God--and his death, at the painfully early age of fifty-three, spared him the necessity of witnessing either Nixon's gutting of the Bill of Rights or the American' people's lamblike complicity in their own slaughter. Vear remembers that in Merton's Asian Journal, circulated posthumously in samizdat copies among many Catholics, the man expressed satisfaction that Kentucky had not voted for George Wallace in the '68 election but tremendous disappointment that Nixon had beaten Herbert Humphrey. " [More refs. to Merton, not all in DB.]

Catholic - Trappist world 1999 Hand, Elizabeth. Glimmering. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 89. "'He's a kind of saint, Jack. I mean, a real, live saint, like Mother Teresa, or--well, I don't know. Thomas Merton, maybe? The Dalai Lama? I mean, I've met the Dalai Lama, Jack, and it wasn't like this.'

'Because Dr. Hanada--he had done things. Like Merton, you know. He hadn't just been in this monastery his whole life, he'd had this whole other life...' "

Catholic - Trappist world 2060 Russell, Mary Doria. The Sparrow. New York: Ballantine (1996); pg. 49. "The Society of Jesus rarely attracted mystics, who generally gravitated to the Carmelites or the Trappists, or wound up among the charismatics. "
Catholic - Uniate Ukraine 1642 Anderson, Poul. The Boat of a Million Years. New York: Tor (1989); pg. 276. "Pyotr frowned. 'I've read about those Cossack rebellions.'

Katya winced. Three centuries fell from her, and she stood again in her village when men... galloped in after riding with Chmielnicki and shouted their boasts. Every Catholic or Uniate priest they or the serfs caught, they hanged in front of his altar alongside a pig and a Jew. 'Barbaric times,' she said. "

Catholic - Uniate world 2050 Bova, Ben. "Acts of God " in Sam Gunn Forever. New York: Avon (1998; c. 1995); pg. 38. "'Another thing,' Sam added. 'You guys have been working for a century or so to heal the rifts among other Christians. Imagine how the Protestants will feel if they see the Vatican getting special treatment from the World Court... how will the Swedes feel about it? Or the Orthodox Catholic in Greece and Russia and so on? Or the Southern Baptists?' "
Cayuse USA 1943 Bishop, Michael. Brittle Innings. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 295. "My attackers, whose arrows flew wide or rebounded from my granite throne, wore the dress of the Sahaptin group of North American Indians: Cayuse, Palouse, or Wallawalla. I identified them by their vestments and, when they audibly conferred, by certain quirks of their Penutian-derived tongue. "
Celt Arizona 1996 Dreyfuss. Richard & Harry Turtledove. The Two Georges. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 19. "Oh, a fair number of the people in cars, on bicycles, and walking on the sidewalks showed Nuevespanolan blood. In manner and dress, though, most of them were not easily distinguishable from their Anglo-Saxon and Celtic counterparts of similar class. " [Also pg. 196.]
Celt California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 32. "The source-basis for Parsifal consisted of Celtic legends, and Wagner's research into Buddhism for his never-written opera about the Buddha to be called The Victors (Die Sieger). Where did Richard Wagner get the notion that time could turn into space?) " [Also pg. 144-145.]
Celt California: Los Angeles 1986 Bear, Greg. The Serpent Mage. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1986); pg. 7. "Michael had come upstairs to read, but he put down his book--Evans-Wentz's The Fairy-Faith in Celtic Countries... "
Celt California: San Francisco 1991 Blaylock, James P. The Paper Grail. New York: Ace Books (1991); pg. 233. "He spoke a Celtic tongue, but the words were filtered through Mrs. Moynihan's cranium and were uttered as modern English. "
Celt California: San Francisco 2021 Dick, Philip K. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?. New York: Ballantine (1996; c. 1968); pg. 187. "Rachel had been modeled on the Celtic type of build, anachronistic and attractive. "
Celt Canada 1993 Katz, Welwyn Wilton. Come Like Shadows. Regina, Saskatchewan: Coteau Books (2001; 1993); pg. 206. "Celtic medallion "
Celt Europe 865 C.E. Harrison, Harry. The Hammer and the Cross. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 87. "...from the floating population of Norsemen who for generations had been moving into the Outer Isles of the Celtic regions: the Orkneys and Shetlands, then the Hebrides, the Scottish mainland. " [Other refs., not in DB. Enter novel takes place in Europe, much of it in England. But the word 'Celt' is apparently not except here.]
Celt Europe 1990 Byatt, A.S. Possession. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1990); pg. 377. Pg. 377, 394, 426.
Celt Gaia 2046 Bear, Greg. Eternity. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 77. "'He's a Kelt, isn't he?'

'From the Parisioi,' Rhita affirmed.

'There are plenty of Kelts in Galatia,' Yallos said. 'I'm of Nabataean and Hellenic ancestry, myself.' " [More.]

Celt galaxy 1943 Lewis, C.S. Out of the Silent Planet. New York: Simon & Schuster (1996; c. 1943); pg. 106. "...alternated with patches of design as close and intricate as Norse or Celtic jewelry... "
Celt galaxy 2250 Dick, Philip K. A Maze of Death. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1970); pg. 127. "Wait, he thought. I think I know what a stoppery is. It is based on the Celtic, I believe. A dialect word only comprehensible to someone who has a varied and broad background of liberal, humansitic information at his disposal. "
Celt galaxy 2270 Carey, Diane. Chainmail (Star Trek: Challenger / Gateways: Book 2 of 7). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 267. "They were enticing pictures, exaggerated zoomorphs and storyglyphs with a vicious edge, like the heads of Viking ships, meant to scare the enemy, or Celtic illuminations meant to confuse the eye of evil. "
Celt galaxy 2364 Dvorkin, David & Daniel Dvorkin. The Captains' Honor (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1989); pg. 48. "'Computer, tell me about the spread of the English language on Earth.'

...'English is the descendant of multiple languages: principally Anglo-Saxon, Latin, and various Celtic tongues. It was the primary language of England, one of three nations on a small island in the North Atlantic Ocean. IN an ongoing process of colonial expansion beginning late in the sixteenth century and continuing until the early twentieth century, England established herself as the supreme political, military, and economic power in the world.

'With the expansion of English power, the language spread as well, eventually becoming the universal language of trade, science, and international politics. By nature a dynamic and flexible language, it provides the basis of current Federation Standard, continuing to adapt new words, new concepts, and new cultures.' "

Celt galaxy 2368 Neason, Rebecca. Guises of the Mind (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 68. [Data:] "'...I spent last night reading the history of the planet Earth, particularly in regard to the development of myth and religion. Although there are many esoteric writings I have yet to cover, I believe I know have a basic working knowledge of the subject. Many cultures worshiped warrior gods and valued warrior abilities. Among the most notable were the Aztecs from an area once known as Central America, the followers of Ba'al in the Middle East, the Celtic members of the Cult of the Head, the followers of the Norse gods Odin and Thor...' "
Celt galaxy 2373 Mangels, Andy & Michael A. Martin. Rogue (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 94. Pg. 94: "...voices of a Celtic choir... traveling the stars with the lives of his ancestors, the nomadic Celts who explored ancient Europe, created a comfortable overlap. Exploration was in his blood. "; Pg. 96: "'...Dark room, Celtic music, avoiding the topic--' " [Some other Celtic/Irish references and names, but no other refs. to Celts by name.]
Celt galaxy 2500 Anthony, Piers & Jo Anne Taeusch. The Secret of Spring. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 37. "This did not include foreign institutes specializing in Egyptian magic, Celtic Runes, Voodoo, and alien based future castings... "
Celt galaxy 2800 Brin, David. Startide Rising in Earthclan (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (first pub. 1983); pg. 90-91. [Year is estimated.] "'Yes, lass?'...

She glared at him, 'Oh . . . I'll bet you haven't a drop of Celtic blood in your body!'

The dark engineer smiled at her. 'Why, bairn, didn' ya know? All Scots are engineers, and all engineers are Scots.' "

Celt galaxy 3000 Greeley, Andrew M. The Final Planet. New York: Warner Books (1987); pg. 2. Pg. 2: "And then he sighed for a third time, this one intended for Himself, the stars, the Lady Deirdre, and anyone else in the cosmos who might be listening--the immemorial protest of the Celt against his unfair destiny.

...Well, admittedly, the dominant species here is supposed to have come about the same time the Proto-Celts came to Tara. We became pilgrims because we wanted to keep alive our culture; they because they wanted to build a perfect society. "; Pg. 8: "Strumming his harp, he crooned an ancient and mournful Celtic melody... "; Pg. 28: "'Is it, Seamus? We Celts are a blend of fatalism and hope--that's why we go on pilgrimages...' " [Other refs., not in DB. The future fictional society depicted in the novel is descended from Irish settlers. See also pg. 300.]

Celt galaxy 3017 Niven, Larry & Jerry Pournelle. The Mote in God's Eye. New York: Simon and Schuster (1974); pg. 42. "The two outer planets occupy the same orbit and are named Dagda and Mider in keeping with the system's Celtic mythological nomenclature. "
Celt Illinois: Chicago 2100 Dickson, Gordon R. Necromancer. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1962); pg. 82. "But it was a somewhat changed version of one of the old north-of-England corpse chants, sung at wakes with the corpse under the table and a dish of salt on its breast. It was a ritual with its roots going back beyond Christianity to the ancient Celts, to a time when small dark men crept together in the forests to sing their dead kinsman on his road of shadows, in the first nights after hid departure. And the version Paul heard now had none of the solemn music of its seventeenth-century shape, but was nearly back to the harsh atonal chant of the original primitive, cold as winter stones, and unsparing as the wind across them... "
Celt Iowa 2030 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 109. "...his bright red hair forming a kind of aureole about his palely perfect Celtic face. "
Celt Ireland 2030 Hogan, James P. Entoverse. New York: Ballantine (1991); pg. 82. "'...long before Caesar crossed the Channel.'

'Let me see, every English schoolboy knows that. Fifty-five B.C., yes?'

'Right. Their race was unique, descended from a mixture of Celts and a pre-Celtic stock from the eastern Mediterranean... It wasn't at all the kind of repressive thing that people were conditioned to think of later, you know. It was a very earthy, zestful, life-loving culture.' " [More here, pg. 103.]

Celt Ireland 2050 Scarborough, Elizabeth Ann. Last Refuge. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 197. "'...about the magicians of Ireland... Well, for one thing, most of the old Celtic magicians--the Druids, you know--existed a long time before this.' " [More.]
Celt Louisiana: New Orleans 2027 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. Crescent City Rhapsody. New York: Tor (2001; c. 2000); pg. 190. Celtic rock
Celt Mars 2011 Zubrin, Robert. First Landing. New York: Ace Books (2002; c. 2001); pg. 77. -
Celt Massachusetts: Nantucket -1250 B.C.E. Sterling, S. M. Island in the Sea of Time. New York: Penguin (1998); pg. 92. Pg. 92, 134, 281.
Celt New York 1987 Anderson, Poul. The Shield of Time. New York: Tor (1990); pg. 5. "A sad little romance with a Celtic slave girl, foredoomed by the abyss between their birthtimes if by nothing else; his rranging at last for her manumission and marriage; farewell... "
Celt New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 64. -
Celt Pennsylvania 1993 Simmons, Dan. The Hollow Man. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 11. "...thinking about getting home in time to watch the Celtics game. "
Celt Roman Empire 300 C.E. Anderson, Poul & Karen Anderson. The King of Ys: Roma Mater. New York: Baen (1986) [Book jacket] "Roma Mater combines Celtic myth with our distant memories of Roman Britain and adds a magic of its own: Ys, daughter of Carthage on the coast of Brittany, ruled by the magic of The Nine and the might of the King, their Husband. How The Nine conspired with their gods to bring him to them, though he belonged to Mithras and to Rome, is only the beginning of the story . . . " [Refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]
Celt Roman Empire 300 C.E. Anderson, Poul & Karen Anderson. The King of Ys: Roma Mater. New York: Baen (1986); pg. 65. "Certainly this land clung unhindered to its own old ways. Cynan had been right; Christianity was a religion for towns. Frequently Gratillonius spied a cella, a Celtic temple. Even smaller than a Mithraeum, it consisted of a single square room... "
Celt Roman Empire 359 C.E. Anderson, Poul. The Boat of a Million Years. New York: Tor (1989); pg. 33. "A hunchbacked beggar whined for alms in the name of Christ and then, when likewise ignored, tried Jupiter, Mithras, Isis, the Great Mother, and Celtic Epona... "
Celt Roman Empire 620 C.E. Douglas, L. Warren. The Veil of Years. New York: Baen (2001); pg. 5. Pg. 5: Celtic drums; Pg. 7: Celtic color; Pg. 18: "Downstream, an eroding bank released the bones of an ancient, Celt, clad in the rust of chain mail. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Celt Tran 1996 Pournelle, Jerry & Roland Green. Tran. New York: Baen (1996); pg. 39. Pg. 39: "Every six hundred years, when surinomaz grew well under the influence of the Demon Star, the Shalnuksis came to Tran with a fresh crop of Earth mercenaries. Roman legionnaires, Celtish warriors, Franks. And every time, when the aliens had got all they wanted, they tried to exterminate their agents. "; Pg. 356: "...had brought in Achaean Bronze Age warriors. Romans from the time of Septimius Serverus, and again from the Byzantine period. Franks. Celts. Scythians. Cultures mixed together... "
Celt United Kingdom 100 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Lady of Avalon. New York: Viking Penguin (1997); pg. 93. Pg. 270: "The Celtic rush pulsed with the wild energy of a wildfire, roaring toward the foe. The British could see the Roman plan, but no one, not even their own leaders, could ever be sure what the Celtic warriors would do... Suddenly the high ground, which had allowed the Romans to get beyond the center of the enemy, became a disadvantage, for the Celtic horsemen were higher still. "; Pg. 270: "'Your support comes from the princes of Britannia,' exclaimed Allectus, 'from the men of the old Celtic blood who made your Emperor!...' "; Pg. 277: "'Perhaps they were born barbarians, but they have been civilized. They recognize that this is a Celtic land...' "; Pg. 287: "'But as I travel about, I hear murmurs. Our people--the men of the old Celtic blood--are awakening. To escape from the Roman yoke...' "; Pg. 291: "'...Celtic warriors made the walls of Rome tremble when your people were still crawling out of the mire.' " [Some other refs., not in DB.]
Celt United Kingdom 249 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Diana L. Paxson Priestess of Avalon. New York: Viking (2001); pg. 24. Pg. 24, 394, elsewhere.
Celt United Kingdom 700 C.E. Vance, Jack. Lyonesse: Madouc. Lancaster, PA: Underwood-Miller (1989); pg. 348. Pg. 322: "'King Dartweg would not receive me immediately. At first I thought his motives to be sheer Celtic perversity, but later I learned...' "; Pg. 348: "On the same day that Casmir sent off the dispatch, a courier arrived from the west, with news of the Celtic defeat and the death of King Dartweg, which meant that King Aillas and his Ulfish armies would not be preoccupied doing battle with the Celts. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
Celt United Kingdom 700 C.E. Vance, Jack. Lyonesse: Madouc. Lancaster, PA: Underwood-Miller (1989); pg. 2. "The Elder Isles had known the coming and going of many peoples: Pharesmians, blue-eyed Evadnioi, Pelasgians and their maenad priestesses, Danaans, Lydians, Phoenicians, Etruscans, Greeks, Celts from Gaul, Ska from Norway by way of Ireland, Romans, Celts from Ireland and a few Sea Goths... Celts had wandered everywhere across the Elder Isles, leaving behind not only place names, but Druid sacrifices in sacred groves, and the 'March of the Trees' during Beltane. " [Many other refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]
Celt United Kingdom 1360 C.E. Dickson, Gordon R. The Dragon on the Border. New York: Ace Books (1992); pg. 40. "'How to explain? James, even you must have heard of King Arthur.'

'Heard of him?' said Jim, annoyed. 'I studied the Arthurian legend. He was either a myth or a series of myths which were originally thought to be Celtic, but which new evidence indicates may have migrated west with the Roman soldiery from as far as the steppes of South Russia...' "

Celt United Kingdom 1897 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "The Adventure of the Devil's Foot " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 32. "'...And now, my dear Watson, I think we may dismiss the matter from our mind and go back with a clear conscience to the study of those Chaldean roots which are surely to be traced in the Cornish branch of the great Celtic speech.' "
Celt United Kingdom 1968 Roberts, Keith. "The Lady Margaret " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1966); pg. 210. "Jesse curled his lip. 'Norman bastards' Dickon had called them. It was as accurate a description as any. True, they claimed Norman descent; but in this Catholic England of more than a thousand years after the Conquest, bloodlines of Norman, Saxon, and original Celt were hopelessly mixed. What distinctions existed were more or less arbitrary, reintroduced in accordance with the racial theories of Gisevius the Great a couple of centuries ago... Most people had at least a smattering of the five tongues of the land: the Norman French... Latin of the Church, Modern English... outdated Middle English and Celtic of the churls... "
Celt United Kingdom 1994 Holdstock, Robert. The Hollowing. New York: Roc (1994); pg. 115. Pg. 115: "...the old Welsh tales of Celtic adventure. "; Pg. 125: "...with an intense Celtic ancestry "; Pg. 126: "'Of course, the true Celts would never have eaten hare. It would have been sacrilege. Did you know that?... The hare was a sacred animal . . . to the true Celts. They worshiped it.' " [Many other refs.]
Celt United Kingdom 1995 Kurtz, Katherine & Deborah Turner Harris. Dagger Magic. New York: Ace Books (1995); pg. 20. "Peregrine had opted for a plain gold band lightly etched with a Celtic interlace design... " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Celt United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 15. "'...We will need the support of Romans and Celts and Cymry, and they will follow only their on war duke, their Pendragon...' " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Celt United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Woolley, Persia. Queen of the Summer Stars. New York: Poseidon Press (1990); pg. 41. Pg. 41: "That, and a name . . . Arthur. Arthur from the Roman family of Artoris; Arthur from the Celtic word for bear... A Celtic ruler, Urien devoted more time to hunting and cattle raids than to his new life... "; Pg. 42: "The Cumbri, those northern Celts clinging to the Old Ways, roar and howl and fight against the southern Britons... "; Pg. 43: "Not that the May Day rites include such sacrifices nowadays, but ever Celt remembers what lies at the heart of the royal promise--that any true monarch stands between the people and their Gods, willing to bridge the distance... " [Many other refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]


Celt, continued

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