Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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Catholic, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Catholic United Kingdom 1320 C.E. Willis, Connie. Doomsday Book. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 157. "Father Roche told her that... The line between the spiritual world and the physical wasn't clearly drawn until the Renaissance, and the contemps routinely saw visions of angels, the Last Judgment, the Virgin Mary. Lady Imeyne... is still trying to convince Ellwys to send Gawyn to Osney to fetch a monk... Village-level priests in the 1300s were merely peasants who'd been taught the mass by rote and a smattering of Latin. " [Many other references to Catholicism/Christianity in the 1320 time period. Other refs. not in DB.]
Catholic United Kingdom 1360 C.E. Dickson, Gordon R. The Dragon on the Border. New York: Ace Books (1992); pg. 4. Pg. 4: "'All Saints preserve us!' [said] Brian, crossing himself, 'They ride either upon air or on invisible horses!' "; Pg. 13: "'For that, we give blessings to Holy Church,' rumbled Herrac... " [Other refs. not in DB.]
Catholic United Kingdom 1364 C.E. Dickson, Gordon R. The Dragon, the Earl, and the Troll. New York: Ace Books (1994); pg. 105. "'...On this Holy Day, to have one present here gifted with a Holy Vision is too precious a thing to risk losing. Therefore I make you responsible--and I will remind you, Sir James, of the covenant under which the Holy Church has permitted such as yourself with those certain arts known as Magick; and which puts you under the command of the Church at any time deemed necessary by one of authority like myself. It is my command to you that you ensure that Sir Brian has every chance to recall his vision.'

'Yes, my Lord,' said Jim...

'You shall have them,' said the Bishop... " [Other refs., to the Church, Bishops, etc., not in DB. At this point in time, in the fourteenth century, there is essentially one unified Western Christian church in England, not yet called 'Catholic'. No refs. to 'Catholic' by name in novel, but many refs. to the period's Christianity.]

Catholic United Kingdom 1367 C.E. Dickson, Gordon R. The Dragon in Lyonesse. New York: Tor (1998); pg. 98. Pg. 98: "'...because the Lady of the Bright Knight--she has no other name, by the by--is tainted with magick, and therefore cannot wed in the eyes of the Holy Church. She was a damosel of Morgan le Fay; and won her freedom from service in some way only the two of them and Merlin might know...' "; Pg. 110: "'I will swear it!' cried the Lady. 'Bring me a Holy Cross and I will swear to it. Oh, my Lords, I have kept him safe, lo these many years...' "
Catholic United Kingdom 1928 Baxter, Stephen. The Time Ships. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 206. "There was a game of football going on in one corner, with gas-masks piled up to serve as posts; I even heard speckles of laughter. Wallis told me that people would still turn out to the Speakers' Corner, to hear the Salvation Army, the National Secular Society, the Catholic Evidences Guild, the Anti-Fifth Column League... and so forth. "
Catholic United Kingdom 1962 Thomsen, Brian M. "Infallibility, Obedience, and Acts of Contrition " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 76. "'...An example must be made.'

'Like an example was made in Ireland, granting papal dispensation to all members of the IRA who died in action?'

'It worked. Britain is one, and the Church of England is no more.'

'But to absolve murderers and terrorists is wrong.'

'They had to confess their sins. They were absolved.'

'And got off free.' "

Catholic United Kingdom 1968 Roberts, Keith. "The Lady Margaret " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1966); pg. 197-198. [Alternate history.] "Durnovaria, England, 1968.
The appointed morning came, and they buried Eli Strange. The coffin, black and purple drapes twitched aside, eased down into the grave; the white webbings slid through the hands of the bearers in nomine Patris, et Fili, et Spiritus Sancti. . . . The earth took back her own. "
Catholic United Kingdom 1968 Roberts, Keith. "The Lady Margaret " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1966); pg. 201. Pg. 201: "With the Church openly backing the clamor of the Guilds for shorter hours and higher pay it looked as if the haulage companies were going to have to tighten their belts again... "; Pg. 202: "The memory of that still rankled the West at least. The economy of England was stable, for the first time in years; stability meant wealth, gold reserves. And gold, stacked anywhere but in the half-legendary coffers of the Vatican, meant danger . . . "
Catholic United Kingdom 1968 Roberts, Keith. "The Lady Margaret " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1966); pg. 203. "Maybe one day petrol propulsion might amount to something... But the hand of the Church would have to be lifted first. The Bull of 1910, Petroleum Veto, had limited the capacity of IC engines to 150 cc, and since then the hauliers had no real competition...

Mother of God, but it was cold! Jesse shrugged himself deeper into his jacket... "

Catholic United Kingdom 1968 Roberts, Keith. "The Lady Margaret " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1966); pg. 210. "Jesse curled his lip. 'Norman bastards' Dickon had called them. It was as accurate a description as any. True, they claimed Norman descent; but in this Catholic England of more than a thousand years after the Conquest, bloodlines of Norman, Saxon, and original Celt were hopelessly mixed. What distinctions existed were more or less arbitrary, reintroduced in accordance with the racial theories of Gisevius the Great a couple of centuries ago. Most people had at least a smattering of the five tongues of the land: the Norman French of the ruling classes, Latin of the Church, Modern English of commerce and trade, the outdated Middle English and Celtic of the churls. There were other languages of course: Gaelic, Cornish, and Welsh, all fostered by the Church, kept alive centuries after their use had worn thin. But it was good to chop a land piecemeal, set up barriers of language, as well as class. 'Divide and rule' had long been the policy, unofficially at least, of Rome. "
Catholic United Kingdom 1968 Roberts, Keith. "The Lady Margaret " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1966); pg. 211. "Cement manufacture was controlled rigidly by Rome, its price prohibitive. The embargo was deliberate of course; the stuff was far too handy for the erection of quick strong-points. Over the years there had been enough revolts in the country to teach caution even to the Popes. "
Catholic United Kingdom 1968 Roberts, Keith. "The Lady Margaret " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1966); pg. 212. "The air was full of din; the noise of the engines; shouts from the steersmen and drivers, the bawling of town marshalls and traffic wardens. Bands of Pope's Angels wound between the massive wheels, chanting carols and holding up their cups for offerings...

'Bishop Blaize's benision again, friend?'

Jesse grunted an affirmative...

'Belay that,' roared the policeman. 'What've ye got up there, that needs so much hurry?'

The driver... spat a cigarette butt overboard. 'Shellfish for 'Is 'Oliness,' he quipped. 'They're burning Rome tonight. . . .' The story of Pope Orlando dining on oysters while his mercenaries sacked Florence had already passed into legend. " [Much of story focuses on a strong Catholic Church in an alternative history timeline in which, apparently, Protestantism never arose. See also pg. 214, 220, 222, 230.]

Catholic United Kingdom 1976 Amis, Kingsley. The Alteration. New York: Viking Press (1976); pg. 1. "He [King Stephen III of England and her Empire] had been a good king, worthy of distinction in matters of faith and observances, enjoying mutually respectul relations with both Convocation and the Papal Cure, held in tender affection by the people. A large number of those attending his Requiem Mass would have been moved as much by a sense of personal loss as by simple duty or the desire to assist at a great occasion. Just as many, perhaps, were put in awe by the size and richness of the setting. Apart from Wren's magnificent dome, the most renowned of the sights to be seen was the vast Turner ceiling in commemoratio of the Holy Victory, the fruit of four and a half years' virtually uninterrupted work; the was nothing like it anywhere. The western window by Gainsborough, beginning to blaze now as the sun first caught it, showed the birth of St Helena, mother of Constantine the Great, at Colchester. "
Catholic United Kingdom 1976 Asimov, Isaac. "The Ultimate Crime " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984; copyright 1976); pg. 342. "'...I once met a Holmes fan--he may even have been a Baker Street Irregular--who told me he was working on a paper that would prove that both Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson were fervent Catholics and I said, 'Well, wasn't Doyle himself a Catholic?' which he was, of course. My friend turned a very cold eye on me and said, 'What has that to do with it?' ' "
Catholic United Kingdom 1985 Dickinson, Peter. The Green Gene. New York: Random House (1973); pg. 75. "Its plush mess was dominated by a large poster taped to one wall, which showed a vivid green face, a priest's habit, and an arm with a green hand pointing straight at the viewer. Beside the figure was printed, 'Your Church Needs You.'...

'That is a recruiting slogan for the first war against Germany, I believe,' he said.

'...but it's Irish, 1921. The English got out of Ireland then, only too glad to go, now that there was no money in agriculture, and left the Irish to fight it out among themselves, Prots in the north against Papists in the south. They're still at it. It's a bloody shambles...' " [More, not in DB.]

Catholic United Kingdom 1988 Adams, Douglas. The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul. New York: Simon and Schuster (1988); pg. 85. "'Turned very neatly indeed, Mr. Odwin,' said the nurse, 'I supervised the turning down of the sheets myself.'

'I'm glad of that, Sister Bailey, very glad,' said Odin. 'You have a fine eye for a trimly turned fold. It alarms me to know what I shall do without you.'

'Well, I'm not about to go anywhere, Mr. Odwin,' said sister Bailey, oozing happy reassurance...

'You're Irish, aren't you, Sister Bailey?' he asked...

'I am indeed so, Mr. Odwin.' " [The nurse is apparently a Catholic nun.]

Catholic United Kingdom 1988 Adams, Douglas. The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul. New York: Simon and Schuster (1988); pg. 167. "'Er, should I know that name?'

'Well,' said Kate slowly, 'it depends if you're alive or not, I suppose. He's the head of the Aries Rising Record Group. Less famous than the Pope, I grant you, but--you know of the Pope, I take it?'

'Yes, yes,' said Dirk impatiently. 'White-haired chap.'

'That's him. He seems to be about the only person of note this envelope hasn't been addressed to at some time...' "

Catholic United Kingdom 1992 Dukthas, Ann. A Time for the Death of a King. New York: St. Martin's Press (1995; c. 1994); pg. 6. [Referring to the year 1560.] "'Consequently, by the time she was seventeen, Mary was Queen of France and Queen of Scotland, and in England, the Catholic faction regarded her as their rightful monarch, dismissing Elizabeth, daughter of Anne Boleyn, as illegitimate.'

...'They were led by the Calvinist John Knox, a religious fanatic. He couldn't stand Catholics and he couldn't tolerate women.'

'I have met a few Knoxes in my life,' Ann said. " [Other refs., not in DB.]

Catholic United Kingdom 1997 Bradbury, Ray. "Virgin Resusitas " in Driving Blind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 218. "'Hold on to your hat. I've joined the Church.'

'You--what church?' I stammered.

'Good grief! There's only one!'

'You have a lot of Mormon friends, and a few Lutherans on the side . . .'

'My God,' she cried. 'Catholic, of course.'

'Since when have you liked Catholics? I thought you were raised in an Orange family, family from Cork, laughed at the Pope!'

'Silly. That was then, this is now. I am certified.'

'Give me that bottle.' I downed my second wine and refilled and shook my head. 'Now, give me that again. Slowly.'

'I've just come from Father Reilly's down the street.'

'who--?'

'He's the head priest at St. Ignatius. He's been preparing me, you know, instruction, the last month or so.' " [Many more refs. throughout story, not in DB.]

Catholic United Kingdom 1997 Bradbury, Ray. "Virgin Resusitas " in Driving Blind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 222. "'You mean you brought me all the way over here just to tell me you are a practicing Catholic and have unloaded fifteen years of accumulated guilt?' "
Catholic United Kingdom 1998 Benford, Gregory. Timescape. New York: Simon & Schuster (1980); pg. 90. "Suddenly music blared over the Whim's stereo: 'An' de Devil, he do de dance whump whump with Joan de Arc--' "
Catholic United Kingdom 1999 Banks, Iain. The Business. New York: Simon & Schuster (1999); pg. 111. "'Are you perhaps a Catholic, Kate?'

'What?'

'You looked so sad. The plot in which Guy Fawkes was taking part was an attempt to restore the Catholic succession in England, was it not? I thought perhaps you were lamenting to yourself his lack of success in blowing up the Houses of Parliament.'

I smiled. 'No, Prince. I was never a Catholic.' "

Catholic United Kingdom 2020 Aldiss, Brian. "Headless " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001; c. 1994); pg. 70. "Behind him stood a nun, Sister Madonna, his sole companion in these last days. She was chosen because she had once made a mistaken pilgrimage to Ashkhabad, capital of Turkmenistan, believing she was travelling to Allahabad in India. "
Catholic United Kingdom 2030 McAuley, Paul J. Fairyland. New York: Avon Books (1997; c 1995); pg. 31. "The sun is brutal, and when Alex puts on his big black hat Perse laughs and says it makes him look like a nun in drag. "
Catholic United Kingdom 2030 McAuley, Paul J. Fairyland. New York: Avon Books (1997; c 1995); pg. 75. "'...They do what your viruses do, only it' purer, very intense and very precise. I made the first strain. It gives you a vision of the Madonna--the Mother of God, not the pop star. I let it loose, and the hackers took over...' "
Catholic United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 320. "The music was heavenly, both Gregorian and Ambrosian, and the church was packed. There were monks and friars and abbots of every description, standing about in sandals among the knights, whose armour flashed by candlelight. There was even a Franciscan bishop, wearing grey, with a red hat. The copes and mitres were almost all of solid gold cloth crusted with diamonds, and there was such a putting of them on and taking of them off that the whole cathedral rustled. As for the Latin, it was talked at such a speed that the rafters rang with genitive plurals--and there was such a prelatical issuing of admonitions, exhortations and benedictions that it was a wonder the whole congregation did not go to heaven on the spot. Even the Pope, who was as keen as anybody that the thing should go with a swing, had kindly sent a number of indulgences for everybody he could think of. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Catholic United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 376. "Sir Bedivere came and admitted how he had swapped off his adulterous wife's head. He had brought it with him, and was told to take it to the Pope as a penance--he became very holy after that. "
Catholic United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 395. "There was a time when it was of vital interest to us to find out whether there was a God or not. Obviously the existence or otherwise of a future life must be of the very first importance to somebody who is going to live her present one, because her manner of living it must hinge on the problem. There was a time when Free Love versus Catholic Morality was a question of as much importance to our hot bodies as if a pistol had been clapped to our heads. " [Also, pg. 456.]
Catholic United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 466. "'...And so far as this Quest for the Holy Grail is concerned, he seems to have been doing a sort of advanced course in Catholic dogma.' " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
Catholic United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 564. "As Malory pictures him, Arthur of England was the champion of a civilization which is misrepresented in the history books. The serf of chivalry was not a slave for whom there was no hope. On the contrary, he had at least three legitimate ways of rising, the greatest of which was the Catholic Church. With the assistance of Arthur's policies this church--still the greatest of all corporations free to learned men on earth--had become a highway open to the lowest slave. A Saxon peasant was Pope in Adrian IV, the son of a carpenter in Gregory VII. "
Catholic United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 569. "Did you know that in these dark ages which were visible from Guenevere's window, there was so much decency in the world that the Catholic Church could impose a peace to all their fighting--which it called The Truce of God--and which lasted from Wednesday to Monday, was well as during the whole of Advent and Lent? Do you think that they, with their Battles, Famine, Black Death and Serfdom, were less enlightened than we are with our Wars, Blockade, Influence and Conscription? "
Catholic United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 626. "'Even if God won't, he remarked bitterly, 'we could apply to the Pope.'

'The Pope!'

He looked up.

'What do you mean?'

'Why, Lance, the thing you said. . . . If the Pope was to send bulls to both sides, saying he would excommunicate us if we didn't come to terms? If we appealed for a papal ruling? Bors and the others would have to accept it. Surely. . . .' " [More.]

Catholic United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 36. "Baptized a Presbyterian, he counted himself a Unitarian, following Priestley's rational example. His declared beliefs was in one God, free of papist trimmings. "
Catholic United Kingdom: England 1810 Powers, Tim. The Anubis Gates. New York: Ace (1983); pg. 126. Pg. 126: "...from St. Martin's Lane to St. Paul's Cathedral... "; Pg. 186: Chartres Cathedral; Pg. 189: "...a face like Michelangelo's Adam on the Sistine Chapel ceiling. "; Pg. 309: Westminster Cathedral
Catholic United Kingdom: England 1905 Gibson, William & Bruce Sterling. The Difference Engine. New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 26. "...in the window of a firm of Oxford Street instrument-makers. Mick handled it with a caution that was very nearly comical, like some Papist called upon to move the dust of a dead Pope. "
Catholic United Kingdom: England 1953 Kerr, David. "Epiphany for Aliens " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 471. [Author's self-written biography, in the introduction to his story.] "Born in Carlisle England (near the Scottish border) in 1942... I was educated in the State system until the age of 11, when I transferred to a Roman Catholic seminary, Ushaw College, Durham, considerably less horrifying than Joyce's but similarly traumatic. At the age of 18 I became disillusioned with the seminary, left it and shortly afterward the Catholic Church "
Catholic United Kingdom: England 1976 Amis, Kingsley. The Alteration. New York: Viking Press (1976); pg. 1. "Hubert Anvil's voice rose above the sound of the choir and full orchestra, reaching the vertex of the loftiest dome in the Old World and the western doors of the longest nave in Christendom. For this was the Cathedral Basilica of St. George at Coverley, the mother church of all England and of the English Empire overseas. That bright May afternoon it was as full as it had ever been in the three centuries since its consecration, and it could scarcely have been a more distinguished assembly at any time: the young King William V himself; [many world leaders listed] these and thousands besides had congregated for the laying to rest of His Most Devout Majesty, King Stephen III of England and her Empire. "
Catholic United Kingdom: England 1976 Amis, Kingsley. The Alteration. New York: Viking Press (1976); pg. 19-20. "'Down on your knees, unhappy children. Pray to God to remit some small part of your dreadful punishmen. Ask His divine mercy for the grievous sins you have wrought this day... And I ask Thy favour and protectio for all men in this house, and for all the children too, especially Thomas . . . and Decuman and Mark, and for my father and mother and Anthony, and, oh, I pray for the peace of the soul of Thy servant King Stephen the Third, and I ask Thy favour and protection for myself and for my soul, through Jesus Christ Our Lord. Amen.' "
Catholic United Kingdom: England 1976 Amis, Kingsley. The Alteration. New York: Viking Press (1976); pg. 6-7. "On the wall above these hung in each case the statutory crucifix and devotional picture: an Annunciation and a St. Jerome with a demented-looking lion. They showed some skill and taste, to be expected in a first-rate bedchamber at the Inn of the Twelve Apostles, King Stephen II Street, Coverly. "
Catholic United Kingdom: England 1979 Ballard, J. G. The Unlimited Dream Company. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1979); pg. 16. Pg. 16: "'Father Wingate--he's come round.' Dr. Miriam steadied me against her shoulder. 'That's one miracle I concede to you.'

'I can see that Miriam.' The priest made no attempt to come any nearer, as if wary of me, rebuffed by my return to the living. 'Well, thank God. . . . But let him rest.' ";

Pg. 23: "The clergyman had pulled me onto the grass, and at this point in the confusion some lunatic had tried to revive me. "; Pg. 40: "I saw that Father Wingate was sitting in the rear seat behind the two policemen. He stared at me through the closed window with the pensive gaze of someone who has quietly turned himself in to the police... I could see Father Wingate watching me from the back seat of the police car, like a fellow conspirator keeping his own counsel, careful to give away nothing... " [Some other refs. not in DB. Novel does not appear to deal extensively with the Catholic Church, or with Christianity, although there are other refs. to the priest character.]

Catholic United Kingdom: England 1979 Ballard, J. G. The Unlimited Dream Company. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1979); pg. 74. "But his brusque handling of the prayer books and hymnals, of the gilt-framed portraits of saints and apostles which he heaped into the wooden crate, convinced me that he had some other motive, some scheme in which I was to play a role. Father Wingate was clearing the decks of his life with too much relish

Without thinking, I found myself rising to his physical rivalry. We moved from pew to pew, dragging these lengths of spent timber against the walls... I dragged the last of the pews across the open nave, twisting it out of the priest's hands as he tried to keep up with me... Breathing harshly, Father Wingate leaned against his thighs in the center of the dust-filled nave. Flecks of my blood stained his floral shirt... Later, when I had swept the floor of the nave, Father Wingate unlocked the doors and let the fresh morning air clear the dust from the church... "

Catholic United Kingdom: England 1982 Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. iii. "'. . . Morgan le Fay was not married, but put to school in a nunnery, where she became a great mistress of magic.'

--Malory, Morte d'Arthur "

Catholic United Kingdom: England 1982 Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. v. [Acknowledgments.] "For material on pre-Augustinian Christianity, I have used, by permission, a privately circulated manuscript entitled 'The Pre-Constantine Mass: A Conjecture,' by Father Randall Garrett; I have also drawn upon materials from the Syro-Chaldean liturgies, including the Holy Orbana of St. Seraphion, as well as liturgical materials from local groups of St. Thomas Christians and pre-Nicene Catholic groups. "
Catholic United Kingdom: London 1990 Byatt, A.S. Possession. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1990); pg. 398. "We all went to hear Mass at the church at midnight. My father and I always go. My grandfather would not enter the church; his principles were republican and atheist. I am not sure that my father's religious beliefs would please the Cure, if he were to discuss them with him, which he does not. But he beliefs strongly in the continuance of the life of the community, the Breton people, which includes Christmas and all its meanings, old and new. She says she is a member of the Church of England in England, but that here the faith of her fathers is the Catholic faith, in its Breton form. " [More.]
Catholic United Kingdom: London 1995 Ryman, Geoff. 253. New York: St. Martin's Press (1998); pg. 129. "Perhaps Italian? Calm, beautiful, in a Virgin Mary way... "
Catholic United Kingdom: London 1995 Ryman, Geoff. 253. New York: St. Martin's Press (1998); pg. 172. "So what is it with him? Under it all, John's a good Catholic boy from the quiet suburbs, who burns candles every Sunday, and confesses minor sins of lust or gluttony. "
Catholic United Kingdom: London 2001 Stroyar, J.N. The Children's War. New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 747. "'He was Jewish?' Peter and Zosia asked simultaneously.

'Seem so. Anyway, he got a job in London. I guess he told the immigration authorities he was Catholic because there was no record of his being Jewish in their files when they got captured by the Nazis. Or maybe they didn't record that kind of information...' "

Catholic United Kingdom: London 2012 Clarke, Arthur C. The Ghost from the Grand Banks. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 137. "Eva sometimes wondered what dear Sister Margarita would have thought of her star pupil's present vocation; the last time she had wept was when the notice of her old friend's death had reached her from the Mother Superior. And she remembered, with wistful amusement, the question she had once been tempted to ask her tutor: exactly why should a vow of perpetual chastity be considered any nobler--any holier--than a vow of perpetual constipation?

Sister Margarita already knew that little Eva Merrick was not meant for the church; but Eva still sent a generous donation to St. Jude's every Christmas. "

Catholic United Kingdom: London 2030 McAuley, Paul J. Fairyland. New York: Avon Books (1997; c 1995); pg. 43. "'Sometimes I wish I was a Catholic,' Alex says.

Ma Nakome laughs and punches him the arm and starts to get up, like a summery mountain rising. 'You are a crazy man,' she says. "

Catholic United Kingdom: Scotland 1432 C.E. King, J. Robert. "Wyrm of the Loch " in Testament of the Dragon (Weis, Margaret, ed.) New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 76. Pg. 76: "'You will go to Loch Ness, to the Cameron Abbey. There is a priest visiting there, treasurer of the Church at Glasgow--Robert de Moffethe. Slay him.'

Justinian blinked. His first kill had been a priest, nearly fifty years ago, just after Gwendolyne died. Slaying so-called men of God always through back the piquant grief of his loss. 'Another priest? Why?'

'Because it suits me,' came the reply.

The Earl of sterling sighed deeply. He opened his mind to the Dragon. 'I will.' ";

Pg. 79: "A robed monk wandered the torchlit cloister. He changed some tuneless devotion, and, strangely, bore a club over one shoulder... The monk was not alone. Three others walked the cloister, one in each colonnade, clubs in their fists. The clerics moved synchronously, their steps marked by a military snap.

It was an odd hour for diligence. . . . The priest chanted prayers... " [Many other refs. to the abbey and the priest, not in DB.]

Catholic United Kingdom: Scotland 1567 C.E. Dukthas, Ann. A Time for the Death of a King. New York: St. Martin's Press (1995; c. 1994); pg. 160. Pg. 160: "Her two familiars, Walsingham and Cecil, had crept like Job's comforters about her. They wove their nightmare tapestry before her eyes; a Catholic Queen backed by French troops pouring across the Channel as her grandfather Henry Tudor had some seventy-five years previously. In Scotland, the Great Lords, eager to avenge the defeats of Flodden and Solway Moss, would mass on the border, two swords to England's throat. "; Pg. 203: "'And Mary would have kept it shut,' Segalla declared. 'She wanted peace. Born a Catholic, raised a Catholic, nevertheless Mary came back here, committed to toleration for all faiths.' " [Extensive Catholic refs. throughout much of novel.]
Catholic United Kingdom: Scotland 1997 Lobdell, Scott & Elliot S. Maggin. Generation X. New York: Berkley (1997); pg. 79. "'So did you go to Catholic school?' Walter asked Chamber.

'No, I--' Jono paused and if he had a mouth he would have smiled. ' "Was always fond of the sisters, though.' " [Conversation at Xavier's school in Massachusetts, but refers to Jono's pre-GenX life in UK.]

Catholic United Kingdom: Scotland 2000 Cox, Greg. X-Men & the Avengers: Gamma Quest: Book 3: Friend or Foe?. New York: Berkley Boulevard (2000); pg. 18. "A shame that Iron Man's employer, the famous Tony Stark, is nowhere nearby, Nightcrawler thought, the man is supposed to be a mechanical genius. A devout Catholic, the demonic-looking X-Man prayed that some of Stark's brilliance had rubbed off on his armor-plated bodyguard. " [Some other refs. to Kurt Wagner, Nightcrawler, in novel, but this is the only place that mention his Catholicism.]
Catholic United Kingdom: Scotland: Muir Isle 1985 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 26: "Legion ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Apr. 1985); pg. 4. Pg. 4: Tom Corsi: "Shoot, I knew I should'a paid more attention in catechism class. A guy can never think of a decent prayer when he really needs one. "; Pg. 5: Tom's thoughts: "I don't like the way he's [Legion] looking at us! Why us, Lord, ain't we been through enough?! "
Catholic United Kingdom: Scotland: Muir Isle 1986 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 44: "Runaway! ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Oct. 1986); pg. 16. Pg. 16: Scottish police officer: "Saints preserve us--I'm dreamin'?! "; Pg. 20: Roberto's thoughts: "Madonna, my skin--smoldering! But I won't let go! " [As he tries to subdue Legion, who is on a rampage. Roberto's exclamation reflects his Brazilian Catholic heritage.]
Catholic USA 1761 Green, Roland J. "The King of Poland's Foot Cavalry " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 245. "There were rumors this afternoon of harsh words and even worse between our brigade and the Massachusetts men. It seems that the gentlemen of the Bay Colony dispute Americans learning the martial methods of Papists.

I cannot see that the Roman faith is less acceptable in a Pole than in a Marylander--although to be sure the Bay Colony folks have little use for their southern brethren either! "

Catholic USA 1907 Simmons, Dan. "Sleeping with Teeth Women " in Lovedeath. New York: Warner Books (1993); pg. 81. "Almost eighty years ago I entered my first Catholic church--a small mission chapel on the plains, it has been gone since before the great Depression--and I remember my shock at hearing the priest explain to us the idea of the Eucharist. 'This is the body of Christ,' he said through the converted Brule Sioux who spoke his words to us. 'This is his actual flesh, of which we partake.'

I remember my family's shock as we discussed this in our lodge that night. We had known the Wasicun to be greedy--the very word for white man means 'fat takers'--but we had not known them to be cannibals. We had not known that they ate the blood and flesh of their God.

...'This thing the Wasicun priest has said is not bad,' said my tunkashila. 'Perhaps the flesh of their God is turned into bread the way the flesh of our people is turned into pipestone...' "

Catholic USA 1939 Thomsen, Brian M. "Infallibility, Obedience, and Acts of Contrition " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 69. "'Or the U.S.'

'Which wouldn't be so bad either. I've had many conversations with the ambassador to the court of Saint James, and he sees many great things in America's future, and who knows--that might even include a Catholic president. That would be a most valuable ally.' "

Catholic USA 1943 Bishop, Michael. Brittle Innings. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 312. "'Il Duce's an evil man,' Miss Giselle said, 'but must we destroy the Holy See to uproot him? Is it necessary, sir, to bomb to rubble both the Vatican and the monuments of Rome to unseat this petty despot?' [Mussolini]

'Not at all,' FDR said. 'Nor shall we do so. I've urged the Vatican to try to get him to declare Rome an open city--to remove all military bases and personnel in and about Rome to the countryside, and to desist from using the city's railroad facilities as reprovisioning conduits for either Hitler's boys or the Italian infantry. If Benito listens to reason, Rome survives unscathed. If not, well, to my mind there's not one Roman statue or one relic in the Vatican worth the blood of a single American soldier.' "

Catholic USA 1950 Williams, Walter Jon "Witness " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 121. "MR. RANKIN: I would like to assure the Jewish gentleman from New York that he will encounter no bias on account of his race. Any man who believes in the fundamental principles of Christianity and lives up to them, whether he is a Catholic or Protestant, has my respect and confidence.

WITNESS: May I say to the committee that I object to the characterization of 'Jewish gentleman.'

MR. RANKIN: Do you object to being called a Jew or being called a gentleman? What are you kicking about? "

Catholic USA 1955 Haldeman II, Jack C. & Barbara Delaplace. "That'll Be the Day " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 131. "'...but this country's not ready for a Jewish president.'

'I believe Sal is Catholic,' said Bill Haley.

'Jewish, Catholic, whatever,' said Freed with a shrug. "

Catholic USA 1959 Willis, Connie. Bellwether. New York: Bantam Spectra (1997; 1st ed. 1996); pg. 3. "Hula hoop (March 1958-June 1959)... sold for $1.98 to adults and kids alike. Nuns, Red Skelton, geishas, Jane Russell, and the Queen of Jordan... "
Catholic USA 1963 Freedman, Nancy. Joshua Son of None. New York: Delacorte Press (1973); pg. 18. "The litany for the dead, the Apostolic blessing flowed in black robes, 'Ego faculate mihi ab Apostolica Sede tributa, indulgentiam--in nomine Patis, et Filii, et Spiritus Sancti.' 'Baruch atah adonai Elohenu melech ha olam,' intoned a minyan of old Jews... The old Jews nod and concur in the death.

And the priest draws a cross in blank air and agrees... Thor Bitterbaum woke, remembering his dream. Wondering if it was a dream. Wise men of two world religions warned him in Hebrew and Latin. "

Catholic USA 1963 Grimwood, Ken. Replay. New York: Arbor House (1986); pg. 41. "'Hey,' he said. 'One of those drive-ins we passed on the way into town was showing Dr. No; want to check it out?'

'Jesus, Frank, how many times have you seen that movie already?'

'Three or four. It gets better every time.'

'Enough already. I've OD's on James Bond.'

Frank looked at him quizzically. 'You what?'

'Never mind...'

'What's the matter, you in mourning for the Pope? I didn't even know you were Catholic.'

Jeff laughed, reached for his shoes. 'Oh, what the hell, all right. At least it's not Roger Moore.'

'Who the hell is Roger Moore?'

'He'll be a saint someday.'

Frank shook his head and frowned. 'Are we talking about the Pope dying, or James Bond, or what?...' "

Catholic USA 1963 Grimwood, Ken. Replay. New York: Arbor House (1986); pg. 139. "'...I still thought I was dead, and this was some bizarre way God had of giving me one last glimpse at my time on earth. I was terrified of the front door; I really believed that if I walked through it I'd be in Heaven, or Hell, or Limbo, or whatever.'

'You were Catholic?'

'No, my mind was just swirling with all these vague images and fears...' " [Also pg. 181.]



Catholic, continued

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