Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Catholic, France

Catholic, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Catholic France: Paris 1738 Suskind, Patrick. Perfume: The Story of a Murderer. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1986; c. 1985); pg. 9. Pg. 9: "'God bless you, Father Terrier, I wish you a good day!' "; Pg. 10: "'He really is an adorable child. He's rosy pink, he doesn't cry, and he's been baptized.'

'He's possessed by the devil.'

...'Impossible! It is absolutely impossible for an infant to be possessed by the devil...' ";

Pg. 11: "'You priests will have to decide whether all this has anything to do with the devil or not, Father Terrier. That's not for such as me to say...' " [Many other refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]

Catholic galaxy 1992 Snodgrass, Melinda M. Wild Cards X: Double Solitaire. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 225. Pg. 128: "The central hub combined the beauty and reverence of a Gothic cathedral, the manic energy of... the New York Stock Exchange... "; Pg. 180: "'We could give her a bazooka to hold. The Madonna of the AK-47.' "; Pg. 225: "...but her soft hair looked like spun caramel, and the pure oval shape of her face reminded Jay of a painting he'd seen in one of his catechism books--the Madonna of the Cherries. It was the only picture of the Virgin he'd ever liked. Instead of looking sappy the Virgin looked sensual, and she seemed genuinely thrilled to be kissing her baby. "
Catholic galaxy 2049 Blish, James. A Case of Conscience. New York: Ballantine (1979; c. 1958); pg. 15. "The calendar caught his eye... The date was April 19, 2049. Almost Easter... To Ruiz-Sanchez personally, however, the year date was almost equally significant, for 2050 was to be a Holy Year.

The Church had returned to the ancient custom, first recognized officially in 1300 by Boniface VIII, of proclaiming the great pardon only once every half-century. If Ruiz-Sanchez was not in Rome next year when the Holy Door was opened, it would never be opened again in his lifetime. " [This novel deals heavily with theological issues and feature extensive references to Jesuits and Catholicism. Most refs. not in DB.]

Catholic galaxy 2049 Blish, James. A Case of Conscience. New York: Ballantine (1979; c. 1958); pg. 20. "A high ecclesiastic heritage to be sure, but the latter-day Lucien, a lapsed Catholic, was a political figure... "
Catholic galaxy 2050 Anthony, Patricia. "Bluebonnets " in Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997; c. 1989); pg. 74. "Mama's smile broadens into a sweet benediction of a smile, a smile Lou has seen on the painted faces of Blessed Virgin Marys... Mr. Parks takes a medication disc from his pocket. He is smiling, too. A Jesus-with-the-children sort of smile. "
Catholic galaxy 2050 Blish, James. A Case of Conscience. New York: Ballantine (1979; c. 1958); pg. 128. "The Catholic Church in 2050 was still fourth in rank in terms of number of adherents, with Islam, the Buddhists, and the Hindi sects commanding the greater number of worshippers, in that order; after Catholicism, there was the confusing number of Protestant groups, which might well outnumber the Catholics if one included all those in the world who had no faith worth mentioning... "
Catholic galaxy 2050 Blish, James. A Case of Conscience. New York: Ballantine (1979; c. 1958); pg. 26. "And there was such a thing as an excess of devotion, a form of pride among the pious which the Church had long found peculiarly difficult to make clear to them. At its worst, it produced the hospital saints, whose attraction to noisomeness so peculiarly resembled the vermin-worship of the Hindi sects--or a St. Simon Stylites, who though undoubtedly acceptable to God had been for centuries very bad public relations for the church. "
Catholic galaxy 2075 Card, Orson Scott & Kathryn H. Kidd. Lovelock. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 34. [Year is estimated.] "Mamie was absolutely transparent--to me, at least. She had tended to be so well-bred that she hardly noticed Carol Jeanne's international renown--fame was just another burden that people of 'our' class have to bear. Yet she clung to every scrap of reflected glory that she could get hold of, all the while resenting the fact that it was her Catholic-born daughter-in-law and not her dear little white-bread boy who earned all the attention. " [Carol Jeanne, the scientist who was Catholic before marrying into a Episcopalian family, is the main human character in this novel.]
Catholic galaxy 2075 Card, Orson Scott & Kathryn H. Kidd. Lovelock. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 50. [Year is estimated.] "Dividing communities by language [aboard the colony ship] made sense to me. But it was a typical human absurdity that, after language, the next most important set of divisions was religious. Muslims, Buddhists, Catholics, Jews, Hindus, Espiritistas: All had their own villages. "
Catholic galaxy 2075 Card, Orson Scott & Kathryn H. Kidd. Lovelock. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 51. [Year is estimated.] "A certain woman might be the greatest gaiologist in the world, and perfectly rational, but she had grown up Catholic, and so her Episcopalian mother-in-law would always look down on her and 'her people.' " [Referring to the reason for separating the colony ship into villages by faith group.]
Catholic galaxy 2075 Card, Orson Scott & Kathryn H. Kidd. Lovelock. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 62. [Year is estimated.] "Penelope looked disgruntled; then she swelled up importantly and took a deep breath. 'Well, I'll have to tell you about it myself. First of all, we're Presbyterians here.'

'Mamie sniffed. 'There's not a Presbyterian in the bunch of us.' she said. 'I'm Congregationalist, and Stef and Red and the girls are Episcopalian. Of course, with a name like Cocciolone, Carol Jeanne just has to be Catholic.' Mamie treated it as if it were an old family joke. But her smile was tight. Lines radiated from her mouth like legs on a spider. "

Catholic galaxy 2075 Card, Orson Scott & Kathryn H. Kidd. Lovelock. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 156. [Year is estimated.] "'...Yet I've had you in my house and endured your whims and your snobbery and your vicious comments about Italians and Catholics and Cocciolones...' "
Catholic galaxy 2075 Card, Orson Scott & Kathryn H. Kidd. Lovelock. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 174. [Year is estimated.] "I have never had much use for human religions... Nevertheless, I enjoyed the weekly Presbyterian services as much as Carol Jeanne loathed them. She needed the solemn rituals of mass, but I preferred the greater casualness of Protestant worship. Would old Mrs. Burke drop her hymnal on the organ keyboard during prayers?... These were variables that were sorely lacking in the Catholic religion. "
Catholic galaxy 2075 Card, Orson Scott & Kathryn H. Kidd. Lovelock. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 177. [Year is estimated.] "Naturally she was uncomfortable attending Presbyterian services instead of the Catholic ones of her childhood. "
Catholic galaxy 2075 Card, Orson Scott & Kathryn H. Kidd. Lovelock. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 51-52. [Year is estimated.] "We were in a village in ourselves, no matter that officially she was going to belong to an arbitrary clumping of effete Christians called Mayflower Village. She would be a Catholic among Congregationalists, I a low-order primate among Presbyterians... "
Catholic galaxy 2100 Bear, Greg. Anvil of Stars. New York: Warner Books (1992); pg. 204. Pg. 204: "'You're so big and strong, a strapping theoretical fellow,' Hakim said with a smile. 'Catholic cannot take a dare from a Muslim?'

Giacomo squinted. 'Bolsh,' he said. 'My parents didn't even go to church. ";

Pg. 205: "'The Pope died with Earth,' Giacomo said. 'Isn't that something? The moms didn't save the Pope. I wonder why.' "

Catholic galaxy 2102 Heinlein, Robert A. Starship Troopers. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1959); pg. 7. [A Catholic chaplain is mentioned.] "Jelly glanced over at Sergeant Migliaccio, first section leader. 'Five minutes for the Padre,' he stated. Some of the boys dropped out of ranks, went over and knelt in front of Migliaccio, and not necessarily those of his creed, either--Moslems, Christians, Gnostis, Jews, however wanted a word with him before the drop, he was there. I've heard tell that there used to be military outfits whose chaplains did not fight alongside the others, but I've never been able to see how that could work. I mean, how can a chaplain bless anything he's not willing to do himself? In any case, in the Mobile Infantry, everybody drops and everybody fights, chaplain and cook and Old Man's writer... "
Catholic galaxy 2102 Heinlein, Robert A. Starship Troopers. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1959); pg. 7. [A Catholic chaplain is mentioned.] "I didn't go over [to the chaplain]. I was always afraid somebody would see me shake if I did, and, anyhow the Padre could bless me just as handily from where he was. But he came over to me as the last stragglers stood up and pressed his helmet against mine to speak privately. 'Johnnie,' he said quietly, 'this is your first drop as a non-com... Don't buy a farm. You know your job; just do it. Don't try to win a medal.'

'Uh, thanks, Padre. I shan't.'

He added something gently in a language I don't know, patted me on the shoulder, and hurried backto his section. "

Catholic galaxy 2103 Heinlein, Robert A. Starship Troopers. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1959); pg. 113. "My daily shipside job, aside from cleaning, was servicing electronic equipment under the close supervision of 'Padre' Migliaccio, the section leader... "
Catholic galaxy 2150 Williams, Walter Jon. Angel Station. New York: Tor (1989); pg. 24. [Year is estimated] "'Marco's not planning on dying anytime soon, right?'

'He'll live forever. He's got this deal with God, I think.' He gave an apologetic grin. 'He's a serious Old Catholic. Got a shrine to Our Lady in the fuge, next to his office. He's in there a lot, cutting deals with the angels.' "

Catholic galaxy 2200 Bradley, Marion Zimmer. "Elbow Room " (published 1980) in The Norton Book of Science Fiction (Ursula K. Le Guin & Brian Atterbery, editors). New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1993); pg. 414. [Year is estimated.] "'Bless you, my child.' Father Nicholas is there, although his Mass must be long over. I sometimes wonder if this doesn't violate the sanctity of the confessional, that he cannot help knowing which of his congregation is kneeling there; I am the only one who ever gets up before second-dawn. And I don't really know whether I have sinned or not. How could I sin against God or my fellow man, when I am thousands or millions of miles away from all but five or six of them? "; Pg. 416: "He reminds me to turn on the monitor in my room and he will say Mass for me tomorrow. And again I am certain that there is nobody there, that it is a program, in the computer; is there any other reason we do not all assemble for Christian fellowship? " [Other refs. not in DB. Story deals extensively with Catholic doctrine.]
Catholic galaxy 2200 Clarke, Arthur C. "The Star " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1955); pg. 123. [Year estimated] "It is three thousand light-years to the Vatican. Once I believed that space could have no power over Faith. Just as I believed that the heavens declared the glory of God's handiwork. Now I have seen that handiwork, and my faith is sorely troubled.

I stare at the crucifix that hangs on the cabin wall above the Mark VI computer, and for the first time in my life I wonder if it is no more than an empty symbol.

I have told no one yet, but the truth cannot be concealed. The data are there for anyone to read, recorded on the countless miles of magnetic tape and photographs we are carrying back to Earth. Other scientists can interpret them as easily as I can--more easily, in all probability. I am not one who would condone tampering with the Truth which often gave my Order a bad name in the olden days. " [Story's narrator is a Jesuit priest. Many refs. to Catholicism throughout story, not all in DB.]

Catholic galaxy 2200 Silverberg, Robert. Starborne. New York: Bantam (1997; co. 1996); pg. 22. "...there was still some value in valiantly claiming, 'I am a Welshman' or 'I am a communicant of the Roman Catholic Church' or 'I carry the blood of the Norman aristocracy.' Such people were considered quaint and eccentric; but there were plenty of them, even now. "
Catholic galaxy 2266 Anderson, Poul. "Appendix A: Design for Two Worlds " in Murasaki (Robert Silverberg, ed.) New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 262. "...we need to explain why our human travelers are going to Murasaki's worlds in the first place... The only rational reason I can see for spending the resources necessary would be pure scientific inquiry. Nonrational reasons might include national prestige, or missionary fervor. Possibly Islam or the Catholic church could get up the money to send a missionary expedition out, and under certain circumstances might want to do so, assuming they supposed the Genjians and Chujoans had souls to save. "
Catholic galaxy 2278 Bear, Greg. "Mandala " in The Wind from a Burning Woman. Sauk City, WI: Arkham House (1983; story copyright 1978); pg. 136. Pg. 136: "'Jeshua.' It was the chief of the guard and the council of laws, Sam Daniel the Catholic. His father and Sam Daniel had been friends before his father disappeared. 'Time for the Synedrium to convene.'

...The representative of the seventy judges, the Septuagint, called the gathering to order.. "; Pg. 140: "'Enough!' cried the chief of the guard, Jeshua stopped and blinked at San Daniel the Catholic. " [Other refs. to this character 'Sam Daniel the Catholic,' and other refs. to Catholicism throughout story, not all in DB. A central theme of this story is Christianity vs. Judaism.]

Catholic galaxy 2278 Bear, Greg. "Mandala " in The Wind from a Burning Woman. Sauk City, WI: Arkham House (1983; story copyright 1978); pg. 168. "That had been years before the Synedrium had stiffened the separation laws between Catholic and Habiru rituals. His father and most of his acquaintances had been Habiru and spoke Hebrew. But prominent members of the community, such as Sam Daniel, had by long family tradition worshiped Jesus as more than a prophet, according to established creeds grouped under the title Catholicism. His father had not resented the Catholics for their ideas.

At that communion, not only had Habiru and Catholic worshiped, but also the now separate Muslims and a few diverse creeds best left forgotten. "

Catholic galaxy 2300 Dickson, Gordon R. "Soldier, Ask Not " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1964); pg. 422-423. [Year estimated] "'Name, sir?' he said. 'Business on St. Marie?'

...'Follow the highway straight to Joseph's Town...'

...'All right. You go to New San Marcos...'

...Above the edge of the blue uniform collar on the right side of his neck I could see an inch or two of fine silver chain, bright against winter-pale skin. The crucifix attached to it would be down under his shirt. 'The Friendly soldiers have been here two years now. How do people like them?' "

Pg. 424: "There was a St. Christopher's medal on the car's instrument panel... The autopilot of the car threaded me through a small, neat, typical St. Marie City of about a hundred thousand people. " [This story evidently takes place on a Catholic-colonized world. Catholicism not mentioned by name, and the religion may more properly be thought of as 'Catholic-derived.' Other refs. not in DB.]

Catholic galaxy 2300 Shunn, William. "Dance of the Yellow-Breasted Luddites " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000); pg. 181. "Hannah... She was an atheist herself, although one of her mothers had tried to inflict neo-Catholic doctrine upon her as a child. "
Catholic galaxy 2368 Neason, Rebecca. Guises of the Mind (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 16. "Troi was seated across the table from Mother Veronica. The nun had stayed quiet throughout the meal... To the counselor's practiced eye, the nun looked troubled and exhausted.

Seated to Troi's left, Sister Julian was as animated as Mother Veronica was reticent. 'It was 1873, not 4, when our Order was founded, Captain,' she was saying. 'In October. The 4th of October--the feast day of Saint Francis of Assisi, whose Rule we follow.'

Then Sister Julian stopped and laughed. 'You'll have to forgive me, Captain,' she said. 'I find history a fascinating subject, and I tend to become rather passionate when I'm discussing it.'

...'I am... a history enthusiast myself... In fact, aside from the wonderful work you do... part of what interests my about your Order is the fact that you have survived the centuries. Even now, when religions no longer play such a pervasive part in society, your Order seems to be thriving.' " [More about this Catholic order throughout novel.]

Catholic galaxy 2368 Neason, Rebecca. Guises of the Mind (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 18. "'Then your work is mostly with homeless and war-traumatized children?' Riker asked.

'Oh no, Commander,' Sister Julian answered. 'That was only how our Order was established. Our work, our mission to use the Church term, is to provide a loving home for all children. Any child, regardless of need or condition, is taken in and cherished. And throughout the centuries there is little we have not seen--the homeless, the abused, the sick--sometimes terminally--the openly rebellious who are really looking for security, the autistic who are locked behind the curtain of their own minds, the mentally deficient, the physically challenged--all of them find a home within our walls.' " [The Little Mothers, a fictional Catholic order, is central to the novel, although the word 'Catholic' is rarely used.]

Catholic galaxy 2368 Neason, Rebecca. Guises of the Mind (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 40. "Mother Veronica took a ragged breath. 'One of your crew members [aboard the Enterprise came to me. He wanted comfort and reassurance. His parents were religious people and he had been raised in the Church. His father had wanted him to become a priest but he had run away and joined Starfleet instead. Now his father is dead.' " [More.]
Catholic galaxy 2368 Neason, Rebecca. Guises of the Mind (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 48. "Mother Veronica looked up and let her eyes scan the windows. ' 'The heavens declare the glory of the Lord,' ' she whispered. ' 'And the firmament showeth his handiwork. . . .' '

'Is that from a poem?'

Mother Veronica nodded. 'In a way,' she said. 'It's from the Psalms, which are a series of prayer-poems.'

'Do you know all of the Psalms?'

Again the nun nodded. 'I began learning them as a child, shortly after I came to the convent. They comforted me--and have gone on comforting me throughout the years.'

'Tell me how you came to the convent,' Troi said.

'I was a small child--I don't remember much about it.' " [More.]

Catholic galaxy 2368 Neason, Rebecca. Guises of the Mind (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 84. [1] "He entered the chapel and it was like stepping back in time and place, back to the years of his childhood and the home of his youth [France]. Silence enveloped him as he stood just inside the door and waited while his eyes adjusted to the dim light. It was not an empty silence. Picard smiled as he listened to it. In a brief, uncommon flight of fancy, it seemed to him as if that silence smiled back, like an old friend welcoming his return.

It had been more years than Picard liked to count since he first stepped through the doors of the little parish church after which this chapel was fashioned. He had been eight years old. It was a hot summer day and his older brother, Robert, had been tormenting him, as usual--about what, Picard could not remember now. But it had mattered then, very much, and the eight-year-old Jean-Luc had run from his bullying brother, looking for a place to hide. "

Catholic galaxy 2368 Neason, Rebecca. Guises of the Mind (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 84. [2] "The little church stood in the heart of the town. Picard had run in no particular direction that day, but as he had neared the church he heard Robert's voice too close behind him. The church had offered a refuge; Jean-Luc had opened one door and slipped quietly inside.

Picard remembered how on that day, too, it had been the silence that first greeted him. The church had been cool after the heat of the summer sunshine and the interior of the building held the faint aroma of incense that after the centuries had permeated the wood of the altar, pews and kneelers. It had awakened the young Jean-Luc's curiosity and drawn him father inside.

The older Picard now walked into the chapel, moving not with the hesitation of an eight-year-old boy, but with the confident treat of a starship captain. He took a seat in the third pew and looked at the alter. Tall candlesticks and flowers adorned it. The immaculate covering of linen seemed to glow... " [More.]

Catholic galaxy 2368 Neason, Rebecca. Guises of the Mind (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 86. [3] "The younger Picard had found the facts about the parish church in the town library. But it was this older Picard who understood the people beyond the facts. Captain Picard knew about duty and devotion, and if the ideals that moved him were different from the men and women who, stretching back through the centuries, had built the church, served at its altar and worshipped in its pews, it did not matter. The essence was the same.

It was a good heritage and Picard was proud of it. He stood and again tugged at his uniform, straightening and settling it firmly about his shoulders. When he reached the door, he noticed the little brass cherub that formed the holy water font. He reached out and ran a finger caressingly over its outstretched wings. Then he turned back and let his eyes embrace the chapel a final time. He was glad he had come; in just over a week the Little Mothers would be leaving the ship and this room would revert to its original form. "

Catholic galaxy 2368 Neason, Rebecca. Guises of the Mind (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 128. "Others spoke of religion and religious practices in terms of family history and traditions rather than personal beliefs. They reminded Data of something Keiko and Miles O'Brien had said shortly before their wedding.

Keiko's family still followed the Ryobu-Shinto tradition which united the earth mysticism of the Shinto with the teachings of Buddhism. O'Brien's heritage was Irish Catholic. Data knew that historically these two religions were opposed, sometimes violently, to one another, yet rather than be disturbed by the differences, as their ancestors would have been, Keiko and Miles O'Brien welcomed the diversity and claimed it added a richness to their marriage. "

Catholic galaxy 2372 Cox, Greg. The Black Shore (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 142. "He has a point, Janeway thought. I would not introduce humanity to another species by telling them about, say, the Eugenics Wars or the Spanish Inquisition. "
Catholic galaxy 2375 Lang, Jeffrey. Immortal Coil (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (2002); pg. 223. "Where most Starfleet bases were models of streamlined, geometric efficiency, this station, this Valhalla, could claim as ancestors both Gothic cathedrals and snowflakes. Every surface was carved, sculpted with rich geometric detail. It was overwhelming in its fractal complexity. "
Catholic galaxy 2376 Martin, Michael A. & Andy Mangels. Cathedral (Star Trek: DS9; "Mission: Gamma " #3 of 4). New York: Pocket Books (2002); pg. 31. "The object utterly defeated the eye, sometimes appearing to be a tangle of impossibly intersecting Platonic shapes, planes, and lines, other times taking on the aspect of a Gothic cathedral. It brought to mind the visually deceptive works of the ancient Terran artist M. C. Escher. "
Catholic galaxy 2400 Heinlein, Robert A. Citizen of the Galaxy. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1957), pg. 91. [Pg. 78 in Ballantine 1984 ed.] "...They [the Free Traders] talk their 'secret language'--only it isn't secret; it's just Finnish. Each Trader has its own language--one of the Terran tongues. And the culture has on over-all 'secret' language which is merely degenerate Church Latin--and at that they don't use it; 'Free Ships' talk to each other in Interlingua. "
Catholic galaxy 2450 Kato, Ken. Yamato II: The Way of the Warrior, Part 2. New York: Warner Books (1992); pg. 105. "'...The only reason we jettison is if we're attacked, I think you should know I ain't much of a talent, and because of Aziza Pope and her cost-cutting I got no expensive astrogators...' " [Also, pg. 284.]
Catholic galaxy 2500 Anthony, Piers & Jo Anne Taeusch. The Secret of Spring. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 53. "As he turned the corner, he saw the symbol of a Vegetarian Temple ahead. On impulse, he went inside where an old Treeple Elder was standing by the altar.

'May I, uh, make admission, Elder?' he asked.

The Treeple nodded him toward the booth. Entering, he sat facing the Elder with a curtain of wallflowers between them. He began the ritual.

'Forgive me, Elder. I have erred.'

'In what manner, my son?' asked the Ancient.

'I was wilted this past week,' he confessed. " [More. Novel has no actual references to Catholicism by name, but this practice is clearly a plant-centric mimic of Catholic confession.]

Catholic galaxy 2700 Harrison, Harry. "The Streets of Ashkelon " in Stainless Steel Visions. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 16. [Year unknown.] Pg. 16: "The man turned toward him and Garth saw the clerical dog collar and knew just what it was that Singh had been chuckling about.

'What are you doing here?' Garth asked, and in spite of his attempt at self-control he snapped out the words. If the man noticed this he ignored it...

'Father Mark,' he said, 'of the Missionary Society of Brothers. I'm very pleased to meet . . .'

'I said, what are you doing here.' Garth's voice was now under control...

'That should be obvious,' Father Mark said, his good nature unruffled. 'Our missionary society has raised funds to send spiritual emissaries to alien worlds for the first time. I was lucky enough . . .' ";

Pg. 18: "Father Mark stepped forward, the winning smile back now. A Bible, taken from a pocket of his robe, in his raised hand. 'My son--' he said. "; Pg. 21: "'What are you saying?' the priest frowned... 'You're being insulting to the Church, sir...' " [More, throughout story.]

Catholic galaxy 2732 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 25-26. "THE PRIEST'S TALE:
'THE MAN WHO CRIED GOD'

'Sometimes there is a thin line separating orthodox zeal from apostasy,' said Father Lenar Hoyt.

So began the priest's story... Lenar Hoyt had been a young priest, born, raised, and only recently ordained on the Catholic world of Pacem, when he was given his first offworld assignment: he was ordered to escort the respected Jesuit Father Paul Dure into quiet exile on the colony world of Hyperion.

In another time, Father Paul Dure certainly would have become a bishop and perhaps a pope... Dure was a follower of St. Teilhard [and] an... eminent Jesuit theologian. Despite the decline of the Catholic Church into what amounted to a half-forgotten cult tolerated because of its quaintness and isolation from the mainstream of Hegemony life, Jesuit logic had not lost its bite. Nor had Father Dure lost his conviction that the Holy Catholic Apostolic Church continued to be humankind's last, best hope for immortality. "

Catholic galaxy 2733 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 12. [Aboard the starship Yggdrasill, en route to the planet Hyperion.] "To the Consul's left sat Father Lenar Hoyt, a priest of the old-style Christian sect known as Catholic. For a second the Consul had forgotten the significance of the black clothing and Roman collar, but then he remembered St. Francis Hospital on Hebron where he had received alcohol trauma therapy after his disastrous first diplomatic assignment there almost four standard decades earlier. And at the mention of Hoyt's name he remembered another priest, one who had disappeared on Hyperion halfway through his own tenure. " [Many other references to Catholicism in this book, most not in DB.]
Catholic galaxy 2733 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 20. "Father Hoyt smiled without humor. 'The Catholic Church ordained me,' he said. 'Shrike-worship contradicts everything the Church defends.' "
Catholic galaxy 2733 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 20. "Martin Silenus... '...I have been a Catholic, a revelationist, a neo-Marxist...' "
Catholic galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 336. "'Interesting, is it not,' said the Bishop, 'that three of humankind's most profound religions are represented here today?' 'Yes,' said Dure. 'Profound, but hardly representational of the beliefs of the majority. Out of almost a hundred and fifty billion souls, the Catholic Church claims fewer than a million. The Shri--ah . . . The Church of the Final Atonement perhaps five to ten million. And how many Templars are there, M. Hardeen?'

'Twenty-three million,'... "

Catholic galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 20. Pg. 20: "'Perhaps the Shrike is gone,' says Father Hoyt. 'Perhaps by collapsing the anti-entropic fields you've freed it forever...' "; Pg. 24: "Martin Silenus laughs. 'Pardon me, priest,' he says, 'but you're full of...'

...'How the... should I know, Padre?...' " [Father Hoyt, a Catholic priest, is a main character. Many refs. to Catholicism throughout novel, only a few in DB.]

Catholic galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 40. "Father Lenar Hoyt of the twelve-year-old Society of Jesus, resident of the New Vatican on Pacem and loyal servant of His Holiness Pope Urban XVI... "
Catholic galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 107. "Tyrena Wingreen-Feif laughed and turned to the man in red and black to her right. 'Monsignor, your church... Catholic, early Christian isn't it? . . . don't you have some delightful old doctrine about mankind achieving a more exalted evolutionary status?'

We all turned to look at the small, quiet man in the black robe & strange little cap. Monsignor Edouard, a representative of the almost-forgotten early Christian sect was now limited to the world of Pacem and a few colony planets, was on the guest list because of his involvement with the Armaghast relief project, and until now he had been quietly applying himself to his soup. He looked up with a slightly surprised look on a face lined with decades of exposure to weather and worry. 'Why yes,' he said, 'the teachings of St. Teilhard discuss an evolution toward the Omega Point.'

'And is the Omega Point similar to our Zen Gnostic idea of practical satori?' asked Sudette Chier. " [Many other refs. to this Monsignor.]

Catholic galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 108. "'And is the Omega Point similar to our Zen Gnostic idea of practical satori?' asked Sudette Chier.

Monsignor Edouard looked wistfully at his soup, as if it were more important than the conversation at that moment. 'Not really too similar,' he said. 'St. Teilhard felt that all of live, every level of organic consciousness was part of a planned evolution toward ultimate mergence with the Godhead.' He frowned slightly. 'The Teilhard position has been modified much over the past eight centuries, but the common thread has been that we consider Jesus Christ to have been an incarnate example of what the ultimate consciousness might be like on the human plane.'

I cleared my throat. 'Didn't the Jesuit Paul Dure write extensively on the Teilhard hypothesis?'

Monsignor Edouard leaned forward and looked directly at me. There was surprise on that interesting face. 'Why yes,' he said, 'but I'm amazed that you're familiar with the work of Father Dure.' " [More.]

Catholic galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 108. "I returned the gaze of the man who had been Dure's friend even while exiling the Jesuit to Hyperion for apostasy. I thought of another refugee from the New Vatican, young Lenar Hoyt... lying dead in a Time Bomb while the cruciform parasites carrying the mutated DNA of both Dure and himself carried out their grim purpose of resurrection. How did the abomination of the cruciform fit into Teilhard and Dure's view of inevitable, benevolent evolution toward the Godhead?

...'And what is your cult's goal, Monsignor Edouard?' Tyrena Wingreen-Feif asked...

'To help mankind to know and serve God,' he said... The archaic little priest looked down the table... "

Catholic galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 132. "Father Dure stood, stretched, and paced back and forth. He was a tall man, thin but with a sense of strength about him, and Brawne Lamia found herself impressed by his presence, by that strange, inexplicable charisma of personality which had cursed and bestowed power upon a few individuals since time immemorial. She had to remind herself that, first, he was a priest of a cult that demanded celibacy from its clerics, and, second, an hour earlier he had been a corpse.... and she realized that both observations were true but neither could counteract the personal magnetism the priest radiated. She wondered if the men sensed it. "
Catholic galaxy 2891 Barnes, John. Sin of Origin. New York: Congdon & Weed (1988); pg. 16. [On the planet Randall.] "...the new arrivals had left the Archbishopric seventeen years before... "; Pg. 17: "'More additions to your distinguished career. The Church has of course not forgotten your two other First Contacts.' " [The primary human culture described in this book is Catholic. There are references to Catholicsm throughout the book, though usually not by name, as usually the term 'Christian' is used.]
Catholic galaxy 2891 Barnes, John. Sin of Origin. New York: Congdon & Weed (1988); pg. 23. "'Doctrinal problems?' he asked sympathetically. Three of his own papers had had to be rewritten after Paul XIX had made the Doctrine of Unipsychism an article of faith. "
Catholic galaxy 2891 Barnes, John. Sin of Origin. New York: Congdon & Weed (1988); pg. 72. "'I'm just glad the vatican can't get us a decree on this for at least 104 years MTT. Something tells me the Pope will have to think a little.' "
Catholic galaxy 2891 Barnes, John. Sin of Origin. New York: Congdon & Weed (1988); pg. 128. "'...The last pope I knew about made it clear--only Infidel worlds with nuclear weapons and space travel can be consideref for domestication. The purpose is supposed to be just to remove positive dangers from Christian space--that's all... Do a little arithmetic. The number of habitable worlds we know about is almost twice the number we have settlers on. We have to keep our frontiers with the Islamics and the Communists, and we have to keep expanding outward because sooner or later we're going to meet the Equivalent Culture we've all been fearing...' "
Catholic galaxy 2891 Barnes, John. Sin of Origin. New York: Congdon & Weed (1988); pg. 2. [On the planet Randall.] "Men were more than ordinarily cautious today--the last sortie had cost two Aqunian Brothers and a badly needed Leonardan... Aquinian Brothers generally had a reputation for being less than brilliant, but Joshua did more than his share to uphold the stereotype. " [Many other referances to Aquinians in this book, apparently a fictional Catholic order. They appear to be the most frequently order in the book, the only one mentioned regularly. Jesuits are referred to as 'one of the older orders'. Most refs. to Aquinians not in DB.]
Catholic galaxy 3000 Greeley, Andrew M. The Final Planet. New York: Warner Books (1987); pg. 3. Pg. 1: "...like a monastery, yet it had been home for the quarter century of his life, the symbol of the Spirit of Exploration for which the Holy Order of Saint Brigid and Saint Brendan stood... "; Pg. 3: "God knows, if herself's analysis is to be believed, they need us. Ah, but do they want us? That's the issue, my boy, isn't it?

The Holy Order no more made converts than did St. Columcile in Switzerland or St. Donatus in Italy or St. Killian in Bavaria long ago during the First Exploration. Peregrinationes pro Christos. If the natives were so impressed by the scholarship and service of the monks that they became interested in the Faith, that was another matter. " [Many refs. throughout novel, not in DB. The novel's author is a Catholic priest, and the culture depicted is Catholic, although the word 'Catholic' is never used in the novel.]

Catholic galaxy 3000 Greeley, Andrew M. The Final Planet. New York: Warner Books (1987); pg. 84. Pg. 6: "...like the monastery greenhouse at Easter. "; Pg. 84: "'Then without reflection he muttered the age-old Gaelic benediction. 'Jesus and Mary and Brigid be with this house.'

'Who are they?' Marjetta demanded.

'Ah, holy people.'

'What does that mean?'

'Well, special friends of God.'

'I see,' but in the darkness she sounded like the did not. 'Your god has special friends?'

'Well, kind of. We pray to Him through them. We sort of hope they'll use their influence with Him.'

'How consoling. A kindly god then?'

'Sometimes too kindly by half. Won't leave us alone. Head over heels with us. If you take my reasoning.'

'Extraordinary. And yet somehow not unreasonable. I should like someday to know more about him...' " [Many refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]

Catholic galaxy 3000 Greeley, Andrew M. The Final Planet. New York: Warner Books (1987); pg. 284. "'I am,' announced the vision, 'Lady Deirdre Fitzgerald, Countess of Cook, Archbishop of Chicago Nova, Fleet Commodore of Tara, Captain Abbess of the Pilgrim Ship Iona, and Cardinal Priest of the Holy Roman Church of Saint Clement. Who, may I ask, kind sir, are you?' "
Catholic galaxy 3011 McDevitt, Jack. Infinity Beach. New York: HarperCollins (2000); pg. 87. "Here was a memorial to Max Esterly, portraying him poised in thought over a computer console, presumably designing the engines which had made the Queen class of liners possible. And there was the presidential suite in which Jennifer Granville had drawn up the Articles. On the glass deck, so-called because of the view it provided, an assassin had brought down Pius XIX, last of the officially recognized popes. "
Catholic galaxy 3017 Niven, Larry & Jerry Pournelle. The Mote in God's Eye. New York: Simon and Schuster (1974); pg. 89. "Now the huge space was packed to overflowing. Viceroy Merrill, Minister Armstrong, Admiral Cranston, Cardinal Randolph, and a host of lesser officials stood... "
Catholic galaxy 3017 Niven, Larry & Jerry Pournelle. The Mote in God's Eye. New York: Simon and Schuster (1974); pg. 149. "Hardy had been fifteen years a priest and twelve years a Navy chaplain, but he was only beginning to think of it as his profession. At age thirty-five he had been a full professor at the Imperial University on Sparta, an expert in ancient and modern human langauges... He had not been particularly religious until his wife was killed in a landing boat crash; then, and he was not sure even yet how it happened, the Bishop had come to see him, and Hardy had looked long and searchingly at his life--and entered seminary... A Latin crossword puzzle lay on the desk at his left hand, and hardy played idly with it. Domine, non---sum. . .

'Dignis
, of course.' Hardy chuckled to himself. " [This priest is a major character and Catholicism is mentioned many times in the book. Most such references are not recorded in this database.]


Catholic, continued

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