Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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miscellaneous regional info, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
miscellaneous regional info world 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 129. "Did God see all the conceivable actions for all conscious lifeforms--six billion humans, eight billion Forhilnors (as Hollus had told me at one point), fifty-seven million Wreeds... "
miscellaneous regional info world 2001 Clarke, Arthur C. 2001: A Space Odyssey. New York: New American Library (1969; c. 1968); pg. 43. "Though birth control was cheap, reliable, and endorsed by all major religions, it had come too late; the population of the world was now six billion--a third of them in the Chinese Empire. Laws had even been passed in some authoritarian societies limiting families to two children, but their enforcement had proved impracticable. As a result, food was short in every country; even the United States had meatless days, and widespread famine was predicted within fifteen years, despite heroic efforts to farm the sea and to develop synthetic foods. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2001 Knight, Damon. CV. New York: Tor (1985); pg. 46. "The human race had to do something. There were almost six billion people in the world... "; Pg. 95 [to provide an estimate of the year]: "'New things do seem to turn up. You remember Legionnaire's Disease, and AIDS, fifteen or twenty years ago?' "
miscellaneous regional info world 2002 Knight, Damon. Why Do Birds. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 36. "'...how big would it have to be?'

The architect scratched his nose. 'Well, the world population is around six billion now. Can I assume--'

'Wait a minute. Six billion? Back in the thirties, it was about two. How could that happen?'

'Natural increase, I suppose. Anyway, am I right that you want to pack them in there dead? They don't have to have room to move around?'

'Not dead exactly, but yeah, just pack them in.'

'Okay, fine. Well, suppose we figure about twenty-five cubic feet per person. That's high, because some of them will be children... That would give you a cube just over sixty-one hundred feet on a side--about one and two-tenths miles.' "

miscellaneous regional info world 2002 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Lathe of Heaven. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1971); pg. 78. "He was not the thin, sharp-boned man he had been in the world of the seven billion; he was quite solid, in fact... He thought: In that life, yesterday, I dreamed an effective dream, which obliterated six billion lives and changed the entire history of humankind for the past quarter century. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2002 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Lathe of Heaven. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1971); pg. 64. "It was dangerous, this talking right on the critical subject, but he could not think of anything else: he was ass if compelled. His head was too full, holding the two sets of memories, two full systems of information: one of the real (no longer) world with a human population of nearly seven billion and increasing geometrically, and one of the real (now) world with a population of less than one billion and still not stabilized.

My God, he thought, what has Orr done?

Six billion people.

Where are they? "

miscellaneous regional info world 2002 Sawyer, Robert J. Hominids. New York: Tor (2002); pg. 267. [The parallel world of Neanderthals has a much smaller population than our world.] "'How many people are there?''

'In the whole world?' asked Mary.

'Yes.'

'A little over six billion.'

'A billion is . . . a thousand times a million?'

'That's right,' said Mary. 'At least here in North America. In Britain--no, forget it. yes, a billion is a thousand million.'

Ponter sagged in his chair. 'That is a . . . a staggering number of people.' " [Also pg. 341.]

miscellaneous regional info world 2002 Sawyer, Robert J. Hominids. New York: Tor (2002); pg. 267. [The parallel world of Neanderthals has a much smaller population than our world.] "'How many people are there?''

'In the whole world?' asked Mary.

'Yes.'

'A little over six billion.'

'A billion is . . . a thousand times a million?'

'That's right,' said Mary. 'At least here in North America. In Britain--no, forget it. yes, a billion is a thousand million.'

Ponter sagged in his chair. 'That is a . . . a staggering number of people.'

Mary raised her eyebrows. 'How many people are there on your world?'

'One hundred and eighty-five million,' said Ponter.

'Why so few?'

asked Mary.

'Why so many?' asked Ponter.

'I don't know,' replied Mary. 'I never thought about it.'

'Do you not--in my world, we know how to prevent pregnancy. I could perhaps teach you . . .'

Mary smiled. 'We have methods, too.'

Ponter lifted his eyebrow. 'Perhaps ours work better.' "

miscellaneous regional info world 2003 Barnes, John. Kaleidoscope Century. New York: Tor (1995); pg. 130. "The four and a half billion people left alive after mutAIDS and the Eurowar couldn't afford large-scale agriculture or industrial facilities anymore... "
miscellaneous regional info world 2003 Disch, Thomas M. Camp Concentration. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1968); pg. 135. "'Twenty years ago it would have been a good idea,' he said. 'But now, according to the big computer at M.I.T., nothing is going to level out that curve. It'll [the population of the world] hit twenty billion by 2003, come hell or high water...' "
miscellaneous regional info world 2003 Knight, Damon. Why Do Birds. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 131. "'And another thing, I notice people are still talking about progress and growth, as if it was the same thing. We never should of got to six billion people in the world. In the thirties, two billion, we could handle that. We should of stopped there, and we could of, or anyway close to it. But we didn't, and now they're talking about ten billion, or twenty. You talk about selling people on bizarre ideas, how about that one?' "
miscellaneous regional info world 2005 Bear, Greg. Eon. New York: Bluejay (1985); pg. 90. "The Death, when it came, was completely earnest and open. Every weapon was used as it had been designed to be used. There seemed to be no compunction about consequences... The Little Death resulted in 4 million casualties, most in Western Europe and England. The Death resulted in approximately 2 1/2 billion casualties, and the numbers will always be uncertain, for by the time the body counts were 'completed,' it is possible that as many bodies had rotted as had been counted. And, of course, as many more had been completely vaporized. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2005 Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles. New York: Bantam (2000; c. 1958); pg. 131. "'It's like when I was a boy,' said Father Peregrine. 'We heard about wars in China. But we never believed them. It was too far away. And there were too many people dying. it was impossible. Even when we saw the motion pictures we didn't believe it. Well, that's how it is now. Earth is China. It's so far away it's unbelievable. It's not here. You can't touch it. You can't even see it. All you see is a green light. Two billion people living on that light? Unbelievable! War? We don't hear the explosions.' "
miscellaneous regional info world 2008 Asimov, Isaac. "All the Troubles of the World " in Nine Tomorrows. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1959; story c. 1958); pg. 144. "Multivac directed Earth's economy and helped Earth's science. Most important of all, it was the central clearing house of all known facts about each individual Earthman. And each day it was part of Multivac's duties to take the four billion sets of facts about individual human beings that filled its vitals and extrapolate them for an additional day of time. Every corrections Department on Earth received the data appropriate to its own area of jurisdiction, and the over-all data was presented in one large piece to the Central Board of Corrections in Washington, D.C. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2009 Sawyer, Robert J. Flashforward. New York: Tor (2000; c. 1999); pg. 234. "At any given moment, a third of humanity is normally asleep--but right now almost all of Earth's seven billion people were wide awake. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2010 Blake, Sterling. "A Desperate Calculus " in New Legends. Greg Bear (ed.) New York: Tor (1995); pg. 53. "Megacities. Humanity growing by a hundred million fresh souls per year, with disease and disorder in ample attendance. Twenty-nine megacities with more than ten million population. Twenty-five in the 'developing' world--only nobody was developing anymore. Tokyo topped the list, as always, at thirty-six million. Sao Paulo was coming up fast on the outside with thirty-four million. Lagos, Nigeria, which nobody ever thought about, festered with seventeen million despite the multitudes lost to AIDS. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 331. "'...What we can't cope with is seven billion competing members of our own species...' "
miscellaneous regional info world 2015 Sheffield, Charles. Brother to Dragons. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1992); pg. 107. "When the Quiebra Grande came and the population was up to nine billion, they picked their pagano: science. Scientists made technology possible. Technology produced wastes and pollution. Ergo, scientists were to blame for everything. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2019 Asimov, Isaac. "Reason " in The Complete Robot. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1982; c. 1941); pg. 229. [Year est.] "'The dots to which our energy beams are directed, are nearer and much smaller. They are cold and hard and human beings like myself live upon their surfaces--many billions of them. It is from one of these worlds that Donovan and I come. Our beams feed these worlds energy drawn from one of those huge incandescent globes that happens to be near us. We call that globe the Sun and it is on the other side of the station where you can't see it... There it is. The very bright one in the corner. We call it Earth... Good old Earth. There are three billions of us there... and in about two weeks I'll be back there with them.' "
miscellaneous regional info world 2020 Heinlein, Robert A. Friday. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1982); pg. 107. "Georges said, 'There you have it, my dears. Pick one. A theocracy ruled by witchburners. Or a fascist socialism designed by retareded schoolboys. Or a crowd of hard-boiled pragmatists who favor shooting the horse that misses the hurdle...' "
miscellaneous regional info world 2020 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 220. "'Please,' said the long-bearded one--the one to whom the Spectre referred as an old wizard [Shazam]. 'Pleae, I could love him [Captain Marvel] no more if he were my own son. And he is lost. We must show him the way. We must take a hand, for the sake of all of them.'

'All ofthem, Brother?' said a thickset old man whose bush of a white beard hung in ringlets. 'All seven billion of them?'

'Seven billion. Seven billion,' the first one said. 'Perhaps only the ones we love.' "

miscellaneous regional info world 2023 Haldeman, Joe. The Forever War. New York: Avon Books (1997; first ed. 1975); pg. 111. Pg. 108: "...late 2023, Greenwich time. "; Pg. 111: "'...The population of Earth is nearly nine billion, with five or six billion unemployed.' "
miscellaneous regional info world 2024 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 262. Pg. 262: "'So they snuff out five billion people?' "; Pg. 267: "'...Maybe you guys made a mistake in 1937, but five billion people died because of mine.' "
miscellaneous regional info world 2025 Aldiss, Brian. "Pause Button " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001; c. 1997); pg. 113. [Nothing to index. The story is about a nanomachine therapy which is invented and which is applied to the human brain, causing people to pause and have time to consider their actions before they commit a violent act.] "Much violence is prevented. Beating the dog, the child, men beating the women -- such things are forestalled. The percentages of male violence against their female partners were alarming: in the U.K., twenty-five percent, in the U.S.A., twenty-eight per cent. Many such elemental attacks were launched when the woman became pregnant. Since the widespread introduction of DFRs, these figures have dropped to eleven percent and twelve per cent respectively (there has been a greater take-up in the U.S.A. than the U.K.) "
miscellaneous regional info world 2025 Clifton, Mark & Frank Riley. The Forever Machine. New York: Carroll & Graf (1992; first ed. 1956); pg. 348. "'...There is not now, there never has been any real issue between faith science and faith. Both strive for the same identical goal; both seek comprehension; both wish to benefit man that we live happier, healthier, more harmoniously with himself and with his neighbors. Man seeks to comprehend, to understand the forces which govern his life. The sometimes apparently different paths taken by science and faith are of no consequence in comparison with man's yearning to know.

'Truth frightens man. He plants illusion in the debris of his mind to hide him from the clean white light she brings. His arguments defeat her wisdom...' "

miscellaneous regional info world 2025 Cool, Tom. Infectress. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 48. "'Oh, yeah. Hippocrates. Circa 400 B.C. or something. World population, about 100 million. Back then, the planet was natural. People were people. Diseases were diseases.'

'What's your point?'

'This is your wake-up call, Freddie. Good morning. It's 2025 A.D. The world population is nine billion. Today, the planet is patient. People are the infection.'

'People?'

'People are the disease...' "

miscellaneous regional info world 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 24-25. "In the real world--planet Earth, Reality--there are somewhere between six and ten billion people. At any given time, most of them are making mud bricks or field stripping their AK-47s. Perhaps a billion of them have enough money to own a computer; these people have more money than all of the others put together. Of these billion potential computer owners, maybe a quarter of them actually bother to own computers, and a quarter of these have machinese that are powerful enough to handle the Street protocol. That makes for about sixty million people who can be on the Street at any given time. Add in another sixty million or so who can't really afford it but go there anyway, by using public machines, or machines owned by their school or their employer, and at any given time the Street is occupied by twice the population of New York City. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. xxx. "World population now [2026] at seven billion, expected to drop to six billion by 2034. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2027 Atack, Chris. Project Maldon. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 42. "Economics says the more there is of something the cheaper it is. Thus air (until recently) was free, while diamonds commanded a high price. The same principle applies to human life. With twelve billion people swarming the globe, life is cheaper than it used to be. How much cheaper we are still discovering.

Breaking Point, a collection of essays on Post Millennial topics by Henrikus Grobius, Jr. "

miscellaneous regional info world 2030 Brin, David. Earth. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 374. "World human population figures: 1982: 4.3 billion; 1988: 5.1 billion; 2030: 10.3 billion "
miscellaneous regional info world 2030 Sawyer, Robert J. Flashforward. New York: Tor (2000; c. 1999); pg. 159. "The world's population in 2030 will be eleven billion; four billion of those were born after 2009, and so could never have had a vision. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2030 Sawyer, Robert J. Flashforward. New York: Tor (2000; c. 1999); pg. 234. "At any given moment, a third of humanity is normally asleep--but right now almost all of Earth's seven billion people were wide awake. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2034 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. xxx. "World population now [2026] at seven billion, expected to drop to six billion by 2034. " [The alien race Hefn are enforcing a temporary ban on childbirth.]
miscellaneous regional info world 2035 Asimov, Isaac. "The Evitable Conflict " in The Complete Robot. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1982; c. 1950); pg. 464. Pg. 453: "The Eastern Region: a-Area: 7,500,000 square miles; b-Population: 1,700,000,000; c-Capital: Shanghai ";

Pg. 456: "The Tropic Region: a-Area: 22,000,000 square miles; b-Population: 500,000,000; c-Capital: Capital City [in Nigeria] ";

Pg. 459: "The European Region: a-Area: 4,000,000 square miles; b-Population: 300,000,000; c-Capital: Geneva ";

Pg. 462: "The Northern Region: a-Area: 18,000,000 square miles; b-Population: 800,000,000; c-Capital: Ottawa ";

Pg. 464: "Earth (Including the uninhabited continent, Antarctica): a-Area: 54,000,000 square miles (land surface); b-Population: 3,300,000,000; c-Capital: New York "

miscellaneous regional info world 2038 Brin, David. Earth. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 98. "'...in a world of ten billion people...' "
miscellaneous regional info world 2038 Brin, David. Earth. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 258. "Census Counts (in billions of individuals): Human beings: 1988: 5.2; 2038: 10.6 "
miscellaneous regional info world 2040 Bova, Ben. Moonrise. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 253. "'It's criminal to prevent nanotherapy!'

'Yeah, maybe so. but they've got their reasons, you know.'

'Religious fanatics,' Doug complained. 'And politicians without enough spine to stand up straight. Nanoluddites.'

'Now, don't go getting all righteous and indignant,' Brennart said.

'Why not? What they've done--'

'Take a look at Earth. Take a good look. Going on ten billion people down there, with no end to population growth in sight.'

'What's that got to do with it?'

'Last thing in the world those governments need is people who live two or three hundred years. They're barely holding things together as it is, and you want them to let people extend their lifepans indefinitely? Get real.' "

miscellaneous regional info world 2040 Pohl, Frederik. Man Plus. New York: Random House (1976); pg. 1. "It is necessary to tell you about Roger Torraway. One human being does not seem particularly important, when there are eight billion alive. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2041 Panshin, Alexei. Rite of Passage. New York: Ace Books (1973; first ed. 1968); pg. 9. "From what I learned in school, population pressure is the ultimate cause of every war. In 2041, there were eight billion people on Earth alone, and nobody even had free room to sneeze... "
miscellaneous regional info world 2041 Turner, George. Drowning Towers. New York: William Morrow (1987); pg. 21. "In 2041 the population of the planet passed the 10 billion mark. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2044 Sterling, Bruce. Distraction. New York: Bantam (1998); pg. 25. "The threatened. The endangered. The all-but-technically extinct. Wildlife native to habitats long obliterated by climate change, rising seas, bulldozers, and the urban sprawl of 8.1 billion beings. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2050 Aldiss, Brian W. Helliconia Winter. New York: Atheneum (1985); pg. 98. "The crowded nations of Earth spent most of the twenty-first century locked in a series of uncomfortable confrontations: East threatened West, North threatened South, First World helped and cheated Third World. Growing populations, dwindling resources, continuous localised conflicts, slowly transferred the face of the lobe into something approaching a pile of rubble. The concept of 'terrorist nation' dominated the mid-century; it was at this time that the ancient city of Rome was taken out. Yet, contrary to gloomy expectations, that ultimate Valhalla, nuclear war, was never resorted to. This was in part because the superpowers masked their operations behind manipulated smaller nations, and in part because the exploration of neighbouring space acted as something of a safety valve for aggressive emotions. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2050 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 76. "With a thousand colony planets and perhaps five major settlements per world to keep track of--well, that was about five billion people, over half of Earth's pre-exodus population. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2050 Asimov, Isaac. "True Love " in The Complete Robot. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1982; c. 1977); pg. 52. [Year est.] "'...Just find me the ideal girl. You are connected to the Multivac-complex so you can reach the data banks of every human being in the world. We'll eliminate them all by groups until we're left with only one person. The perfect person. She will be for me.'

I said, 'I am ready.'

He said, 'Eliminate all men first.'

...At his words, I withdrew from 3,784,982,874 men. I kept contact with 3,786,112,090 women.

He said, 'Eliminate all younger than twenty-five; all older than forty. Then eliminate all with an IQ under 120; all with a height under 150 centimeters and over 175 centimeters.'

He gave me exact measurements; he eliminated women with living children; he eliminated women with various genetic characteristics. '...no red hair. I don't like red hair.'

After two weeks, we were down to 235 women. "

miscellaneous regional info world 2050 Bova, Ben. Moonwar. New York: Avon Books (1998); pg. 26. "Ten billion people on Earth. And that was only the official count. There were probably a billion more, at least, that the various national censuses missed. Ten or eleven billion mouths to feed, ten or eleven billion people to house and clothe and educate. Most of them were poor, hungry, ignorant. And their numbers were growing faster than anyone could cope with. Three hundred thousand babies born every day. All the wealth in the world could barely maintain a minimum level of existence for them. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 87. [Fictional table: "Area and Population of the Worlds ", showing figures for (est. millions) for 1900, 1950, 2000, 2050, 2075. Source is given as "Rand McNally & Co. "]
miscellaneous regional info world 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Forever Peace. New York: Ace Books (1998; first ed. 1997); pg. 186. "Another little problem was what to do with people like Amelia? They couldn't be jacked, and so they couldn't be humanized. They would be handicapped and angry--and able to do violence. Two percent of six billion is 120 million people. One wolf for every forty-nine sheep is another way of looking at it. Marty suggested that initially we relocate them all onto islands, asking all the humanized islanders to emigrate. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Forever Peace. New York: Ace Books (1998; first ed. 1997); pg. 294. "Ellie had intuited my unease, though, and had remarked that not using mathematics was like writing about religion without mentioning God, but the editors believed that ninety percent of their readers would quit at the first equation. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2050 Knight, Damon. The Man in the Tree. New York: Berkley Books (1984); pg. 136. We can't feed that many,' he said. 'Even if we could, can we feed twice that many? Fifteen billion in twenty fifty? What about twenty-four billion? If we don't reduce our population ourselves, something else will reduce it for us.' "
miscellaneous regional info world 2051 Worthen, M. W. "You Can't Go Back " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 123. "He knew damn well that jobs were more than scarce. Employment on Earth was 24.2 percent, and computer programmers and analysts were a penny a thousand... I'd die of starvation. Or exposure. There was simply no place to stay--welfare housing was bulging, and without a place life could get deadly. The average temperature may be up, but it could still get plenty cold, and freak storms were getting more and more frequent. If I managed to live through those things, the street gangs or the scavengers would get my organs if not just for relief from boredom. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2057 Asimov, Isaac. "The Feeling of Power " in Nine Tomorrows. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1959; story c. 1957); pg. 75-85. [Year estimated. Story takes place in the not-too-distant future in which people have forgotten how to do computing except with a computer. One of the character amazes officials at the New Pentagon by displaying his ability to do simply multiplication with just a piece of paper and a pencil. The "Denebian war is a war of computer against computer. Their computers forge an impenetrable shield of counter-missiles against our missiles, and ours forge one against theirs. " The character suggests that their side can leapfrog the Denebians' computer technology by using human minds--have people make strategic plans instead of the stalemated computers. No apparent refs. to any religious groups.]
miscellaneous regional info world 2075 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 87. [Fictional table: "Area and Population of the Worlds ", showing figures for (est. millions) for 1900, 1950, 2000, 2050, 2075. Source is given as "Rand McNally & Co. "]
miscellaneous regional info world 2075 Heinlein, Robert A. The Moon is a Harsh Mistress. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1966); pg. 33. "Three million, unarmed and helpless [on the moon]--and eleven billion of them... "
miscellaneous regional info world 2075 Jones, Raymond F. "Intermission Time " in The Non-Statistical Man. New York: Belmont Books (1964; copyright 1953); pg. 121. "Out there on Planet 7, in the Alpha system, they were trying to make new man because the old man had failed. Homo sapiens had burned up a world.

In the hundred years since, only a quarter of the Earth had become habitable, and its population was less than thirty millions. A sober, stunned, and bewildered humanity rebuilding amid the ruins.

They had accomplished much in that century. There were cities again; there was space-flight; then overdrive and the stars; and the mutants had been wiped out. There was a single coordinated government that united the efforts of all races and tongues. "

miscellaneous regional info world 2082 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 278. "Halfway through, though, I couldn't hold the sandwich up anymore. It wasn't like the Coke, before. I lowered it to my lap and my lids lowered, too... "
miscellaneous regional info world 2086 Heinlein, Robert A. Stranger in a Strange Land. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1961); pg. 72. Pg. 11: "The first human expedition to Mars... At that time, eight Terran years after the founding of the first human colony on Luna [circa 2050?], an interplanetary trip made by humans had to be made in free-fall orbits--from Terra to Mars, 258 Terran days, the same for return, plus 455 days waiting at Mars while the planets crawled back into positions for the return orbit. "; Pg. 13: "A quarter of an Earth century passed before Mars was again visited by humans... Federation Ship Champion... made the crossing under Lyle Drive in 19 days. "; Pg. 72: "The third planet from Sol held 230,000 more humans this day than yesterday; among five billion terrestrials such increase was not noticeable. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2093 Kube-McDowell, Michael. The Quiet Pools. New York: Ace (1990); pg. 5. "As always, Homeworld had worked hard to make certain that the coprsec, Allied Transcon management, and as many of Earth's eight billion as possible heard. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2093 Kube-McDowell, Michael. The Quiet Pools. New York: Ace (1990); pg. 200. "'Were you under orders to murder Malena Graham?'

'Execute,' corrected Silverman. 'My hands are Jeremiah's hands. I do his work.'

'Not any longer.'

'There are ten thousand for Tau Ceti--ten thousand minus one. There are ten billion Homeworlders standing for the Earth [referring to the total population of the Earth, not the people involved in the radical Homeworld eco-terrorist movement]. In that ten billion there are ten times ten time sten thousand who will gladly do what I've done.' "

miscellaneous regional info world 2093 Kube-McDowell, Michael. The Quiet Pools. New York: Ace (1990); pg. 64. "Thomas Tidwell... Curiously, A Summer in Eden was seen as validation by both the most conservative and the most experimental elements of society. For the former, it was a cautionary parable, a warning of dire consequences if the rigid more of the AIDS era were recklessly abandoned. For the latter, it was an exhilarating manifesto, an invitation to abandon now-irrelevant conventions and re-create a lost age of sexual freedom. The two poles had been fighting a war of opinion ever since--more than twenty-two years. "
miscellaneous regional info world 2100 Asimov, Isaac. The Gods Themselves. Greenwich, CT: Fawcett Crest (1973; c. 1972); pg. 42. "'...He is the father of the Electron Pump to Earth's two-billion population...' "
miscellaneous regional info world 2100 Heinlein, Robert A. Starship Troopers. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1959); pg. 24. "I thought about it during the last session of our class in History and Moral Philosophy. H. & M. P. was different from other courses intht everybody had to take it but nobody had to pass it...

But on the last day he seemed to be trying to find out what we had learned. One girl told him bluntly: 'My mother says that violence never settles anything.'

'So?' Mr. Dubois looked at her bleakly. 'I'm sure the city fathers of Carthage would be glad to know that. Why doesn't your mother tell them so? Or why don't you?'

They had tangled before--since you couldn't flunk the course, it wasn't necessary to keep Mr. Dubois buttered up. She said shrilly, 'You're making fun of me! Everybody knows that Carthage was destroyed!'

'You seem to be unaware of it,' he said grimly. 'Since you do know it, wouldn't you say that violence had settled their destinies rather thoroughly?...' "

miscellaneous regional info world 2100 Heinlein, Robert A. Starship Troopers. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1959); pg. 24. "'...However, I was not making fun of you personally: I was heaping scorn on an inexcusably silly idea... Anyone who clings to the historically untrue--and thoroughly immoral--doctrine that 'violence never settles anything' I would advise to conjure up the ghosts of Napoleon Bonaparte and the Duke of Wellington and let them debate it. The ghost of Hitler could referee, and the jury might well be the Dodo, the Great Auk, and the Passenger Pigeon. Violence, naked force, has settled more issues in history than any other factor, and the contrary opinion is wishful thinking at its worst. Breeds that forget this basic trut have always paid for it with their lives and freedoms.' "
miscellaneous regional info world 2100 Heinlein, Robert A. Starship Troopers. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1959); pg. 74. [Letter from Mr. Dubois] "...When you reach that spiritual mountaintop you felt something, a new something. Perhaps you haven't words for it (I know I didn't, when I was a boot). So perhaps you will permit an older comrade to lend you the words, since it often helps to have discrete words. Simply this: The noblest fate that a man can endure is to place his own mortal body between his loved home and the war's desolation. The words are not mine, of course, as you will recognize. Basic truths cannot change and once a man of insight expresses one of them it is never necessary not matter how much the world changes, to reformulate them. This is an immutable, true everywhere, throughout all time, for all men and nations... "
miscellaneous regional info world 2100 Heinlein, Robert A. Starship Troopers. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1959); pg. 76. "'Nothing of value is free. Even the breath of life is purchased at birth only through gasping effort & pain... If you... had to sweat for your toys the way a newly born baby has to struggle to live you would be happier . . . & much richer. As it is, with some of you, I pity the poverty of your wealth. You! I've just awarded you the prize for the 100-meter-dash. Does it make you happy?'...

'Exactly! The prize for 1st place is worthless to you... because you haven't earned it. But you enjoy a modest satisfaction in placing fourth; you earned it... the poet who wrote [that the best things in life are free] meant to imply that the best things in life must be purchased other than with money--which is true--just as the literal meaning of his words is false. The best things in life are beyond money; their price is agony & sweat & devotion... & the price demanded for the most precious of all things in life is life itself--ultimate cost for perfect value.' "

miscellaneous regional info world 2100 Heinlein, Robert A. Starship Troopers. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1959); pg. 94. "'...Man has no moral instinct. He is not born with moral sense. You were not born with it, I was not--and a puppy has none. We acquire moral sense, when we do, through training, experience, and hard sweat of the mind. These unfortunate juvenile criminals were born with none, even as you and I, and they had no chance to acquire any; their experience did not permit it. What is 'moral sense'? It is an elaboration of the instinct to survive. The instinct to survive is human nature itself, and every aspect of our personalities derives from it. Anything that conflicts with the survival instinct acts sooner or later to eliminate the individual and thereby fails to show up in future generatinos. This truth is mathematically demonstrable, everywhere verifiable... But the instinct to survive... can be cultivated into motivatios more subtle and much more complex than the blind, brute urge of the individual to stay alive...' "


miscellaneous regional info, continued

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