Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to miscellaneous regional info, USA

miscellaneous regional info, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
miscellaneous regional info USA 1985 Knight, Damon. "Point of View " in One Side Laughing. New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; 1985); pg. 20. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1985 Smith, Dean Wesley. "One Last Dance " in L. Ron Hubbard Presents The Best of Writers of the Future (Algis Budrys, ed.) Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (2000; c. 1985); pg. 297. [Story, pg. 297-305. Nothing to index. Character names include Bill, Suzanne, William, Judy.]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1986 Keizer, Gregg. "I Am the Burning Bush " in Future on Fire (Orson Scott Card, ed.) New York: Tor (1991; story copyright 1982); pg. 166-181. [No apparent references to any religious groups.]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1986 Simmons, Dan. "Two Minutes and Forty-Five Seconds " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1988); pg. 350-357. [Nothing to index. This story, pg. 350 to 357. Is about the Challenger shuttle disaster. Specifically, one of the engineers who signed off on the faulty part that caused the Challenger to explode feels such guilt about the incident that he decides to do something drastic about it. He rigs a bomb to blow off the wings of a corporate jet that he and 4 company vice-presidents are aboard, causing them to crash to their death, taking approximately the same amount of time it took the Challenger astronauts to die as they fell to the surface.]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1990 Rogers, Bruce Holland. "A Branch in the Wind " in L. Ron Hubbard Presents The Best of Writers of the Future (Algis Budrys, ed.) Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (2000; c. 1990); pg. 289. [Story, pg. 289-295. Nothing to index. Character names include Scott, Sharon, David, Julie, Patricia.]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 87. "'...do you recall the last census of the American population? It's vague in my mind. Something on the order of three hundred million...' "
miscellaneous regional info USA 1997 Bova, Ben. "Lower the River " in Twice Seven. New York: Avon Books (1998; c. 1997); pg. 231-235. [No apparent religious refs. in story. Story is about physicists Jackson Klondike and William Ratner, and has to do with superconductors.]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1997 Bradbury, Ray. "End of Summer " in Driving Blind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 171-177. [No apparent refs.] Proper names include: Hattie; Mr. Waltzer; Glen Bay Street; Aunt Maude; Cousin Jacob
miscellaneous regional info USA 1997 Bradbury, Ray. "I Wonder What's Become of Sally " in Driving Blind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 91. [No apparent refs.]
miscellaneous regional info USA 2000 Kube-McDowell, Michael. The Quiet Pools. New York: Ace (1990); pg. 138. "...the turn-of-the millennium AIDS epidemic... With the wages of si death, monogamy fast regained its fading respect--and collected a bandwagon's worth of champions. The new fidelity advocacy was an odd alliance comprised, at the most fundamental level, of those women whose security was threatened by male philandering and those men whose control was threatened by female sexual emancipation. Whether they were cleric's garb, a doctor's coat, or the prim dress of a moral reformer, they embraced AIDS almost gleefully as the means to a final victory.

This was true in some degree in every Western nation, but particularly true in the United States... "

miscellaneous regional info USA 2000 Tucker, Wilson. The Year of the Quiet Sun. New York: Ace (1970); pg. 39-40. "...the first few columns were solidly rooted in the census figures of 1970, while the following columns on the following pages were his projections going forward to 2050...

Total population, by the turn of the century: based upon the foregoing [birth, death, etc. predictions], three hundred and forty million people in the forty-eight contiguous states and an additional ten million in the three remaining states (the northern tier of plains states projected as consistent annual losers but with Alaska up significantly; Manhattan Island reaching point of saturation within two years, California by 1990, Florida by 2010). Footnote: recommended that immigration to Manhattan Island, California, and Florida be forbidden by law, and that monetary inducements be offered to relocate in middle states having low densities of population. "

miscellaneous regional info USA 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 102. "In a country of four hundred millions... "
miscellaneous regional info USA 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 3. "This is America. People do whatever the... they feel like doing, you got a problem with that? Because they have a right to. And because they have guns and no one can... stop them. As a result, this country has one of the worst economies in the world. When it gets down to it--talking trade balances here--once we've brain-drained all our technology into other countries, once things have evened out... There's only four things we do better than anyone else

music
movies
microcode (software)
high-speed pizza delivery "

miscellaneous regional info USA 2040 Pohl, Frederik. Man Plus. New York: Random House (1976); pg. 14. "Roger... thought about what it must be like to be the President of three hundred million Americans in a touchy and treacherous world. "
miscellaneous regional info USA 2047 Bear, Greg. Queen of Angels. New York: Warner Books (1994; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 86. "Oversight had proven its worth a hundred times over in giving social statisticians the raw data necessary to make plans track trends understand and serve a nation of half a billion people. "
miscellaneous regional info USA - South 1840 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 264. "Humanity had become as blase about sharing their lives with potential AI monitoring as pre-Civil War Old Earth USA-southern families had been about speaking in front of their human slaves. Nothing could be done about it--every human above the lowest dregs' Hive poverty class had a comlog with biomonitor... "
miscellaneous regional info USA - Southwest 1935 Barton, William. "Home is Where the Heart Is " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 227. "I remember back in the Thirties, honeymooning with my young wife in the American southwest, seeing the haze of the Grand Canyon... "
miscellaneous regional info USA - Southwest 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 19: "Siege ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Sep. 1984); pg. 22. Sam: Daylight! The air's warm--it's summertime! An will y'all look at where we are! This is somewhere out west! " [In the background, the scene is a desert, with mesas, as one would find in Utah or Arizona.]
miscellaneous regional info USA - Southwest 1987 Bryant, Edward. "The Second Coming of Buddy Holly " in Wild Cards V: Down and Dirty (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 202. "Holley turned the object over and over, examining it closely. 'Doesn't look American southwest--Polynesian? Australia, maybe?' "
miscellaneous regional info USA - Southwest 1987 Le Guin, Ursula K. "Buffalo Gals, Won't You Come Out Tonight " in Future on Fire (Orson Scott Card, ed.) New York: Tor (1991; story copyright 1987); pg. 195-225. [This story doesn't contain references to any specific religious groups, but takes place in the American Southwest, and heavily features the wildlife and scenery of the Southwest, as well as something of the folklore and rhythm of the region.]
miscellaneous regional info USA - Southwest 3000 Felice, Cynthia. Iceman. New York: Ace (1991); pg. 51. "Except for a small secessionist territory in the far Southwest, where they actually had some functioning cold-fusion power plants, the rest of the American states were practically Stone Age, and even the Southern Hemisphere nations were nothing more than farmers and hunters. Still, even a small-scale election in just the Consortium District had come as a shock. "
miscellaneous regional info USA - West 2030 Willis, Connie & Cynthia Felice. Light Raid. New York: Ace (1989); pg. 2. Pg. 2: "'Is it a letter from a spy?' Beejum said.

'No.' It wasn't from my father either. I could see that without even opening it. It lacked the censorship and neutral communication stickers that were splattered all over everything that came from the Western States. "; Cover jacket: "The world as we know it has changed considerably. A civil war is raging, between the eastern half of North America and the west. The latest methods of destruction are frightening, brutal, inescapable. They are called light raids--massive laser-beam assaults that are as effective as they are merciless. " [ [Many refs. throughout novel to the Western U.S., not in DB. Colorado is a particular important locale in novel.]

miscellaneous regional info USA - West 2065 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Pacific Edge. New York: Tor (1990); pg. 38. "...much of the United States was a desert civilization; and like all previous desert civilizations, it was in danger of foundering when its water systems began to clog. Currently some sixty million people lived in the American West... "
miscellaneous regional info USA: Southwest 1850 Zelazny, Roger. "This Moment of the Storm " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1966); pg. 247. [Year estimated.] "We are still quite primitive. Self-sufficiency, in order to wok on our population: land scale, demanded a society on the order of that of the mid-nineteenth century in the American southwest--at least for purposes of getting started. Even now, Cyg is still partly on a natural economy system... " [An area on a colony planet from a few hundred years in the future is compared to the American Southwest. Note that the author lived in New Mexico at the time.]
miscellaneous regional info USSR 1941 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Tilting the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1995); pg. 208. "The Soviet Union had 190,000,000 people; throw twenty or thirty million on the fire, or even more, and it remained a going concern. Just getting rid of the kulaks, and bringing in collectivized agriculture had killed millions through deliberate famine. If more deaths were what building socialism in the USSR required, more deaths there would be. "
miscellaneous regional info USSR 2015 Sheffield, Charles. Brother to Dragons. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1992); pg. 153. "Brazil and Mexico and Indonesia and the old Soviet states push six hundred million each. "
miscellaneous regional info Utah: Beaver County 2010 Hickman, Tracy. The Immortals. New York: ROC/Penguin Books (1997; c. 1996); pg. 48. "'Each night we lose about one percent of the camp to any number of minor diseases. Reverend Weston's group estimates the maximum capacity of this camp to be about twelve thousand people. That equates to approximately one to two hundred people each night. ERIS sends a pallet every morning to pick them up and drag them down to that central facility a couple miles west of here in the bottom of the valley. The Ranch they call it. They must be doing quite a business--smoke is pouring out of that thing all the time...'

Michael was paler than even the frigid light of the optic emitters could account for. 'All these people are dying from V-CIDS?'

'No, all these people are dying from the most common of diseases and maladies--colds or flu mostly.' "

miscellaneous regional info Vanuatu 2128 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Blue Mars. New York: Bantam Books (1996); pg. 99. [List of towns on Mars, labelled "Towns ", included "New Vanuatu ", evidently settled by people from Vanuatu.]
miscellaneous regional info Vusstra 3038 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Cale's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 31. "No more than a handful of Humans resided on the entire planet of Vusstra, and Cale rarely encountered one. "
miscellaneous regional info world -5998019 B.C.E. May, Julian. The Many Colored Land in The Many-Colored Land & The Golden Torc (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1981); pg. 115. "'...You must have some questions you would like to ask me!'

'Just a few for now. What is your total population?'

'Well, we hardly keep accurate census figures, you understand, but I think a reasonable estimate would be about fifty thousand human souls.'

'Strange, I would have guessed more. Do you suffer from disease?'

'Oh, hardly at all. Our ordinary macroimmunization and genetically engineered resistances seem to protect us very well here in the Pliocene, although the very earliest travelers didn't enjoy the full-spectrum coverage of those who have come to Exile within the last thirty years or so... But most of our--um--attrition has come form accidents... We have physicians, of course. And certain medications are regularly sent through the time-portal. But we cannot regenerate persons suffering really serious trauma. And this world may be said to be civilized, but it is hardly tame, if you take my meaning.' "

miscellaneous regional info world -400 B.C.E. Cool, Tom. Infectress. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 48. "'Oh, yeah. Hippocrates. Circa 400 B.C. or something. World population, about 100 million. Back then, the planet was natural. People were people. Diseases were diseases.' "
miscellaneous regional info world 1200 C.E. Zelazny, Roger. "The George Business " in Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983; story c. 1980); pg. 200. "Deep in his lair, Dark twisted his green and golden length about his small hoard, his sleep troubled by dreams of a series of identical armored assailants. Since dragons' dreams are always prophetic, he woke with a shudder, cleared his throat to the point of sufficient illumination to check on the state of his treasure... " [Entire story is about a dragon. No apparent refs. to specific religious/tribal groups.]
miscellaneous regional info world 1900 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 87. [Fictional table: "Area and Population of the Worlds ", showing figures for (est. millions) for 1900, 1950, 2000, 2050, 2075. Source is given as "Rand McNally & Co. "]
miscellaneous regional info world 1935 Knight, Damon. Why Do Birds. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 36. "'...how big would it have to be?'

The architect scratched his nose. 'Well, the world population is around six billion now. Can I assume--'

'Wait a minute. Six billion? Back in the thirties, it was about two. How could that happen?' "

miscellaneous regional info world 1950 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 87. [Fictional table: "Area and Population of the Worlds ", showing figures for (est. millions) for 1900, 1950, 2000, 2050, 2075. Source is given as "Rand McNally & Co. "]
miscellaneous regional info world 1950 Knight, Damon. The Man in the Tree. New York: Berkley Books (1984); pg. 136. "'See how it rises very gradually until you get to about seventeen fifty. Now it goes up more steeply. The population in nineteen fifty was about two and a half billion...' "
miscellaneous regional info world 1954 Dick, Philip K. "The Crawlers " in The Preserving Machine. New York: Ace Books (1969; c. 1954); pg. 214. [nothing to index]
miscellaneous regional info world 1955 Knight, Damon. "You're Another " in Far Out. New York: Simon and Schuster (1961; c. 1955); pg. 152. "'...You know how many people live on d'planet now?... 'Tirty billion. You know how many go to livies? Half. Fifteen billion. Seven times more people dan live on d'planet in your time...' "
miscellaneous regional info world 1960 Thomas, Ted. "The Intruder " in A Pocketful of Stars (Damon Knight, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971; c. 1960); pg. 32. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info world 1970 Panshin, Alexei. "How Can We Sink When We Can Fly? " in Farewell To Yesterday's Tomorrow. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1975; c. 1971); pg. 123. "...when I was born, in 1940, there were 140 million people in this country, and now there are more than 200 million... Our country has six percent of the world's population. We consume fifty percent of the world's production. How long will we be allowed to continue? Who will we kill to continue. "
miscellaneous regional info world 1974 Disch, Thomas M. Camp Concentration. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1968); pg. 134. Pg. 133-134: "'People used to think, you know, that it would level off, that the curve would be S-shaped.'

'People,' Mina said dismally. 'What people?'

'Riesman, for instance,' he said. 'But those people were wrong. The curve just goes on rising, rising. Exponentially... Four hundred twenty million... Four hundred seventy million. Six hundred ninety million. One point oh nine billion. Two and a half billion. Five billion. And any day now, ten billion. It shoots up off the graph like a Ranger rocket.' " [More about world population, pg. 132-136, 138.]

miscellaneous regional info world 1975 Asimov, Isaac. "Spell My Name with an S " in Nine Tomorrows. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1959; story c. 1958; original title: "S, as in Zebatinsky "); pg. 161-176. [The story is about a Polish-American nuclear physicist who has had trouble getting a job, and visits a numerologist who advises him to change the first letter of his surname ('Zebatinsky') from a 'z' to an 's.' This seems like a very minor change, but the numerologist convinces him to do it, and the end result is that a nuclear war is averted. At the end of the story it is revealed that the numerologist was a member of a race of god-like beings, and that he had a bet with a peer regarding who could cause the biggest change in Earth's history with the smallest stimulus.]
miscellaneous regional info world 1976 Zelazny, Roger. "The Force That Through the Circuit Drives the Current " in Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983; story c. 1976); pg. 81-85. [No apparent refs. to any specific groups in this story. Story makes reference to Hudson Canyon, the Atlantic, Heezen and Ewing of Lamont, turbidity currents, Rhone, Lake Geneva.]
miscellaneous regional info world 1978 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Last Son of Krypton. New York: Warner Books (1978); pg. 85. "Lex Luthor's mind divided the Universe into a finite number of mathematical units. The Earth was four billion people, a day was 86,400 seconds... "
miscellaneous regional info world 1978 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Last Son of Krypton. New York: Warner Books (1978); pg. 213. "'I'm talking about a global culture whose scientific wealth has outstripped by a light-year its social and political development in just one or two generations. I'm talking about a race with a population of humans that theplanet manages to support far beyond its apparent ability to do so. I'm talking about four billion--count 'em--four billion intelligent, incredibly industrious creatures. Capable of making decisions, with the manual dexterity to tie knots and pull triggers, who can navigate courses and plan complicated procedures over periods of not only the next hour or the next day, but the next century. What's the intelligent population of the plant Regulus-6?'

'About 760 million.' "

miscellaneous regional info world 1978 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Last Son of Krypton. New York: Warner Books (1978); pg. 237. "They man [Superman] with powers and abilities far beyond those of mortal men sometimes wondered why he was so attached to this small world and its scurrying inhabitants. In moments like these, though, he understood. Nowhere had he seen greater valor than in these four billion humans who cried as easily as they laughed, who cheated as they were cheated, who seemed bound unbreakably to a tiny clump of water and dirt careening endlessly around a dwarf star, yet dared to dream of God. "
miscellaneous regional info world 1980 Callenbach, Ernest. Ecotopia. New York: Tor (1977; c. 1975); pg. 4. "On board TWA flight 38, New York to Reno, May 3. As I begin this assignment, my jet heads west to Reno--last American city before the forbidding Sierra Nevada mountains that guard the closed boarders of Ecotopia.

The passage of time has softened the shock of Ecotopia's separation from the United States. And Ecotopia's example, it is now clear, was not as novel as it seemed at the time. Biafra had attempted secession from Nigeria in 1968. Bangladesh had successfully broken free of Pakistan in 1971. Ecotopia's secession in 1980 was followed by that of Quebec from Canada in 1983. Our intelligence reports tell of continue 'minority' disturbances even in the Soviet Union. The only important counter-development we can point to is the union of the Scandinavian countries in 1985--and even that is perhaps only an exception to prove the rules, since the Scandinavians were virtually one people culturally in any event. "

miscellaneous regional info world 1980 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 426. "A Level Three person was fixated on rules. 'I followed orders.' Level Four ethics were dictated by the majority. A Level Five person devoted his or her life to creating and defending the laws that best served the widest common good, while defending the legal rights even of those whose views the Level Five person could not accept... Level Sixes were able to transcend the legalistic fixation of Level Fives, focusing on the common good and higher ethical realities across national, cultural, and societal boundaries. Level Sevens responded only to universal principles. Level Sevens appeared to be represented by the occasional Jesuses, Gandhis, and Buddhas. "; Pg. 427: "Level Zeroes did not want to be caught and punished... Level Zeroes could not differentiate criminal acts from everyday functions; they were morally blind... At any given time, in any given culture, one or two percent of the population was at a Level Zero stage of human moral development. "
miscellaneous regional info world 1981 Zelazny, Roger. "Go Starless in the Night " in Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983; story c. 1981); pg. 67-74. [No apparent refs. to any specific groups in this story. The story was written, as the author describes in the introduction, to "provide a novel means of getting at the past--excluding the old Wellsian standby of simple time travel. "]
miscellaneous regional info world 1981 Zelazny, Roger. "Walpurgisnacht " in Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983; story c. 1981); pg. 195-199. [Story appears to take place in the future, perhaps circa 2100. No apparent refs. to specific religious/tribal groups. Story is about technologically modern memorials to the dead or to the past.]
miscellaneous regional info world 1982 Brin, David. Earth. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 374. "World human population figures: 1982: 4.3 billion; 1988: 5.1 billion "
miscellaneous regional info world 1982 Silverberg, Robert. Majipoor Chronicles. New York: HarperPrism (1996; c. 1982) [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info world 1984 Knight, Damon. "The Time Exchange " in One Side Laughing. New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; 1984); pg. 205. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info world 1984 Orwell, George. Nineteen Eighty-Four. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1949); pg. 186. [From Goldstein's book] "The splitting-up of the world into three great superstates was an event which could be and indeed was forseen before the middle of the twentieth century. With the absorption of Europe by Russia and of the British Empire by the United States, two of the three existing powers, Eurasia and Oceania, were already effectively in being. The third, eastasia... The frontiers between the three superstates are in some places arbitrary, and in some others they fluctuate according to the fortunes of war, but in general they follow geographical lines. Eurasia comprises the whole of the northern part of the European and Asiatic land-mass from Portugal to the Bering Strait. Oceania comprises the Americas, the Atlantic islands including the British Isles, Australasia, & the southern portion of Africa. Eastasia... comprises China and the countries to the south of it, the Japanese islands and a large but fluctuating portion of Mancuria, Mongolia, & Tibet. "
miscellaneous regional info world 1987 Donaldson, Stephen R. A Man Rides Through. New York: Ballantine (1987); pg. 11. [Novel is an epic fantasy that takes place in contemporary times, but on an alternate world. One of main characters is Terisa, an American mission secretary who journeyed to this world in the previous novel in this 2-volume series. The novel seems to focus on political and court intrigue, but really seems to have nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info world 1988 Brin, David. Earth. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 374. "World human population figures: 1982: 4.3 billion; 1988: 5.1 billion "
miscellaneous regional info world 1988 Brin, David. Earth. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 259. "Census Counts (in billions of individuals): Human beings: 1988: 5.2; 2038: 10.6 "
miscellaneous regional info world 1988 Russ, Joanna. "Nobody's Home " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1972); pg. 406. "'...It was the result of a bet. Like the bad old days. Did you know there were once five billion people in this world?' "
miscellaneous regional info world 1993 Simmons, Dan. The Hollow Man. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 339. "The world screamed at him in five billion pain-filled voices demanding to be heard, five billion lost children waiting to be held... "
miscellaneous regional info world 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 87. "'...Colonel, do you know how many people turned down the opportunity to live forever? Roughly one in ten thousand.'

'You can't possibly know that.'

'For the sake of argument, let's assume I do. The population of the Earth is roughly six billion, which yields six hundred million individuals who are not, as you say, diseased. Quite a number...' "

miscellaneous regional info world 1996 Bradbury, Ray. "Hopscotch " in Quicker Than the Eye. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 57-66. [No apparent refs. Character names: James Conway (Jim).; Vinia]
miscellaneous regional info world 1996 Bradbury, Ray. "The Electrocution " in Quicker Than the Eye. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 49-55. [No apparent refs. Main characters are Electra and Johnny. Other things mentioned are Ferris wheel; Beautiful, Ohio]
miscellaneous regional info world 1998 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Lathe of Heaven. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1971); pg. 105. "'...Well, it was a lot worse. Worse than you remember. It was the same world as that first one you remember, with a population of seven billion, only--it was worse. Nobody by some of the European countries got rationing and pollution control and birth control going early enough, in the seventies, and so when we finally did try to control food distribution it was too late, there wasn't enough, and the mafia ran the black market, everybody had to buy on the black market to get anything to eat, and a lot of people didn't get anything...' "
miscellaneous regional info world 2000 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 87. [Fictional table: "Area and Population of the Worlds ", showing figures for (est. millions) for 1900, 1950, 2000, 2050, 2075. Source is given as "Rand McNally & Co. "]
miscellaneous regional info world 2000 Knight, Damon. The Man in the Tree. New York: Berkley Books (1984); pg. 136. "'...The population in nineteen fifty was about two and a half billion. By the year two thousand, it will be more like six billion.'

'...What's wrong with six billion people?'

'...'We can't feed that many,' he said. 'Even if we could, can we feed twice that many? Fifteen billion in twenty fifty?' "



miscellaneous regional info, continued

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