Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to miscellaneous regional info, Texas: Dallas

miscellaneous regional info, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
miscellaneous regional info Texas: Dallas 2020 Clarke, Arthur C. "Refugee " in The Sentinel. New York: Berkley Books (1983; c. 1955); pg. 127. "He was slightly below average height, and had fine-drawn, regular features that really lived up to all the genealogical cliches. Captain Saunders, who came from Dallas and had no intention of being impressed by any prince. " [Other refs. to this Texan, not in DB.]
miscellaneous regional info Texas: Dallas 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 21. [Dallas mentioned on pg. 21-22, 28.]
miscellaneous regional info Texas: Dallas 2027 Robinson, Kim Stanley. The Gold Coast. New York: Tor (1995; c. 1988); pg. 100. -
miscellaneous regional info Texas: Dallas 2031 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Chronoliths. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 202. -
miscellaneous regional info Texas: Dallas 2039 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. Crescent City Rhapsody. New York: Tor (2001; c. 2000); pg. 406. -
miscellaneous regional info Texas: Dallas 2050 Egan, Greg. Permutation City. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 69. "'Is there any reason to stay in emergency mode? Is there some snap decision I'm going to have to make? Are there missiles heading for--' He checked a display. '--Dallas?' Dallas? The US dollar must have fallen sharply against the yen. " [More, pg. 70, 211.]
miscellaneous regional info Texas: Dallas 2050 Scarborough, Elizabeth Ann. Last Refuge. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 250, 261-262. -
miscellaneous regional info Texas: Dallas 2054 McGarry, Mark J. "Acts of Love " in The Edge of Space. New York: Elsevier/Nelson Books (1979); pg. 145. "In geosynchronous orbit 36,000 kilometers above the flaming shuttle-field at Dallas, Wing 23 makes its preparations to depart. "
miscellaneous regional info Texas: Dallas 2075 Herbert, Frank & Brian Herbert. Man of Two Worlds. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1986); pg. 176. "'The volcanoes are big,' Lutt said, 'and the plane itself is hot enough just on the surface.'

'Hell! We got a fire department in Dallas could put the whole damn planet out in half an hour.'

'yeah! Everything in Texas is bigger and better.' "

miscellaneous regional info Texas: Dallas 2082 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 30. [The main character of this novel is named Dallas Barr.] "'Maybe it's because you're a Texan,' Randolph said.

'but I'm not. I was born in New Jersey. My mother never would tell me why she named me Dallas.'

'Maybe it was the TV show.'

'No, I was over thirty when that came on.' "

miscellaneous regional info Texas: Dallas 2324 Cherryh, C. J. Hellburner. New York: Warner (1992); pg. 284. "'...Salazar's plane was forced to land in Dallas because of a bomb threat...' "
miscellaneous regional info Texas: Dallas 2370 Thompson, W.R. Infiltrator (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 58. "'I'm Selig Thorn. That's my nephew Dallas.'

...'You're radicals?' she asked.

He nodded. 'We've been called that.' " [Some other refs. to the character named 'Dallas', e.g., pg. 109.]

miscellaneous regional info Texas: Dallas 2500 Asimov, Isaac. "Stranger in Paradise " in The Complete Robot. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1982; c. 1974); pg. 99. [Year est.] Pg. 99: "Looking back on it later, he could never work out just what it was that finally let him to agree to visit Dallas... Anthony worked at Dallas and, William remembered now, at the Mercury Project... "; Pg. 102: "Anthony remembered the day when he had made the suggestion. It was on 7-4-553. He remembered it, for one thing, because he remembered thinking that day that 7-4 had been an important holiday in the Dallas region of the world among the pre-Cats half a millennium before--well, 553 years before to be exact. [Other refs., not in DB.]
miscellaneous regional info Texas: Dallas 3332 Attanasio, A. A. Radix. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1981); pg. 43. "The whole colossal landscape was--had been--a city!

'It was called Houston,' the old voor said. 'Or Dallas. I'm not sure which anymore.' " [More describing the ruins of this city 1,300 years in the future, but no other refs. by name.]

miscellaneous regional info Texas: Dallas 3900 Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Mercedes Lackey. Rediscovery. New York: DAW Books (1993); pg. 6. [Year estimated.] "'...we might just as well have been confined to a single building in Dallas or San Francisco for the past three years...' "
miscellaneous regional info Texas: Orange 2000 Knight, Damon. Rule Golden in Three Novels. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1954); pg. 68. "On the 14th, Zebulon, Georgia (pop. 312), Murfreesboro, Tennessee (pop. 11,190) and Orange, Texas (pop. 8,740) seceded from the Union. "
miscellaneous regional info Thailand 1972 DuBois, Brendan. Resurrection Day. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1999); pg. 298. "'Where is the menace now, ten years after the war? Is there a Soviet empire, holding down satellite nations in Eastern Europe? No. Is there a communist China, threatening its neighbors in Vietnam, Laos, Burman, Thailand, or India? No...' "
miscellaneous regional info Thailand 2023 Egan, Greg. Permutation City. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 95. "2016 to 2023: traveled to Thailand, Burma, India, Nepal. "
miscellaneous regional info Thailand 2065 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Pacific Edge. New York: Tor (1990); pg. 60. "Global village, made in Thailand! " [Category begun 7 October 2000.]
miscellaneous regional info Thailand 2093 Kube-McDowell, Michael. The Quiet Pools. New York: Ace (1990); pg. 125. "Realwadee, a Malay Thai woman, barely a woman at nineteen: 'My option was a gift from King Adulyadj on my admission to Ramkhamhaeng University. My selection honors my father, my family, and my sovereign lord. Can I do other than go?' "
miscellaneous regional info Thailand: Chiang Mai 1989 Simmons, Dan. "Dying in Bangkok " in Lovedeath. New York: Warner Books (1993); pg. 76. "In Chiang Mai, where the whores are cheap and the young men celebrate entry into manhood by buying a [expletive], 72 percent of the city's poorest prostitutes tested positive for HIV in 1989. "
miscellaneous regional info Tibet 1960 Henderson, C. J. "The Worst Prison of All " in X-Men: Legends (Stan Lee, ed.) New York: Berkley Boulevard (2000); pg. 93. "And even when he lost the use of his legs, he had been living life to the fullest he had ever known. raveling in Tibet, he had reached a mysterious walled city in the shadow of the Himalayas. There he had encountered a terrible dictator known only as Lucifer. Leading local rebels had freed the local countryside from the grasp of the monster who had conquered it. Unfortunately, his reward for his efforts had been to end trapped beneath a massive slab of stone, dropped on him by the fleeing tyrant. " [Some more about what happened in Tibet.]
miscellaneous regional info Tidewater 2300 Swanwick, Michael. Stations of the Tide. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 48. [Year is estimated.] Pg. 48: "'He was a normal enough boy. Full of the devil. He used to love stories, I remember. Ghosts and haunts and knights and space pirates. The priest would tell little Aldebaran stories of the martyrs. I remember how he'd sit listening, eyes big, and tremble when they died...' "; Pg. 82: "'Because he had the spirit of a magician. He had that unswerving, unbreakable will that the spiritual arts require, and the sudden instinct for the unexpected.' "; Pg. 111: "'Have you considered spiritual training?' he asked... 'First off, the entity you spoke with was not a haunt... What you saw was an avatar of one of their spirits...' " [No actual Earth religion is mentioned by name in his book, and no religion on the planet Tidewater is identified by name. Much of the religious imagery and practices mentioned are derived from post-medieval esotericism and the occult.]
miscellaneous regional info Tidewater 2300 Swanwick, Michael. Stations of the Tide. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 129. [Year is estimated.] "...Here is where we store all the damned children of science, the outdated, obscure, and impolite information that belongs nowhere else. Flat and hollow worlds, rains of frogs, visitations of angels. Paracelsus's alchemical system in one bottle and Isaac Newton's in another, Pythagorean numerology corked here, phrenology there, shoulder to punt with demonology, astrology, an methods of repelling sharks. It's all rather something of a lumber room now, but much of this information was once quite important. Some of it used to be the best there was.'

'Do you handle magic?'

'Magic of all sorts, sir. Necromancy, geomancy, ritual sacrifice, divination by means of the study of entrails, omens, crystals, dreams, or pools of ink, animism, fetishism, social Darwinism, psychohistory, continuous creation, Lamarckian genetics, psionics, and more. Indeed, what is magic but impossible science?' "

miscellaneous regional info Tidewater 2300 Swanwick, Michael. Stations of the Tide. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 93-94. [Year is estimated.] "He sighed, took Gregorian's notebook from his briefcase, flipped idly through its pages. A new age of magic interpretation of the world is coming, of interpretation in terms of the will and not of the intelligence. There is no such thing as truth, either in the moral or the scientific sense.. Impatiently he skipped ahead.

What is good? Whatever increases the feeling of power, the will to power, and above all else, power itself. Rereading the words, he could see the young Gregorian in his mind, the doubtless gaunt magician-apprentice, filled with the sourceless teenage hunger for importance and recognition. Men are my slaves.

He put the book back, irritated by the naive posturing tone of its aphorisms... he took the notebook out again. There was an early exercise captioned The Worm Ouroboros... "

miscellaneous regional info Tierra del Cygnus: Betty-Beta 2897 Zelazny, Roger. "This Moment of the Storm " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1966); pg. 246. [Year estimated.] Pg. 244: "...back when Betty-Beta's first mayor, Wyeth, had died after two months in office. I was born five hundred ninety-seven years ago, on Earth, but I spent about five hundred sixty-two of those years sleeping, during my long jaunts between the stars. I've made a few more trips than a few others; consequently, I am an anachronism. "; Pg. 245: "Tierra del Cygnus, Land of the Swan--delightful name. It refers to both the planet and its sole continent.

How to describe the world, like quick? Well, roughly Earth-size; actually a bit smaller, and more watery... "; Pg. 246: "Betty's position, too, is occasionally precarious... located on the gulf about twenty miles inland... a strip city... Around eighty percent of the one hundred thousand population is concentrated about the business district, five miles in from the river. "

miscellaneous regional info Trantor 22975 Asimov, Isaac. Prelude to Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 52. "'...Trantor's population is decreasing. Twenty-five years ago, it stood at almost forty-five billion.

'Partly, this decrease is because of a decline in the birthrate. To be sure, Trantor never has had a high birthrate. If you'll look about you when you're traveling on Trantor, you won't encounter very many children, considering the enormous population. But just the same it's declining. Then too there is emigration. People are leaving Trantor in greater numbers than are arriving.' "

miscellaneous regional info Trantor 22995 Benford, Gregory. Foundation's Fear. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 19. Pg. 19: "Trantor supported forty billion people in a world-wrapping single city, seldom less than half a kilometer deep. Sealed, protected, its billions had grown used to recycled air and short perspectives, and feared the open spaces a mere elevator ride away. "; Pg. 27: "Trantor was bad enough, 800 Sectors with forty billion people. "
miscellaneous regional info Trantor 22995 Benford, Gregory. Foundation's Fear. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 339. "The Empire's twenty-five million worlds supported an average of only four billion people per planet. Trantor had forty billion. "
miscellaneous regional info Trantor 23000 Asimov, Isaac. Prelude to Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 27. "TRANTOR-- . . . The capital of the First Galactic Empire . . . Under Cleon I, it had its 'twilight glow.' To all appearances, it was then at its peak. Its land surface of 200 million square kilometers was entirely domed (except for the Imperial Palace area) and underlaid with an endless city that extended beneath the continental shelves. The population was 40 billion and although the signs were plentiful (and clearly visible in hindsight) that there were gathering problems, those who lived on Trantor undoubtedly found it still the eternal World of legend and did not except it would ever . . .

ENCYCLOPEDIA GALACTICA "

miscellaneous regional info Trantor 23000 Asimov, Isaac. Prelude to Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 34. "'No! You're an Outworlder, Seldon. You don't know what Trantor is like. It's forty billion people and there are few other worlds with even a tenth of its population. It is of unimaginable technological and cultural complexity. Where we are now is the Imperial Sector--with the highest standard of living in the Galaxy and populated entirely by Imperial functionaries. Elsewhere on the planet, however, are over eight hundred other sectors, some of them with subcultures totally different from what we have here and most of them untouchable by Imperial forces.' "
miscellaneous regional info Trantor 23008 Asimov, Isaac. Forward the Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1993); pg. 56. "...Trantor was the most highly populated of all the worlds, with its forty billion people. For another, its eight hundred sectors formed a mini-Empire all its own. "
miscellaneous regional info Trantor 23200 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1951); pg. 9. "TRANTOR-- . . . At the beginning of the thirteenth millennium, this tendency reached its climax. As the center of the Imperial Government for unbroken hundreds of generations and located, as it was, in the central regions of the Galaxy among the most densely populated and industrially advanced worlds of the system, it could scarcely help being the densest and richest clot of humanity the Race had ever seen.

Its urbanization, progresing stedily, had finally reached the ultimate. All the land surface of Trantor, 75,000,000 square miles in extent, was a single city. The population, at its height, was well in excess of forty billions. This enormous population was devoted almost entirely to the administrative necessities of Empire, and found themselves all too few for the complications of the task... Daily, fleets of ships in the tens of thousands brought th eproduce of twenty agricultural worlds to the dinner tables of Trantor...

- ENCYLOPEDIA GALACTICA "

miscellaneous regional info Trantor 23200 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1951); pg. 25. "Consider that Trantor has a population of over forty billions. "
miscellaneous regional info United Kingdom: England 2000 Amis, Kingsley. The Alteration. New York: Viking Press (1976); pg. 204. "'...that at this pace there'll be eighty million folk in Englnd by the year of Our Lord two thousand?'

'Yes, Your Holiness,' said the Jesuit, who was well enough aware, having himself supplied the figure to his master. 'Too many mouths to feed.' "

miscellaneous regional info United Kingdom: England 4394 Hoban, Russell. Riddley Walker. New York: Summit Books (1980); pg. 125. "'...A.D. 120 thats the year count they use to have it gone from Year 1 right the way to Bad Time. A.D. means All Done. 120 years all done theyre saying that when they begun this pictur in 120 nor they never got it finisht til 1480 is what it says here wel you know there aint no picter cud take 1360 years to do these here year numbers is about some thing else may be wewl neer know what.'

I said, 'What year is it now by that count?'

He said, 'We don't know just how far that count ever got becaws Bad Time put a end to it. Theres a stoan in the Power Ring stannings has the year number 1997 cut in to it nor we wint nevder seen no year number farther or nor that. After Bad Time dint no 1 write down no year count for a long time we dont know how long til the Mincery begun agen [guess: 50 years]. Since we startit counting its come to 2347 o.c. which means Our Count.' "

miscellaneous regional info United Kingdom: England 4394 Hoban, Russell. Riddley Walker. New York: Summit Books (1980); pg. 125. "I said, 'Dyou mean to tel me them before us by the time they done 1997 years they had boats in the air and all them things and here we are weve done 2347 years and more and stil slogging the mud?' "
miscellaneous regional info United Kingdom: Wales 2110 May, Julian. The Many Colored Land in The Many-Colored Land & The Golden Torc (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1981); pg. 158. "Sukey said, 'Welsh folklore had such creatures, too. But they lived in lakes, not forests. They were called the Gwragedd Annwn and they came up to dance on the water in the misty moonlight and lured travelers into their underwater palaces.' " [See also pg. 232]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1940 Panshin, Alexei. "How Can We Sink When We Can Fly? " in Farewell To Yesterday's Tomorrow. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1975; c. 1971); pg. 123. "...in 1940, there were 140 million people in this country... "
miscellaneous regional info USA 1953 Dick, Philip K. "Roog " in The Best of Philip K. Dick. New York: Ballantine (1977; story c. 1953); pg. 11-16. [No apparent refs. to actual religious groups. Story includes: aliens called Roogs, Guardians, Alf Cardossi and Mrs. Cardossi, and Boris (the dog).]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1953 Dick, Philip K. "Roog " in The Preserving Machine. New York: Ace Books (1969; c. 1953); pg. 50. [nothing to index]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1953 Dick, Philip K. "The Days of Perky Pat " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1953); pg. 301. [Already indexed, from The Best of Philip K. Dick, 1977]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1954 Dick, Philip K. "The Short Happy Life of the Brown Oxford " in I Hope I Shall Arrive Soon. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1985; c. 1954); pg. 24. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1955 Dick, Philip K. "Autofac " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1955); pg. 1. [Already indexed, from The Best of Philip K. Dick, 1977]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1955 Dick, Philip K. "Captive Market " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1955); pg. 37. [Already indexed, from The Preserving Machine, 1969]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1955 Dick, Philip K. "Service Call " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1955); pg. 21. [Already indexed, from The Best of Philip K. Dick, 1977]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1955 Dick, Philip K. "The Mold of Yancy " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1955); pg. 37. [Already indexed, from The Golden Man, 1980]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1955 Knight, Damon. "The Country of the Kind " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1955); pg. 1. [Story has no apparent references to any religious or tribal groups.]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1956 Dick, Philip K. "The Minority Report " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1956); pg. 71. [Already indexed.]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1957 Dick, Philip K. "The Unreconstructed M " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1957); pg. 117. [Already indexed, from The Golden Man, 1980]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1957 Malzberg, Barry. Beyond Apollo. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (1989; 1st ed. 1972); pg. 113. "...and 1956 the highest of the higher forms began to live in clearly defined societies, establish taboos, and create artifacts for the purpose of survival and slaughter. In 1957, the same year the first sputnik went into orbit before an astonished world, these forms were making their first step toward civilization and the creation of technology; this technology, largely refracted through religion, was responsible for the rapid growth of the species through the late 1950's and the corollary diminution and entrapment of most of the subspecies on the planet. In 1961 certain obscure events associated with religiosity resulted in the overthrow of one culture, the establishment of a much wider series of cultures holding similar tenets, and the exclusion of yet other groups which resulted in a polarization among the most intelligent species... "
miscellaneous regional info USA 1959 Dick, Philip K. "Explorers We " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1959); pg. 147. [Already indexed, from I Hope I Shall Arrive Soon, 1985]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1959 Dick, Philip K. "War Game " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1959); pg. 157. [Already indexed, from The Preserving Machine, 1969]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1960 Barnes, John. "Upon Their Backs, to Bite 'Em " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 315. "I had no idea what they thought of him a few thousand timelines over, where he came from--a timeline where the assassination of Andrew Jackson prevented the Trail of Tears, the German Fever devastated the North, and Napoleon fils cut off European emigration for more than forty years. I'd been there once, on a training trip; the USA of 1960 had less than a hundred million people, and they were about one-third Native, one-third Euro, and one-third African in ancestry. Pretty country, but empty. "
miscellaneous regional info USA 1963 Dick, Philip K. "If There Were No Benny Cemoli " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1963); pg. 157. [Already indexed, from The Preserving Machine, 1969]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1963 Dick, Philip K. "Stand-By " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1963); pg. 323. [Already indexed, from The Preserving Machine, 1969, where it was titled "Top Stand-by Job "]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1964 Dick, Philip K. "Oh, to Be a Blobel! " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1964); pg. 301. [Already indexed, from The Best of Philip K. Dick, 1977]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1964 Dick, Philip K. "What the Dead Men Say " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1964); pg. 245. [Already indexed, from The Preserving Machine, 1969]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1968 Wilhelm, Kate. "Windsong " in A Pocketful of Stars (Damon Knight, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971; c. 1968); pg. 2. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1970 Panshin, Alexei. "How Can We Sink When We Can Fly? " in Farewell To Yesterday's Tomorrow. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1975; c. 1971); pg. 123. Pg. 123: "And all the while, the population is growing. Progress. New consumers. But when I was born, in 1940, there were 140 million people in this country, and now there are more than 200 million, half of them born since 1940... "; Pg. 124: "The 100 million of us who are young cannot be told to go away. The 100 million of us who are old cannot be ignored. The 20 million of us who are black cannot be killed, deported, or subjugated longer at any cost short of our total ruin as human beings. "
miscellaneous regional info USA 1972 Anthony, Piers. "In the Barn " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 351. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1972 Lief, Evelyn. "Bed Sheets Are White " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 428-431. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1978 Knight, Damon. "Time Enough " in The Best of Damon Knight. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976; c. 1960); pg. 233. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1981 Zelazny, Roger. "Recital " in Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983; story c. 1981); pg. 40-43. [No apparent refs. to specific religious/tribal groups in this short 4-page story. Main character is called Mary, a retired professional opera singer. Other proper names in story: the Met, 'Roger Z' (the author refers to himself), John, Isak Dinesen.]
miscellaneous regional info USA 1984 Knight, Damon. "The Very Objectionable Mr. Clegg " in One Side Laughing. New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; 1984); pg. 213. [Nothing to index.]


miscellaneous regional info, continued

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