Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to miscellaneous regional info, North America - Rocky Mountains

miscellaneous regional info, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2004 Dick, Philip K. The Zap Gun. New York: Bluejay Books (1985; c. 1965); pg. 80. "They were now passing over Colorado and the Rockies could be seen below, briefly, but due to the nobility of their discussion they ignored that great range. "
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2010 Brackett, Leigh. The Long Tomorrow. New York: Ballantine (1974); pg. 154. "'Esau,' said Hostetter, 'I'll tell you. If we had planes we'd be able to fly them. But we don't have planes, and this better than walking--as you will find out.'

'Do we have to go much farther?' asked Len.

Hostetter made a pushing movement with his head against the west. 'Clear to the Rockies.'

'How much longer?'

'Another month. Maybe more if we run into trouble. Maybe less if we don't.'

'And you won't tell us what it's like?' asked Esau. 'What it's really like, the way it looks, how it is to live there.' "

miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 46. "Jettex is practical as well as luxy--ask the folk from the Mountain States who can hold down city-centre jobs thanks to our five-minutely crush-hour service! "
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2010 Bury, Stephen. Interface. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 36. Pg. 36, 176.
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2020 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 36. "'...The tapering sweep of the initial wave stopped only at the foothills of the Rocky Mountains in eastern Colorado, and the glacial permafrost on the peaks of many of those mountains has melted for the first time in several hundred years...' " [Also pg. 39 and elsewhere.]
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2020 Zelazny, Roger. Damnation Alley. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1969); pg. 66. "...passing later through Rocky Mountain National Park... "
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2024 Clarke, Arthur C. & Mike McQuay. Richter 10. New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 116. "'The Rocky Mountains tend to soak up western quakes,' he said at last. 'Any quake to their east is going to be devastating. Our initial findings put the death toll at over three million people and the damage somewhere in the vicinity of two hundred and fifty billion dollars. The inherent chaos would affect the country's ability to provide goods and services well beyond the quake areas and onto the international stage. The blow tot he economy might doom it, and the country might never recover, much as Great Britain was unable to recover from its Twentieth Century wars.' "
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2025 Wolverton, Dave. "Wheatfields Beyond " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 19. "...then made her walk ten miles through the wilderness in the Rocky Mountains near what had once been Price, Utah. When she dropped from exhaustion near a stand of stunted aspen... "
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2027 Atack, Chris. Project Maldon. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 137. "'...On my time off I thought I'd head out to a spa in the Rockies via the old home town...' "
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2030 Willis, Connie & Cynthia Felice. Light Raid. New York: Ace (1989); pg. 14. Pg. 14: "It took a day and a half to get home. I spent the first few hours sleeping, and then, once we crossed the Rockies into Montana, I spent a lot of time looking out the windows at what had caused the war. "; Pg. 16: "I guess I'd expected half the city to be gone, the Rockies' Rampart Range scarred and smoking.

The Rockies looked untouched, blue-green in the afternoon haze, the valley green with new spring buds where hydra thrived. In their midst were brown spots... " [Much of this novel takes place in the Rocky Mtn. states, particularly Colorado.]

miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2044 Sterling, Bruce. Distraction. New York: Bantam (1998); pg. 5. "...exporting the data by satellite relay to an archival safe house deep in the Rocky Mountains. "
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2049 Knight, Damon. A For Anything. New York: Tor (1990; 1959); pg. 75. Pg. 75: "He leaned forward again, gazing raptly out the window. 'I've always wanted to live in the Rockies.' "; Pg. 207: "The voice said, 'This is Rocky Mountain Relay. Please give your call clearly, naming place and location.' "
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2050 Russ, Joanna. "Nobody's Home " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1972); pg. 410. "'...Go to Arizona or the Rockies and drive on the roads. The sixty-mile-an-hour road. The thirty-mile-an-hour road. Great artistic recreation.' "
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2095 Heinlein, Robert A. "'If This Goes On--' " in Revolt in 2100. New York: Baen (1981; story copyright 1940); pg. 104. "'Don't misunderstand me. I am very fond of Zebadiah and I know he is equally fond of me. But we are both dominant types psychologically--you should see my profile chart; it looks like the Rocky Mountains! Two such people should not marry. Such marriages are not made in Heaven, believe me! Fortunately we found it out in time.' "
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2100 Dickson, Gordon R. Necromancer. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1962); pg. 5. "About him in every direction were the Canadian Rockies, stretching thirty miles in one direction to the British Columbia city of Kamloops, in the other to the Coast Range and the stony beaches touching the salt Pacific Ocean surf. "
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2100 van Vogt, A. E. Slan. New York: Simon & Schuster/Berkley (1975; C. 1968); pg. 73. "A roar from a radio loud-speaker cut off Lorry's voice: 'General warning! An unidentified aircraft was seen a few minutes ago, headed eastward. Pursuing machines were rapidly outdistanced, and the ship seems to be taking a straight-line course toward Centropolis...' "
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2103 Silverberg, Robert. Tom O'Bedlam. New York: Donald I. Fine, Inc. (1985); pg. 232. "'Seems pretty conclusive that Tom's presence here is hyping up the halucination level... We've got the distribution charts. Space dreams reported simultaneously from all over the place. If he's the source then he must be a tremendously powerful transmitter.'

'Transmitter of dreams,' Robinson said softly, shaking his head. 'Doesn't all this sound completely buggy to you, Elszabet?'

'Let's just work with it,' she said. 'A hypothesis. He boils with images, fantasies, hallucinations. He boils over. Broadcasts them from the Rockies to the Pacific, San Diego to Vancouver, as far as we know. Susceptibility varies from practically none at all to extreme...' "

miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2105 Heinlein, Robert A. "Coventry " in Revolt in 2100. New York: Baen (1981; story copyright 1940); pg. 158. "'...If I could go back to where I was before a couple of months ago, before I was arrested, it might be all right to go off to the Rockies, or look up an abandoned farm somewhere...' "
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2175 Dick, Philip K. "The Last of the Masters " in The Golden Man. New York: Berkley (1980; c. 1954); pg. 184. "'That town,' the farmer said, 'is Fairfax. It has a lumber mill, one of the best in the world... A gun shop where they pour the best shot this side of the Rockies...' "
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2198 Conner, Miguel. The Queen of Darkness. New York: Warner Books (1998); pg. 72. "Apparently, he still had knowledge of hidden missile silos deep in the Rocky Mountains, as he told me they were called. "
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2200 Arnason, Eleanor. A Woman of the Iron People. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 46. "There were mountains: a range in the west along the coast and other lesser ranges in the east and south. Nothing impressive, nothing like the Rockies or the Himalayas. "
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2281 Duane, Diane. Spock's World (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1988); pg. 20. [View from space] "...the Rockies and the Himalayas and the Alps and Andes glow with a firefly fire, faint but persistent. "
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2369 Strickland, Brad. The Star Ghost (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1994); pg. 8. "Now it was Jake's turn to give in. 'Well,' he said, 'all right. But not just any program. I'll let you come along only on a hike through the Rocky Mountains.' "
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2375 Lang, Jeffrey. Immortal Coil (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (2002); pg. 1. "When Ira Graves first mentioned this little expedition, he'd told Soong to pack for climbing in cold environments. But Soong had interpreted that to mean the sort of conditions you might find in the North American Rockies or, at worst, the lower reaches of the Alps. "
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2400 Heinlein, Robert A. Citizen of the Galaxy. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1957); pg. 232. "'Hi, kids. Enjoying the hop, Thor?' [Short for Thorby]

'Yes, sir. The scenery is wonderful.'

'The Rockies aren't a patch on the Himalayas. But our Tetons are pretty wondeful . . . and there are they are. We'll be home soon.' He pointed. 'See? There's Rudbek.'

'That city is named Rudbek?'

'It used to be Johnson's HOle, or some such, when it was a village...' " [More.]

miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2874 Forbes, Edith. Exit to Reality. Seattle, WA: Seal Press (1997); pg. 69. "In between the six billion people clustered on the rugged slopes of the Rockies and the fifteen billion honeycombed into the steep sidehills of the Appalachian chain lay an enormous expanse of land with only fourteen cities... "
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 2874 Forbes, Edith. Exit to Reality. Seattle, WA: Seal Press (1997); pg. 254. "Were there places on earth that looked different? What about the Rocky Mountains? The northern tundras? The Grand Canyons? These places, surely, could not be blanketed in solar collectors and growing tanks. "
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 3000 Hubbard, L. Ron. Battlefield Earth. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 128. [Book jacket] "Battlefield Earth is an enormous epic of adventure set in the year 3,000, when the future survival of what's left of the human race is at stake. When Jonnie Goodboy Tyler decides to venture out of the small and dwindling community of humans barely surviving in their Rocky Mountain retreat, he has no thought of challenging the order that for a thousand years has held the earth prisoner to the oppressive alien race of the Psychlos. "; Pg. 128: "...traced out with his finger some of the letters: [ROCKY MOUNTAINS, PIKE'S PEAK, MOUNT VAIL.] "; Pg. 220: "'Shut up,' snapped Terl, not even looking up. '. . . Amazon . . . Andes . . . Mexico . . . Rocky Mountains! Rocky Mountains one, two, and three!' " [Much of the novel takes place in the Rocky Mountains.]
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 3000 Le Guin, Ursula K. "The Word for World is Forest " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 32. "Back on Earth they were using robodeer even in the High Rockies and Himalaya Parks now, the real ones were about gone. "
miscellaneous regional info North America - Rocky Mountains 3000 Williamson, Jack. Terraforming Earth. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 127. "Glacial ice now covered ancient Canada and spread east from the Rockies, far across the upper Mississippi valley. "
miscellaneous regional info Novysibirsk 2075 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 87. [Fictional table: "Area and Population of the Worlds ", showing population figures ( "actual numbers ") for the year 2075. Source is given as "Rand McNally & Co. " In addition to population estimates for all continents, four off-Earth locations are listed: Cislunar space, Moon, Mars, and Novysibirsk.] [Footnote for Novysibirsk states: "Estimates range from 85,000 to 150,000. "
miscellaneous regional info Oceania 1900 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 87. [Fictional table: "Area and Population of the Worlds ", showing figures for (est. millions) for 1900, 1950, 2000, 2050, 2075. Source is given as "Rand McNally & Co. "]
miscellaneous regional info Oceania 1950 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 87. [Fictional table: "Area and Population of the Worlds ", showing figures for (est. millions) for 1900, 1950, 2000, 2050, 2075. Source is given as "Rand McNally & Co. "]
miscellaneous regional info Oceania 2000 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 87. [Fictional table: "Area and Population of the Worlds ", showing figures for (est. millions) for 1900, 1950, 2000, 2050, 2075. Source is given as "Rand McNally & Co. "]
miscellaneous regional info Oceania 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 87. [Fictional table: "Area and Population of the Worlds ", showing figures for (est. millions) for 1900, 1950, 2000, 2050, 2075. Source is given as "Rand McNally & Co. "]
miscellaneous regional info Oceania 2075 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 87. [Fictional table: "Area and Population of the Worlds ", showing figures for (est. millions) for 1900, 1950, 2000, 2050, 2075. Source is given as "Rand McNally & Co. "]
miscellaneous regional info Ohio 1971 Biler, Burt. "Sun " in A Pocketful of Stars (Damon Knight, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971); pg. 132. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info Oregon 1976 Ing, Dean. "Malf " in Firefight 2000. New York: Baen (1987; c. 1976); pg. 69-98. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info Oregon 2011 Brin, David. The Postman. New York: Bantam (1985); pg. 47. "The flow of strange logic ws coming on too fast for Gordon to follow completely. Part of him dispassionately noted that this was all really an intricate and subtle tribal adaptation to a difficult social problem...

'You're different,' She smiled at him. 'I mean, even Michael saw that right from the start. He's not too happy, but he figures you'll only be through once a year or so, and he could stand that...'

...Her expression was enough of an answer. She looked at him as if he were some sort of visiting prophet, or at least a hero out of a story book. 'I'd be honored if you'd say yes,' she said, quietly, and lowered her eyes. "

miscellaneous regional info Oregon 2011 Brin, David. The Postman. New York: Bantam (1985); pg. 289. "All I can tell you is that I hope this thing doesn't turn into a dogma, a religino. In my worst dreams I see women taking up a tradition of drowning their sons, if they show signs of becoming bullies. I envision them doing their duty, by passing on life and death before a male child becomes a threat to all around him.

Maybe a fraction of us males are 'too mad to be allowed to live.' But taken to the extreme, this 'solution' is something that terrifies me . . . as an ideology, it is something my mind cannot even grasp.

Of course, it'll probably sort itself out. Women are too sensible to take this to extremes. That, perhaps, is in the end where our hope lies. "

miscellaneous regional info Oregon: Portland 2002 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Lathe of Heaven. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1971); pg. 126. "Portland was now the home of the World Planning Center, the chief agency of the supranational Federation of Peoples. Portland was, as the souvenir post cards said, the Capital of the Planet. Its population was two million. The whole downtown area was full of giant WPC buildings, none more than twelve years old... "
miscellaneous regional info Oregon: Portland 2002 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Lathe of Heaven. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1971); pg. 26. "Oregon... population... Portland, which only 3 million and no growth potential, had been left far behind in the March of Progress. There was nothing new for Portland. "
miscellaneous regional info Pakistan: Karachi 1890 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 109-110. "One evening... Frigate had spoken about Karachi. This village which later became the capital of Pakistan, the nation created in 1947, had only 2,000 population in Burton's time [1890]. By 1970, its population was approximately 2,000,000. "
miscellaneous regional info Pakistan: Karachi 1970 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 109-110. "One evening... Frigate had spoken about Karachi. This village which later became the capital of Pakistan, the nation created in 1947, had only 2,000 population in Burton's time [1890]. By 1970, its population was approximately 2,000,000. "
miscellaneous regional info Pell's World 2352 Cherryh, C. J. Downbelow Station. New York: DAW Books (1981); pg. 162. "'Ssst! Upabove is not what it seems. The images of the plain we remember. I have seen them. I have slept by them and dreamed dreams. But the images of Upabove . . . they are not for our dreaming... we tell you, storyteller, of one of us you do not see: Lily, humans call her. Her name is Sun-smiles-on-her, and she is the Great Old One, many more than my seasons. The images we gave humans have become human images, and near them a human dreams in the secret places of the Upabove, in a place all bright. Great Sun comes to visit her . . . never moves she, no, for the dream is good. She lies all in bright, her eyes are warm with Sun; the stars dance for her, she watches all the upabove on her walls, perhaps watches us in this moment. She is the image which watches us. The Great Old One cares for her, loves her, this holy one. Good, good is her love, and she dreams us all, all the Upabove, and her face smiles forever upon great Sun...' " [More]
miscellaneous regional info Peru 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. x. "'We're going to do the calculations for a few obvious potential Hot Spot sites first, check them out,' O'Hara explains. 'Lourdes. Stonehenge and Avebury. Delphi. Nazca. Rennes-le-Chateau. That place in Mexico, I forget its name, where the Virgin has been seen so many times...'

His reference to the Nazca desert, in Peru, is a reminder that there is another group every bit as excited as the Gaians by the discovery of the O'Hara Equations. This is the remnant of a once-numerous association of amateur archeologists, chiefly British, who call themselves 'ley hunters.' Leys are straight lines drawn on the landscape, on which important features such as churches, castles, stone circles... are precisely aligned. Of prehistoric origin, they are nevertheless found worldwide; the Nazca lines are perhaps the most famous. "

miscellaneous regional info Pitcairn Island 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 15. "...a misplacement, like the discovery of some new island in an archipelago, known to the natives but lost in a shuffle of navigators' charts; a kind of Pitcairn of volcanic mounds. "
miscellaneous regional info Pitcairn Island 1998 DeFalco, Tom & Adam-Troy Castro. X-Men and Spider-Man: Time's Arrow Book 2: The Present. New York: Berkley (1998); pg. 104. "The island had enjoyed many names, in the century since its discovery. The captain of the first ship to drop anchor there called it New Pitcairn. A British mapmaker updating records in the years after the first World War called it Victory. A freighter that rediscovered it during the 1950s called it St. Joseph's. An atlas published in 1967 called it Vespuccus. None of the names stuck, because nobody ever got around to living there. It was just another uninhabited island, poking its head out of the ocean... "
miscellaneous regional info Pitcairn Island 2236 Asimov, Isaac. Nemesis. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 234. "'But we have had such a situation, at least in analogy. In Earth's early history, human beings settled islands and were isolated from the mainstream. The Irish settled Iceland; the Polynesians settled Easter Island. Result? The colonists withered, sometimes disappeared entirely. Always stagnation. No civilization ever developed except in a continental area, or in islands in close proximity to a continental area. Humanity needs space, size, variety, a horizon, a frontier. You see?' "
miscellaneous regional info Pojjan 2353 Carey, Diane. Red Sector (Star Trek: TNG / Double Helix: Book 3 of 6). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 64. "'The Constrictor wiped out a fifth of the planet's population. Nearly a billion people died.'

'A billion?' "

miscellaneous regional info Remus Cluster 4600 Weber, David & Steve White. In Death Ground. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 38. "There were only five thousand colonists in the Golan System, but there were eight million in Merriweather, another thirty million in Justin, over a hundred million in Sarasota, and more than a billion in the five inhabited systems of the Remus Cluster, and Alex Cheltwyn and the Terran Federation Navy were oath bound to protect them all. "
miscellaneous regional info Ringworld 2800 Niven, Larry. Ringworld. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston (1970); pg. 158. [Glimpses of Ringworld religion.] Pg. 158: "'You fight with light,' said the man with the tattooed hand. 'Surely this is forbidden.'...'We did not know it,' said Louis. 'We apologize.'

'Did not know it? How could you not know it? Did yo not raise the Arch in sign of the Covenant with Man?'

'What arch is that?'

The hairy man's face was hidden, but his astonishment was evident. 'The Arch over the world, O Builder!' "; Pg. 161: "'They should have been kneeling,' Louis complained. 'That's what fooled me. And the translation kept saying 'builder' when it should have been saying 'god.'

'God?' '

'They've made gods of the Ringworld engineers. I should have noticed the silence... nobody but the priest was making a sound! They all acted like they were listening to some old litany. Except that I kept giving the wrong responses.'

'A religion. How weird! But you shouldn't have laughed... Nobody laughs in church, not even tourists.' " [Many other refs., most not in DB.]

miscellaneous regional info Ringworld 2800 Niven, Larry. Ringworld. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston (1970); pg. 176. [Glimpses of Ringworld religion.] "'Why play god?'

Speaker hesitated. 'You speak with literal precision?'

'Right. We're naturals for Ringworld engineers. We don't have the powers they had, but what we do have must look godlike enough to the natives. You can be the god--'

'Thank you.'

'--Teela and I the acolytes. Nessus would make a good captive demon.' "; Pg. 208: "'I'm not an Engineer.' Louis [said]...

But the priest only looked more bewildered. 'Then why are you half-hairless? How do you fly? Have you stolen secrets from Heaven? What do you want here? Have you come to steal my congregation?' "; Pg. 209: "'The legends speak of Zrillir,' said the priest, 'and of how he ruled all the lands under Heaven. On this pedestal stood Zrillir's statue, which was life-sized. The lands supplied Heaven with delicacies which I could name if you like, as we learn their names by rote...' "

miscellaneous regional info Ringworld 2800 Niven, Larry. Ringworld. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston (1970); pg. 209. [Glimpses of Ringworld religion.] "'Heaven was made when the Engineers made the world and the Arch. He who rules Heaven rules the land from edge to edge. So Zrillir ruled, for many lifetimes, throwing sunfire from Heaven when he was displeased. Then it was suspected that Zrillir could no longer throw sunfire.

'The people no longer obeyed him. Thy did not send food. They pulled down the statue. When Zrillir's angels dropped rocks from the heights, the people dodged and laughed.

'Then came a day when the people tried to take Heaven by way of the rising stairway. But Zrillir caused the stairway to fall. Then his angels left Heaven in flying cars.

'Later it was regretted that we had lost Zrillir. The sky was always overcast; crops grew stunted. We have prayed for Zrillir's return--'...

'Yes. In our religious training we were taught that the sun hangs from the Arch by a very strong thread...''

miscellaneous regional info Riverworld 2008 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 50. "Well, she was not the only woman in the world. As a matter of fact, he had the whole world of women, if not at his disposal, at least available to be asked. That is, he did if everybody who had died on Earth was on this planet. She would be only one among many billions (possibly thirty-six billion, if Frigate's estimate was correct). But there was, of course, no such evidence that this was the case. "
miscellaneous regional info Riverworld 7000 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 143, 147. Pg. 143: "'Frigate tells me that if this entire planet is constructed like the areas we've seen... then The River must be at least 20,000 miles long. It's incredible, but so is our resurrection, everything about this world. Also, there may be thirty-five to thirty-seven billion people living along The River...' "; Pg. 147: "'It's my theory that you are a Terrestrial. yo belong to an age chronologically far past 2008 A.D. You must be the descendant of the few who survived my death scanner. Judging by the technology and power required to reconstruct the surface of this planet into one vast Rivervalley, your time must be much later than the 21st century. Just guessing, the fiftieth century A.D.?'

'Spruce looked at the fire, then said, 'Add two thousand more years.' " [This would mean the events of this book take place circa 7000 A.D., but, culturally, the peoples haven't advanced beyond 2008 A.D., so that's the year given for most Riverworld references in this DB.]

miscellaneous regional info Samoa 1400 C.E. Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 199. "But if the index of beauty was not high among them [the Sumerian majority], the pre-Columbian Samoans who made up 30 percent of the population [of this stretch of Riverworld] were more than attractive. "
miscellaneous regional info Samoa 1978 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 159. "Stone found the worms interesting. They were called palolo, from Samoa. They lived in tunnels gnawed deep into coral reefs, and they timed their emergence, to mate, by the last quarter of the October Moon. Every year. But nobody knew how they did this. At Samoa, the tides, linked to the Moon, were too small to be noticed by the worms... "
miscellaneous regional info Samoa 2050 Heinlein, Robert A. "Requiem " in Analog: Readers' Choice: Vol. 2 (Stanley Schmidt, ed.) New York: David Publications (1981; story copyright 1967); pg. 50. "On a high hill in Samoa there is a grave. Inscribed on the marker are these words:... "
miscellaneous regional info Sarasota 4600 Weber, David & Steve White. In Death Ground. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 38. "There were only five thousand colonists in the Golan System, but there were eight million in Merriweather, another thirty million in Justin, over a hundred million in Sarasota... "
miscellaneous regional info Singapore 1997 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 451-452. "One young man a few dozen feet above Edward had enough energy to beat his chest and let loose a Tarzan cry of dominance. Then he grinned foolishly and waved.

'Me Jane, him nuts,' Betsy commented. "

miscellaneous regional info Solar System 2011 Baxter, Stephen. Manifold: Time. New York: Ballantine (2000); pg. 300. "'The Solar System may be able to sustain--comfortably, conservatively--as many as a million times the population of the Earth.' He watched their faces. 'Think about that. A million human beings, for every man, woman and child alive now.'

Emma laughed nervously. 'That's . . . monstrous.'

'Because you can't picture it. Imagine how it would be if the human race reached such numbers. How often does an authentic genius come along--an Einstein, a Beethoven, a Jesus? Once a millennium? We could cut that down to one a day.' "

miscellaneous regional info Solar System 2070 Bova, Ben. "Re-Entry Shock " in Twice Seven. New York: Avon Books (1998; c. 1992); pg. 144-158. [No apparent religious refs. in story. Protagonist is a woman named Dolores Anna Maria Alvarez de Montoya. Story take place on a space station between Earth and the Moon, and the theme involves separatism between wealthy space-dwelling and impoverished Earth-dwelling humans.]
miscellaneous regional info Solar System 2100 Asimov, Isaac. "The Dying Night " in Nine Tomorrows. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1959; story c. 1956); pg. 86-112. [Year estimated. This story takes place during the "first big interplanetary astronomical convention in history ". Human settlers from the moon, Mars, Mercury, and Ceres gather. The casually discuss some of the differences between their various homes, such as differences in gravity. A fellow scientist, named Villiers, has recently died under mysterious circumstances. He had been working on a new technology for rapid "mass-transference " that would have allowed for faster travel between planets. No apparent refs. to any religious groups.]
miscellaneous regional info Solar System 2100 Delany, Samuel R. "Time Considered as a Helix of Semi-Precious Stones " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1969); pg. 813. [Year estimated] "With all of Earth, and Mars, and the Outer Satellites filled up with people and what-all, there had to be something more than this. "


miscellaneous regional info, continued

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