Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to miscellaneous regional info, Luna

miscellaneous regional info, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
miscellaneous regional info Madagascar 2000 Burroughs, William S. "The Ghost Lemurs of Madagascar " in Omni Visions One (Ellen Datlow, ed). Greensboro, NC: Omni Books (1993; story copyright 1987); pg. 34. "Author's note: Now, in 1987, the lemurs of Madagascar are threatened with extinction. When humans first arrived on the island 1,500 years ago... The human population is growing rapidly and may reach 12 million by the year 2000... "
miscellaneous regional info Mars 1934 Gallun, Raymond Z. "Old Faithful " in Analog: Readers' Choice: Vol. 2 (Stanley Schmidt, ed.) New York: David Publications (1981; story copyright 1934); pg. 12-13. "But it was the Rulers' privilege to command and to expect unquestioning obedience. Never once in a millennium had their authority been disputed; for the very existence of the dominant race of Mars, a world aged almost to the limit of its ability to support life, depended on absolute spartan loyalty and discipline. Revolt now was unheard of; it could not be. " [Entire story about Mars and its inhabitants.]
miscellaneous regional info Mars 1938 Asimov, Isaac. "Afterword " in The War of the Worlds (by H. G. Wells). New York: Penguin Putnam (1986; c. 1898); pg. 209. "He [Wells] then went on to write the very first tale of interplanetary warfare the world had ever seen, the first story of an invasion of Earth by alien beings... A few years earlier he had written a time travel story (the first true time-travel story), The Time Machine, and it had been a success. The War of the Worlds, however, was more successful still and it made Wells famous.

It also fixed the notion of intelligent Martians firmly into human consciousness, and for over half a century many people believed in their existence. When, in 1938, Orson Welles put on a radio adaptation of The War of the Worlds and did it very realistically, people in New Jersey (where the ships were supposed to be landing) panicked and fled their homes. "

miscellaneous regional info Mars 1957 Jones, Raymond F. "The Gardener " in The Non-Statistical Man. New York: Belmont Books (1964; copyright 1957); pg. 112. "'Wouldn't you miss watching Ruffy and his friends? Wouldn't you miss the sunsets on the desert of Loh-Khita?'

Jimmy turned slowly to the old man. A sudden finger of chill traced its way along his spine... 'How do you know about Ruffy?' he whispered hoarsely. 'How do you know about the desert of Loh-Khita? They're on Mars!' " [In this story, there is an alien civilization on Mars, and the main character, who has advanced mental and other abilities, is able to see them. Other refs., not in DB.]

miscellaneous regional info Mars 1998 DeFalco, Tom & Adam-Troy Castro. X-Men and Spider-Man: Time's Arrow Book 2: The Present. New York: Berkley (1998); pg. 15. "Spider-Man's adventures hadn't taken him time-traveling as frequently as, let's say, the Fantastic Four's... but he had been back and forth a little, enough to take it more casually than it merited. (He'd fought Martians in the future and Puritans at the Salem Witch Trials--after that, one's sense of awe tended to operate wonkily if at all) "
miscellaneous regional info Mars 2005 Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles. New York: Bantam (2000; c. 1958); pg. 149. "Finally, exhausted, he picked up the thin director which listed every phone on Mars. Fifty thousand names.

He started with number one.

Amelia Ames. He dialed her number in New Chicago, one hundred miles over the dead sea.

No answer.

Number two lived in New New York, five thousand miles across the blue mountains. "

miscellaneous regional info Mars 2020 Zelazny, Roger. Damnation Alley. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1969); pg. 139. "'We put people on the moon and Mars and Titan. We conquered space. We lost time. We had a United Nations. But what happened? Three lousy days, that's what, and everything went to hell... I wonder if the people on Mars are still alive? Or Titan?...' "
miscellaneous regional info Mars 2030 Bova, Ben. "Appointment in Sinai " in Twice Seven. New York: Avon Books (1998; c. 1996); pg. 52. "'And you'd better watch you ass,' Kaiser snapped. 'Do you have any idea of how many people are experiencing the Mars landing? Not just watching it, but experiencing it--as if they were there.'

O'Hara shrugged. 'Twenty million, maybe.'

'I made a couple of phone calls before I came in here. Thirty-six million VR sets in the U.S., and that's not counting laboratories and training simulators. There must be more than thirty million voters on Mars right now.'

'Bullcrap.'

'Yeah? By tomorrow there won't be a VR rig left in the stores. Everybody's going to want to be on Mars.' "

miscellaneous regional info Mars 2030 Sawyer, Robert J. Flashforward. New York: Tor (2000; c. 1999); pg. 156. "No one had yet set foot upon Mars--the early visions that suggested the contrary turned out to be virtual-reality simulations at Disney World. "
miscellaneous regional info Mars 2040 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Red Mars. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 26. "And then the left Antarctica, and the team [to colonize Mars] was chosen. There were fifty men and fifty women: thirty-five Americans, thirty-five Russians, and thirty miscellaneous international affiliates, fifteen invited by each of the two big partners... The lucky ones flew to Cape Canaveral or Baikonur, to ascend to orbit. "
miscellaneous regional info Mars 2050 Carr, Terry. "Hop-Friend " in A Pocketful of Stars (Damon Knight, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971; c. 1962); pg. 157. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info Mars 2050 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Red Mars. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 5. "'We came here to make something new, an when we arrived our earthly differences fell away, irrelevant in this new world!' Yes, he ment it all literally. His vision of Mars was a lens that distorted everything he saw, a kind of religion. "
miscellaneous regional info Mars 2075 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 87. [Fictional table: "Area and Population of the Worlds ", showing population figures ( "actual numbers ") for the year 2075. Source is given as "Rand McNally & Co. " In addition to population estimates for all continents, four off-Earth locations are listed: Cislunar space, Moon, Mars, and Novysibirsk.]
miscellaneous regional info Mars 2075 Jones, Raymond F. "Intermission Time " in The Non-Statistical Man. New York: Belmont Books (1964; copyright 1953); pg. 133. Pg. 133: "'...Some of my friends joined the Moon colonies; some have gone to Mars. But I didn't have money enough for either...' "; Pg. 138: "Moon-colonies and Mars-colonies had been set up, but something was lacking there . . . "
miscellaneous regional info Mars 2086 Heinlein, Robert A. Stranger in a Strange Land. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1961); pg. 120, 126, 134. "Mike [having been raised by indigenous Martians] believes that [the] soul is immortal. "; Pg. 126: "...Martian... faith in immortality... "; Pg. 134: "Mike... could quote nine dictionary definitions [of 'Religion', but] the Martian language contained no word which Mike could equate with any of these definitions; the customs which Jubal had described to Duke as Martian 'religious ceremonies' were not; to Mike such matters were as matter-of-fact as grocery markets were to Jubal; it as not possible to separate in the Martian tongue the human concepts: 'religion,' 'philosophy,' and 'science'--and, since Mike thought in Martian, it was not possible for him to tell them apart. All such matters were 'learnings' from the 'Old Ones.' Doubt he had never heard of, nor of research...; the answers to any questions were available from the Old ones, who were omniscent and infallible, whether on tomorrow's weather or cosmic teleology. "
miscellaneous regional info Mars 2089 Anthony, Piers. Total Recall. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1989) Title page: "Inspired by the works of Philip K. Dick and Ronald Shusett, Dan O'Bannon, Steven Pressfield "; [The book is based on the film Total Recall, which is based on PKD's story 'We Can Remember It For you Wholesale.'] Book jacket: "Douglas Quail is a man haunted by recurring nightmares of what seems to be someone else's life. Though he has never been to Mars, he dreams often of being there, of covert missions, unfriendly agents, an unforgettably alluring woman, and a life much more glamorous than his earthbound A.D. 2089 reality.

Hoping to alleviate his disturbing fantasies, Quail turns to Rekall, a manufacturer of synthetic memories. Its motto: 'We can remember it for you wholesale.' With the help of Rekall, it is possible to have a two-week vacation without ever missing a day at the office. Now Quail can live his fantasy solely through an implanted memory, tailored especially for him. "

miscellaneous regional info Mars 2101 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Green Mars. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 236. "So they're watching us... They're figuring out who they should talk to. They're asking themselves, which of these giant idiots knows about Ka?

That's their name for Mars, yes. They call it Ka... And so the ka watch us and they ask, who knows Ka? Who spends time with Ka, and learns Ka, and likes to touch Ka, and walks around on Ka, an lets Ka seep into them, and leaves the dust in their rooms alone? "

miscellaneous regional info Mars 2103 Taylor, Jeri. Mosaic (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 54. [In the year 2344, Data recounts some of the history of Mars to a young Kathryn Janeway.] "'Warming the planet [Mars] was accomplished in a fraction of the time twenty-first-century scientists had predicted. Water and oxygen were liberated from the subterranean permafrost and genetically engineered bacteria were introduced into the terrain. This began the terraforming process. There were colonists on Mars as early as 2013, but they needed atmospheric suits in order to breathe outside a biosphere. Not quite one hundred years after that, Mars possessed a breathable atmosphere.' "
miscellaneous regional info Mars 2128 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Blue Mars. New York: Bantam Books (1996); pg. 113. "There were twelve million people on Mars now, and seven million of those had been born there; and almost every single one of these natives could be counted on to support the native political parties, usually Free Mars. "
miscellaneous regional info Mars 2130 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Blue Mars. New York: Bantam Books (1996); pg. 284. "'...Think about the numbers for a while. If every day the cars of all the space elvators on Earth are full, then that's a hundred people per car, therefore twenty-four hundred per day per elevator taking off, and a different twenty-four hundred leaving the cars at the top of the elevator, and transferring into shuttles. There are ten elevators, so that's twenty-four thousand people a day. Therefore eight million seven hundred and sixty thousand people every year [emigrating to Mars from Earth].' "
miscellaneous regional info Mars 2150 Bradbury, Ray. "Mr. Pale " in Driving Blind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 234. [Year estimated.] "'Everyone feared me. And no I'm afraid. For there's no one left to die. A handful on this ship. A few thousand left on Mars. That's why I'm trying to get there, to Mars, where I can live, if I make it. For in order for me to live, to be talked about, to have an existence, others must be alive to die...' "
miscellaneous regional info Mars 2150 Dick, Philip K. "A Game of Unchance " in The Golden Man. New York: Berkley (1980; c. 1964); pg. 223. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info Mars 2150 Dick, Philip K. "We Can Remember It for You Wholesale " in The Preserving Machine. New York: Ace Books (1969; c. 1966); pg. 129. [nothing to index]
miscellaneous regional info Mars 2174 Bear, Greg. Moving Mars. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 97. "Mars supported four million citizens and about half a million prospective citizens, a little less than the population of the old United States in 1800. " [Not a religious statistic, but a legal status statistic.]
miscellaneous regional info Mars 2180 Bear, Greg. Moving Mars. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 254. "The year we worked toward a constitutional assembly was a dangerous time. Elitists--some rehasing the politics of the Statists, others wrapping themselves in even more deeply stained robes of theory... Populists believed that people should dictate their needs to any individual who rose above the herd, and bring them low again... Religion raised its head, as Christians and Moslems and Hindu factions--long a polite undercurrent in Martian life, even within Majumdar BM--saw historic opportunity, and made a rush to the political high ground... The syndic of Cailetet Mars died in 2180... "
miscellaneous regional info Mars 2200 Heinlein, Robert A. Double Star. New York: Ballantine (1986; first ed. 1956); pg. 5. "...table of four Martians near the door. I didn't like Martians. I did not fancy having a thing that looks like a tree trunk topped off by a sun helmet claiming the privileges of a man. I did not like the way they grew pseudo limbs; it reminded me of snakes crawling out of their holes. I did not like the fact that they could look all directions at once without turning their heads--if they had heads, which of course they don't And I could not stand their smell!

Nobody could accuse me of race prejudice. I didn't care what a man's color, race, or religion was. But men were men, whereas Martians were things. They weren't even animals to my way of thinking. I'd rather have a wart hog around me any day. " [Native Martians are one of the central elements of this novel, both on Earth and Mars. Many refs. to the species and its culture; other refs. not in DB.]

miscellaneous regional info Mars 2266 Anderson, Poul. "Appendix A: Design for Two Worlds " in Murasaki (Robert Silverberg, ed.) New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 260. "Some 20 million people live in sealed-in lunar and Martian colonies... "
miscellaneous regional info Mars 2397 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 467-468. "New Mars Gazette, December 21, 2397; editorial by Francine Gordon:

The screen for today's edition is filled with news from the Central Ark. Four hundred more of us, most from the Eurasian arks, have been revived from deep sleep, and prepared for their arrival on New Mars by the Moms. (Does anybody remember who first called the robots Moms? It was Reuben Bourdes...) Our population today hit the mark of 12,250; the Moms say we are doing well, and I believe them.

New Mars today celebrates its first year of autonomy. "

miscellaneous regional info Mars 3000 Niven, Larry. Rainbow Mars. New York: Tor (1999); pg. 21-25. Pg. 21: "'Moon and Mars,' Miya said. 'Mars is just twenty people. Luna City is two thousand...' "; Pg. 23: ''There's Mars Base One. Twenty men and women and some VR sets...' "; Pg. 24: "...The Industrial Age, then was when we should have moved. They put twelve men on the Moon and then went home for four hundred years!'

'I know considerable about the Industrial Age,' said Ra Chen. 'I've been in it. Hundreds of millions of people with thousands of insanely different lifestyles, all of 'em eleven hundred years dead...' "; Pg. 25: 'Everything interesting happened eleven hundred years ago,' Willy Gorky said. 'Industry exploded across the world. Human numbers went into the billions Highways and railroads and airlines webbed the planet...' "

miscellaneous regional info Mars 4901 Aldiss, Brian W. Helliconia Winter. New York: Atheneum (1985); pg. 102. "On Mars, Venus, Mercury, and the moons of Jupiter, human beings were more free--free to found their own petty nations and ruin their own lives their own way. But they formed a sort of second-class citizenry of the solar system...

It was in 4901 that this burden became too great, and in 4901 that a statesman on Earth made the mistake of using the old derogatory term 'immigrants' about the inhabitants of Mars. And so it was in 4901 that nuclear war broke out among the planets--the War over a Word, as it was called. "

miscellaneous regional info Mechis III -99940 B.C.E. Anderson, Kevin J. "Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88 " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 22. "The insurrection [by droids led by IG-88] on Mechis III was quick and bloody and very efficient. Within the space of a few minutes the newly coordinated planetary computer mind supervised a simultaneous uprising of droids, killing all seventy-three human inhabitants before any of them could sound an alarm... "
miscellaneous regional info Mechis III -99940 B.C.E. Anderson, Kevin J. "Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88 " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 21. "Though operations on Mechis III virtually never changed, and every day the afternoon reported listed the same production numbers.... Administrator Hekis looked at each report with a studied interest... It weighed heavy on a man to know that he lorded over one of the most important commercial centers in the industrialized galaxy--even if he was only one of seventy-three humans on the entire planet. " [Of course, there are countless droids on Mechis III, not counted in this population count of 73 people.]
miscellaneous regional info Merriweather 4600 Weber, David & Steve White. In Death Ground. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 38. "There were only five thousand colonists in the Golan System, but there were eight million in Merriweather... "
miscellaneous regional info Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 58. "'Bribe a whole country?'

'Let's see: population ninety million, say a year's income for the cartel people, ten billion or so, that's over a hundred dollars to every man, woman, and child in Mexico just to look the other way. Of course the honest majority would have another Mexican revolution brewing, so that's not how it works. Instead of trying to buy ninety million people, you only buy a few key people, and remind them how easy it is to kill them in case they decide not to stay bought.' "

miscellaneous regional info Mexico 2015 Sheffield, Charles. Brother to Dragons. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1992); pg. 153. "Brazil and Mexico and Indonesia and the old Soviet states push six hundred million each. "
miscellaneous regional info Mexico: Mexico City 1985 Silverberg, Robert. Tom O'Bedlam. New York: Donald I. Fine, Inc. (1985); pg. 156. "...down from twentieth-century peaks... five or six million in La.A. alone... They said sixteen million in Mexico City. Could you believe it? "
miscellaneous regional info Mexico: Mexico City 2025 Cool, Tom. Infectress. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 98. "...Mexico City... a population of thirty million men, women and children, ten million of whom lived, slept and defecated in the street. "
miscellaneous regional info Mexico: Mexico City 2103 Silverberg, Robert. Tom O'Bedlam. New York: Donald I. Fine, Inc. (1985); pg. 156. "...down from twentieth-century peaks... five or six million in La.A. alone... They said sixteen million in Mexico City. Could you believe it? Wasn't anyone in Mexico City now, zero, nada, everybody scattering when the Nicas dusted the place. "
miscellaneous regional info Micronesia, Federated States of: Yap 2028 Barnes, John. Mother of Storms. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 69. "This was not without parallel; on the island of Yap, in the Pacific, money had long been in the form of giant stone wheels, and most property had been land or fishing rights. Neither the land nor the fish moved, and the money was too heavy to move in normal circumstances; only the information flowed.

By 2028, the rest of the world has caught up with Yap. "

miscellaneous regional info Mother Bertha 2305 Panshin, Alexei. "Arpad " in Farewell To Yesterday's Tomorrow. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1975; c. 1971); pg. 94. [Year estimated.] "There are only 28,000 people in Mother Bertha. The Ship is a small world full of fat, slow, lazy, democratic gods. Sheep. Clowns. The democracy is in direct relation to the fatness, the slowness, and the laziness. "
miscellaneous regional info Nauru 1963 Freedman, Nancy. Joshua Son of None. New York: Delacorte Press (1973); pg. 16. "...swam to Nauru Island which was inhabited by a contingent of Japanese. " [More.]
miscellaneous regional info Nauru 1999 Banks, Iain. The Business. New York: Simon & Schuster (1999); pg. 332. "Now, why Fenua Ua? I looked up a map of the Pacific. Why not Nauru, or Kiribati, or even the... Galapagos? "
miscellaneous regional info Nauru 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 37. "Unlike old-fashioned smugglers, the haven pirates never had to physically touch their booty. Data had no substance... The same went for the Singaporeans; they had the dignified cover of an address in Bencoolen Street, while the machinery hummed merrily in Nauru, a sovereign Pacific Island nation with a population of 12,000. For their part, the Grenadians simply brazened it out. "
miscellaneous regional info Nauru 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 230. "The smaller Japanese guy lifted his bush hat... 'Kiribati,' he said.

'If we get the bloody choice we take Nauru,' said the Anglo...

The Japanese ripped the tag loose... 'Kiribati's nowhere, man. They don't have dedicated landlines.'

'The heat will be all over Nauru. They're afraid of those launch sites. . . .'

Nauru and Kiribati, Laura thought--little Pacific island states whose 'national sovereignty' could be had for a price. Good dumping grounds for Bank gangsters, obviously... " [Also pg. 235.]

miscellaneous regional info Nauru 2096 Sterling, Bruce. Holy Fire. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 314. "...it was datastriped through a series of servers in the Pacific Island of Nauru. They were collating the palace line by line out of the Nauru networks, through Morocco... "
miscellaneous regional info Neptune 2100 Panshin, Alexei. "One Sunday in Neptune " in Farewell To Yesterday's Tomorrow. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1975; c. 1969); pg. 79-87. [Year estimated. No apparent refs. to any religious/tribal groups. The story is about the first astronauts to venture into the gas giant Neptune.
miscellaneous regional info New Hampshire 1998 Carey, Diane. Fire Ship (Star Trek: Voyager / The Captain's Table: Book 4 of 6). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 223. [Epigraph] "LIVE FREE OR DIE!
State slogan of New Hampshire "
miscellaneous regional info New Tahiti 3000 Le Guin, Ursula K. "The Word for World is Forest " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 59. "'How many of each race?'

Gosse replied: '2641 Terrans, now. Lyubov and I estimate the native hilf population very roughly at 3 million.'

'You should have considered these statistics, gentlemen, before you altered the native traditions!' "

miscellaneous regional info New Trantor 23450 Asimov, Isaac. "The Mule " in Foundation and Empire. New York: Ballantine (1983; first published 1945); pg. 188. "Men even inhabited Old Trantor. Not many--a hundred million, perhaps, where fifty years before, forty billions had swarmed. "
miscellaneous regional info New Trantor 23500 Asimov, Isaac. "The Mule " in Foundation and Empire. New York: Ballantine (1983; first published 1945); pg. 188. "Men even inhabited Old Trantor. Not many--a hundred million, perhaps, where fifty years before, forty billions had swarmed. The huge, metal world was in jagged splinters. The towering thrusts of the multi-towers from the single world-girdling base were torn and empty... It was strange that a world which had been the center of the Galaxy for two thousand years--that had ruled limitless space... could die in a month... The millions left after the billions had died tore up the gleaming metal base of the planet and exposed soil that had not felt the touch of sun in a thousand years. "
miscellaneous regional info New York 1966 Keyes, Daniel. Flowers for Algernon. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1966); pg. 65. "I've made friends with some of the boys at the Campus Bowl. They were arguing about whether Shakespeare really wrote Shakespeare's plays... And they talked about politics and art and God. I never before heard anyone say that there might not be a God. That frightened me, because for the first time I began to think about what God means. "
miscellaneous regional info New York 1966 Keyes, Daniel. Flowers for Algernon. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1966); pg. 16, 20. Pg. 16: "Then when I am smart they will talk to me and I can sit with them and listen like Joe Carp and Frank and Gimpy do when they talk and have a discushen about important things. While their werking they start talking about things like about god or about the truble with all the mony the presidint is spending or about the republicans and demicrats "; Pg. 20: "Burt says its about art and polatics and religon. I dont know what those things are about but I know religon is god. Mom used to tell me all about him and the things he done to make the werld. She said I shoud always love god and prey to him. I dont remembir how to prey to him but I think mom use to make me prey to him a lot when I was a kid that he shoud make me get better and not be sick. I dont rimember how I was sick. I think it was about me not being smart. "
miscellaneous regional info New York: New York City 1960 Cogswell, Theodore R. "The Burning " in A Pocketful of Stars (Damon Knight, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971; c. 1960); pg. 64. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info New York: New York City 1966 Dorman, Sonya. "Harry the Tailor " in A Pocketful of Stars (Damon Knight, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971; c. 1966); pg. 64. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info New York: New York City 1981 Miller, John J. "Comes a Hunter " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 391. "He breathed deeply. The night stank with the countless scents of seven million people and their myriad hopes, fears, and desperations. He was one of them now. "
miscellaneous regional info New York: New York City 1985 Silverberg, Robert. Tom O'Bedlam. New York: Donald I. Fine, Inc. (1985); pg. 156. "...down from twentieth-century peaks... five or six million in La.A. alone, more than that in New York... "
miscellaneous regional info New York: New York City 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 168. "Donnelly's novel [Caesar's Column]... When the revolution has brought about its own Reign of Terror and the destruction of New York together with a quarter-million of its residents... "
miscellaneous regional info New York: New York City 1999 Harrison, Harry. "Roommates " in Stainless Steel Visions. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 211. Pg. 205: "Monday the ninth of August, 1999--and hot as a furnace already, with the city embedded in the heat wave that had baked and suffocated New York for the past ten days. "; Pg. 211: "'...And there are thirty-five million people here in the city who get damn thirsty.' "; Pg. 221: "New York City trembled on the brink of disaster. "
miscellaneous regional info New York: New York City 2005 Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles. New York: Bantam (2000; c. 1958); pg. 134. "'I'm from New York City. Where I come from there's ten million others just like me. You Martians are a couple dozen left...' "
miscellaneous regional info New York: New York City 2015 Pohl, Frederik. The Years of the City. New York: Timescape (1984); pg. 40. "'The Universal Town Meeting,' said Brandon... 'is a synthesis of sociology, communications theory and computer studies. What it promises to do is make it possible for a city the size of New York City, seven or eight million people, to participate in an interactive, two-way discussion of problem-solving in the same way that the New England town meetings did in the past...' "
miscellaneous regional info New York: New York City 2030 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 209. "By these means New York [City] had reduced its (legal) population to two and a half million. All the rest (another two and a half million? If th authorities knew, they weren't telling) were temps, and lived, like Daniel, as best they could--in church basement dormitories, in the shells of abandoned midtown offices... "
miscellaneous regional info New York: New York City 2045 Barton, William. Acts of Conscience. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. 24. "One fine spring morning, just about 8:15 A.M., on August 6 of the year 2045, a small party from one her more disgruntled client states showed up in Manhattan bearing five egg-crates in their luggage. Spotted them on five street corners in the area between SoHo and the Trumpville slums. Said their prayers. Stooped and pushed five buttons.

There were five bright flashes of light, five loud bangs, five little mushroom clouds, five kilotons apiece.

Five kilotons is not much of a nuclear explosion... Maybe a half million people killed. A similar number badly injured. And the other eight million or so living and working on Manhattan island just had to move away... City services stayed intact for the other boroughs, of course, and there was talk of restoring the heart of New York, but it never happened. Over the course of the next generation, seventy percent of the thirty million people who'd inhabited Greater New York found reason to go elsewhere. "

miscellaneous regional info New York: New York City 2050 Pohl, Frederik. The Years of the City. New York: Timescape (1984); pg. 313. "They should have posponed the UTM [Universal Town Meeting]! New York City wasn't ready! Those ten million people under the dome and in the underground warrens across the river and out in the suburbs... "
miscellaneous regional info New York: New York City 2160 Dick, Philip K. The Game-Players of Titan. Boston, MA: G. K. Hall (1979; c. 1963); pg. 17. "And after all, New York City was well-populated; almost fifteen thousand souls. And many were children, hence new. "
miscellaneous regional info New York: New York City 4912 Asimov, Isaac. The Caves of Steel in The Robot Novels (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1954); pg. 15. "New York City spread over two thousand square miles and at the last census its population was well over twenty million. "


miscellaneous regional info, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus
Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.