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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to miscellaneous regional info, galaxy

miscellaneous regional info, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 22995 Benford, Gregory. Foundation's Fear. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 27. "The Empire of twenty-five million worlds was a problem greater even than understanding the whole rest of the universe--because at least the galaxies beyond did not have humans in them. The blind, blunt motions of stars and gas were child's play, compared to the convoluted trajectories of people.

Sometimes it wore him down. Trantor was bad enough, 800 Sectors with forty billion people. What of the Empire, with twenty-five million planets of average four billion souls apiece? One hundred quadrillion people! "

miscellaneous regional info galaxy 22995 Benford, Gregory. Foundation's Fear. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 339. "The Empire's twenty-five million worlds supported an average of only four billion people per planet. Trantor had forty billion. "
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 23000 Asimov, Isaac. Prelude to Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 7. "How many people ever did see the Emperor? In person, rather than on holovision? How many people saw the real, tangible Emperor... The number was vanishingly small. Twenty-five million inhabited worlds, each with its cargo of a billion human beings or more--and among all those quadrillions of human beings, how many had, or would ever, lay eyes on the living Emperor? A thousand?
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 23000 Asimov, Isaac. Prelude to Foundation. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 55. "Seldon's eyes blinked rapidly. 'Millions of worlds. Billions of cultures. Quadrillions of people. Decillions of interrelationships. --And you want me to reduce it to order.'

'No, I want you to try. For the sake of those millions of worlds, billions of cultures, and quadrillions of people. Not for the Emperor. Not for Demerzel. For humanity.' "

miscellaneous regional info galaxy 23000 Bear, Greg. Foundation and Chaos. New York: HarperCollins (1998); pg. 2. [Year estimated.] "In a real sense, the patient was already dead. Trantor, the political center of the galaxy, had died decades, perhaps centuries before, and was only now obviously falling to rot. "
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 23000 Bear, Greg. Foundation and Chaos. New York: HarperCollins (1998); pg. 9. "Fully a thousand other systems were showing severe unrest, yet with recent breakdowns and degradations, the Imperial communications systems could only handle about a tenth of the information sent from the twenty-five million worlds supposedly under their authority. "
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 23200 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1951); pg. 25. "Consider that Trantor has a population of over forty billions. Consider further that the trend leading to ruin does not belong to Trantor alone but to the Empire as a whole and the Empire contains nearly a quintillion human beings [on 25 million worlds]. " [Quintillion: 10 to the 18th power, or 1 with 18 zeroes after it]
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 23200 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1951); pg. 69. "'Don't you see? It's Galaxywide. It's a worship of the past. It's a deterioration--a stagnation!' "
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 23200 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1951); pg. 3-4. "There were nearly twenty-five million inhabited planets in the Galaxy then, and not one but owed allegiance to the Empire whose seat was on Trantor. It was the last half-century in which that could be said. "
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 33500 Asimov, Isaac. "The Mule " in Foundation and Empire. New York: Ballantine (1983; first published 1945); pg. 97. "Captain Han Pritcher... As a general thing, he discouraged self-analysis and all forms of philosophy and metaphysics not directly connected with his work.

It helped.

His work consisted largely of what the War Department called 'intelligence'... at best a sordid business of routine betrayal and bad faith. It is excused by society since it is in the 'interest of the State,' but since philosophy seemed always to lead Captain Pritcher to the conclusion that even in that holy interest, society is much mor easily soothed than one's own conscience--he discouraged philosophy.

And now, in the luxury of the mayor's anteroom, his thoughts turned inward despite himself. "

miscellaneous regional info galaxy 33500 Asimov, Isaac. "The Mule " in Foundation and Empire. New York: Ballantine (1983; first published 1945); pg. 146. [Magnifico explains the name of his work of Visi-Sonor art.] "'My very own, my lady... it as once, in my youth, that I saw the palace--a gigantic place of jeweled riches... There were people of a splendor undreamed of--and magnificence more than ever I saw afterwards... It is but a poor makeshift I have created, but my mind's poverty precludes more. I call it, 'The Memory of Heaven.' ' "
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 34050 Harrison, Harry. "The Golden Years of the Stainless Steel Rat " in Stainless Steel Visions. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 235-254. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 34700 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation's Edge. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1982); pg. 71. [Year is estimated.] "In the old days of the Great Sack, the Golden Rule had been strained to the breaking point. There was no way of saving Trantor without sacrificing the Seldon Plan for establishing a Second Empire. It would have been humane to spare the forty-five billion, but they could not have been spared without retention of the core of the First Empire and that would have only delayed the reckoning. "
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 35000 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation's Edge. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1982); pg. 99. [Year is estimated.] "'... It just means that the statistics on populated planets are incomplete. After all, there are tens of millions of them and some are very obscure worlds. For instance, there is no good data on the population of nearly half. And concerning six hundred and forty thousand populated worlds there is almost no information other than their names and sometimes the location. Some galactographers have estimated that there may be up to ten thousand inhabited planets that aren't listed at all. The worlds prefer it that way, presumably. During the Imperial Era, it might have helped them avoid taxation.' "
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 35000 Asimov, Isaac. Foundation's Edge. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1982); pg. 246. [Year is estimated.] "That was the Foundation Federation, the more than seven million inhabited worlds ruled by the Council and by herself--the seven million inhabited worlds who voted for and were represented in the House of Worlds, which debated matters of minor importance, and then voted on them, and never, by any chance, dealt with anything of major importance. "
miscellaneous regional info Georgia: Zebulon 2000 Knight, Damon. Rule Golden in Three Novels. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1954); pg. 68. "On the 14th, Zebulon, Georgia (pop. 312), Murfreesboro, Tennessee (pop. 11,190) and Orange, Texas (pop. 8,740) seceded from the Union. "
miscellaneous regional info Germany 2001 Stroyar, J.N. The Children's War. New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 1112. [1] "'What are the current numbers?'...

'One hundred fifty million German or Germanic citizens. Of those, about two million are in prison or concentration camps and have been stripped of their citizenship.'

Peter nodded, repeating, 'Two million.'

'Thirty or so million non-Germans who have obtained full Reich citizenship. Altogether, that's roughly one hundred eighty million people who have a vested interest in the current status quo and who would be the possible victims of any revolutionary terror. Then there are about eighty million subjects without citizenship. These are people who are governed by the Basic Law and the Minimum Guarantee of Rights. Of that number, about fifty million are in untied, paid employment and would have questionable loyalty to any revolution. The other thirty are in tied jobs. They receive minimal salaries and housing but must remain with their employer unless given permission to move. Even they would have a reason to fear abrupt change.' "

miscellaneous regional info Germany 2001 Stroyar, J.N. The Children's War. New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 1112. [2] "'And the rest?' Peter asked. 'How many natural allies do we have?'

'There are about thirty million in forced labor. About sixteen million of these are in conscription with a finite service length. The remaining fourteen million are either in indefinite or permanent forced labor. Eight million of those are living in camps, prisons, and industrial barracks and are completely cut off from the outside world. Of the remaining Zwangsarbeiter, about five million work in shops, restaurants, and other small businesses...' "

miscellaneous regional info Germany 2001 Stroyar, J.N. The Children's War. New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 1112. [3] "'...The remaining million are in domestic employment, mostly in and around Berlin.'

'Only a million? The number did not match intuitively with Peter's own experience, but then he had been a resident of a wealthy and politically connected suburb. 'Didn't the number used to be much higher?'

'Yes, in the forties it was, and the promise was that every German hausfrau, no matter how lowly, would one day own a servant, but that proved to be unworkable, and the Labor Ministry pulled back on the numbers.'

'Why was it unworkable? Was there unrest?'

'No. Not unrest, fraternization,' Ryszard explained. 'You wouldn't believe the number of conspiracies between German women who wanted to skip the joy of eight pregnancies and the servant women who wanted to keep their babies. Even without sham adoptions and faked births, they found there were problems with children raised to speak fluent German. Once you get rid of the language differences, our people are indistinguishable.' "

miscellaneous regional info Golan System 4600 Weber, David & Steve White. In Death Ground. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 38. "There were only five thousand colonists in the Golan System, but there were eight million in Merriweather, another thirty million in Justin... "
miscellaneous regional info Gotham 1979 O'Neil, Dennis. "Ticket to Tragedy " in Batman in the Seventies, (Michael Wright, ed.) New York: DC Comics (1999; story first pub. in Detective Comics #481, December 1978-January 1979); pg. 166. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info Greece: Thessaloniki 1985 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 133-134. "...the religious networks, where, with sustained and general excitement, the Message [from extraterrestrials] was being discussed... The Message, Ellie believed, was a kind of mirror in which each person sees his or her own beliefs challenged or confirmed... A Thessalonian philosopher, auspiciously named Nicholas Polydemos, was attracting attention with a set of passionate arguments for what he called the 'reunification' of the religions, governments, and peoples of the world. Critics began by questioning the 're.' "
miscellaneous regional info Guernsey 1944 Allred, Lee. "The Greatest Danger " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 189. "'These are the Channel Islands. The northernmost island is roughly sixty miles south of Britain, about eight miles west of France... Four main islands: Guernsey, Jersey, Alderney, Sark... A duke named William grabbed them in 933--sort of a dry rehearsal for a conqueror named William in 1066. Part of the British Empire ever since--even before Britain proper, as the Islanders are fond of saying.' "
miscellaneous regional info Haven II: Haven 23500 Asimov, Isaac. "The Mule " in Foundation and Empire. New York: Ballantine (1983; first published 1945); pg. 88. [Actual year unknown.] "'Well, now, Bay, it [Haven] isn't like anything on the Foundation, of course, but it's the biggest city on Haven II--twenty thousand people, you know... "
miscellaneous regional info Heaven 1993 Morrow, James. Only Begotten Daughter. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1990); pg. 170. "'All right--I give up. Who got saved?'

...'Heaven's not a crowded place.'

'So I gather. A million?'

'Cold.'

'Fewer?'

'Uh-huh.'

'Ten thousand?'

'Lower.'

'One thousand?'

'Such an optimist.' Wyvern snapped his fingers, crushing the earwig. 'Four.'

'Four?'

'There are four people in heaven.' The devil's diaphanous eyelids began a snide descent. 'Enoch and Elijah, for starters. I couldn't do anything about that--it's in Scripture. Then there's Saint Peter, of course. And finally, Murray Katz.'

'Pop? He was a Jew.'

'Yes, but consider his connections. Of all beings in the cosmos, he alone was selected to gestate God's daughter.' "

miscellaneous regional info Helior 4000 Harrison, Harry. Bill, the Galactic Hero. New York: Avon (1975; c. 1965); pg. 113. Pg. 113: "'...but if there is one operation that doesn't give us any problem, it's sewage, because it's mostly automated. We're proud of our sewage record because it's a big one; there must be over 150 billion people on Helior . . .'

'WOW!'

'. . . you're right... That is a lot of sewage...' ";

Pg. 114: "'...Did you ever think how many newspapers 150 billion people throw away every day? Or how many dispos-a-steins? Or dinner plates?...' "

miscellaneous regional info Hong Kong 2001 Hickman, Tracy. The Immortals. New York: ROC/Penguin Books (1997; c. 1996); pg. 32. "Michael had been to New Hong Kong in '01. It was his last trip to Asia before all the trouble began. "
miscellaneous regional info Hyperion: Keats 2732 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 35. "I am tired of this city. I am tired of its pagan pretensions and false histories. Hyperion is a poet's world devoid of poetry. Keats itself is a mixture of tawdry, false classicism and mindless boomtown energy. There are three Zen Gnostic assemblies and four High Muslim mosques in town, but the real houses of worship are the countless saloons and brothels, the huge marketplaces handling the fiberplastic shipments from the south, and the Shrike Cult temples where lost souls hide their suicidal hopelessness behind a shield of shallow mysticism. The whole planet reeks of mysticism without revelation. "
miscellaneous regional info Illinois: Chicago 1998 York, J. Steven. Generation X: Crossroads. New York: Berkley (1998); pg. 221-222. "'This is Combat One. Sound off. Gonzalez.'

A woman's voice, 'Combat Two, armed.'

'Vogle.'

'Combat Three, ready.'

'Sledge.'

'Combat Four, go.'

'Petra.'

'Combat Five, said another woman's voice. 'Let's go kick some but.' "

miscellaneous regional info Illinois: Chicago 2990 Niven, Larry & Jerry Pournelle. The Mote in God's Eye. New York: Simon and Schuster (1974); pg. 19. The real Chicago is not being referred to in the following passage, but a planet named after Chicago: "NEW CHICAGO: Inhabited world, Trans-Coalsack Sector, approximately 20 parsecs from Sector Capital. The primary is an F9 yellow star commonly referred to as Beta Hortensis... Most inhabitants reside in a single city which bears the same name as the planet. Other population centers are widely scattered, with none having a population over 45,000. Total planet population was reported as 6.7 million in the census of 2990. "
miscellaneous regional info India 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 31. "But British India, properly so called, only embraces seven hundred thousand square miles, and a population of from one hundred to one hundred and ten inhabitants. A considerable portion of India is still free from British authority; and there are certain ferocious rajahs in the interior who are absolutely independent. "
miscellaneous regional info India 1905 Gibson, William & Bruce Sterling. The Difference Engine. New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 269. Pg. 269: "'What did you think of India, by the way?'

'It's a dreadful place, India,' Brian said readily, 'brim-full of queer marvels, but dreadful. There's only one folk in Asia with any sense, and that's the Japanese.' "; Pg. 270: "'Fantatics,' Mallory nodded. 'Your common Indian, though, must be surely grateful for a decent government. Railroads, telegraphs, aqueducts, and such.' "

miscellaneous regional info India 1974 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 134. "'Barring decisive action on my part, the population of India alone is expected to exceed one billion by the year 2000...' "
miscellaneous regional info India 2000 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 141. "Many of the younger children we could see running naked through the mud would not survive the next few years. Those that did reach our age would greet the new century in a nation of a billion people facing famine and social chaos. "
miscellaneous regional info India 2015 Sheffield, Charles. Brother to Dragons. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1992); pg. 153. "China tops one and a half billion, India's the same... "
miscellaneous regional info India 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 347. "Over a million Indians made it out of India before the Chinese sealed the borders. Out of a population of a billion and a half, that was far too few. At least ten times that million were transported over the next year, from India to the cold lands of Manchuria and high deserts of Sinkiang. "
miscellaneous regional info India: Punjab 1972 DuBois, Brendan. Resurrection Day. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1999); pg. 110. "But Rachel had been on holiday with her parents in the Punjab in northern India, touring places that her father knew, back when was [sic] in the Foreign Service. "
miscellaneous regional info Indonesia 2015 Sheffield, Charles. Brother to Dragons. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1992); pg. 153. "Brazil and Mexico and Indonesia and the old Soviet states push six hundred million each. "
miscellaneous regional info Indonesia 2095 Sterling, Bruce. Holy Fire. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 24. "Mia could have called her daughter, Chloe, in Djakarta, but there was no comfort in that. Chloe would only pick at her batik and utter harrangues about turns of the wheel and spiritual authenticity. "
miscellaneous regional info Indonesia: Bali 1984 Adams, Douglas & John Lloyd. The Meaning of Liff. New York: Harmony Books (1984); pg. 79. "Shalunt (n.) One who wears Trinidad and Tobago T-shirts on the beach in Bali to prove they didn't just win the holiday In a competition or anything. "
miscellaneous regional info Ireland 2100 Le Guin, Ursula K. "Nine Lives " in Nebula Award Stories Five (James Blish, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1972; 1st ed. 1970; story c. 1969); pg. 66. [Year estimated.] "'Do you come from Ireland, Owen?'

'Nobody comes from Ireland, Zayin.'

'There are lots of Irish-Americans.'

'To be sure, but no more Irish. A couple of thousand in all the island, the last I knew. They didn't go in for birth-control, you know, so the food ran out. By the Third Famine there were no Irish left at all but the priesthood, and they were all celibate, or nearly all.'

Zayin and Kaph smiled stiffly. They had no experience of either bigotry or irony. "

miscellaneous regional info Japan 2020 Zelazny, Roger. Damnation Alley. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1969); pg. 139. "'...New York is a Hot Spot [still radioactive after nuclear bomb strikes]. So are most of the big cities. Maybe only the islands made it: the Caribbean, Hawaii, Japan, the Greek isles. They kept broadcasting for a long time, you know, after the others quit. Maybe there are still people alive in Japan and the Mediterranean...' "
miscellaneous regional info Japan 2030 Gibson, William. Neuromancer. New York: Ace Books (1984); pg. 12. "Julius Deane was one hundred and thirty-five years old, his metabolism assiduously warped by a weekly fortune in serums and hormones. His primary hedge against aging was a yearly pilgrimage to Tokyo, where genetic surgeons re-set the code of his DNA, a procedure unavailable in Chiba. Then he'd fly to Hongkong and order the year's suits and shirts. Sexless and inhumanly patient, his primary gratification seemed to lie in his devotion to esoteric forms of tailor-worship. case had never seen him wear the same suit twice, although his wardrobe seemed to consist entirely of meticulous reconstructions of garments of the previous century. "
miscellaneous regional info Japan 2030 Gibson, William. Neuromancer. New York: Ace Books (1984); pg. 58. "It wasn't a name he knew. Something new, something that had come in since he'd been in Chiba. Fads swept the youth of the Sprawl at the speed of light; entire subcultures could rise overnight, thrive for a dozen weeks, and then vanish utterly. "
miscellaneous regional info Japan 2350 Bear, Greg. Beyond Heaven's River. New York: Dell (1980); pg. 91. "The islands of Japan supported one billion human beings. "
miscellaneous regional info Japan: Tokyo 2010 Blake, Sterling. "A Desperate Calculus " in New Legends. Greg Bear (ed.) New York: Tor (1995); pg. 53. "Megacities... Tokyo topped the list, as always, at thirty-six million. "
miscellaneous regional info Justin 4600 Weber, David & Steve White. In Death Ground. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 38. "There were only five thousand colonists in the Golan System, but there were eight million in Merriweather, another thirty million in Justin... "
miscellaneous regional info Kenya 1981 Bishop, Michael. No Enemy But Time. New York: Timescape (1982); pg. 7. "Author's Note

...No Enemy But Time
is a work of fiction. The country Zarakal does not exist on any map, but I imagine its geographic dimensions roughly coexstensive with Kenya. However, the reader may not automatically suppose that Zarakal and Kenya are historically, sociologically, and politically identical. They are not, nor were they intended to be. " [In this DB, citations from the book that take place in 'Zarakal' will be listed with Kenya as the location.]
miscellaneous regional info Kiribati 1999 Banks, Iain. The Business. New York: Simon & Schuster (1999); pg. 332. "Now, why Fenua Ua? I looked up a map of the Pacific. Why not Nauru, or Kiribati, or even the... Galapagos? "
miscellaneous regional info Kiribati 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 230. "The smaller Japanese guy lifted his bush hat... 'Kiribati,' he said.

'If we get the bloody choice we take Nauru,' said the Anglo...

The Japanese ripped the tag loose... 'Kiribati's nowhere, man. They don't have dedicated landlines.'

'The heat will be all over Nauru. They're afraid of those launch sites. . . .'

Nauru and Kiribati, Laura thought--little Pacific island states whose 'national sovereignty' could be had for a price. Good dumping grounds for Bank gangsters, obviously... " [Also pg. 235.]

miscellaneous regional info Kiribati 2040 Bova, Ben. Moonrise. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 154. "They were standing on the white sand beach on the lagoon side of Bonriki. The airport was hidden by the high-rise office towers of the town, but out in the lagoon Joanna could see the floating platforms and work boats of the sea-launched rocket boosters Almost on the equator, Tarawa lagoon was an ideal launch point for Pacific traffic into orbit. The island nation of Kiribati was getting rich on its royalties from Masterson Aerospace. " [Other refs. to Kiribati, not in DB.]
miscellaneous regional info Kiribati 2040 Bova, Ben. Moonrise. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 315. "Let them make their treaty; we'll find a way around it. Kiribati will have the highest per-capita income on Earth, just from the bribes Mom and Greg will spread around. "
miscellaneous regional info Kiribati 2050 Bova, Ben. "Sam's War " in Sam Gunn Forever. New York: Avon (1998; c. 1994); pg. 60. "...the silver-haired representative from Kiribati dressed in the colorful robes of his Pacific atolls. "
miscellaneous regional info Kiribati 2050 Bova, Ben. Moonwar. New York: Avon Books (1998); pg. 1. "Masterson Corporation owned and operated Moonbase through a wholly-owned subsidiary headquartered in the island nation of Kiribati. "
miscellaneous regional info Kiribati 2050 Bova, Ben. Moonwar. New York: Avon Books (1998); pg. 18. "The United Nations' nanotechnology treaty banned all nanotech operations, research and teaching in the nations that signed the treaty. Seven years earlier, when it became clear that the United States would sign the treaty--indeed, American nanoluddites had drafted the treaty--Masterson Corporation had set up a dummy company on the island nation of Kiribati and transferred Moonbase to the straw-man corporation. As long as Kiribati did not sign the treaty, Moonbase could legally continue using nanomachines, which were as vital to Moonbase as air. " [Many other refs. to Kiribati, not in DB.]
miscellaneous regional info Luna 25 C.E. Lupoff, Richard A. "Jubilee " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 165. "'We've been going to Luna for 200 years.'

'Indeed, if you consider a mere moon a planet . . .' "

miscellaneous regional info Luna 1835 Asimov, Isaac. "Afterword " in The War of the Worlds (by H. G. Wells). New York: Penguin Putnam (1986; c. 1898); pg. 207. "The nearest of the worlds was the Moon and it became clear by the mid-1600's that there was neither air nor water on the Moon and that it was therefore a dead world. Nevertheless, nearly two centuries later, in 1835, when the New York Sun published a series of hoax articles reporting the discovery of life on the Moon, this was widely accepted. That's how strongly people wanted to believe there was life on other worlds. "
miscellaneous regional info Luna 2020 Zelazny, Roger. Damnation Alley. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1969); pg. 139. "'We put people on the moon and Mars and Titan. We conquered space. We lost time. We had a United Nations. But what happened? Three lousy days, that's what, and everything went to hell...' "
miscellaneous regional info Luna 2040 Niven, Larry. The Patchwork Girl. New York: Ace (1980); pg. 10, 54. Pg. 10: "'Relax, I was kidding. People have been landing on the Moon for a hundred and fifty years, and they've only had two accidents.' "; Pg. 54: "'...People have been living on the Moon for a hundred and twenty years or so, but even eighty years ago there were only a few hundred. Human beings aren't adapted biologically to have children in low gravity...' "
miscellaneous regional info Luna 2075 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 87. [Fictional table: "Area and Population of the Worlds ", showing population figures ( "actual numbers ") for the year 2075. Source is given as "Rand McNally & Co. " In addition to population estimates for all continents, four off-Earth locations are listed: Cislunar space, Moon, Mars, and Novysibirsk.]
miscellaneous regional info Luna 2075 Heinlein, Robert A. The Moon is a Harsh Mistress. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1966); pg. 32. "'Yes, we could throw rocks. But the solution is so simple that you all knew it. Here in Luna we're rich. Three million hardworking, smart, skilled people, enough water, plenty of everything, endless power, endless cubic. But . . . what we don't have is a free market. We must get rid of the Authority!' "; Pg. 33: "Three million, unarmed and helpless--and eleven billion of them... "; Pg. 166: "'...Here we are, two milion males, less than one million females...' "
miscellaneous regional info Luna 2075 Jones, Raymond F. "Intermission Time " in The Non-Statistical Man. New York: Belmont Books (1964; copyright 1953); pg. 133. Pg. 133: "'...Some of my friends joined the Moon colonies; some have gone to Mars. But I didn't have money enough for either...' "; Pg. 138: "Moon-colonies and Mars-colonies had been set up, but something was lacking there . . . "
miscellaneous regional info Luna 2076 Heinlein, Robert A. The Moon is a Harsh Mistress. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1966); pg. 205. "One female (most were men, but women made up for it in silliness) had a long list she wanted made permanent laws--about private matters. No plural marriage of any sort. No divorces. No 'fornication'--had to look that one up. No drinks stronger than 4% beer. Church services only on Saturdays and all else to stop that day... A long list of drugs to be prohibited and a shorter list dispensed only by licensed physicians... She even wanted to make gambling illegal.
miscellaneous regional info Luna 2266 Anderson, Poul. "Appendix A: Design for Two Worlds " in Murasaki (Robert Silverberg, ed.) New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 260. "Some 20 million people live in sealed-in lunar and Martian colonies... "
miscellaneous regional info Luna 3000 Niven, Larry. Rainbow Mars. New York: Tor (1999); pg. 21-25. Pg. 21: "'Moon and Mars,' Miya said. 'Mars is just twenty people. Luna City is two thousand, I think, but buried, not much to see...' "; Pg. 24: "...The Industrial Age, then was when we should have moved. They put twelve men on the Moon and then went home for four hundred years!'

'I know considerable about the Industrial Age,' said Ra Chen... "; Pg. 25: 'Everything interesting happened eleven hundred years ago,' Willy Gorky said. 'Industry exploded across the world. Human numbers went into the billions Highways and railroads and airlines webbed the planet...' "



miscellaneous regional info, continued

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