Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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miscellaneous regional info, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
miscellaneous regional info Diaspar 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 9. Pg. 8-9: "Yet to everyone in Diaspar, 'outside' was a nightmare that they could not face... In a city of ten million human beings, thought Alvin, there was no one to whom he could really talk. "; Pg. 18: "'...At any moment... only a hundredth of the citizens of Diaspar live and walk its streets. The vast majority slumber in the Memory Banks, waiting for the signal that will call them forth onto the stage of existence once again. So we have continuity, yet change--immortality, but not stagnation.' "
miscellaneous regional info Diego Garcia 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 224. "The SinoInds nuked more than one island in the Indian Ocean... Despite the density of our defensive curtain, Diego Garcia was now inhabitable; Aussies refueled in the Maldives. "
miscellaneous regional info Earth Observation Station Avernus 4000 Aldiss, Brian. Helliconia Spring. New York: Atheneum (1982); pg. 87. "As Father Bondorlonganon was drawn back, pickled, across the plain to Borlien, the clouds parted. Above him, beading the night sky, were the prodigal stars.

Among the constellations and the fixed stars was a light that crawled. Not a comet but Earth Observation Station Avernus.

From the ground below, the station apeared as no more than a point of light, casually watched by travellers and trappers as it passed overhead. Close to, it revealed itself as an irregular and complex series of units with a number of specialised functions.

The Avernus housed some five thousand men, women, children, and androids, all of the adults specialising in some aspect of the planet below. Helliconia. An Earth-like planet with particular interest for the people of Earth. "

miscellaneous regional info Ecotopia 1980 Callenbach, Ernest. Ecotopia. New York: Tor (1977; c. 1975); pg. 81. "...original Ecotopian population of some 15 million [in 1980] has now declined... "
miscellaneous regional info Ecotopia 2001 Callenbach, Ernest. Ecotopia. New York: Tor (1977; c. 1975); pg. 81. [Ecotopia: nation comprising northern California, Oregon, and Washington] "Population has tended to drop gently at a rate of around 65,000 per year, so that the original Ecotopian population of some 15 million [in 1980] has now declined to about 14 million. "
miscellaneous regional info Epsilon One 2353 Weiss, Bobbi J. G. & David Cody Weiss. Lifeline (Star Trek: Voyager: Starfleet Academy). New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 69. "As described by the computer itself: 'You are science technicians aboard the starship U.S.S. Argonaut orbiting planet Epsilon One, a class-M world with an advanced humanoid population of 3.76 billion...' "
miscellaneous regional info Europa Nova 2376 DeCandido, Keith R. A. Demons of Air and Darkness (Star Trek: DS9 / Gateways: Book 4 of 7). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 44. "'...But right now, we have to give priority to the three million people on Europa Nova.' " [The central plot of the novel involves the evacuation of this planet's population, so there are many refs. to the number of inhabitants, including refs. to the populations of specific cities and regions.]
miscellaneous regional info Europe 1350 C.E. Robinson, Andrew J. A Stitch in Time (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 311. "'If you and the other were carriers of some disease,' he shrugged. 'In our fourteenth century on Earth there was a terrible plague, the Black Plague, which wiped out half of Europe's population. People believed that the dead bodies had to be destroyed, burned . . . buried . . . because it was the only way to prevent the spread of the disease. . . .' "
miscellaneous regional info Europe 1900 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 87. [Fictional table: "Area and Population of the Worlds ", showing figures for (est. millions) for 1900, 1950, 2000, 2050, 2075. Source is given as "Rand McNally & Co. "]
miscellaneous regional info Europe 1950 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 87. [Fictional table: "Area and Population of the Worlds ", showing figures for (est. millions) for 1900, 1950, 2000, 2050, 2075. Source is given as "Rand McNally & Co. "]
miscellaneous regional info Europe 1994 Bishop, Michael. Catacomb Years. New York: Berkley (1979); pg. 13. [Timeline] "1978-1994: Pan-European Ecumenical Movement provides foundation for New Free Europe (NFE). "
miscellaneous regional info Europe 2000 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 87. [Fictional table: "Area and Population of the Worlds ", showing figures for (est. millions) for 1900, 1950, 2000, 2050, 2075. Source is given as "Rand McNally & Co. "]
miscellaneous regional info Europe 2046 Bear, Greg. Eternity. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 16. "'What about Gerald Brooks in England?'

'I met with him, Ser. He is not a threat.'

'He worries me. He has quite a following in Europe.'

'At most two thousand in a recovered population of ten million...' "

miscellaneous regional info Europe 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 87. [Fictional table: "Area and Population of the Worlds ", showing figures for (est. millions) for 1900, 1950, 2000, 2050, 2075. Source is given as "Rand McNally & Co. "]
miscellaneous regional info Europe 2075 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 87. [Fictional table: "Area and Population of the Worlds ", showing figures for (est. millions) for 1900, 1950, 2000, 2050, 2075. Source is given as "Rand McNally & Co. "]
miscellaneous regional info Federation 2375 Leisner, William. "Gods, Fate, and Fractals " in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds II (Dean Wesley Smith, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 201. "The United Federation of Planets. Home to over a trillion sentients, all living in comfort and harmony like no other society in all of history. "
miscellaneous regional info Florin 1400 C.E. Goldman, William. The Princess Bride. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1973); pg. 40. [Year estimated.] "The Land of Florin was set between where Sweden and Germany would eventually settle. (This was before Europe.) In theory, it was ruled by King Lotharon and his second wife, the Queen... " [The novel primarily takes place in the fictional land of Florin.]
miscellaneous regional info France 1971 Panshin, Alexei. "How Georges Duchamps Discovered a Plot to Take Over the World " in Farewell To Yesterday's Tomorrow. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1975; c. 1971 in different form); pg. 77-78. [In this one-page story, Georges, a Frenchman, discovers a button on Marie. It chimes when pressed. He wonders if there is a plot to take over the world, and then Marie points out that he, too, has a similar button on him. No apparent refs. to any actual religious/tribal groups.]
miscellaneous regional info France 1985 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 133-134. "...the religious networks, where, with sustained and general excitement, the Message [from extraterrestrials] was being discussed... The Message, Ellie believed, was a kind of mirror in which each person sees his or her own beliefs challenged or confirmed... Apparitions of Vishnu had been reported in India, and of the Amida Buddha in Japan; miraculous cures by the hundreds were announced at Lourdes; a new Bodhisattva proclaimed herself in Tibet. "
miscellaneous regional info galaxy -100008 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. Jedi Apprentice: The Rising Force (Star Wars). New York: Scholastic (1999); pg. 2. [Various intelligent species mentioned in novel. Page numbers shown here are the first mention.] Humans (throughout), Yoda's species (pg. 1, many more); Togorian (pg. 2-3, 6, 85, 88, 91-98); Calamarian (pg. 17); Dresselian (pg. 20); Corellian (pg. 37), pg. 37: Arconans, Hutts, Whiphids (many refs. to these three); pg. 61: Meerians; pg. 164: Jawa]
miscellaneous regional info galaxy -99956 B.C.E. Moran, Daniel Keys. "The Last One Standing: The Tale of Boba Fett " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 277-278. "The last statement of the Journeyman Protector Jaster Mereel, known later as the Hunter Boba Fett, before exile from the world of Concord Dawn:

Everyone dies.

It's the final and only lasting Justice. Evil exists; it is intelligence in the service of entropy. When the side of a mountain slides down to kill a village, this is not evil, for evil requires intent. Should a sentient being cause that landslide, there is evil; and requires Justice as a consequence so that civilization can exist.

There is no greater good than Justice; and only if law serves Justice it is good law. It is said correctly that law exists not for the Just but for the unjust, for the Just carry the law in their hearts, and do not need to call it from afar.

I bow to no one and I give service only for cause.
"

miscellaneous regional info galaxy -99940 B.C.E. Burns, Laurie. "Retreat from Coruscant " in Star Wars: Tales from the Empire (Peter Schweighofer, ed.) New York: Bantam (1997); pg. 116. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info galaxy -99940 B.C.E. Endom, Erin. "Do No Harm " in Star Wars: Tales from the Empire (Peter Schweighofer, ed.) New York: Bantam (1997); pg. 214. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info galaxy -99940 B.C.E. Newcomb, Charlene. "A Certain Point of View " in Star Wars: Tales from the Empire (Peter Schweighofer, ed.) New York: Bantam (1997); pg. 144. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info galaxy -99940 B.C.E. Phillips, Angela. "Slaying Dragons " in Star Wars: Tales from the Empire (Peter Schweighofer, ed.) New York: Bantam (1997); pg. 198. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info galaxy -99940 B.C.E. Russo, Tony. "Blaze of Glory " in Star Wars: Tales from the Empire (Peter Schweighofer, ed.) New York: Bantam (1997); pg. 166. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info galaxy -99940 B.C.E. Stackpole, Michael A. "Side Trip Part Three " in Star Wars: Tales from the Empire (Peter Schweighofer, ed.) New York: Bantam (1997); pg. 278. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info galaxy -99940 B.C.E. Stackpole, Michael A. "Side Trip Part Two " in Star Wars: Tales from the Empire (Peter Schweighofer, ed.) New York: Bantam (1997); pg. 255. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info galaxy -99940 B.C.E. Tyers, Kathy. "Tinian on Trial " in Star Wars: Tales from the Empire (Peter Schweighofer, ed.) New York: Bantam (1997); pg. 26. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info galaxy -99940 B.C.E. Zahn, Timothy. "First Contact " in Star Wars: Tales from the Empire (Peter Schweighofer, ed.) New York: Bantam (1997); pg. 1. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info galaxy -99940 B.C.E. Zahn, Timothy. "Side Trip Part Four " in Star Wars: Tales from the Empire (Peter Schweighofer, ed.) New York: Bantam (1997); pg. 278. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info galaxy -99940 B.C.E. Zahn, Timothy. "Side Trip Part One " in Star Wars: Tales from the Empire (Peter Schweighofer, ed.) New York: Bantam (1997); pg. 233. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info galaxy -99936 B.C.E. Moran, Daniel Keys. "The Last One Standing: The Tale of Boba Fett " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 285. "'Does it ever both your conscience,' Fett said again, in the voice that always sounded so harsh when he spoke Basic, 'trafficking in spice?'

Voors said a little hesitantly, 'It's not even addictive. And there are valid medical uses for it--'

The bodyguard nearest Fett blinked, shook his head and blinked again. 'Substances that are not addictive,' said Fett, 'frequently lead to the misuse of substances that are. Doesn't that bother you?' "

miscellaneous regional info galaxy -99936 B.C.E. Moran, Daniel Keys. "The Last One Standing: The Tale of Boba Fett " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 295. "One of the guards stepped to the side, and a form--a human--was shoved into the room... 'From Jabba,' the near guard grunted. 'Enjoy her.'

Fett reached back with one hand and touched the control for the light fixtures... looked down on Lei Organa, Princess of Alderaan.

She scrambled to her feet and backed up into a corner... 'You touch me--' Her voice failed her, and she stood there, shivering, and finally said, 'Touch me and one of us is going to die.'

...'Cover yourself. I'm not going to touch you.'

Organa moved slightly to the side... 'You're not?'

Fett shook his head... 'Sex between those not married,' said Fett, 'is immoral.'

'Yeah,' said Organa. 'So's rape.'

Fett nodded. 'So is rape.'... He had never so much as held a woman in his arms... but in Fett's mind his chastity made him no less a man... "

miscellaneous regional info galaxy -99936 B.C.E. Moran, Daniel Keys. "The Last One Standing: The Tale of Boba Fett " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 279-280. "Most fathers, Fett knew, on most planets, would not have killed a boy for such behavior; indeed, most bounty hunters would have turned down such a job.

Fett was not among them. Laws vary, planet to planet; but morality never changes. He had delivered the boy to his executioners and he had never regretted it. "

miscellaneous regional info galaxy -99936 B.C.E. Moran, Daniel Keys. "The Last One Standing: The Tale of Boba Fett " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 296-297. "'...What you're doing is morally wrong. The Rebels are in the wrong, and the Rebellion will fall--and it should.'

Leia Organa could not keep the outrage out of her voice. 'Morally wrong? Us? We're fighting for homes and our families and our loved ones, the ones who are all alive and the ones we've lost. The Empire destroyed my entire world, virtually everyone I ever knew as a child--'

Fett actually leaned forward slightly. 'Those worlds rose in rebellion against the authority legally in place over them. The Emperor was within his rights to destroy them; they threatened the system of social justice that permits civilization to exist... I am sorry for the deaths of the innocent. But that happens in war, Leia Organa. The innocent die in wars, and your side should not have started this one.' "

miscellaneous regional info galaxy -99936 B.C.E. Moran, Daniel Keys. "The Last One Standing: The Tale of Boba Fett " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 297-298. "'...But Solo? He's a brave man, yes; he's also a mercenary who's never done a decent thing in his life, who's never done a difficult thing that somebody wasn't paying him for. He's smuggled banned substances--'

'He ran spice!'

Fett found himself on his feet and yelling.

'Spice is illegal! It's a euphoric, it alters moods, and the use of it leads to the use of worse substances, and a man who will run spice... will run anything!... And If I had been using spice tonight, Leia Organa, perhaps you would not be safe with me in this room.' "

miscellaneous regional info galaxy -99936 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. "Payback: The Tale of Dengar " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 146. "This time, he realized, he finally had something to lose. He had Manaroo, and he had a man who wanted to be his partner.

Boba Fett flipped the blaster over, handed it to Dengar. 'I owe you,' he said. 'Do what you will.'

Dengar holstered the blaster and stood looking down at Boba Fett. 'I'm getting married in a couple of weeks, and I'll need a best man. You available?'

Boba Fett nodded, and they shook it. " [This scene takes place on Tatooine. Dengar is a native of Corelia.]

miscellaneous regional info galaxy -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 5. [This scene on Coruscant is indicative of the size of the Galactic Empire.] "The diplomats were all speaking softly, listing to comlinks and watching Leia... Perhaps five hundred thousand beings had gathered on the main floors, eager to catch a glimpse of the Hapans. Tens of thousands of security guards had cleared the gold carpet between the shuttle and Leia... Nearly every star system in the old Empire had had its own balcony here, and beside each balcony was the nation's standard. Over six hundred thousand of those standards hung now on the ancient marble walls, showing the membership of the New Republic. "
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 1367 C.E. Banks, Iain M. Consider Phlebas. New York: St. Martin's Press (1987); pg. 462. Appendices: the Idiran-Culture war: "Statistics: Length of war: forty-eight years, one month. Total casualties, including machines (reckoned on logarithmic sentience scale), medjel and non-combatants: 851.4 billion (+/- .3%). Losses: ships (all classes above interplanetary): 91,215,660 (+/- 200); Orbitals: 14,334; planets and major moons: 53; Rings: 1; Spheres: 3; stars (undergoing significant induced mass-loss or sequence-position alteration): 6

Historical perspective: A small, short war that rarely extended throughout more than .02% of the galaxy by volume and .01% by stellar population. Rumours persist of far more impressive conflicts, stretching through vastly greater amounts of time and space. . . . Nevertheless, the chronicles of the galaxy's elder civilisations rate the Idiran-Culture war as the most significant conflict of the past fifty thousand years, and one of those singularly interesting Events they see so rarely these days. "

miscellaneous regional info galaxy 1963 Simak, Clifford D. Way Station. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Robert Bentley, Inc. (reprinted 1979; copyright 1963); pg. 71. "'We'd have so much to learn. They [the interplanetary-traveling citizens of the galaxy] know so much more than we. Their concept of religion, for example.'

''I don't know,' said Enoch. 'whether it's actually a religion. It seems to have few of the trappings we associate with religion. And it is not based on faith. It doesn't have to be. It is based on knowledge. These people know, you see.'

'You mean the spiritual force.'

'It is there,' said Enoch, 'just as surely as all the other forces that make up the universe. There is a spiritual force, exactly as there is time and space and gravitation and all the other factors that make up the immaterial universe. It is there and they can establish contact with it. . .'

'But don't you think,' asked David, 'that the human race may sense this? They don't know it, but they sense it. And are reaching out to touch it. They haven't got the knowledge, so they must do the best they can with faith...' "

miscellaneous regional info galaxy 1963 Simak, Clifford D. Way Station. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Robert Bentley, Inc. (reprinted 1979; copyright 1963); pg. 72. "The Talisman could be operated only by certain beings with certain types of minds and something else besides (could it be, he wondered, with certain types of souls?). 'Sensitives' was the word he had used in his mental translation of the term for these kinds of people, but... could not be sure if the word came close to fitting. The Talisman was placed in the custody of the most capable, or the most efficient, or the most devoted (whichever it might be) of the galactic sensitives, who carried it from star to star in a sort of eternal progression. And on each planet the people came to make personal and individual contact with the spiritual force through the intervention and agency of the Talisman and its custodian.... The assurance would be there, he thought, the assurance that life had a special place in the great scheme of existence, that one, no matter how small, how feeble, how insignificant, still did count for something in the vast sweep of space and time. "
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 1963 Simak, Clifford D. Way Station. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Robert Bentley, Inc. (reprinted 1979; copyright 1963); pg. 71-72. "But his mind went back to that strange business of the spiritual force and the even stranger machine which had been built eons ago, by means of which the galactic people were able to establish contact with the force. There was a name for that machine, but there was no word in the English language which closely approximates it. 'Talisman' was the closest, but Talisman was too crude a word... The Talisman was more than a talisman and the machine which had been given the name was more than a mere machine. Involved in it, as well as certain mechanical concepts, was a psychic concept, perhaps some sort of psychic energy unknown on Earth. That and a great deal more. He had read some of the literature on the spiritual force and on the Talisman and had realized, he remembered, in the reading of it, how far short he fell, how far short the human race must fall, in an understanding of it. "
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 1980 Adams, Douglas. The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. New York: Harmony Books (1980); pg. 128. "Here is a sample:

The Universe--some information to help you live in it.

1. AREA: Infinite...

4. POPULATION: None.

It is known that there are an infinite number of worlds, simply because there is an infinite amount of space for them to be in. However, not every one of them is inhabited. Therefore, there must be a finite number of inhabited worlds. Any finite number divided by infinity is as near to nothing as makes no odds, so the average population of all the planets in the Universe can be said to be zero. From this it follows that the population of the whole Universe is also zero, and that any people you may meet from time to time are merely the products of a deranged imagination. "

miscellaneous regional info galaxy 1980 Adams, Douglas. The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. New York: Harmony Books (1980); pg. 127. "Here is a sample:

The Universe--some information to help you live in it.

1. AREA: Infinite.
The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy offers this definition of the word 'Infinite.'

Infinite: Bigger than the biggest thing ever and then some. Much bigger than that in fact, really amazingly immense, a totally stunning size, real 'wow, that's big,' time. Infinity is just so big that by comparison, bigness itself looks really titchy. Gigantic multiplied by colossal multiplied by staggeringly huge is the sort of concept we're trying to get across here.

2. IMPORTS: None.
It is impossible to import things into an infinite area, there being no outside to import things from.

3. EXPORTS: None.
See Imports. "

miscellaneous regional info galaxy 1981 Dick, Philip K. "The Alien Mind " in I Hope I Shall Arrive Soon. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1985; c. 1981); pg. 104. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 1982 Miller, Calvin. Guardians of the Singreale. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1982). Back cover book description: "Guardians of the Singreale carries us into a beautiful land imperiled by arcane evils and the tragic conflict between two proud, ancient races. Caught in the struggle are Raccoman, inventor of the 'Paradise Falcon'; Velissa, his noble and heroic bride; and the treacherous, power-mad Parsky, creator of the monstrous Iron Destroyer. Master storyteller Calvin Miler plunges us into a world of high romance, alien beasts, strange magic, unearthly splendor, and the awesome power of the Singreale, which holds the balance of good and evil and decides the destiny of a world. " [This novel is a fantasy, and takes place on another world. It was written by a Baptist minister and was later published by a Baptist publishing house, so it likely has Baptist ethics and allegory. But it has no explicit references to any actual Earth religious groups.]
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 1992 Foster, Alan Dean. The False Mirror. New York: Ballantine (1992); pg. 259. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 1995 Aldiss, Brian. "Galaxy Zee " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001); pg. 181. [The entire story is about a civilization has spread to fill its galaxy.] "Autumn. Autumn had come to Galaxy Zee. On a million million uninhabited plants, trees of all varieties turned their blacks to a freshening wind and shed leaves like sepia tears. On a million million inhabited planets, where trees were permitted, there too those trees which lived their lives out in the stony solitude of streets, sent their browned tears bowling down the highways to Distribution Centres. In those centres they would be machine-masticated into nourishment for the huddled poor. The huddled poor would struggle to comfort themselves against the new chill in a million million atmospheres.

...Where would they run to, these paupers? Not to another planet. Planet A resembled Planet B resembled Planet C resembled Planet D, right through a million million alphabets. All planets had been terraformed alike. All lifestyles were alike. "

miscellaneous regional info galaxy 2069 Clarke, Arthur C. The Fountains of Paradise. New York: Ballantine (1980; 1st ed. 1978); pg. 92. Pg. 92: "...the Starholmers had managed a rough classification of cultures according to their standards of technology--perhaps the only objective basis possible. Humanity was interested to discover that it came in Category Five on a scale that used these approximate stages: 1. Stone tools. 2. Metals, fire. 3. Writing, handicrafts, ships. 4. Steam power, basic science. 5 Atomic energy, space travel... Six, characterized by the ability to convert matter competely into energy, and to transmute all elements on an industrial scale. "; Pg. 94: "'Behavior of the type you call religious occurred among 3 of the 15 known Category One cultures, 6 of the 28 Category Two cultures, 5 of the 14 Category Three cultures, 2 of the 10 Category Four cultures, and 3 of the 174 Category Five cultures. You will appreciate that we have many more examples of Category Five, because only they can be detected over astronomical distances.' "
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 2070 Dick, Philip K. "Oh, to Be a Blobell " in The Preserving Machine. New York: Ace Books (1969; c. 1964); pg. 214. [nothing to index]
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 35. "'Planet Tarot?'

'As you know, Earth has colonized something like a thousand habitable worlds in the current matter transport program. One of these is named Tarot...' "

miscellaneous regional info galaxy 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 76. "With a thousand colony planets and perhaps five major settlements per world to keep track of--well, that was about five billion people, over half of Earth's pre-exodus population. "
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 2100 Laumer, Keith. "The Last Command " in A Pocketful of Stars (Damon Knight, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971; c. 1966); pg. 217. [Nothing to index.]
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 2102 Heinlein, Robert A. Starship Troopers. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1959); pg. 17. ['Skinnies' are the soldiers' nickname for an alien race the Earth-based humans are at war with, and are attacking in this scene, on one of the skinny planets.] "I decided to go through the next couple of buildings instead of over. So I grabbed the heavy flamer off my back as I hit and flipped the snoopers down ove rmy eyes, tackled a wall in front of me with a knife beam at full power. A section of wall fell away and I charged in.

And backed out even faster.

I didn't know what it was I had cracked open. A congregation in church--a skinny flophouse--maybe even their defense headquarters. All I knew was that it was a very big room filled with more skinnies than I wanted to see in my whole life.

Probably not a church, for somebody took a shot at me as I popped back out... "

miscellaneous regional info galaxy 2110 May, Julian. The Many Colored Land in The Many-Colored Land & The Golden Torc (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1981); pg. 29. "But unfortunately for Stein Oleson, human cultural savagery was extinct in the Galactic Age, mourned only by a few ethnologists, and the subtleties of the new mental barbarians were beyond Stein's power to grasp. This exciting and dangerous job of his had been vouchsafed him by a compassionate computer, but his soul-hunger remained unsatisfied. He had never considered emigrating to the stars; on no human colony anywhere in the galactic Milieu was there a primal Eden. The germ plasm of humanity was too valuable to fritter in neolithic backwaters. Each of the 738 new human worlds was completely civilized, bound by the ethics of the Concilium, and obligated to contribute toward the slowly coalescing Whole. People who hankered after their simpler roots had to be content with visiting the Old World's painstaking restorations of ancient cultural settings, or with the exquisitely orchestrated Immersive Pageants... "
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 2125 Clarke, Arthur C. "Rescue Party " in The Sentinel. New York: Berkley Books (1983; c. 1946); pg. 24. [At end of story, an advanced alien race is observing humans, and referring to a galactic civilization.] "'...Remember, this is the youngest civilization in the Universe. four hundred thousand years ago it did not even exist. What will it be a million years from now?... I wonder what they'll be like?' he mused. 'Will they be nothing but wonderful engineers, with no art or philosophy? They're going to have such a surprise when Orostron reaches them--I expect it will be rather a blow to their pride. It's funny how all isolated races think they're the only people in the Universe. But they should be grateful to us; we're going to save them a good many hundred years of travel.'

'You know,' he said to Rugon, 'I feel rather afraid of these people. Suppose they don't like our little Federation?'

...'Something tells me they'll be very determined people,' he added. 'We had better be polite to them. After all, we only outnumber them about a thousand million to one.' "

miscellaneous regional info galaxy 2150 Dickson, Gordon R. The Magnificent Wilf. New York: Baen (1995)

[Book jacket] "When Earth is contacted by galactic civilization, our heroic couplet--diplomat Tom Parent, and his linguist wife, Lucy--prove themselves to be just the pair to tour the galaxy representing Earth and learning the whys and wherefores of galactic civilization. There's only one tiny catch to this grand tour--on Tom and Lucy's performance hinges our acceptance by the rest of the galaxy as a civilized world rather than as ward of some more 'advanced' species. (You don't want Earth to become a Galactic ward.) In the normal run of events this would be fine, because Tom and Lucy are the kind of folks any race might be proud to have represent them. The trouble is that while Tom is a regular fellow, Lucy is--or may be--a Wilf. And Magnificent or not, you know what that means. . . . "
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 2150 Dickson, Gordon R. The Magnificent Wilf. New York: Baen (1995)

; pg. 15.

"'Mind bending--isn't it?' said Domango, smiling. 'We were still hiding in caves when they were out among the stars. If all the forty-three Races who have seats as Representatives on the Council for our Galactic Sector, on Cayahno, were as mature, as helpful, and as--according to the Sector Charter, at least--as civilized as the Oprinkians are, our being in the same Sector wouldn't be as worrisome as it could be, now. The fact of the matter is the Council contains a few of what the Oprinkians would politely consider barely civilized Races. That description applies to us, too, of course; and these others have been admitted to knowledge of galactic civilization simply because once in a millennium inevitably some problem occurs where all the Races in that Sector have to work together.' "
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 2180 Dick, Philip K. "If There Were No Benny Cemoli " in The Preserving Machine. New York: Ace Books (1969; c. 1963); pg. 169. [nothing to index]
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 2198 Panshin, Alexei. Rite of Passage. New York: Ace Books (1973; first ed. 1968); pg. 204. "'It seems like slavery, drugging them and all.'

Mr. Kutsov said gently. 'Only God can decide a question like that. Be it slavery to use my horses to work for me? I don't know anyone who would say so. A man be a different matter, though. The question be whether a Losel be like a horse, or like a man, and in all truth I can't answer...' "

miscellaneous regional info galaxy 2198 Panshin, Alexei. Rite of Passage. New York: Ace Books (1973; first ed. 1968); pg. 8-9. "There are three major holidays here in the Ship, as well as several minor ones. On August 14, we celebrate the launching of the Ship--last August it was one hundred and sixty-four years ago. Then, between December 30 and January 1 we celebrate Year End. Five days of no school, no tutoring, no work. Dinners, decorations hung everywhere, friends visiting, presents, parties. Every fourth year we tack on one more day. These are the two fun holidays.

March 9th is something different. That's the day that Earth was destroyed and it isn't the sort of thing you celebrate. It's just something you remember.

From what I learned in school, population pressure is the ultimate cause of every war. In 2041... "

miscellaneous regional info galaxy 2266 Anderson, Poul. "Appendix A: Design for Two Worlds " in Murasaki (Robert Silverberg, ed.) New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 260. "A.D. 2266 Japanese ship arrives

A.D. 2286 Earliest date when radioed reports from Spacer ship can be received in Earth system.

Ad lib: Other expeditions launched from space or Earth, arriving whenever you like after A.D. 2266...

LIFE ON EARTH

At this point in the future there are nearly 20 billion human beings alive. Nineteen billion of them on Earth itself. Some 20 million people live in sealed-in lunar and Martian colonies; all the rest, nearly a billion in all, live in O'Neill-type orbiting habitats. Each habitat has an average population of 100,000, and there are nearly 10,000 habitats somewhere in solar space. "

miscellaneous regional info galaxy 2300 Bujold, Lois McMaster. Falling Free. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1991; first pub. 1988); pg. 70. [Characters in book use a moderate amount of profanity, usually generic references to God. This reflects the monotheistic background of their heritage. Interestingly, there does not appear to be any explicitly Christian profanity.] Pg. 70: "For God's sake make it look smooth, Van Atta had instructed Leo urgently... "; Pg. 99: "'Nelson, for God's sake call the medical squad...' "; Pg. 100: "'Oh, thank God,' said the medtech, turning to Leo. 'At last, somebody knows what the hell they're doing...' "; Pg. 118: "Leo closed his eyes in pain. 'God,' he asked, 'why me?' "; Pg. 277: "Now--oh, God--if only the TNM hadn't all been used by somebody... "
miscellaneous regional info galaxy 2300 Bujold, Lois McMaster. Falling Free. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1991; first pub. 1988); pg. 135. "'...I thought for sure the nurses were going to question our talking to Tony, but evidently they all think Minchenko is God, there. We just blasted right through and were on our way out...' "


miscellaneous regional info, continued

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