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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Zionism, USA

Zionism, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Zionism Virginia 1980 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 278. Pg. 278, 337.
Zionism Washington, D.C. 1980 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 253. -
Zionism world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 115-116. "'We have found their passports. They are all Israeli citizens. That in itself is quite odd. Generally, Jews that old do not care to come to this country, for obvious reasons. However, there was an organization connected with the Zionist movement founded here in Ingolstadt on May 1, 1776. These elders of Zion might have assembled here to celebrate the anniversary.'

'Oh, yes... The Illuminati of Bavaria, wasn't it? I remember hearing about them when we first arrived here.'

'The organization was founded by an unfrocked Jesuit, and its membership consisted of freemasons, freethinkers, and Jews...'

'And this organization was behind the Zionist movement, you say?'

...'...Zionism was a logical development out of the situation of the Jews during the last hundred years. One need not imagine some group of illuminated ones thinking it up and promulgating the movement for devious reasons of their own...' "

Zionism world 1988 Godwin, P. Waiting for the Galactic Bus. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 25. "More and more people arrived, prejudiced as Augustine. Barion was forced to subdivide his nebulous domain into different realities. Pagans were no problem as long as they had sunlight and greenery, nor the Jews so long as they could suffer and argue and Hasidim didn't ahve to deal with the new Zionists. "
Zionism world 1999 Banks, Iain. The Business. New York: Simon & Schuster (1999); pg. 98. "According to which one [Web site] you choose to believe, we [the Business] are either:... an even more extreme, hideous and sinister branch of the International Zionist Conspiracy (in other words, the Jews) "
Zionism world 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 271. "Organizations publicly claiming responsibility included the Earth-Firsters, the Red Army Faction, the Islamic Jihad..., the Secret Army of the Kuomintang, the Zionist League, the Party of God... "
Zionism world 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 147. "Of course, it's possible to enjoy the traditions of religion--the ceremonies, the ties with the past--without believing in God. After all, as one of my Jewish friends has been known to observe, the only Jews who survived World War II were either now atheists or hadn't been paying attention.'

But, in fact, there are millions of Jews who believe--really believe--in God (or G-d); indeed, secular Zionist Judaism was on the wane while formal observance was rising. "

Zobop Haiti 1986 Miller, John J. "Beasts of Burden " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 46. "The woman shook her head and made tsking sounds. 'You shouldn't have run off like that. It caused quite a bit of trouble and worry for us. We thought that the zobop column might capture you again.'

'Zobop? What's a zobop?' It sounded to Chrysalis like a term for some kind of jazz aficionado. It was all she could do to keep from laughing hysterically at the thought.

'Zobop are'--the woman gestured vaguely with her hands as if she were trying to describe an enormously complicated subject in simple words-- 'the assistants of a bokor--an evil sorcerer--who have sold themselves to the bokor for material riches. They follow his bidding in all things, often kidnapping victims chosen by the bokor.' " [May be other refs. not in DB.]

Zobop Haiti 1986 Miller, John J. "Beasts of Burden " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 52. "It was a rather simple plan. Two Bizango chasseurs--men with a rank of hunter in the Bizango, Mambo Julia explained--would dress in the zobop robes and masks that they'd captured earlier that evening, bring Chrysalis to Calixte's fortress, and tell him that they tracked her down in the forest. " [Also pg. 53-54.]
Zoroastrian Africa 2008 McDonald, Ian. Evolution's Shore. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1995); pg. 172. "'You're right. The stars aren't out anymore. They never were. Something got there before us, before we ever existed.'

'I suppose we could hold hands and whistle Thurs Spake Zarathustra?' Gaby suggested. "

Zoroastrian Asia 1980 Anthony, Piers. Vision of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (1985; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 38. "The source religion of Western Asia is unknown, but certain similar themes run through Buddhism, Brahmanism and Hinduism of India, and Mithraism, Zoroastrianism and Judaism of Asia Minor, suggesting that there was once a common body of information. "
Zoroastrian California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 77. Pg. 76-77: "'What's C.E.'?'

'Common Era. The designation replaces A.D. Valentinus's Gnosticism is the more subtle branch as opposed to the Iranian, which of course was strongly influenced by Zoroastrianism dualism...' "

Zoroastrian California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 112. "Being eclectic in terms of his theology, Fat listed a number of saviors: the Buddha, Zoroaster, Jesus and Abu Al-Qasim Muhammad Ibn Abd Allah Abd Al-Muttalib Ibn Hashim (i.e. Muhammad). Sometimes he also listed Mani... The sifting bridge of Zoroastrianism had been set up, by means of which good souls (those of light) became separated from bad souls (those of darkness). " [More]; Pg. 124: "We are all wounded and we all need a physician--Elijah for the Jews, Asklepios for the Greeks, Christ for the Christians, Zoroaster for the Gnostic, the followers of Mani, and so forth. " [Also pg. 123, 159, 165, 222.]
Zoroastrian California 1971 Matheson, Richard. Bid Time Return. New York: Viking Press (1975); pg. 8. Pg. 7-8: "The Music Center. Stunning place. Went there a week or so ago... Mahler's Second Symphony. Mehta did a brilliant job. When the chorus came in softly in the final movement, I began to tingle. " [Mehta, the conductor, is a Zoroastrian.]
Zoroastrian California 1975 Dick, Philip K. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. New York: Timescape Books (1982); pg. 72. "This same kind of absolute foreknowledge is or was considered by the Zoroastrians to be an attribute of God, the Wise Mind.' "
Zoroastrian California 1975 Dick, Philip K. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. New York: Timescape Books (1982); pg. 80. "'...They ate anokhi and they drank anokhi and, as a result, they became anokhi. They became God Himself.'

'Which is what Christianity teaches,' I said, 'regarding the Mass.'

'There are parallels found in Zoroastrianism,' Tim said. 'The Zoroastrians sacrificed cattle and combined this with an intoxicating drink called haoma. But there is no reason to assume that this resulted in a homologizing with the Deity. That, you see, is what the Sacraments achieve for the Christian communicant: he--or she--is homologized to God as represented in and by Christ...' "

Zoroastrian California 1975 Dick, Philip K. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. New York: Timescape Books (1982); pg. 83. Pg. 83: "'...What else does it say about the Expositor?'

'He returns in the Final Days and acts as Eschatological Judge.'

'That's fine,' I said.

'That's found in Zoroastrianism, also,' Tim said. 'So much seems to go back to the Iranian religions . . . the Jews developed a distinct Iranian quality to their religion during the time . . .' ";

Pg. 122: "'Nothing.' She walked toward the bedroom. 'I'll finish transcribing it. It wouldn't be a good idea if you--I don't know why we have to keep going into this. Promise me you won't launch into one of your tirades about the Zoroastrians.'

Faintly but firmly, Tim said, 'If I'm to trace the origins of Patristic thought--'

'I don't think the Lions want to hear about the desert fathers and the monastic life in the second century.' "

Zoroastrian California 2051 Niven, Larry & Steven Barnes. Dream Park. New York: Ace (1981); pg. 40. "'What's it like to die?'

'Cold.'

'Cold?'

'Persian hell is cold,' said Chris.

Ollie piped up. 'That would be Zoroastrian. Early Persian.' "

Zoroastrian California: Los Angeles 1993 DeChance, John. MagicNet. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 173. "'You said his big crotchet was Persian magic?'

'Yeah, he's really into esoteric stuff. Zoroastrianism.'

I scooped up some sand. 'Another subject I don't know much about, and what I've read is mostly forgotten.'

'I don't know much either. I know he spent time in Iran on an archaeological dig, before that country got to be a dangerous place for Westerners. Must have been in his undergraduate days.'

I let the sand run through my fingers. 'Then the magic that Merlin works is Zoroastrian?'

Jill thought about it. 'I think he's combined some systems. Grant would know, since Grant works in the same system.'

' 'Ragnarok' isn't a name from Persian mythology. Scandinavian.'

'As I said, you can combine mythologies.' "

Zoroastrian California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 182. "Kootie's parents had told him all about Rama and Koot Hoomie and Zorro-Aster and Jiddu Krishnamurti... "
Zoroastrian California: San Francisco 1977 Leiber, Fritz. Our Lady of Darkness. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1977); pg. 73. "But White was certainly Cal's adjective; all right, no Lady of Darkness, but a Lady of Light and in eternal opposition to the other, yang to its yin, Ormadz to its Ahriman--yes, by Robert Ingersoll! "
Zoroastrian California: San Francisco 2036 Besher, Alexander. Mir: A Novel of Virtual Reality. New York: Simon & Schuster (1998); pg. 154. "'Dieter?'

'Ja. Who's this?'

'Tattoo Alpha Zoroaster.'

'Taz?' "

Zoroastrian Europe 1478 C.E. Ford, John M. The Dragon Waiting. New York: Timescape Books (1983); pg. 55. "For a terrible, weak-kneed instant Dimi thought he would not be able to speak, but the strength came. 'You are Mithras, and you must slay the bull.'

The hand held him. 'Who says this? Are you a messenger of Ahriman, who would have the bull destroyed?'

'I bring orders form the Sun,' Dimitrios said. 'He says the bull must die.'

'Then it is done,' said the voice of Mithras, and though Dimi had been taught the legend well... " [More about Mithraism, which has absorbed some names and concepts from Zoroastrianism.]

Zoroastrian galaxy 2049 Blish, James. A Case of Conscience. New York: Ballantine (1979; c. 1958); pg. 72. "'...Neither would a Taoist. Neither would a Zoroastrian, presuming that there were still such...' "
Zoroastrian galaxy 2250 Dick, Philip K. A Maze of Death. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1970); pg. 205. "What did we make up? he asked himself blearily. The entire theology, he realized. They had fed into the ship's computer all the data they had in their possession concerning advanced religions. Into T.E.N.C.H. 889B had gone elaborate information dealing with Judaism, Christianity, Mohammedanism, Zoroastrianism, Tibetan Buddhism . . . a complex mass, out of which T.E.N.C.H. 889B was to distill a composite religion, a synthesis of every factor involved. "
Zoroastrian galaxy 4000 Harrison, Harry. Bill, the Galactic Hero. New York: Avon (1975; c. 1965); pg. 137. Pg. 137: "By Ahriman, he had forgotten that he was a spy for the G.B.I.... "
Zoroastrian galaxy 4000 Harrison, Harry. Bill, the Galactic Hero. New York: Avon (1975; c. 1965); pg. 26. Pg. 26: "'My folks were Fundamentalist Zoroastrian, so I suppose . . .'

'Superstition, my boy, rank superstition. It was the hand of fate that brought us together in this ship, that your soul would have this one chance to be saved from the fiery pit...' "

Zoroastrian galaxy 4000 Harrison, Harry. Bill, the Galactic Hero. New York: Avon (1975; c. 1965); pg. 36. [1] "'...But I see you are troubled. May I ask if you are of the faith?'

'Which faith is that?'

'That's what I'm asking you!' the chaplain snapped... 'How can I help you if I do not know what your religion is?'

'Fundamentalist Zoroastrian.'

The chaplain took a plastic-covered sheet from a drawer and ran his finger down it. 'Z . . . Z . . . Zen . . . Zodomite . . . Zoroastrian, Reformed Fundamentalist, is that the one?'

'Yes, sir.'

'Well, should be no trouble with this, my son . . . 21-52-05 . . .' He quickly dialed the number on a control plate set into the desk; then, with a grand gesture and an evangelistic gleam in his eye, he swept all the laundry papers to the floor. Hidden machinery hummed briefly, a portion of the desk top dropped away and reappeared a moment later bearing a black plastic box decorated with golden bulls, rampant. 'Be with you in a second,' the chaplain said, opening the box. "

Zoroastrian galaxy 4000 Harrison, Harry. Bill, the Galactic Hero. New York: Avon (1975; c. 1965); pg. 36. [2] "First he [the chaplain] unrolled a length of white cloth sewn with more golden bulls, and draped this around his neck. He placed a thick, leather-bound book next to the box, then on the closed lid set two metal bulls with hollowed-out backs. Into one of them he poured distilled water from a plastic flak and into the other sweet oil, which he ignited. Bill watched these familiar arrangements with growing happiness.

'It's very lucky,' Bill said, 'that you are a Zoroastrian. It makes it easier to talk to you.'

'No luck involved, my son, just intelligent planning.' The chaplain dropped some powdered Haoma into the flame, and Bill's nose twitched as the drugged incense filled the room. 'By the grace of Ahura Mazdah I am an anointed priest of Zoroaster. By Allah's will a faithful muezzin of Islam, through Yahweh's intercession a circumcised rabbi, and so forth.' His benign face broke into a savage snarl. 'And also... the damned laundry officer.' His face cleared. "

Zoroastrian galaxy 4000 Harrison, Harry. Bill, the Galactic Hero. New York: Avon (1975; c. 1965); pg. 37. [3] "'But now, you must tell me your problem . . .'

'Well, it's not easy. It may be just foolish suspicion on my part, but I'm worried about one of my buddies. There is something strange about him. I'm not sure how to tell it . . .'

'Have confidence, my boy, and reveal your innermost feelings to me, and do not fear. What I hear shall never leave this room, for I am bound to secrecy by the oath of my calling. Unburden yourself.'

...The chaplain continued to nod, smiling, half-unconscious from the Haoma fumes. Finally he snapped out of it, blew his nose, and opened the thick copy of the Avesta. He mumbled aloud in Old Persian a bit, which seemed to brace him, them slammed it shut.

'You must not bear false witness!' he boomed, fixing Bill with piercing gaze and accusing finger.

'You got me wrong,' Bill moaned... 'He's done these things, I saw him use the watch. What kind of spiritual aid do you call this' "

Zoroastrian galaxy 4000 Harrison, Harry. Bill, the Galactic Hero. New York: Avon (1975; c. 1965); pg. 38. [4] "'Just a bracer, my boy, a touch of the old-time religion to renew your sense of guilt and start you thinking about going to church regular again. You have been backsliding!'

'What else could I do--chapel is forbidden during recruit training?'

'Circumstances are not excuse, but you will be forgiven this time because Ahura Mazdah is all-merciful.'

'But what about my buddy--the spy?'

'You must forget your suspicions, for they are not worthy of a follower of Zoroaster. This poor lad must not suffer because of his natural inclinations to be friendly, to aid his comrades, to keep himself pure, to own a crummy watch that goes click. And besides, if you do not mind my introducing a spot of logic--how could he be a spy? To be a spy he would have to be a Chinger, and Chingers are seven feet tall with tails. Catch?'

'Yeah, yeah,' Bill mumbled unhappily. 'I could figure that one out for myself--but it still doesn't explain everything . . .' "

Zoroastrian galaxy 4000 Harrison, Harry. Bill, the Galactic Hero. New York: Avon (1975; c. 1965); pg. 38. [5] "'It satisfies me, and it must satisfy you. If eel that Ahriman has possessed you to make you think evil of your comrade, and you had better do some penance and join me in a quick prayer before the laundry officer comes back on duty.'

This ritual was quickly finished, and Bill helped stow the things back in the box and watched it vanish back into the desk. He said good-bye and turned to leave. "

Zoroastrian Greece -479 B.C.E. Wolfe, Gene. Soldier of the Mist. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 259. Pg. 258-260: Ahuramazda
Zoroastrian Hyperion 2075 Anderson, Poul. "Scarecrow " in New Legends. Greg Bear (ed.) New York: Tor (1995); pg. 346. "A calm that would have been beyond him had come upon Bronya. 'Yes,' she murmured, 'you have a Manichaean kind of religion. Ormuzd and Ahriman, Law and Chaos, Light and Dark, forever at war. A very natural faith, here. . . . But that's all incomprehensible to you, isn't it? Never mind.' "
Zoroastrian Iran -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 4. "Have I not looked upon the holy fire, which is the face of Ahura Mazdah, the Wise Lord? I have also seen Persia and India and farthest Cathay. No other man alive has traveled in as many lands as I.

I am digressing... My grandfather in his seventy-fifth year used to talk for hours without ever linking one subject to another. He was absolutely incoherent. But then, he was Zoroaster, the prophet of Truth; and just as the One God that he served is obliged to entertain, simultaneously, every aspect of all creation, so did His prophet Zoroaster. The result was inspiring if you could ever make sense of what he was saying. " [Extensive references to Zoroastrianism through novel. Most other refs. not in DB. The main character is Zoroastrian, and the book refers to Zoroastrian history, scripture, doctrine, practice, etc.]

Zoroastrian Iran -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 6. "I am the last living grandson in the male line of Zoroaster, the prophet of the One God, Ahura Mazdah--in Greek, the Wise Lord. Since the Great King Darius converted to Zoroastrianism a half-century ago, the royal family has always treated our family with reverence, which makes me feel something of an imposter. After all, one cannot choose one's grandfather. "
Zoroastrian Iran -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 25. "At the beginning there was fire. All creation seemed to be aflame. We had drunk the sacred haoma and the world looked to be as ethereal and as luminous and as holy as the fire itself that blazed upon the altar.

This was in Bactria. I was seven years old. I stood next to my grandfather Zoroaster. In one hand, I held the ritual bundle of sticks and watched closely as Zoroaster lit the fire on the altar. As the sun set and the fire flared upon the altar, the Magians began to chant one of those hymns that Zoroaster had receive directly from Ahura Mazdah the Wise Lord. In my grandfather's thirtieth year, he had begged the wise Lord to show him how a man could practice righteousness in order to achieve a pure existence, now and forever. It was then that the miracle happened.

The Wise Lord appeared to Zoroaster... "

Zoroastrian Iran -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 25. "The Wise Lord told Zoroaster exactly what must be done in order that he--and all mankind--might be purified before the time of the long dominion. As the Wise Lord lit with fire the way of Truth that we must follow if we do not succumb to the lie, so Zoroaster and those who follow the true religion light the sacred fire in a sunless place.

I can still see the light from the fire altar as it illuminated the row of golden jars that held the sacred haoma. I scan still hear the Magians as they chanted the hymns in celebration of the Wise Lord. I can still remember the point at which they got in the hymn... "

Zoroastrian Iran -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 28. "The Magians are the hereditary priests of the Medusa and the Persians, just as the Brahmans are the hereditary priests of India. "
Zoroastrian Iran -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 30. "'...I did know that I wanted never to be a priest. A priest, mind you, not a Magian. Although all Magians are born priests, not all priests are Magians. Certainly, we Spitamas are not Magians...'

...'There is no higher task for anyone on earth--except for you. You are different. You were there. In the temple. You heard the voice of the Wise Lord.' Although my good fortune--if that is the phrase--in being present at the murder of Zoroaster has made me of permanent interest to all who follow the Truth and renounce the Lie, I sometimes think that my life might have been a good deal less complicated had I been born an ordinary Persian noble, unmarked by deity...' "

Zoroastrian Iran -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981), book jacket. Book jacket: "With this epic novel of the fifth century B.C. Gore Vidal returns to the genre of which he is an acknowledged master: great historical fiction... The fifth century was perhaps the most spectacular period in the history of mankind--the age of the Persian kings Darius and Xerxes, Anaxagoras, Socrates, Pericles, and of the first explorations into the human soul and the mysteries of the universe. Through Vidal's hero-narrator, Cyrus Spitama, grandson of the prophet Zoroaster, we witness at first hand the wonders of the epoch. "
Zoroastrian Kenya 2002 Bishop, Michael. No Enemy But Time. New York: Timescape (1982); pg. 383. "The Marakoi Pops broke into an up-tempo version of Thus Spake Zarathustra, and applause again filled the hall. "
Zoroastrian Mars 2059 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Red Mars. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 418. " 'No wonder Marxism is dead.'

'Well, sir actually a lot of people on Mars call themselves Marxists.'

'Sh--! They might as well call themselves Zoroastrians, or Jansenists, or Hegelians.'

'Marxists are Hegalian, sir.' "

Zoroastrian Mars 2110 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Green Mars. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 287. "'There is a group of Sufis in Elysium,' Dhu told them, 'who are exploring backwards to our roots in Mithraism an Zoroastrianism...' "
Zoroastrian Missouri: St. Louis 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 76. "Randy was telling him to 'fly like Superman.' The soundtrack went suddenly silent, and the rumbling music of Strauss' Also Sprach Zarathustra began. "
Zoroastrian Persia 500 C.E. Garfinkle, Richard. Celestial Matters. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 237. "'He wants no honor from us,' I said. I pointed to the frieze of the last emperor of Persia surrendering to Alexander. 'Mihradarius is a Zoroastrian fanatic. He is trying single-handedly to defeat the invaders who conquered his people and assimilated his religion a thousand years ago.' "
Zoroastrian Roman Empire 300 C.E. Anderson, Poul & Karen Anderson. The King of Ys: Roma Mater. New York: Baen (1986); pg. 15. "While they numbered under a score, they were of many sorts, not only soldiers but workmen, serfs, slaves. Rank on earth counted for nothing before Ahura-Mazda.

As it did not before the Lord of the Christians . . . but they welcomed women to their services, passed fleetingly through Gratillonius. His father, his brother, himself followed Mithras... "

Zoroastrian Roman Empire 300 C.E. Anderson, Poul & Karen Anderson. The King of Ys: Roma Mater. New York: Baen (1986); pg. 71. "He didn't think Ahriman would deign to employ mere spooks, and in any event they must flee from the light of Ahura-Mazda which Mithras bore. He could not understand why otherwise rational people had all those vague superstitions about Ys. " [Other refs. to Ahura-Mazda and Ahriman, figures from Zoroastrianism, not in DB. But in novel, these elements are apparently referred to in the context of Mithaism, which as absorbed them. Other refs. include pg. 274, 282-283, etc.]
Zoroastrian Roman Empire 300 C.E. Anderson, Poul & Karen Anderson. The King of Ys: Roma Mater. New York: Baen (1986); pg. 282. "'Above all Gods,' Gratillonius said, 'is Ahura-Mazda. He's also called Ormazd, Jupiter, Zeus, many names. Those don't mean much; He Is, the High, the Ever-Good.' He found himself slipping into the words of the Lion from whom he had received instruction. Well, they were doubtless better than any he could put together. 'Below all Gods is Ahriman, Evil, Chaos, maker of hell and devils and misery. The story of the world is the story of the war between Ahura-Mazda and Ahriman. So is the story of your soul, lad. They war for it the same as they do for the whole of Creation. But you don't have to stand by helpless. You can be a soldier yourself.' "
Zoroastrian United Kingdom 700 C.E. Vance, Jack. Lyonesse: Madouc. Lancaster, PA: Underwood-Miller (1989); pg. 2. "...while the Danaans introduced the more wholesome Aryan pantheon. With the Romans came Mithraism, Christianity, Parsh, the worship of Zoroaster, and a dozen other similar sects. "
Zoroastrian USA 1965 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 154. "'You dragged me to see 2001: A Space Odyssey five times the year it was at the Cinerama theater in Houston.' It was not an exaggeration. Muldorff had been obsessed with the movie and had insisted on his crewmates repeatedly seeing it with him. Before their flight, Dave had talked enthusiastically about smuggling an inflatable black monolith along only to 'discover it' buried under the lunar surface during one of their EVAs. A shortage of inflatable black monoliths had frustrated their plan so Dave had contented himself with having Mission Control awaken them at the end of each sleep period by playing the opening chords of Also Sprach Zarathustra. Baedecker had thought it mildly amusing the first few times. "
Zoroastrian USA 1993 DeChance, John. MagicNet. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 28. "FOR INSTANCE, THIS PROGRAM IS BASED IN PART ON A NECROMANTIC EVOCATION OF THE DEAD THAT DATES TO THE TIME OF THE FOUNDATION OF THE PERSIAN EMPIRE...

O GREAT MAGUS, PRAY TELL--WHAT... HAS ALL THIS TO DO WITH ANYTHING? "

Zoroastrian Virginia 1957 Dick, Philip K. The Cosmic Puppets. New York: Berkley Books (1983; c. 1957); pg. 133. [1] "And He--from the boiling suns. The hot flaming masses of gas that bubbled and hurled up streamers and ignited the darkness. Fiery shafts that penetrated the void, reaching, groping, pushing back the cold. Filling the emptiness with hot sound and motion. An eternal struggle. Sterile darkness, silence, cold, immobility, death, on one hand. And on the other, the flaming heat of life. Blinding suns, birth and generation, awareness and being.

The cosmic polarities.

'He is Ormazd,' Doctor Meade said.

'And it?'

'Out of darkness, filth and death. Chaos and evil. Seeking to destroy His law. His order and truth. Its ancient name is Ahriman.'

Barton was silent a moment. 'I suppose Ormazd will win, eventually.'

'According to the legend, He will triumph and absorb Ahriman. The struggle has gone on billions of years. It will certainly go on several billions more.'

'Ormazd the builder,' Barton said. 'Ahriman the wrecker.'

'Yes,' Meade said. "

Zoroastrian Virginia 1957 Dick, Philip K. The Cosmic Puppets. New York: Berkley Books (1983; c. 1957); pg. 134. [2] "'The old town is Ormazd's. Ahriman laid this layer of black fog, this distortion and illusion.'

Meade hesitated. 'Yes.'

Barton tensed himself; it was now or never. 'Where can we make contact with the Wanderers?' " [Many other refs. to Ahriman and Ormazd, dualistic gods of Zoroastrianism. Their conflict, set in a small Virginia town, is a central plot element of the novel, although they are not mentioned by name until near the end of the novel.

Zoroastrian Virginia 1957 Dick, Philip K. The Cosmic Puppets. New York: Berkley Books (1983; c. 1957); pg. 153. [1] "Far off, at the other end of the valley, he could make out the great bleak figure of Ahriman. The giant shape against the night sky, arms outstretched over them all, the cosmic wrecker. Where the hell was Ormazd? Barton craned his neck and tried to look up. Ormazd was supposed to be here; this ridge was about even with His kneecap. Why didn't He do something? What was holding Him back?

Below, the lights of the town winked. The fake town, the distortion Ahriman had cast, eighteen years ago, the day of the Change. The day Ormazd's great original plan had been monkeyed with, while He did nothing. Why did He let Ahriman get away with it? Didn't He care what happened to His design? Didn't it interest Him?

'It's an old problem,' Doctor Meade said, from the shadows. 'If God made the world, where did Evil come from . . .' "

Zoroastrian Virginia 1957 Dick, Philip K. The Cosmic Puppets. New York: Berkley Books (1983; c. 1957); pg. 154. [2] "'He just stands there,' Barton said futilely. 'Like a big carved rock. While we try like hell to fix things up the way He had them. You'd think He'd give us a hand.

'His ways are strange.'

'You don't seem to care particularly.'

'I care. I care so much I can't talk about it.' "

Zoroastrian Virginia 1957 Dick, Philip K. The Cosmic Puppets. New York: Berkley Books (1983; c. 1957); pg. 159. "Barton crushed golems and rats underfoot as he retreated, his tire iron swinging furiously. Ahriman was huge. In the shape of a human body it had been small, cut down to size. Now there was no holding it. Even as he watched, it grew. A bubbling, swelling mass of gray-yellow jelly. Particles of filth embedded in it. A tangled web of thick hair, clotted and dripping as the thing dragged itself forward. The hair quivered and twitched, sprouted and extended itself in all directions. Bits of the thing were deposited down the slope, the way it had come. Like a cosmic slug it left a trail of slime and offal as it went. " [More, not in DB, about 'Ahriman.' Mentioned by name pg. 160, 180, 184. Ormazd mentioned, pg. 170-176.]
Zoroastrian Virginia 1957 Dick, Philip K. The Cosmic Puppets. New York: Berkley Books (1983; c. 1957); pg. 172. "The plucking feelers of filth, the extensions of Ahriman, were sliding and oozing over the side of the slope, a few yards before him. they touched the charred corpses of rats and golems and snakes Ormazd had left behind, and then came on. They inched their way greedily toward Barton, but it was too late.

Barton crawled to a safe place, crouched, and held his breath. In the sky, the god Ormazd raced up to give battle. Ahriman snapped his extensions back like rubber bands, suddenly aware of danger. In an instant they closed, time too small to be known, distances too vast for human understanding.

The fragment, glimpsed by Barton's mortal eyes, indicated it was going to be quite a fight.

The outlines of the two gods were still dimly visible, as the sun left the mountains and began to illuminate the world.

They had grown fast. In the brief flash... the two gods had swept beyond the limits of the Earth... The whole universe shuddered. They met head-on, body to body... "

Zoroastrian Virginia 1957 Dick, Philip K. The Cosmic Puppets. New York: Berkley Books (1983; c. 1957); pg. 184. "This was Millgate as it would have been, had Ahriman never showed up. The struggle still continued throughout the universe, but in this one spot, the God of Light's victory was fairly clean-cut. Not absolutely complete, perhaps. But nearly so. "
Zoroastrian world -1249 B.C.E. Sterling, S. M. Island in the Sea of Time. New York: Penguin (1998); pg. 412. "She looked at her colleagues. 'There's a certain balance of denominational forces here that's pretty well unique. And we're in a world where, say, Islam or Buddhism is completely absent, even Zoroastrianism. No other what you might call competing higher religions.' "
Zoroastrian world -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 11. "'Indeed I do, Callias. We have that in common. Remember? I am also hereditary . . . torchbearer.'

'You are?' Callias has not much memory for recent information. 'Oh, yes. Of course. Fire-worship. Yes, very interesting, all that. You must let us watch one of your ceremonies. I'm told it's quite a sight. Particularly the part where the Arch-Magian eats the fire. That's you, isn't it?'

'Yes.' I no longer bother to explain to Greeks the difference between Zoroastrians and Magians. 'But we don't eat fire. We tend it. The fire is the messenger between us and the Wise Lord. The fire also reminds us of the day of judgment when each of us must pass through a sea of molten metal--rather like the real sun, if Anaxagoras' theory is true.'

'But then what happens?'...

I answered him, traditionally: 'If you have served the Truth and rejected the Lie, you will not feel the boiling metal. You will--' "

Zoroastrian world -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 15. "Magian ritual requires the exposure of the dead to the elements. As a good Zoroastrian, Amestris defied the Magians and ordered the dead youths buried. This was a calculated political gesture, demonstrating once again the victory of Zoroaster over the devil-worshipers. "
Zoroastrian world -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 21. "'But do you think that you yourself will continue in another fashion?' The young man seemed genuinely interested in what I thought, or, rather, what Zoroastrians think.

'We believe that all souls were created at the beginning by the Wise Lord. In due course, these souls are born once, and only once. On the other hand, in the east, they believe that a soul is born and dies and is born again, thousands and thousands of times, in different forms.' "

Zoroastrian world -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 22. "Democritus wants to know why the Wise Lord has gone to so much trouble. Why did he consent to the creation of evil? Because, Democritus, he had no choice. Whose choice was it? you ask. I have devoted my life to trying to answer that question... "
Zoroastrian world -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 145. "I give full credit to Zoroaster for showing mankind not only the oneness of deity but that simultaneous duality which is a necessary condition of true deity. Truth cannot be true without the Lie, and the Lie cannot be refuted without the True. In consequence, each human life is a battleground between the two. "


Zoroastrian, continued

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