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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Zen, galaxy

Zen, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Zen galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. 497. "...the religious beliefs dominant in the Imperium up to the time of Maud'Dib [include] The so-called Ancient Teachings--including those preserved by the Zensunni Wanderers... the Zen Hekiganshu of III Delta Pavonis... "
Zen galaxy 13500 Herbert, Frank. Dune. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co. (1965); pg. xxi. [Definitions in 'Terminology of the Imperium'] "ORANGE CATHOLIC BIBLE: the 'Accumulated Book,' the religious text produced by the Commission of Ecumenical Translators. It contains elements of most ancient religions, including the Maometh Saari, Mahayana Christianity, Zensunni Catholicism and Buddislamic traditions. " [bold added to emphasize applicable segments]; [Book has many references to 'Zensunni', most not in DB. This term is derived from 'Zen' (the branch of Buddhism) and 'Sunni' (the branch of Islam).]
Zen galaxy 13560 Herbert, Frank. Dune Messiah. New York: Ace (1987; c. 1969); pg. 91. Pg. 91: "'Zensunni philosopher,' Paul mused... 'You've examined your own role and motives?' ";

Pg. 92: "'Bondage, my Lord? The cleansed mind makes decisions in the presence of unknowns and without cause and effect. Is this bondage?'

Paul scowled. It was a Zensunni saying, cryptic, apt--immersed in a creed which denied objective function in all mental activity. Without cause and effect! Such thoughts shocked the mind. Unknowns! Unknowns lay in every decision, even in the oracular vision. ";

Pg. 94: "But then, how else could a Zensunni-mentat respond? Even in a ghola, a mentat could speak no less than the truth, especially out of Zensunni inner calm. This was a human computer, mind and nervous system fitted to the tasks relegated long ago to hated mechanical devices. To condition him also as a Zensunni meant a double ration of honesty... " [More, e.g., pg. 95-96, 163-165, 280, 325-327.]

Zen galaxy 13560 Herbert, Frank. Dune Messiah. New York: Ace (1987; c. 1969); pg. 295. "'The Zensunni approach to birth,' he said... 'is to wait without purpose in the state of highest tension. Do not complete with what is happening. To compete is to prepare for failure. Do not be trapped by the need to achieve anything. This way, you achieve everything.' "
Zen galaxy 13575 Herbert, Frank. Children of Dune. New York: Berkley (1976); pg. 113. "'But . . . I'm looking directly at you. Of course I see you!' She glared at him. His words reflected knowledge of the Zensunni Codex as she'd been taught it in the Bene Gesserit schools: play of words to confuse one's understanding of philosophy. " [Few other refs., e.g., pg. 377, 422.]
Zen galaxy 15200 Herbert, Frank. The Heretics of Dune. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1984); pg. 59. "Knowing that his councillors also recalled this catechism of the Great Belief, Waff reminded them of the Zensunni admonition.

'Behind such assumptions lies a faith in words that the powindah do no question. Only the Shariat question and we do so silently.'

His councillors nodded in unison.

Waff inclined his head slightly and continued: 'The act of saying that things exist that cannot be described in words shakes a universe where words are the supreme belief.'

'Powindah poison!' his councillors shouted.

He had them all now and Waff hammered home his victory by demanding: 'What is the Sufi-Zensunni Credo?'

They could not speak it but all reflected on it: To achieve s'tori no understanding is needed. S'tori exists without words, without even a name. " [Many other refs., not in DB, e.g. pg. 185, 297, 320.]

Zen galaxy 15200 Herbert, Frank. The Heretics of Dune. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1984); pg. 155. "'You are not amused,' she said. 'But cling to your doubts anyway. Doubt is necessary to a philosopher.'

'So the Zensunni assure us.'

'All mystics agree on it, Miles. Never underestimate the power of doubts. Very persuasive. S'tori holds up doubts and surety in a single hand.'

Really quite surprised, he asked: 'Do Reverend Mothers practice Zensunni rituals?' He had never even suspected this before.

'Just once,' she said. 'We achieve an exalted form of s'tori, total. It involves every cell.'

'The spice agony,' he said.

'I was sure your mother told you. Obviously, she never explained the affinity with the Zensunni.' "

Zen Georgia: Atlanta 2067 Bishop, Michael. Catacomb Years. New York: Berkley (1979); pg. 282. "Out into the storm, young woman. Never darken my endeavor for satori again. "
Zen Greece 1997 Preuss, Paul. Secret Passages. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 378. "Then Peter experienced a moment of . . . not bliss, exactly, but of happy comprehension. A Zen moment. He knew the feeling well enough not to cling to it, having experienced it only once before, in connection with a mathematical insight... "
Zen Greece: Crete 1997 Preuss, Paul. Secret Passages. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 179. "'It's exactly what happened to David Bohm... The Zen of the Tao, or whatever. Wooly Dancing Masters. all that metaphysical New Age crap.' "
Zen Hawaii 1994 Simmons, Dan. Fires of Eden. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1994); pg. 99. -
Zen Hawaii 2034 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. The Bones of Time. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 12. "She felt a brief stab of pain but ignored it. She'd feel better in a minute. She'd left the Zendo because she'd felt sick. She went every morning at 4:30 A.M., walking down dark Nuuanu to the corner Zen church, next to the Japanese Embassy. "; Pg. 9: "Honolulu: 2034 "
Zen Hawaii 2034 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. The Bones of Time. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 164. "The Japanese monks had tolerated her presence at the zendo, as they ought to have. But they must have been able to tell how very far she was from enlightenment "
Zen Idaho 2198 Bell, M. Shayne. Nicoji. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 62. [At Zen temple in Idaho Falls.] "Finally I stood up. 'Enough peace,' I said. 'Let's get out of here.' He wouldn't go. 'See you later,' I said. I carried my pillow to the reception room and told Jose adios. Sam vaced the wall for six hours and claimed that once I'd left he'd had a spiritual experience.

If he'd ruined the guns [end of flashback, now referring to their experience on the Nocoji planet], he'd have given both of us the ultimate in spiritual experiences. We'd have gotten to see what the life after this one was like.

I got the bowl of nicoji and took it to Sam.

'I don't want to eat,' Sam said. 'You killed those Nicoji.'

'We don't have anything else to eat but gagga raisins; and besides, you're mixing Hinduism with Mexican Buddhism. It won't work.' "

Zen Idaho 2198 Bell, M. Shayne. Nicoji. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 61-62. "Sam used to claim he wished he'd been born Japanese or Mongolian so he could understand the universe and not have a crippled Western mind. I'd gone with him once to a Zen temple in Idaho Falls. Jose Melendez, a wrinkled Mexican with a Fu Manchu mustache, met us at the door and bowed, had us sit on red mashed-down pillows, poured us tea in tiny cups, and trie to act movie-oriental. Sam donated siz dollars to the temple, and Jose looked at me as if he he expected me to donate something, too. I just poured myself more tea. The phone rang, and Jose went to answer it. Sam japped me in the ribs and told me no one ever pours his own tea and that I had to give Jose some money or he wouldn't give us a lecture. When Jose came back, I handed him three bucks which was more than I thought any lecture of his would be worth. "
Zen Idaho 2198 Bell, M. Shayne. Nicoji. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 61-62. [At Zen temple in Idaho Falls.] "Jose [Josť] shoved the money in his pocket and started lecturing Sam and me in bad English on patience and the necessity of drawing on one's inner resources in times of both calm and trouble. He talked for about three minutes. Then he had us carry our pillows to a back room and sit facing a bare, white wall. 'Sit aqui till you feel pacifico, at peace,' he said, and he left. I sat still for eight minutes then looked at Sam and started laughing. Sam didn't laugh, and he didn't smile. 'You're not taking this seriously, are you?' I asked. No answer. Sam just faced the wall and sat very still. My legs went to sleep after half an hour, and I had to kneel down. Then I put my legs straight out in front of me. "
Zen Illinois 1960 Simmons, Dan. Summer of Night. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1991); pg. 117. "...but mostly the boys and two girls took their baseball seriously and played I with the Zen-poem perfection of wordless concentration. "
Zen India 1967 Chayefsky, Paddy. Altered States. New York: Harper & Row (1978); pg. 19. "He had been interested in Buddhism and yoga lately, ever since he had been struck by the similarity in encephalographic patterns between his own tank states and those of yogis and Zen monks in meditation. "
Zen India: Calcutta 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 27. "'I quit in disgust when a fool professor would not accept my paper on Walt Whitman's debt to Zen Buddhism. An arrogant, parochial fool.' "
Zen Japan 1987 Shiner, Lewis. "Zero Hour " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 304. "He spent the mornings in meditation or study, going twice a week to a zen Shukubo across the bay in Chiba City. "
Zen Japan 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 304. "As they sped through the countryside, they talked about Usumi, the Abbot of the most Zen Buddhist monastery in Japan. A few years before, at ceremonies marking the fiftieth anniversary of the destruction of Hiroshima, Utsumi had delivered a speech that commanded worldwide attention. He was well connected in Japanese political life, and served as a kind of spiritual adviser to the ruling political party, but he spent most of his time in monastic and devotional activities.

'His father was also the abbot of a Buddhist monastery,' Sukhavati mentioned.

Ellie raised her eyebrows.

'Don't look so surprised. Marriage was permitted to them, like the Russian Orthodox clergy...' "

Zen Japan 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 305. "The Abbot's head was shaved, his garment a robe of black and silver. He greeted them in perfect colloquial English, and his Chinese, Xi later told her, turned out to be passable as well. The surroundings were restful, the conversation lighthearted. Each course was a small work of art, edible jewels. She understood how nouvelle cuisine had its origins in the Japanese culinary tradition. If the custom were to eat blindfolded, she would have been content. If, instead, the delicacies were brought out only to be admired and never to be eaten, she would also have been content. To look and eat both was an intimation of heaven.

Ellie was seated across from the Abbot and next to Lunacharsky. Others inquired about the species--or at least the kingdom--of this or that morsel. Between the sushi and the gingko nuts, the conversation turned, after a fashion, to the mission. "

Zen Japan 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 305. "'But why do we communicate?' the Abbot said.

'To exchange information,' replied Lunacharsky, seemingly devoting full attention to his recalcitrant chopsticks.

'But why do we wish to exchange information?'

'Because we feed on information. Information is necessary for our survival. Without information we die.'

...'I believe,' continued the Abbot, 'that we communicate out of love or compassion.'

...'Then you think,' she asked, 'that the Machine is an instrument of compassion? You think there is no risk?' "

Zen Japan 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 306. "'I can communicate with a flower,' he went on as if in response. 'I can talk to a stone. You would have no difficulty understanding the beings--that is the proper world?--of some other world.'

'I am perfectly prepared to believe that the stone communicates to you,' Lunacharsky said... 'But I wonder about you communicating to the stone. How would you convince us that you can communicate with a stone? The world is full of error. How do you know you are not deceiving yourself?'

'Ah, scientific skepticism.' The Abbot flashed a smile that Ellie found absolutely winning; it was innocent, almost childlike. "

Zen Japan 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 306. "'To communicate with a stone, you must become much less preoccupied. You must not do much thinking, so much talking. When I say I communicate with a stone, I am not talking about words. The Christians say, 'In the beginning was the Word.' But I am talking about a communication much earlier, much more fundamental than that.'

'It's only the Gospel of Saint John that talks about the Word,' Ellie commented--a little pedantically, she thought as soon as the words were out of her mouth. 'The earlier Synoptic Gospels say nothing about it. It's really an accretion from Greek philosophy...' "

Zen Japan 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 306. "'...What kind of preverbal communication do you mean?'

'Your question is made of words. You ask me to use words to describe what has nothing to do with words. Let me see. There is a Japanese story called 'The Dream of the Ants.' It is set in the Kingdom of the Ants. It is a long story, and I will not tell it to you now. But the point of the story is this: To understand the language of the ants, you must become an ant.'

'The language of the ants is in fact a chemical langauge,' said Lunacharsky, eyeing the Abbot keenly. 'They lay down specific molecular traces to indicate the path they have taken to find food. To understand the language of the ants, I need a gas chromatograph, or a mass spectromer. I do not need to become an ant.'

'Probably, that is the only way you know to become an ant,' returned the Abbot, looking at no one in particular. 'Tell me, why do people study the signs left by the ants?' "

Zen Japan 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 307. "'Well,' Ellie offered, 'I gues an entomologist would say that it's to understand the ants and ant society. Scientists take pleasure in understanding.'

'That is only another way of saying that they love the ants.' [said the Zen Abbot]

She suppressed a small shudder.

'Yes, but those who fund the entomologists say something else They say it's to control the behavior of ants, to make them leave a house they've infested, say, or to understand the biology of soil for agriculture. It might provide an alternative to pesticides. I guess you could say there's some love of the ants in that,' Ellie mused.

'But it's also in our self-interest,' said Lunacharsky. 'The pesticides are poisonous to us as well'

'Why are you talking about pesticides in the midst of such a dinner?' show Sukhavati from across the table.

'We will dream the dream of the ants another time,' the Abbot said softly to Ellie, flashing again that perfect, untroubled smile. "

Zen Japan 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 307. "Reshod with the aid of meter-long shoehorns, they approached their small fleet of automobiles, while the serving women and proprietess smiled and bowed ceremoniously. Ellie and Xi watched the Abbot enter a limousine with some of their Japanese hosts.

'I asked him [the Zen Abbot], If he could talk with stone, could he communicate with the dead?' Xi told her.

'And what did he say?'

'He said the dead were easy. His difficulties were with the living.' "

Zen Japan 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 312. "The Sufis, he explained after the evening with Abbot Utsumi, were to Islam what Zen was to Buddhism. Ahmadiyah proclaimed 'a jihad of the pen, not the sword.' "
Zen Japan 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 115. "The toolbox weighted fifteen pounds, was the size of a large breadbox, and had been lovingly assembled by Rizome craftsmen in Kyoto. Looking inside, with the gleam of chromed ceramic and neat foam sockets for everything, you could get a kind of mental picture of the guys who had made it--white robed Zen priests of the overhead lathe, guys who lived on brown rice and machine oil. . . . "
Zen Japan 2054 Dick, Philip K. & Ray Nelson. The Ganymede Takeover. New York: Ace Books (1967); pg. 212. [Watching Gus's broadcast.] "In Rome the Pope changed channels, searching for a good Italian western.

In Kyoto, Japan, a Zen master laughed himself into a fit of hiccups. "

Zen Japan: Hokkaido 1987 Shiner, Lewis. "Zero Hour " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 312. "'...In all the time I've been here I've only heard about one actual confirmed ace, a zen roshi up north on Hokkaido Island...'

...'I went looking for you after Wild Card Day. Your mother said you were going to a monastery.'

'I was. Then when I got here I heard about that monk, the one up in Hokkaido.'

'The ace.'

'Yeah. His name is Dogen. He can create mindblocks, a little like the Astronomer could, but not as drastic. He can make people forget things or take away worldly skills that might interfere with their mediation or--'

'Or take away somebody's wild card powers. Yours, for instance.'

'For instance.'

'Did you see him?'

'He said he'd take me in. But only if I gave up my power.' "

Zen Japan: Hokkaido 1987 Shiner, Lewis. "Zero Hour " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 321. "He couldn't seem to settle down. What he wanted was to talk to the roshi, Dogen. But Dogen was a day and a half away, and he would have to travel by airplane, train, bus, and foot to get there. Peregrine was grounded by her pregnancy, and he doubted Mistral was strong enough for a twelve-hundred-mile round trip. There was no way he could get to Hokkaido and back in time to help Hiram. " [More, pg. 321-322, 331.]
Zen Louisiana 1987 Geary, Patricia. Strange Toys. New York: Bantam (1989; c. 1987); pg. 91. "'The Buddha, for one thing.'

'My glorious Buddha!' Linwood was trying not to cry. 'That's a very Zen way of going, though, fire.'

'Regular people don't have Buddha's and they don't talk about 'Zen' and they don't have witches for sisters.' " [Also pg. 120, 125, 196, 239.]

Zen Mars 2114 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Green Mars. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 369. "All of Sabishii had been built in its signature Martian/Japanese style, and her neighborhood had the look of a Zen garden, all pines and moss scattered among polished pink boulders... The Sabishiians had all shaved their heads, and in their work jumpers looked like Zen monks... 'this fifth day of August, 2114.' "
Zen Mars 2128 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Blue Mars. New York: Bantam Books (1996); pg. 72. "some of the gardeners, Nanao said, worked according to the precepts of Muso Soseki, other according to other Japanese Zen masters... "
Zen Mars 2181 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Blue Mars. New York: Bantam Books (1996); pg. 500-501. "'A kind of enlightenment,' Michel guessed. 'Satori. Or epiphany. A mystical oneness with the universe. It's usually a short-lived phenomenon, I am told...'...'But it could be cultivated. Prepared for, I mean. That's what they do in Zen Buddhism, if I understand correctly.'

So she read some Zen texts. But they all made it clear; Zen was not information, but behavior. If your behavior was right, then the mystic clarity might descend; or might not. And even if it did, it was usually a brief thing, a vision.

She was too stuck in her habits for that kind of change in her mental behavior. She was not in the kind of control of her thoughts that could prepare for a peak experience. She lived her life, and these mental breakdowns intruded on her. Thinking about the past helped to trigger them, it seemed; so she focused on the present as much as she could. That was Zen, after all, and she got fairly good at it... "

Zen Mars 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 146. "For centuries after the death of Old Earth, Mars had been such a backwater planet that the WorldWeb had not established farcaster portals there--a desert planet of interest only to the orphans of New Palestine... to Zen Christians returning to Hellas Basin to reenact Master Schrauder's enlightenment at the Zen Massif. "
Zen Maryland 1965 Chayefsky, Paddy. Altered States. New York: Harper & Row (1978); pg. 3. "At the half-hour mark, rhythmical waves of 7-8/sec. appeared, and then, suddenly, rhythmical theta trains... began to appear. This EEG pattern was startlingly similar to that of Zen priests in meditation. "
Zen Massachusetts 1997 Lobdell, Scott & Elliot S. Maggin. Generation X. New York: Berkley (1997); pg. 186. "'Good old Synch, the Zen motorist.' Angelo clapped his friend on the back... "
Zen Mississippi 1980 Waldrop, Howard. "Ugly Chickens " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1980); pg. 481. "Behind the Krait house was a henhouse and pigsty where hots lay after their morning slop like islands in a muddy bay, or some Zen pork sculpture. "
Zen Nevada 1993 Simmons, Dan. The Hollow Man. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 249. "Bremen hadn't played cards since his college days... What he had not remembered was the Zen-like concentration that the game demanded. "
Zen New York: New York City 1976 Silverberg, Robert. Dying Inside. New York: Ballantine (1976; c. 1972); pg. 153. "...and onto one of her hobbyhorses. She was the first on the block to own the I Ching. She had done time inside orgone boxes. She believed that the Great Pyramid of Gizeh held divine revelations for mankind. She had sought deeper truths by way of Zen, General semantics, the Bates eyesight exercises, and the readings of Edgar Cayce. "
Zen New York: New York City 1981 Miller, John J. "Comes a Hunter " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 380. "He took a deep breath, held it, and let all thought drain from his mind. He was back in Japan again, facing Ishida, trying to answer the riddle the roshi has posed him when he had first sought entry to the monastery.

'A sound is heard when both hands are clapped. What is the sound of one hand clapping?'

Wordlessly Brennan had thrust forth one hand, clasped into a fist. Ishida had nodded, and Brennan's training began in earnest. He called upon that training now. He entered deeply into zazen, the state of mediation where he emptied himself of all thought, feeling, emotion, and expression. A timeless time passed and, as if from a long distance away, he heard Fortunato mutter, 'Extraordinary,' and he brought himself back.

Fortunato looked at him with [some] respect in his eyes. Chrysalis watched them both carefully.

'You're into Zen?' Fortunato asked.'

A humble student,' Brennan murmured, his voice sounding even to him as if coming from a distant mountain peak. "

Zen New York: New York City 1986 Miller, John J. "Only the Dead Know Jokertown " in Wild Cards V: Down and Dirty (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 34. "Brennan hung up after Whiskers gave him directions to the apartment. He stared at nothing for a moment, marshaling all his Zen training to calm his mind, to soothe his racing pulse. He needed calmness, not a brain drenched in hate, anger, and fear. Part of him wondered at his strong reaction to Whiskers's news. part of him knew the reason, but the biggest part told him to forget it for now, to bury it and examine it later. There was a way out of this mess . . . there had to be. . . .

He sunk his consciousness in the pool of being, seeking knowledge through perfect tranquility, and when he brought his mind back from zazen, he had his answer. It was Kien, and what he knew of the man, his fears, his strengths, his weaknesses. " [Brennan, who evidently practices Zen, is the main character of this story.]

Zen New York: New York City 1986 Miller, John J. "Only the Dead Know Jokertown " in Wild Cards V: Down and Dirty (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 36. "...his dark eyes haunted by memories of death and destruction that despite his Zen training, despite his dogged concentration, were never far from the surface of his thoughts. "
Zen New York: New York City 1988 Martin, George R. R. & John J. Miller. Wild Cards VII: Dead Man's Hand. New York: Bantam Books (1990); pg. 8. "He took a few minutes to cool down his breathing, then folded himself comfortably into a meditative posture and gazed out over the kare sansui, the raked gravel bed rippling like frozen water in the morning breeze. Nested in the gravel were three rock triads. Brennan spent a timeless time sunk in the pool of zazen, not studying the rocks, their shadows, or the patterns of the moss that grew on them, then stood smoothly, relaxed, refreshed and ready for the day. "
Zen New York: New York City 1991 Miller, John J. "And Hope to Die " in Wild Cards IX: Jokertown Shuffle (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 14. "The scene in the backyard was worse than Brennan had imagined. Tiny broken bodies violated the calm serenity of his Zen garden. " [Brennan, the story's main character, practices Zen. All refs. to Zen by name in DB, but other refs. to character are not.]
Zen New York: New York City 1991 Miller, John J. "And Hope to Die " in Wild Cards IX: Jokertown Shuffle (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 21. "Tachyon seemed to be speaking in riddles, but the years Brennan had spent in a Zen monastery made him used to that. Tachyon was making a koan, a Zen riddle designed to teach a subtle lesson about the nature of life. " [More.]
Zen New York: New York City 1991 Miller, John J. "And Hope to Die " in Wild Cards IX: Jokertown Shuffle (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 48. "There was a scene of him fighting some forgotten battle in some forgotten Asian country during his mercenary years and one of him practicing Zen archery in the temple with his roshi Ishida looking on. "
Zen New York: New York City 1991 Miller, John J. "And Hope to Die " in Wild Cards IX: Jokertown Shuffle (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 53. "Brennan felt totally serene. It surprised him. All of the hate and anger had been burned away, perhaps by the joy of finding Jennifer again. He wondered for a moment if somehow, some impossible way, he'd achieved enlightenment, the ultimate Zen goal of a totally self-realized man, then rejected that notion as farfetched. He was hardly worthy of such a state. "
Zen New York: New York City 2000 Silverberg, Robert. The Stochastic Man. New York: Harper & Row (1975); pg. 69. "Transit, of course, wasn't Hindu--more a mixture of Buddhism and fascism, actually, a stew of Zen and Tantra and Platonism and Gestalt therapy... "
Zen New York: New York City 2000 Silverberg, Robert. The Stochastic Man. New York: Harper & Row (1975); pg. 153. "All part of my training, it seemed. Existential masochism: the Zen approach to gambling. All right. Never ask questions. A week later he had me put a thou on 333, and I hit for a not-so-small fortune. "
Zen New York: New York City 2002 Friesner, Esther M. Men in Black II. New York: Ballantine (2002); pg. 30. Pg. 30: "though without giving in to conscious kitschiness. It was what it was--which was a pretty Zen attitude for a building to have--from the Art Deco lettering on its facade to the 1950s clip art adorning its menus. "; Pg. 234: "There were hints of an attempt at crafting a Zen garden, including one of those large, decorative rocks so popular during the 1980s heyday when all things Japanese were in. "
Zen New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 256. "'Her thoughts translate into my action. But, I'm like an arrow shot into water. She can see Her target through the ripples, but the water is deep and the current strong. The arrow doesn't always stay true to its course.'

...'Yeah, right. What is this, 'Zen and the Art of Mastering Freewill'?' More seriously, I added, 'But since we're on philosophy, riddle me this, Michael...' "

Zen Oregon 1989 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 208. "'by dreaming about it but not thinking about it,' he said.

'Right. Have you ever practiced any Zen meditation?'

'No,' said Baedecker.

'I did for a few years,' said Dave. 'The idea is to get rid of all the thinking so there's nothing between you and the thing. By not looking you're supposed to see clearly.'

'Did it work?'

'Nope,' said Dave, 'not for me. I'd sit there chanting my mantra or whatever and think about every damned thing in the universe. Half the time I'd have a hard-on from erotic daydreams...' "

Zen Oregon 2011 Brin, David. The Postman. New York: Bantam (1985); pg. 212. "It required a special, remote kind of concentration to move this way in the near-total darkness . . . a zenlike exercise that was elevating--as detached but more active than that sunset meditation two days ago... "
Zen Oregon: Portland 2002 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Lathe of Heaven. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1971); pg. 54. "It feeds a 9-cycle alpha rhythm through appropriately placed electrodes, and within seconds the brain can accept that rhythm and begin producing alpha waves as steadily as a Zen Buddhist in trance. "
Zen T'ien Shan 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 365. "...the legendary Carl Linga William Eiheji, Zen archer, watercolorist, karate master, philosopher, former flyer, and flower arranger. Eiheji looks to be built of coiled steel wrapped about with pure muscle as he strides forward and fills the immense hall with his voice. "
Zen T'ien Shan 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 375. "'As we previously discussed, Cardinal Mustafa, our form of Buddhism has evolved since we landed on this mountain world. Now it is very much filled with the spirit of Zen. And one of the great Zen masters of Old Earth, the poet William Blake, once said--'Eternity is in love with the productions of time.' ' " [Other refs., not all in DB. See pg. 376-378, 398-401.]
Zen T'ien Shan 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 400. "'...Just as Zen is not a religion, but is religion, so that Void Which Binds is not a state of mind, but is the state of mind. "
Zen Tarot 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 126. "'...I have tried hatha yoga and zen meditation and read the Vedas, but never achieved any proper awareness of either prana or jiva...' "
Zen Texas: Dallas 1993 Shiner, Lewis. Glimpses. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 20. "It's like the Zen business where you're supposed to not think about a white horse, only it's impossible, you can't not think about something. "
Zen United Kingdom 1988 Adams, Douglas. The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul. New York: Simon and Schuster (1988); pg. 46. "...a tremendous propensity for getting lost when driving. This was largely because of his 'Zen' method of navigation, which was simply to find any car that looked as if it knew where it was going and follow it. The results were more often surprising than successful, but he felt it was worth it for the sake of the few occasions when it was both. "
Zen United Kingdom 2030 McAuley, Paul J. Fairyland. New York: Avon Books (1997; c 1995); pg. 35. "...George Gamow's classic, Mr. Tomkins Explores the Atom... It helped him define what he wanted to be; one of the mind tools he uses to engage in the zen-like deep hacking mode needed to work out his complex syntheses is to imagine himself as a nucleus at the heart of an atom, fat and happy and strong... "


Zen, continued

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