Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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witch, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
witch Utah 1991 Whipple, Maurine. "They Did Go Forth " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1991); pg. 16. "'You can't never tell what'll scare a witch!' "
witch Vermont 1986 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 43: "Getting Even ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Sep. 1986); pg. 14. Pg. 14: Empath's thoughts: "no way out through the window--it's a sheer drop! This feels like Earth . . . unless the witch is casting a spell to make me think so . . . and I'm really still here in her accursed Limbo. "; Pg. 17: Empath's thoughts: "The witch--Magic--she teleported him away! "
witch Washington, D.C. 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 5. Pg. 5: "I met them in Magic, Witchcraft, and Religion. A fitting place, that magician's grove within the enchanted forest that was the Divine... "; Pg. 6: "Beneath its walls wandered a weird profusion of nuns and rabbis and sikhs and friars, and others of even more dubious spiritual provenance: Hare Krishnas, earnest Moonies, witches and druids nouveaux. "; Pg. 116: "...I would escort her to Magic, Witchcraft and Religion. "; Pg. 128: "If you know anything at all about history, you can see the signs: there'll be these little isolated outbreaks, like the old religions that were persecuted as witchcraft during the Middle Ages, and again in Salem. The whole hippie movement in the 1960s, and some of this pagan revival stuff that's going on now. " [Also, pg. 27.]
witch Washington, D.C. 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 111. [faux newspaper article]

"

COLLEGE STUDENT SUICIDE
University Denies Involvement with Satanists, Blames Drugs

...But a high school friend of Harmon's, who refused to be identified, alleged that at college the former A-student had gotten involved with 'some kind of coven.' University officials, however, denied all charges of occult activity at the school... "

witch Washington, D.C. 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 130. Pg. 130: "'...All of a sudden all these things made sense--why they used to burn witches at the stake, why women aren't allowed to be priests or rabbis, why Christmas is a big deal, but Halloween is just for little kids...' "; Pg. 151: "'Christ, Annie, what do you think you could have done? Some kind of, of witchcraft, what could you have done about that! These people are crazy; Angelica is crazy and you think you could have stopped her?' "
witch Washington, D.C. 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 276. "'...the local media and the national news are talking about ritual murders. They're talking covens, they're talking witches, Satanic rites . . .'

...'Well, let them talk. Remember Freedom of Religion, Elspeth? Remember the Santeria Decision?'

...'This isn't about freedom of religion, Angelica! This is ritual murder--' "

witch Washington, D.C. 2014 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. Crescent City Rhapsody. New York: Tor (2001; c. 2000); pg. 70. "'Sure. Witch hunt...' "
witch Washington: Seattle 1998 Brooks, Terry. A Knight of the Word. New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 3. "The Wizard! The old man spits, his voice rising brokenly in the hissing sound of the rain. The Wizard of Oz! You are the one who killed him! I saw you! There, in the palace he visited, in the shadow of the Tin Woodman [sic], in the Emerald city! You killed the Wizard! You killed him! You! " [John Ross, the main character, dreams. Many refs. to the book/movie The Wizard of Oz throughout the novel. One of the main characters is nicknamed 'Wizard of Oz', or 'Wiz' for short (story takes place largely in Seattle, which is known as the Emerald City). Some refs. to actual magic, but no specific refs. to any 'witch.']
witch world -12000 B.C.E. Niven, Larry. "Not Long Before the End " in Nebula Award Stories Five (James Blish, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1972; 1st ed. 1970; story c. 1969); pg. 97. Pg. 97: "A swordsman battled a sorcerer, once upon a time.

In that age such battles were frequent. A natural antipathy exists between swordsmen and sorcerers, as between cats and birds, or between rats and men. Usually the swordsman lost, and humanity's average intelligence rose some trifling faction. Sometimes the swordsman won, and again the species was improved; for a sorcerer who cannot kill one miserable swordsman is a poor excuse for a sorcerer.

But this battle differed from the others. On one side, the sword itself was enchanted. On the other, the sorcerer knew a great and terrible truth.

We will call him Warlock, as his name is both forgotten and impossible to pronounce... " [Other refs. throughout story.];

Pg. 98: "So he thought. But some five decades later (the date was on the order of 12,000 B.C.)... "

witch world -5010 B.C.E. Tolkien, J. R. R. The Fellowship of the Ring. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1965); pg. 14. Pg. 14: "To the last battle at Fornost with the Witch-lord of Angmar they sent some bowmen... "; Pg. 17: "...in the recent centuries among Dwarves and such other folk, Rangers, Wizards, or wanderers... "; Pg. 18: "But even the Dunedain of Gondor allow us this credit: Hobbits first put it into pipes. Not even the Wizards first thought of that before we did. Though one wizard that I know took up the art long ago, and became as skillful in it as in all other things that he put his mind to. " [Many other references to magic throughout novel, as well as to witches and wizards specifically. Only a few examples in DB.]
witch world -5009 B.C.E. Tolkien, J. R. R. The Two Towers. New York: Ballantine (2000; c. 1954, 1965); pg. 89. [Actual year indeterminate. Part 2 of The Lord of the Rings.] "'Who is Saruman?' asked Pippin. 'Do you know anything about his history?'

'Saruman is a wizard,' answered Treebeard. 'More than that I cannot say. I do not know the history of wizards. They appeared first after the Great Ships came over the Sea; but if they came with the Ships I never can tell. Saruman was reckoned great among them, I believe. He gave up wandering about and minding the affairs of Men and Elves, some time ago--you would call it a very long time ago; and he settled down at Angrenost, or Isengard as the Men of Rohan call it. He was very quiet to begin with, but his fame began to grow. He was chosen to be the head of the White Council, they say; but that did not turn out too well. I wonder now if even then Saruman was not turning to evil ways. But at any rate he used to give no trouble to his neighbours...' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

witch world -5009 B.C.E. Tolkien, J. R. R. The Two Towers. New York: Ballantine (2000; c. 1954, 1965); pg. 137. "'The staff in the hand of a wizard may be more than a prop for age,' said Hama. He looked hard at the ash-staff on which Gandalf leaned. 'Yet in doubt a man of worth will trust to his own wisdom. I believe you are friends and folk worthy of honour, who have no evil purpose. You may go in.' "
witch world -5009 B.C.E. Tolkien, J. R. R. The Two Towers. New York: Ballantine (2000; c. 1954, 1965); pg. 175. "'...Strange help you bring. You are mighty in wizardry, Gandalf the White!'

'That may be. But if so, I have not shown it yet. I have but given good counsel in peril, and made use of the speed of Shadowfax. Your own valour has done more, and the stout legs of the Westfoldmen marching through the night.'

Then they all gazed at Gandalf with still greater wonder. Some glanced darkly at the wood, and passed their hands over their brows, as if they thought their eyes saw otherwise than his.

Gandalf laughed long and merrily. 'The trees?' he said. 'Nay, I see the wood as plainly as do you...'

'Then if not yours, whose is the wizardry?' said Theoden. 'Not Saruman's, that is plain. Is there some mightier sage, of whom we have yet to learn?'

'It is not wizardry, but a power far older,' said Gandalf: 'a power that walked the earth, ere elf sang or hammer rang...' "

witch world -5008 B.C.E. Tolkien, J. R. R. The Return of the King. New York: Ballantine (2000; c. 1955, 1965); pg. 20. [Actual year indeterminate. Part 3 of The Lord of the Rings.] Pg. 19: "Where are we, Gandalf?' he asked. "; Pg. 20: "'In the realm of Gondor,' the wizard answered. 'The land of Anorien is still passing by.' " [Many other references to wizards and witches throughout novel, not in DB.]
witch world -5008 B.C.E. Tolkien, J. R. R. The Return of the King. New York: Ballantine (2000; c. 1955, 1965); pg. 101. "'Yet now under the Lord of Barad-dur the most fell of all his captains is already master of your outer walls,' said Gandalf. 'King of Angmar long ago, Sorcerer, Ringwraith, Lord of the Nazgul, a spear in the hand of Sauron, shadow of despair.'

'Then, Mithrandir, you had a foe to match you,' said Denethor. 'For myself, I have long known who is the chief captain of the hosts of the Dark Tower. Is this all you have returned to say? Or can it be that you have withdrawn because you are overmatched?' " [More.]

witch world -5000 B.C.E. Tolkien, J. R. R. The Hobbit or There and Back Again. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1997; c. 1937, 1966); pg. 13. "By some curious chance one morning long ago in the quiet of the world, when there was less noise and more green, and the hobbits were still numerous and prosperous, and Bilbo Baggins was standing at his door after breakfast... Gandalf came by. Gandalf! If you had heard only a quarter of what I have heard about him, and I have heard but very little of all there is to hear, you would be prepared for any sort of remarkable tale... All that the unsuspecting Bilbo saw that morning was an old man with a staff. He had a tall pointed blue hat, a long grey cloak, a silver scarf over which his long white beard hung down below his waist, and immense black boots. " [Many other refs. to the wizard Gandalf, and other witches, wizards, and magical creatures, throughout story, not in DB.]
witch world -5000 B.C.E. Tolkien, J. R. R. The Hobbit or There and Back Again. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1997; c. 1937, 1966); pg. 14. "'Gandalf, Gandalf! Good gracious me! Not the wandering wizard that gave Old Took a pair of magic diamond studs that fastened themselves and never came undone till ordered? Not the fellow who used to tell such wonderful tales at parties, about dragons and goblins and giants and rescue of princesses and the unexpected luck of widow's sons? Not the man that used to make such particularly excellent fireworks! I remember those! Old Took used to have them on Midsummer's Eve. Splendid!... Not the Gandalf who was responsible for so many quiet lads and lasses going off into the Blue for mad adventures? Anything from climbing trees to visiting elves--or sailing in ships, sailing to other shores!... I beg your pardon, but I had no idea you were still in business.'

'Where else should I be?' said the wizard. 'All the same I am pleased to find you remember something about me...' "

witch world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragon Wing. New York: Bantam (1990) [Book jacket:] "Ages ago, sorcerers of unmatched power sundered a world into four realms--sky, stone, fire, and sea--then vanished. Over time the magic weakened. Magicians learned to work spells only in their own realms and forgot the others. Now only those few who have survived the Labyrinth and traversed the Death Gate know of the presence of all four realms . . . and even they have not unraveled all the mysteries of their severed world.

Dragon's Wing is the tale of Arianus, the Realm of Sky--a world of airborne islands where humans, elves, and dwarves battle for control of precious water... " [Many refs. to sorcerers and magic throughout novel, only a few examples in DB.]

witch world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragon Wing. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 2. "'Centuries ago, the Sartan thought to defeat our ambition by sundering the world that was ours by rights and throwing us into their prison. As you well know, the way out of the Labyrinth is long and tortuous. It took centuries to solve... something went wrong. Perhaps you'll discover what it was when you enter Death ate. It seems, from what I have been able to decipher in the old books, that the Sartan were to have monitored the Labyrinth and kept its magic in check. But, either through malicious intent or for some other reason, they forsook their responsibility as caretakers of our prison. The prison gained a life of its own--a life that knew only one thing, survival. And so, the Labyrinth, our prison, came to see us, its prisoners, as a threat...' "
witch world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragon Wing. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 11. "'Did he give you any trouble?' asked a well-formed man of perhaps forty cycles...

'None that I couldn't handle, Magicka,' said Gareth, subdued in the presence of the house magus.

The wizard nodded and--conscious of a vast audience--straightened to his full height and folded his hands ceremoniously over his brown velvet cassock; he was a land magus and so wore the colors of the magic he favored. He did not, however, wear in addition the mantle of royal magus--a title he had, according to rumor, long coveted but one which Lord Rogar, for reasons of his own, refused to grant. "

witch world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragon Wing. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 13. "'...And wasn't it strange, my dagger disappearing like that. As if by magic--'

The wizard lifted his hands. 'The ground quakes in fury at this man's blasphemy!' he shouted. the courtyard began to shake and tremble. Granite towers swayed. People cried out in panic... Magicka glared down his long nose at the captain of the knights... The Hand's gaze, however, never wavered or faltered, but remained fixed on the wizard, who was pale with fury.

'I have been patient,' said Magicka, breathing heavily, 'but I will not be subjected to such filth. I apologize to you, captain,' the wizard continued, shouting to be heard above the rumbling of the ground and the cries of the people. You were right. He will say anything to save his miserable life.'

Gareth grunted but did not reply. Magicka raised his hands placatingly and, gradually, the ground ceased to shake... "

witch world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragon Wing. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 28. "Once asleep, a dragon is extremely difficult and even dangerous to wake, for sometime during sleep the spells of submission and obedience which are cast over them can be accidentally broken and you've got a confused, irate, and loudly vocal creature on your hands. An experienced dragonrider never allows his animal to sleep unless he knows there is a competent wizard nearby. "
witch world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragon Wing. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 47. "'...due to its magical properties, the amulet cannot be removed unless the prince is'--here Trian faltered once again--'dead... Send us this amulet, and we will know . . .' His voice trailed off.

'What magic?' Hugh asked suspiciously.

But the wizard, pale as death, was silent, as death. He shook his head, whether physically unable to speak or refusing to answer, Hugh couldn't tell. At any rate, it was obvious he wasn't going to find any more about the prince or his amulet.

It probably didn't matter. Such magically blessed objects were commonly given to babes to protect them from disease or rat bites or keep them from tumbling headfirst into the firepit. Most of the charms, sold by roaming charlatans, had as much magical power in them as did the stone beneath Hugh's feet. A king's son, of course, was likely to have a real one, but Hugh knew of none--even those with true power--who could protect a person from, say, having his throat cut... "

witch world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragon Wing. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 190. Pg. 190: "Elven wizards possess the power to magically enhance ordinary silken thread, making it as hard and tough as steel. "; Pg. 191: "And the Bane saw the talismans. Worn around the elves' necks, the talismans were created by the elven wizards to protect their people against human war magic. Bane didn't understand this, but he knew a warding talisman when he saw it and knew that, inadvertently, it was shielding the elves from the enchantment. "; Pg. 192: "Bane possessed the power of magic, but the was untrained, not having been brought up in his father's house. He could feel magic run through him like adrenaline, he lacked the knowledge to make it work. "
witch world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragon Wing. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 193. "At first it was difficult and seemed impossible. Generations of wizards long dead plus the boy's own inherent skills and intelligence came to Bane's aid. The trick was to banish reality, to convince the mind that its body did not weight sixty-some rock, that it weighted nothing or less than nothing. It was a skill most young human wizards must study years to attain, yet Bane was having to learn it in seconds. Mother birds teach the young to fly by tossing them out of the nest. Bane was acquiring the art of magic in the same way. Shock and sheer terror jolted his natural talent into taking over and saving him. "
witch world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragon Wing. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 420. "MAGIC IN THE SUNDERED REALMS EXCERPT FROM A SARTAN'S MUSINGS

Magic is a thunder heard in each of the sundered realms. Its power reverberates through the foundations of all Existence. It echoes the lightning of creation itself. In its voice is heard the promise of life and death. It is a power to be coveted and feared.

Theorists tell us that magic draws its power from the original creation of the Omniverse. In the beginning, Elihn, God in One, stretched out his hand amid the Chaos. The motion of his hand ordered chaos into infinite possibilities of creation. This motion was the first Order out of Chaos. It is called the Wave Prime or more often simply the Prime.

Elihn saw in the Prime the creation of the ethereal and the physical, and the seeing of it made it so. In the creation of the spiritual and the physical, the Prime split into two sets of waves, each infinite in their possibilities... " [More.]

witch world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragon Wing. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 421. "Reality is simply the manifestation of intersection waves of possibility. It is a vast and almost incomprehensible weave of solid physics in the midst of a myriad of infinite potentials. Science, technology and biology all use the woven rope of reality.

Magic, on the other hand, functions by reweaving the fabric of reality. A wizard begins by concentrating on the wave of probabilities rather than on reality itself. Through his learning and his powers, he looks out upon the myriad waves of infinite possibilities to find that part of the wave where his desired reality would be true. Then the wizard creates a harmonic wave of possibility to bend the existing wave so that what was once only possible becomes part of what is true. In this way the magician weaves his desire into existence. "

witch world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragon Wing. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 422. "For example, a wizards stands on a field of battle against a great knight. The spell caster, wearing only his robes, is at the mercy of the armored and more powerful knight. This is reality and, if left alone, the knight will most likely slay the wizard without much resistance. However, the wizard knows from his study where the possibility (desired effect) of a protective shield exists on one of the countless waves of possibility. The wizard sets up a harmonic wave of possibility through his motions, thoughts, words, signs, and other aids. This magic alters the possibility wave so that what was once the possibility of a magical shield is woven into reality. The new reality includes the desired effect and so the magical shield now guards the wizard.

Although, to the outside observer, the protective field seems to spring up around the wizard from nothing, it would be more accurate to say that the possibility of such a field has been called into reality from... "

witch world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragons of a Fallen Sun. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast (2000); pg. 33. "He knew the answer, though he continually struggled against it. Of late, in the past two years, the elven sorcerers had felt their power to cast spells ebbing. The loss was gradual, barely felt at first, attributed to illness or exhaustion, but the sorcerers were at last forced to admit that their magical power was slipping away like grains of sand from between clutching fingers. They could hold onto some, but not all. The elves were not alone. They had reports that the same loss was being felt among humans, but this was little comfort. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
witch world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragons of a Fallen Sun. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast (2000); pg. 98. "'There's that young wizard staying here in the Inn. Room Seventeen. His name is . . . well, I forget his name, but you'll send him to the Tower of High Sorcery in Wayreth, where Palin is Head of the Order of White Robes.' "
witch world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragons of a Fallen Sun. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast (2000); pg. 121. "Black-robed wizards worked constantly to keep the city fit for habitation... The Conclave of Wizards sent mages to continue to cleanse the poisonous air... The residents of Sanction came to realize that the gods were gone. Magic--as they had known it--was gone... "
witch world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragons of a Lost Star. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast (2001) [Back cover] "A mysterious force holds Krynn in thrall. A young woman, protected by her regiment of dark-armored knights, calls upon the might of an unknown god to bring victory to her amy as it sweeps across the land. The souls of the dead rob the livingof their magic. A dragon overlord threatens the very land the elves hold most dear.

Amidst the chaos, a band of brave and selfless heroes struggles aginst an immortal power that appears to thwart them at every turn. The encroaching darkness threatens to engulf all hope, all faith, all light. " [Extensive refs. to magic, not in DB.]

witch world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragons of a Lost Star. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast (2001); pg. 6. "'...Suddenly there appeared among us, as if by magic, one of Mina's Knights. Through the power of the One God, he came to tell us that the shield had indeed fallen, brought down by the elven king himself, Silvanoshei, son of Alhana... As to the army, my lord, they have not attacked us. According to Mina, the king, Silvanoshei, has told them that Mina has come to save the Silvanesti nation in the name of the One God. I must say, my lord, that the elves are in pitiable condition... We thought to slay the wretches, but Mina forbde it. She performed miracles of healing on the dying elves and restored them to life. When we left, the elves were singing her praises and blessing the One God and vowing to worship this god in Mina's name.

...The One God! Ha! Targonne thought to himself, seeing far more in the messenger's mind than he was saying. Sorcery. This Mina is a witch. She has everyone ensorcelled--the elves, dogah, and my Knights included. " [Extensive refs., not in DB.]

witch world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragons of a Lost Star. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast (2001); pg. 168. "He probably should be glad the powerful wizard had rescued them. Otherwise he and Tasslehoff would be sitting in the dragon Beryl's prison cell... that Dalamar had shored up the walls with magic. The spiral staircase had always been treacherous to walk... "
witch world -4000 B.C.E. Delany, Samuel R. "The Game of Time and Pain " in The Bridge of Lost Desire. New York: Arbor House (1987); pg. 113. [Year estimated.] "Others said he was a sorcerer who had bound you to a pact within which your pat successes and your future triumphs were inscribed with equal legibility and for which, as each occurred, you paid with the blood of your body and the humiliation of your soul... You were the sorcerer whose program of liberation masked unscriable depths and complexities, within which good and evil were so entangled there was no extricating them. The one-eyed demon, appearing in the collar that once you'd worn as your personal sign, was only the most frequent of the many illusions you could call up to manifest a strength and a will for which words like adamantine and indomitable were inadequate. "
witch world -4000 B.C.E. Delany, Samuel R. "The Tale of Gorgik " in The Bridge of Lost Desire. New York: Arbor House (1987; c. 1979); pg. 239. "Sometimes it was '. . . for all the Mad Witch's warning. . . .,' which didn't fit the rhythm; sometimes it was '. . . for all Mad Olin's warning. . . .,' which did, but no one was sure what that meant. "
witch world -3300 B.C.E. Brooks, Terry. First King of Shannara. New York: Ballantine (1996); pg. 42. "...If you say the Warlock Lord exists, then he exists...' " [There are refs. to Magic throughout novel, but mostly in the context of Druids. No apparent refs. specifically to any 'witch' or 'sorcerer.' Warlock Lord also mentioned, pg. 70, 75, 81, 130, etc.]
witch world -3002 B.C.E. Gaskell, Jane. The City. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978; c. 1966); pg. 52. "Once, from the carriage in which I rode on a troubled drum-hearted evening, with my Mother and the wife-witch Ooldra, from the nurses and nursery-Tower of my childhood to the enemy campment... "
witch world -2700 B.C.E. Brooks, Terry. The Scions of Shannara. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 258. "It could be said that the Druids merely worked to preserve and protect, never to shape. But had there ever been one without the other? And necessity was always in the eye of the beholder. Warlock Lords, Demons, and Mord Wraiths past--they had been exchanged for Shadowmen. " [Although this is a fantasy, the novel has no references to witches (other than 'Warlock Lord' mentioned once here). The magic in the novel is associated with Druids.]
witch world -2500 B.C.E. Brooks, Terry. Ilse Witch: Book One of The Voyage of the Jerle Shannara. New York: Ballantine (2000) [As the title indicates, many refs. to magic and witches throughout novel, not in DB.] "Now Brooks embarks on what promises to be his masterpiece--Ilse Witch: Book One of the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara.

When the mutilated body of a half-drowned elf is found floating in the seas of the Blue Divide, an old mystery resurfaces. Thirty years ago, the elven prince Kael Elessedil--brother to the current king--led an expedition in search of a legendary magic said to be more ancient, more powerful than any in the world... Walker Boh, the last of the Druids. But someone else understands the map's significance, someone dark and ruthless: the Ilse Witch, a beautiful but twisted young woman who wields a magic as potent as his own. She will stop at nothing to possess the map--and the magic it leads to. To stop her, Walker must find the magic first. "

witch world -2000 B.C.E. Brust, Steven. The Phoenix Guards. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 208. [Fantasy. Actual year indeterminate or irrelevant.] Book jacket: "In his most exciting and ambitious novel to date, Steven Brust... returns to the world of his popular 'Vlad Taltos' series with a very different tale that takes place almost a thousand years before Vlad's birth. The Phoenix Guards is a delightful fantasy homage to the swashbucklers of Dumas and Sabatini... "; Pg. 10: "Now Khaavren, we should understand, had one of those searching, inquiring minds which, in a more serious studious person, leads to work in some of the more strange and esoteric branches of magic, and perhaps the discovery of spells that had never been thought of before. But, Tiassa that he was, he had not the disposition for it... "; Pg. 142: "...below Sorcerer's Rock high in the pass... "; pg. 272: "'...it isn't for nothing that I am a sorcerer. I should have rendered them useless.' " [May be other minor refs., not in DB. But magic does not at all seem to be a prominent theme.]
witch world -1500 B.C.E. Brust, Steven. Five Hundred Years After. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 11. [Fantasy. Actual year indeterminate or irrelevant. Takes place on another world.] Book jacket: "At last, Steven Brust returns with a glittering sequel to his bestselling The Phoenix Guards, reuniting our Heroes Khaavren, Pel. Aerich and Tazendra in Dragaera City, five hundred years after the events of the previous book . . . just in time for an uprising which threatens to destroy the Imperial Orb itself. ";

Pg. 11: "Cast of Characters

...Nyleth -- Court Wizard

...Cariss -- A Jhereg Sorceress "

[About 60 characters are listed here, including minor ones. Only two are identified here as wizard or sorceress. That there are multiple refs. to such, not in DB, but that magic/magic-users aren't a central aspect of the novel.]; Pg. 314: "'Captain, there are some nineteen or twenty persons gathered outside... carrying the sort of rods one might associate with wizards... many of them appear to be Dzurlords, and one or two are without doubt Dragonlords.' "

witch world -1000 B.C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer; Julian May & Andre Norton. Black Trillium. New York: Doubleday (1990); pg. 11. "'By the White Lady, this time there can be no doubt! The sorcerer Orogastus has indeed called down lightning from a clear sky, and this stroke has breached the wall of the inner ward!'

...They were closely followed by mounted knights led by the brutal General Hamil. The charging attackers flattened the valiant Citadel defenders as easily as the hurricane blasts marshgrass. Moments later there was a third blinding magical flash, and then a fourth, and after each one enemy hordes poured through fresh breaks in the fortifications.

'It is the end,' said the King. 'If that ancient rampart with its multiple bastions can be pierced by the uncanny bolts of Orogastus, then there is no way the great keep itself can long remain secure.' " [Many other refs. to magic and sorcery in novel, not in DB.]

witch world -1000 B.C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer; Julian May & Andre Norton. Black Trillium. New York: Doubleday (1990); pg. 64. "'Do . . . do your people make common use of magic, then?'

'Oh, no. It is a special thing, not to be invoked lightly. Sometimes it is there and sometimes not, no matter how desperately one wishes for its help. For your people Mother and Father, there was no magical assistance--'

'And that was cruel! It makes no good sense that the King and Queen of Ruwenda perish and the country be conquered while magic shields me and my sisters!'

'Peace, child, peace. Magic is a mystery, like so much of life. It can be wielded for good or evil, and we do not always know which is which, any more than we really understand what magic is.' "

witch world -1000 B.C.E. Gloss, Molly. Outside the Gates. New York: Atheneum (1986); pg. 264. [Fantasy. Actual year unknown.] Pg. 57: "The night before, lying awake inside his spruce tree shelter, Vren had thought endlessly of Rusche and of the spellbinder. He had slowly begun to wish that Shel had told him a tale of giants, or of great monsters with three heads... When he imagined those things, he was only afraid. When he thought of Rusche going away with the spellbinder, his feelings grew dark and muddy. There was pain in them, and shame, and a different, more secret kind of fear. "; Pg. 86: "Bloom the young red deer... and the spellbinder's long metal knife. She might have seen the gray, whispering no-time place, and the boy's reflection in the darkness of the spellbinder's eyes. If she had looked inward, all the way to the center of the boy's heart, she would know, as he did, what it was that made the spellbinder's Shadow so black. " [Some more about the spellbinder.]
witch world -1000 B.C.E. Goodkind, Terry. Stone of Tears. New York: Tor (1995); pg. 7. [Fantasy. Actual year indeterminate or immaterial.] "'...She learned it when she was young... In a song. She learned it from wizards.'

...'...Some wizards devote their lives to the study of them [prophecies], and yet even they understand only a tiny fraction of their truth.' " [Refs. to wizards and magic throughout novel, not in DB.]

witch world -1000 B.C.E. Norton, Andre & Mercedes Lackey. Elvenblood. New York: Tor (1996; c. 1995) [Back cover] "The powerful magic of ruthless Elvenlord masters has for centuries ruled the world. Even Shana, the legendary Elvenbane prophesied to deliver the oppressed into freedom, is helpless before such power. She and her raging band of outcasts, half-blood wizards, escaped human slaves, and free-thinking dragons have gained only a token victory against the mighty lords.

Only the long-forgotten Iron People, a band of human nomads, have escaped the tyranny of the reigning wizards. How have they survived through the centuries? " [Extensive refs. to wizards and magic throughout novel.]

witch world -998 B.C.E. Goodkind, Terry. Blood of the Fold. New York: Tor (1996) "Now Richard and Kahlan's struggles continue, against a new and equally dire foe. The Blood of the Fold, a group of fanatical anti-magic zealots, have joined the forces thwarted by Richard and Kahlan. They are the unwilling pawns of a sorcerous evil from the Old World, a realm that has been magically sealed for thousands of years. Richard, Kahlan, and their allies face the combined might of two worlds--the Old and the New. This stunning confrontation threatens an armageddon of unimaginable proportions unless Richard and Kahlan can believe in the power of their love and their faith in the Truth. " [Refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]
witch world -998 B.C.E. Goodkind, Terry. Blood of the Fold. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 24. "Richard was a wizard, too, he now knew. The gift, the force of magic within him called Han, had been passed down from two lines of wizards: Zedd, his grandfather on his mother's side, and Darken Rahl, his father. That combination had spawned in him magic no wizard had possessed in thousands of years--not only Additive but also Subtractive Magic. Richard knew precious little about being a wizard, or about magic, but Zedd would help him learn, help him control the gift an use it to aid people. "
witch world -998 B.C.E. Goodkind, Terry. Temple of the Winds. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 38. Pg. 38: "Ancient magic had aided the Sisters of the Light in their task by altering time at the palace so that they would have the time needed, in the absence of an experienced wizard, to teach the boys to control their magic... 'He probably thought a wizard, like Marlin here...' ";

Pg. 50: "'The wizards of that time wore this? I thought wizards always wore simple robes.'

'Most of them did. One wore some of this.'

'What kind of wizard wore an outfit like this?'

'A war wizard.'

'A war wizard,' she whispered in astonishment. Though he largely didn't know how to use his gift, Richard was the first war wizard to have been born in nearly three thousand years. " [Other refs. throughout the novel, not in DB.]

witch world -996 B.C.E. Goodkind, Terry. Soul of the Fire. New York: Tor (1999); pg. 75. "'A Lurk?' Richard frowned. 'What's a Lurk? And how do you know?'

'Ann and I have been casting verification spells,' the old wizard said. 'You've given us the piece of evidence we needed to be sure. The trace of magic on this arrow confirms our suspicion. We have grave trouble.'

'It was conjured by those committed to the Keeper,' Ann said. 'Those who can use Subtractive Magic: Sisters on the Dark.'

'Jagang,' Richard whispered. 'He has Sisters of the Dark.'

Ann nodded. 'The last time Jagang sent an assassin wizard, but you survived it. He now sends something more deadly.' " [Other refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]

witch world -996 B.C.E. Goodkind, Terry. Soul of the Fire. New York: Tor (1999); pg. 197. Pg. 197: "Kahlan blinked at the explanation. 'Witch? Witch house?'

'She means Sister Verna and the Palace of the Prophets,' Richard said. 'They led Sister Verna and me there not because I freed Du Chaillu, but because I fulfilled an ancient prophecy.' ";

Pg. 199: "'Even though the sunlight could never itself reach the corner, by using a mirror you can get the sunlight to fall where it ordinarily wouldn't. Magic can sometimes work like that. Magic is much more complex, of course, but that's the easiest way I can explain it.

'Even if only by some ancient law that completes a long-forgotten condition, the spell might reflect the condition to fulfill the arcane requirements of the magic involved. Like water seeking its own level, a spell will often seek its own solution--within the laws of its nature.' "

witch world -800 B.C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Lady of the Trillium. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 2. [Fantasy. Year indeterminate or immaterial.] "Kadiya, the second of the sisters, had been the first to leave. After the great battle with the invaders from Labornok and the evil sorcerer Orogastus, she had disappeared into her beloved swamps with her Oddling companion and her talisman, the Three-Lobed Burning Eye, which formed part of the great magical scepter the triplets had used to defeat Orogastus. " [Many refs. to sorcery and magic throughout novel, not in DB.]
witch world -800 B.C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Lady of the Trillium. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 114. "'...With the ice all over it, I couldn't be sure, but I think the courtyard might be a solar cell. In fact, I think the entire Tower is built on top of what was supposed to be the power supply for the devices in the ice caves. That would be just the sort of thing Orogastus would do, thinking the devices were magic..' The word twisted sarcastically in her mouth as she thought of what Haramis had said about Orogastus and true magic. 'It never would have occurred to him to look for a physical power source...'...

'...I think I may need to use weather magic. Uzun, you told Fiolon to tell Haramis that you would teach me--I assume that means you can teach me?'

'Of course I can teach you, Princess,' Uzun replied, sounding somewhat offended.

'Can you teach me weather magic? In your present form?' Mikayla asked. "

witch world -800 B.C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Lady of the Trillium. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 133. "'...Obviously her need for magical training had just become much more urgent than it had been when Haramis was well and controlling everything. Which meant that finding Uzun a body so he could train her properly should be done right away. Could the mirror find help for her?

Mikayla pondered how to word her question. 'Scan magicians,' she said, a bit tentatively.

'Specify all or by race.'

Mikayla thought about that for a minute. 'Human,' she finally said.

The mirror displayed a series of pictures of humans working magic, changing from one to another at short intervals. Mikayla recognized one of them as a magician who came to the Citadel from time to time--he had produced some truly spectacular illusions for one of Prince Egon's birthday parties. Suddenly she gasped and said, 'Stop!' "

witch world -800 B.C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Lady of the Trillium. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 2. [Fantasy. Year indeterminate or immaterial.] "Kadiya, the second of the sisters, had been the first to leave. After the great battle with the invaders from Labornok and the evil sorcerer Orogastus, she had disappeared into her beloved swamps with her Oddling companion and her talisman, the Three-Lobed Burning Eye, which formed part of the great magical scepter the triplets had used to defeat Orogastus. " [Many refs. to sorcery and magic throughout novel, not in DB.]
witch world -800 B.C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Lady of the Trillium. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 114. "'...With the ice all over it, I couldn't be sure, but I think the courtyard might be a solar cell. In fact, I think the entire Tower is built on top of what was supposed to be the power supply for the devices in the ice caves. That would be just the sort of thing Orogastus would do, thinking the devices were magic..' The word twisted sarcastically in her mouth as she thought of what Haramis had said about Orogastus and true magic. 'It never would have occurred to him to look for a physical power source...'...

'...I think I may need to use weather magic. Uzun, you told Fiolon to tell Haramis that you would teach me--I assume that means you can teach me?'

'Of course I can teach you, Princess,' Uzun replied, sounding somewhat offended.

'Can you teach me weather magic? In your present form?' Mikayla asked. "

witch world -800 B.C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Lady of the Trillium. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 133. "'...Obviously her need for magical training had just become much more urgent than it had been when Haramis was well and controlling everything. Which meant that finding Uzun a body so he could train her properly should be done right away. Could the mirror find help for her?

Mikayla pondered how to word her question. 'Scan magicians,' she said, a bit tentatively.

'Specify all or by race.'

Mikayla thought about that for a minute. 'Human,' she finally said.

The mirror displayed a series of pictures of humans working magic, changing from one to another at short intervals. Mikayla recognized one of them as a magician who came to the Citadel from time to time--he had produced some truly spectacular illusions for one of Prince Egon's birthday parties. Suddenly she gasped and said, 'Stop!' "

witch world -500 B.C.E. Drake, David. Lord of the Isles. New York: Tor (1997) [Fantasy. Year indeterminate.] Book jacket: "Now, in Lord of the Isles, Drake returns to fantasy with a towering and complex epic of heroic adventure filled with passion and magic, and set in an extraordinary and colorful world where the elemental forces that empower magic are rising to a thousand-year peak. Into this world, survivors from the last magical peak intrude: Tenoctris, a quiet and scholarly sorceress swept out of the past at the moment of final catastrophe as her civilization sank beneath the sea; the ghost of the greatest ruler, King Carus of the Isles; and the great magician known only as The Hooded One, who actually caused that ancient catastrophe. " [Many refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]
witch world -500 B.C.E. Duane, Diane. The Door Into Sunset. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 157. "The Goddess folded Her arms and looked at the atheist with bemusement tinged with annoyance. 'This is getting us nowhere,' She said. 'I do godly things right here in front of you, one after another, and you say they're mere sorcerer's work, hedge-magic. What work is going to be big enough to convince you?' "
witch world -500 B.C.E. Duncan, Dave. The Living God. New York: Ballantine (1994) [Fantasy: actual year indeterminate or immaterial.] Book jacket: "The sorcerer Zinixo had declared himself the Almighty, and none could doubt that the end of the era was at hand...

Stableboy, sorcerer, king, and now rebel: as leader of the insurgency, Rap of Krasnegar faced almost certain defeat... " [Refs. throughout, not in DB.]

witch world -500 B.C.E. Duncan, Dave. The Living God. New York: Ballantine (1994); pg. 13. "Most of the trolls were down in the cabins or the hold, by themselves, staying out of the sun, but they were watching nonetheless. Witch Grunth had appropriated the best hideaway, the chain locker. There she had removed all her clothing for comfort and was combing her shaggy hair. Nudity emphasized her grotesque animal bulk, wrinkled and flabby and hideous. " [Other refs. to witches and sorcerers throughout novel, not in DB.]
witch world -500 B.C.E. Hambly, Barbara. Dragonshadow. New York: Ballantine (1999); pg. 17. [Fantasy novel.] Pg. 12: "You're a witch and will grow old alone. "; Pg. 33: "He knew perfectly well that such magic was an act of betrayal, of violation, and he squirmed with shame every time he did it, but as a wizard, he felt driven to learn. ";

Pg. 89: 'You're a witch.'

'So are you.'

'I ain't! Not really.'... There were spells Jenny knew that might have constrained the girl...

'Men don't hurt witches.'

...'You're a witch?' " [Refs. to witches, wizards, magic throughout novel, not in DB.]

witch world -500 B.C.E. Ing, Dean. "Manaspill " in Firefight 2000. New York: Baen (1987; c. 1981); pg. 53. Pg. 53: "wizardry... sorcery " [plus, many refs. to magic throughout story, associated with a 'shaman.']
witch world -500 B.C.E. McKillip, Patricia A. The Forgotten Beasts of Eld. New York: Atheneum (1984; c. 1974) [Fantasy: Actual year indeterminate or immaterial.] [Book jacket] "Sybel, daughter of a wizard, granddaughter of a wizard, knows little of the ways of men. She has spent her life in her crystal hall, high on a mountain, caring for legendary beasts she and the wizards before her have called. beasts she molds through the power of her mind and her magic.

Nothing disturbs Sybel until a man comes bearing a baby, a distant relative of hers, he says. What am I to do with this? she asks. And he, sensing her coolness, her lack of regard for the merely human, almost leaves. But the child is in danger. It needs a hiding place. And reluctantly he leaves it.

The boy, Tam, for it is a boy, is soon worth more to Sybel than all of the animals she holds so closely... " [Refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]



witch, continued

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