Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to witch, United Kingdom

witch, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
witch United Kingdom 1994 Holdstock, Robert. The Hollowing. New York: Roc (1994); pg. 15. " the enchantress Morgan le Fay, disguised as Lady Bertolac... " [Many refs., not in DB.]
witch United Kingdom 1995 Kurtz, Katherine & Deborah Turner Harris. Dagger Magic. New York: Ace Books (1995); pg. 17. "Only a handful of people, many of them present today, knew anything of his dedication to more arcane pursuits, as white-occultist, Adept, and Master of an esoteric fraternity known as the Hunting Lodge, charged with enforcing the higher laws of the Inner Planes. " [This refers to the main character of the book. Many other refs., not in DB.]
witch United Kingdom 2030 McAuley, Paul J. Fairyland. New York: Avon Books (1997; c 1995); pg. 5. Pg. 5: "...genuine antique stainless steel oyster Rolex... It was given to him by the Wizard--the Wizard was always giving him stuff like that, in the days when Alex was the brightest and best of the Wizard's apprentices. But Alex lost the Rolex when he was banged up with the Wizard and the rest of his crew. "; Pg. 6: "The Wizard taught him never to ring clients from a mobile phone--the locations of switched-on mobile phones are constantly updated on lookup tables, microwave junctions are tapped, with AIs patiently listening in for keywords, and anyone within fifteen kilometers can eavesdrop... " [More about 'the Wizard', pg. 11, 31, 38, 54, etc. Not a wizard in a traditional, magical sense, but apparently a criminal leader.]
witch United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 259. "'Lady, I do not know, but I do know that the Mother Superior wanted to forbid one of them, because... he is a wizard and sorcerer, so she said, and a Druid!'

'It is the Merlin of Britain, for he is my father, and he is no wizard, child, but a scholar trained in the crafts of the wise. Even the church fathers say that the Druids are good and noble men, and worship with them in harmony, since they acknowledge God in all things, and Christ as one of many prophets of God.' " [Merlin is one of main characters in novel. Only a few examples in DB, but there are many refs. throughout to sorcery and magic. The central religions in novel, however, are ancient Goddess worship, Druidism, and Christianity.]

witch United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 269. "'...he came to you by the Merlin's arts in the magical disguise of Gorlois...' "
witch United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 734. "'Jesus and Mary defend me from evil,' he said. 'This is some wicked enchantment, wrought by my sister and her witchcraft!' He shuddered and called out, 'Bring me my sword!' "
witch United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Woolley, Persia. Queen of the Summer Stars. New York: Poseidon Press (1990); pg. 20. "No one, except Igraine. She'd come out of retirement to greet her son's bride and shape my future as surely as Merlin shaped Arthur's... The common folk claimed Arthur's birth was the result of magic--that Merlin created him to fulfill the prophesy that a great king would rise out of Cornwall and lead the Britons to victory against the Saxon invaders. There were stories of dragons and comets, and mighty spells cast over the fortress at Tintagel. " [Although not the focus of the novel, there are many refs. to Merlin the sorcerer in novel. Other refs. not in DB. Also in novel: Morgan le Fey.]
witch United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 12. [Year estimated.] "There were magicians in the forest also in those legendary days, as well as strange animals now known to modern works of natural history. "
witch United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 22-23. "He [Merlyn] was dressed in a flowing gown with fur tippets which had the signs of the zodiac embroidered over it, with various cabalistic signs, such as triangles with eyes in them, queer crosses, leaves of trees, bones of birds and animals, and a planetarium whose stars shone like bits of looking-glass with the sun on them. He had a pointed hat like a dunce's cap, or like the headgear worn by ladies of that time, except that the ladies were accustomed to have a bit of veil floating from the top of it. He also had a wand of lignum vitae, which he had laid down in the grass beside him, and a pair of horn-rimmed spectacles like those of King Pellinore. They were unusual spectacles, being without ear pieces, but shaped rather like scissors or like the antennae of the tarantula wasp... 'My name,' said the old man, 'is Merlyn.' " [Many other refs. throughout book to Merlyn, and other magical beings, not in DB.]
witch United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 23. "Merlyn had a long white beard and long white moustaches which hung down on either side of it. Close inspection showed that he was far from clean. It was not that he had dirty fingernails or anything like that, but some large bird seemed to have been nesting in his hair. The Wart was familiar with the nests of Spar-hawk and Gos, the crazy conglomerations of sticks and oddments which had been taken over from squirrels or crows, and he knew how the twigs and the tree foot were splashed with white mutes, old bones, muddy feathers and castings. This was the impression which he got from Merlyn. The old man was streaked with droppings over his shoulders, among the stars and triangles of his gown, and a large spider was slowly lowering itself from the tip of his hat, as he gazed and slowly blinked at the little boy in front of him. "
witch United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 32. "He said he would not use magic. He said you could not use magic in Great Arts, just as it would be unfair to make a great statue by magic. You have to cut it out with a chisel, you see... Hob made a duty to Merlyn, who returned it courteously. They looked upon one another with grave affection, knowing each other to be masters of the same trade. "
witch United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 52. "...but Sir Ector... said that the battle of Crecy had been won upon the playing fields of Camelot. This made Merlyn so furious that he gave Sir Ector rheumatism two nights running before he relented. "
witch United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 58. Pg. 58: "'He is a white magician,' said the Wart. 'You need not be afraid of him. He is my best friend, your majesty, and in any case he generally gets his spells muddled up.'

'Ah, yes,' said King Pellinore. 'A white magician, what? How small the world is, is it not?' ";

Pg. 60: "'This is my tutor,' said the Wart hurriedly. 'Merlyn, the magician.'

Sir Grummore looked at Merlyn--magicians were considered rather middle-class by the true jousting set in those days--and said distantly, 'Ah, a magician. How-de-do?' "

witch United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 75. "'Madam,' he said, 'I am one of the Merlins of the Forest Sauvage.'

There was silence at this, the silver silence which he had begun to fear.

'There are the Yorkshire Merlins,' said the honorary colonel in her slow voice at last, 'and the Welsh Merlins, and the McMerlins from the North. Then there are the Salisbury ones, and several from the neighbourhood of Exmoor, and the O'Merlins of Connaught. I do not think I have heard of any family in the Forest Sauvage.' "

witch United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 87. "'That is no excuse. Naturally I meant the one I was wearing.

'but wearing now, of course, you fool. I don't want a hat I was wearing in 1890. Have you no sense of time at all?'

Merlyn took off the sailor hat which had just appeared and held it out to the air for inspection.

'This is an anachronism, he said severely. 'That is what it is, a beastly anachronism.'

Archimedes seemed to be accustomed to these scenes, for he now said in a reasonable voice: 'Why don't you ask for the hat by name, master? Say, 'I want my magician's hat,' not 'I want the hat I was wearing.' Perhaps the poor chap finds it as difficult to live backward as you do.'

'I want my magician's hat,' said Merlyn sulkily.

Instantly the long pointed cone was standing on his head. "

witch United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 181. "'Well, I am a Cinderella now,' he said to himself. 'Even if I have had the best o fit for some mysterious reason, up to the present time... now I must pay for my past pleasures and for seeing all those delightful dragons, witches, fishes, cameleopards, pismires, wild geese and such like...' "
witch United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 564. "And it is a mistake to believe that Arthur's civilization was weak in this famous science of ours. The scientists, although they happened to call them magicians at the time, invented almost as terrible things as we have invented--except that we have become accustomed to theirs by use. The greatest magicians, like Albertus Magnus, Friar Bacon, and Raymond Lully, knew several secrets which we have lost today, and discovered as a side issue what still appears to be the chief commodity of civilization, namely gunpowder. "
witch United Kingdom: England 1200 C.E. Beagle, Peter S. The Last Unicorn. New York: Ballantine (1968); pg. 242. [Year estimated.] "'You are a true and mortal wizard now, as you always wished. Does it make you happy?'

'Yes,' he replied with a quiet laugh. 'I'm no poor Haggard, to lose my heart's desire in the having of it. But there are wizards and wizards; there is black magic and white magic, and the infinite shades of gray between--and I see now that it is all the same. Whether I decide to be what men would call a wise and good magician--aiding heroes, thwarting witches, wicked lords, and unreasonable parents; making rain, curing woolsorter's disease, and the mad staggers, getting cats down from trees--or whether I choose the retorts full of elixirs and essences, the powders and herbs and banes, the padlocked books of gramarye bound in skins better left unnamed, the muddy mist darkening in the chamber... why, life is short, and how many can I help or harm? I have my power at last, but the world is still too heavy for me to move...' "

witch United Kingdom: England 1200 C.E. Beagle, Peter S. The Last Unicorn. New York: Ballantine (1968); pg. 239. "They complained bitterly that Schmendrick could do it all in a moment by means of his magic. But he answered them, 'I could not, even if I would. There are laws that govern the wizard's art, as laws command the seasons and the sea. Magic made you wealthy once, when all others in the land were poor; but your days of prosperity are ended, and now you must start over. What was wasteland in Haggard's time shall grow green and generous again, but Hagsgate will yield a living exactly as miserly as the hearts that dwell there...' " [Many other refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]
witch United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 4. "'I'll be swivel-eyed!' said the man, bloody fingers closing on air. ' 'Twas a witch!'

'Nay,' said another. ' 'Twas an angel.' "

witch United Kingdom: England 1944 Holdstock, Robert. Mythago Wood. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1984); pg. 208. "'What is he?' Keaton said.

'A shaman. A magic man. A necromancer.'

'The Saxon called him Freya. I thought that was a Viking god or something.'

'God grew out of the memories of powerful men,' I suggested. 'Perhaps an early form of Freya was a witch.' "

witch United Kingdom: England 1955 Lewis, C.S. The Magician's Nephew (Narnia #6). New York: Macmillan (1970; c. 1955); pg. 20. Pg. 20: "'...One doesn't become a magician for nothing...' "; Pg. 21: "...a world that could be reached only by Magic... "; Pg. 67: "The Queen, or the Witch (whichever you like to call her) had come up with them... " [As the title indicates, the book has many refs. to magic, and magicians. Many other refs. to the Witch.]
witch United Kingdom: England 1985 Dickinson, Peter. The Green Gene. New York: Random House (1973); pg. 57. "The charm had no effect.

This was Glenda's doing. He remembered her look as she ha come from the cupboard and a broken phrase in the launderette... What kind of curse might an English witch have put on such a token? Wait! She had said he could take it off in the bath! "

witch United Kingdom: England 1985 Dickinson, Peter. The Green Gene. New York: Random House (1973); pg. 73. "He walked round during the lunch hour and picked the message up. It said: 'FIRST CLASS MANTRA AGAINST WITCHES IN PREPARATION STOP MEANWHILE ADVISED FOLLOWING FORMULA EFFICACIOUS QUOATE DA NARA DA GABA DEE END QUOTE REPEAT AS NECESSARY STOP YOUR EVER LOVING MOTHER.' "
witch United Kingdom: London 1500 C.E. Moorcock, Michael. Gloriana. New York: Warner Books (1986; c 1978); pg. 51. "Dee was evidently astonished by this expression of a previous century's superstition--words which might have come from Montfallcon's famous witch-seeking grandfather. "
witch United Kingdom: London 1500 C.E. Moorcock, Michael. Gloriana. New York: Warner Books (1986; c 1978); pg. 237. "'I've been tricked. Lured by a witch, eh?' Una spoke with crazy irony. 'What are you, all of you?' "
witch United Kingdom: London 1990 Byatt, A.S. Possession. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1990); pg. 55. Pg. 55: "....and a Feminist Revue: 'Come and see the Sorceries, the Vamps, the daughters of Kali and the Fatae Morganae. We make your blood run cold and make you laugh on the Sinister side of your face at Women's Wit and Wickedness.' "; Pg. 77: The Incarcerated Sorceress [faux book by R. H. Ash]; Pg. 185: "Am I a Sorcerer--like Macbeth's witches--mixing truth and lies in incandescent shapes? "; Pg. 241: witch-hunts [Also pg. 187, 379, 453, other.]
witch United Kingdom: Scotland 1500 C.E. Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 47: "My Heart for the Highlands ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Jan. 1987); pg. 16-17. Pg. 16: English knight (upon seeing Magma use her powers): "Sorcery! " [Magme is actually a mutant, not a sorceress.]; Other English knight (upon seeing Illyana/Magik use her teleporting powers on a fellow knight): Pg. 17: "Sorceress, I'll-- " [He attempts to kill her with his sword, but is stopped by Karma. Magik actually is a witch, but her ability to teleport is her mutant power, not a function of her magickal powers.]
witch United Kingdom: Scotland 1993 Katz, Welwyn Wilton. Come Like Shadows. Regina, Saskatchewan: Coteau Books (2001; 1993); pg. 315. Pg. 299: "Macbeth, Lucas thought joyously, his Macbeth, speaking to him at last! For a bare instant he forgot the witches, forgot the mirror in his hand... "; Pg. 315: "'Everett will have to replace his First Witch.' " [Many other refs. not in DB, e.g. pg. 141, 163, 192, 195.]
witch USA 1932 Wilson, Robert Charles. A Hidden Place. New York: Bantam (1989; c. 1986); pg. 54. "Strange words flashed in her mind.

Witch. Demon. Succubus. "

witch USA 1940 Hubbard, L. Ron. Fear. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1991; c. 1940); pg. 22. Pg. 22: "'You say that the gods of luck are false; you wrote that it is silly to seek the aid of gods beyond the aid of the one supreme God; you said that demons and devils were the manufacture of Machiavellian witch doctors and that men could only be herded by the fear of those things they could not see...' "; Pg. 149: "'Well, well, well, old Witch Doctor Lowry himself!...' "
witch USA 1949 Jackson, Shirley. "The Witch " in The Lottery and Other Stories. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1998; first published 1949); pg. 64. Pg. 64: "'I saw a witch,' he said to his other after a minute. 'There was a big old ugly old bad old witch outside.'

'Fine,' his mother said.

'A big old ugly witch and I told her to go away and she went away,' the little boy went on, in a quiet narrative to himself,' she came and said, 'I'm going to eat you up,' and I said, 'no, you're not,' and I chased her away, the bad old mean witch.'

He stopped talking and looked up as the outside door of the coach opened and a man came in... 'What you looking for out that window?' the man asked.

'Witches,' the little boy said promptly. 'Bad old mean witches.'

'I see,' the man said. 'Find many?'

'My father smokes cigars,' the little boy said.

'All men smoke cigars,' the man said. 'Someday you'll smoke a cigar, too.' "; Pg. 65: "'Listen,' the man said, 'shall I tell you about my little sister?'

'Tell me about your sister,' the little boy said. 'Was she a witch?'

'Maybe,' the man said. "

witch USA 1949 Jackson, Shirley. "The Witch " in The Lottery and Other Stories. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1998; first published 1949); pg. 65. "'Listen,' the man said, 'shall I tell you about my little sister?'

'Tell me about your sister,' the little boy said. 'Was she a witch?'

'Maybe,' the man said. "

witch USA 1949 Jackson, Shirley. "The Witch " in The Lottery and Other Stories. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1998; first published 1949); pg. 67. "'Did that man really cut his little sister up in pieces?'

'He was just teasing,' the mother said, and added urgently, 'Just teasing.'

'Prob'ly,' the little boy said. With his lollipop he went back to his own seat, and settled himself to look out the window again. 'Prob'ly he was a witch.' "

witch USA 1949 Jackson, Shirley. The Lottery and Other Stories. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1998; first published 1949); pg. 143. [Lengthy quote from Joseph Glanvil's Sadducismus Triumphatus] "The Confession of Margaret Jackson, relict of Tho. Stuart in Shaws, who being examined by the Justices anent her being guilty of Witchcraft, declares . . . That forty years ago, or thereabout, she was at Pollockshaw-croft, with some few sticks on her back, and that the black Man came to her, and that she did give up herself unto the black Man, from the top of her head to the sole of her foot; and that this was after the Declarant's renouncing of her Baptism; and that the Spirit's name, which he designed her, was Locas... And declares, That this Man who disappeared was the Devil. "
witch USA 1954 Dick, Philip K. "Upon the Dull Earth " in The Preserving Machine. New York: Ace Books (1969; c. 1954); pg. 29. Pg. 29-30: witch
witch USA 1955 Martin, George R. R. "Interlude One " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 181. "It [McCarthyism] was a true modern witch-hunt, and like their spiritual ancestors at Salem, those hauled before Tail-Gunner Joe for the non-crime of being an ace had a hard time proving their innocence. How do you prove that you can't fly. "
witch USA 1957 Dickson, Gordon R. "St. Dragon and the George " in Dragon Tales (Isaac Asimov, ed.) New York: Ballantine (1982; c. 1957); pg. 194. Pg. 194: "The magician stared at him for a long minute, then threw up his beard with both hands in a gesture of despair, caught some of it in his teeth as it fell down and began to chew on it fiercely.

'Now where,' he demanded, 'did a dragon acquire the brains to develop the imagination to entertain the illusion that he is not a dragon? Answer me, O Ye Powers!' ";

Pg. 198: "'What?' cried Carolinus. 'Teach your grandmother to suck eggs. Hypnotize! Ha! And what about the First Law of Magic, eh?'

'The what?' said Jim.

'The First Law--the First Law--didn't they teach you anything in that college?... Why do I live by my fees instead of by conjurations? Why does a magic potion have a bad taste?...'

...'Greetings, Mage! boomed the old dragon... " [Other refs. throughout story, not in DB.]

witch USA 1966 Geary, Patricia. Strange Toys. New York: Bantam (1989; c. 1987); pg. 5. Pg. 5: "HAPPY HALLOWEEN, POODLE! it said, in orange and black and green. A month early, but so what? I'd made some pumpkins and ghosts and a smiling witch on a broomstick, the regular stuff but whimsical. "; Pg. 23: "Children dream of the seven tongues of fire. We fear only the Master Wizard. Now he is on us. His arms are giant radishes with revolving razor blades... We feel the heat on our cheeks. Without the magic formula, we will be torn to ribbons! "
witch USA 1967 Gardner, Craig Shaw. Dragon Sleeping. New York: Ace Books (1994); pg. 13. "The red light shifted to blue and then to green, as if it might entertain itself despite the wizard. Nunn reached out quickly with the flat of his hand, slashing across the illumination.

The green light screamed.

The magician withdrew his hand. His fingers tingled where he had made contact.

'Much better,' the wizard added. 'It pleases me so much when you choose to verbalize.' " [Many other refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]

witch USA 1973 Goldman, William. The Princess Bride. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1973); pg. 205. "Would you believe that for me right then it was like one of those comic books where the light bulb goes on over Mandrake the Magician's head? "
witch USA 1980 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Miracle Monday. New York: Warner Books (1981); pg. 69. Pg. 69: "When the survivors among the company of hard-nosed realists reached the summit, they were amazed to find a collection of mystics, sorcerers and wild-eyed prophets already there... "; Pg. 70: "There might also exist, moving among the countless universes of Creation, angels, devils, demonic possession, miracles, leprechauns, warlocks, and other world seen in dreams. "; Pg. 93: "...an equally large Walt Simonson acrylic of Merlyn. "
witch USA 1982 Norden, Eric. "The Curse of Mhondoro Nkabele " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 179. "I have received your wire and am most sympathetic to your plight, although I cannot countenance the idea that multi, or witch-power, is at the root of your difficulties... "
witch USA 1984 Heinlein, Robert A. Job: A Comedy of Justice. New York: Ballantine (1984); pg. 130. "There were other interesting and worthwhile goals that I kept off the agenda... but instead carried them on my 'Maybe next year' list:

...Restoring the death penalty for witchcraft and satanism "

witch USA 1984 Heinlein, Robert A. Job: A Comedy of Justice. New York: Ballantine (1984); pg. 238. "' 'Witch' is the usual term for both male and female adepts of the Craft. 'Wizard' is an acceptable term but is not technically exact; it means 'sorcerer' or 'magician' . . . but not all magicians are witches and not all witches practice magic. But 'warlock' is considered to be offensive as well as incorrect because it is associated with Devil worship--and the Craft is not Devil worship--and the word itself by its derivation means 'oath breaker'--and witches do not break oaths. Correction: The Craft forbids the breaking of oaths. A witch who breaks an oath, even to a gentile, is subject to discipline, even expulsion if the oath is that major. So I am not a 'graduate warlock.' The correct designation for my present status is 'Accepted Craftsman,' that is to day: 'witch.' " [More, pg. 238-241, 356.]
witch USA 1985 Zelazny, Roger. Trumps of Doom. New York: Arbor House (1985); pg. 140. "'...Maybe you can help. You're a sorcerer.'

I didn't like that opening, but I asked, 'What's the problem.?'

'I went to Bleys' rooms, to see whether he wanted to come down and join us. He's gone.'

'Wasn't his door locked? Most people do that around here.'

'Yes, from the inside. So he must have trumped out. I broke in when he didn't answer, since there'd been one attempt on his life already.'

'And what would you want of a sorcerer?'

'Can you trace him?'

'Trumps don't leave tracks,' I said... " [Some other refs., not in DB. The Amber 'Trump' characters do not refer to themselves as sorcerers, although their abilities may make them seem like they are to people of Earth/Shadow.]

witch USA 1986 Brooks, Terry. Magic Kingdom for Sale - Sold!. New York: Ballantine (1986); pg. 20. "Would it be like the land of Oz with Munchkins and witches and a tin man who talked? Would there be a yellow brick road to follow? "
witch USA 1990 De Haven, Tom. Walker of Worlds. New York: Doubleday (1990); pg. 292. "'What's a Hobbit, anyway?'

And Money might've laughed, except she was afraid that this bona fide witch in this bona fide place might suddenly make good on her threat. . . . "

witch USA 1993 Anthony, Piers. Demons Don't Dream. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 24. "Nada got down to business. 'It is almost impossible to win the prize directly, because we don't even know where to look for it. So we shall have to go see the Good Magician, and hope that you can make some kind of deal with him for his advice...' " [Many refs. to witches, magicians, and other magical things throughout novel, not in DB.]
witch USA 1993 DeChance, John. MagicNet. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 26. "HOW? [does the computer program work?]

DAMN GOOD QUESTION. VERY COMPLEX QUESTION, BUT IT CAN BE OVERSIMPLIFIED THIS WAY: HOW ARE MAGIC SPELLS TRADITIONALLY CAST? ASIDE FROM THE USE OF MAGICAL OBJECTS OR TALISMANS, THE TWO MOST PREFERRED GIMMICKS ARE MAGIC WORDS--INCANTATIONS--AND INSCRIBED MAGICAL PATTERNS: PENTACLES, ARCANE DOODLES. RIGHT? OKDAY. NOW, MAGIC IS APRECISE ART, FOR ALL THE HOCUS-POCUS. FOR INSTANCE, YOU GOTTA INSCRIBE A PENTAGRAM JUST RIGHT OR IT WON'T WORK. SAME GOES FOR INCANTATIONS. FLUB A LINE, AND THE SPELL FIZZLES. WEL, YOU CAN GET NO END OF PRECISION WITH GRAPHIC SOFTWARE, AND AT 20 MEGAHERTZ YOU CAN REPEAT AN INCANTATIO SEVERAL MILLION TIMES A SECOND. GOT IT SO FAR? " [The main character runs a computer program that is an interface between the computer and occult/magical power. This is the central plot element of the novel. Refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]

witch USA 1993 DeChance, John. MagicNet. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 28. Pg. 28: "THE SPELLS YOU GET OUT OF BOOKS ON WITCHCRAFT IN ANY PUBLIC LIBRARY--SOME OF THAT'S THE GENUINE ARTICLE ALL RIGHT, BUT MOST OF WAS DELIBERATELY DISTORTED IN ANTIQUITY, BY HIGH PRIESTS AND COURT MAGICIANS AND THE LIKE, FOR REASONS OF SECURITY. CLASSIFIED MATERIAL. THE REAL MCCOY WAS EVENTUALLY LOST, AND THE MAGIC DIED OUT. EVER WONDER WHY THE OLD TESTAMENT, FOR INSTANCE, TAKES EFFICACIOUS MAGIC AS A GIVEN? PHARAOH'S MAGICIANS WORKED THE RIGHT STUFF; IT'S JUST THAT MOSES (OR AARON, I GUESS) WAS THE BETTER MAGICIAN. OKAY, BELOVED INFIDEL, MAYBE EXODUS IS MORE FICTION THAN FACT, BUT IT JUST MAY BE THAT THE 'NONFICTION NOVEL' IS OLDER THAN TRUMAN CAPOTE. IN ANY EVENT, THE OLD STUFF WORKS, IF YOU DO IT RIGHT. "; Pg. 34, 42, etc: Merlin
witch USA 1993 DeChance, John. MagicNet. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 64. "'You're going to need help.'

'Sima?'

'Not Sima. You need someone who understand magic.'

'And who might that be?'

'Woman by the name of Jill Lo Bianco.'

'Unusual name.'

'She's different. Actually, she's a witch.'

'Witch, huh?' I gave up a groaning, eschatological sigh.

'Pretty, too. But . . . Look give her a call...' " [Much more about this witch character, not in DB.]

witch USA 1993 Ellison, Harlan. Mefisto in Onyx. Shingletown, CA: Mark. V. Ziesing Books (1993); pg. 80. "...stoned and drowned the Salem witches... "
witch USA 1995 Chalker, Jack L. The Cybernetic Walrus (Book One of The Wonderland Gambit). New York: Ballantine (1995); pg. 143. "You want a world with an Easter Bunny, you got to take all the rest, too. Santa Claus, Jack Frost, Halloween witches, Humpty Dumpty--you see how it goes? "
witch USA 1996 Swanwick, Michael. "Covenant of Souls " in Omni Visions One (Ellen Datlow, ed). Greensboro, NC: Omni Books (1993; story copyright 1986); pg. 177. "The acid was in the glue backing of a Mickey Mouse decal. Mickey was dressed as the Sorcerer's Apprentice, gesturing up stars... "
witch USA 1996 Willis, Connie. Bellwether. New York: Bantam Spectra (1997; 1st ed. 1996); pg. 108. "The Salem witch trials were caused by fear and greed, but they're always around, and we don't burn witches all the time, so there must be something else going on. "
witch USA 1997 Bradbury, Ray. "Thunder in the Morning " in Driving Blind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 182. "'Me and my magical broomstick,' he thought. 'Me a male witch riding under the autumn noon. A good witch. The good witch of the East; wasn't that it, from the old Oz book when I was six with whooping cough in bed?' "
witch USA 1998 DeFalco, Tom & Adam-Troy Castro. X-Men and Spider-Man: Time's Arrow Book 2: The Present. New York: Berkley (1998); pg. 15. "Spider-Man's adventures hadn't taken him time-traveling as frequently as, let's say, the Fantastic Four's... but he had been back and forth a little, enough to take it more casually than it merited. (He'd fought Martians in the future and Puritans at the Salem Witch Trials--after that, one's sense of awe tended to operate wonkily if at all) "
witch USA 1998 DeFalco, Tom & Adam-Troy Castro. X-Men and Spider-Man: Time's Arrow Book 2: The Present. New York: Berkley (1998); pg. 94. "'It's everybody. All mutants. All paranormals. Whether they're mutants, enhanced humans, sorcerers, cyborgs, even people with powers too minor to be of any real use in a fight..' "
witch USA 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 85. "The policeman on the beat, your doctor, your spouse: any of them might be an alien. Just so, according to McCarthyite witch-hunters of that era, Commie spies were everywhere, having disguised themselves as New Deal liberals. "
witch USA 2002 Reed, Kit. Little Sisters of the Apocalypse. Boulder, CO: Black Ice Books (1994); pg. 38. "Like the Wicked Witch Courtney thinks, Then I will be the fairest in the land. Or does she mean: the strongest. "
witch USA 2019 Burton, Levar. Aftermath. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. 142. "The thought stopped Amy dead in her tracks. What if they really were gingerbread houses and Sister Rose was actually a witch? She had read the story of Hansel and Gretel and knew what witches did to children. She didn't want to be cooked in an oven and eaten. The thought passed as quickly as it came. Sister Rose couldn't be a witch, because she had been in a church. Witches melted when they stepped inside a church. Everyone knew that. "
witch USA 2020 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 23. "My great-aunt Rebecca, Grandma Imogene's older sister, had been a witch, the recognized matriarch of a number of covens of the exponents of the ancient Wicca faith, who danced naked in the forests of the upper Midwest. " [See other refs. under 'Wicca.' The term 'witch,' as normally used in science fiction and fantasy, is not the same as 'Wiccan' (an adherent of the modern religion known as Wicca), but here the distinction is blurred.]
witch USA 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 48. "A Voodoo witch-doctor could not only find hospitality at the station... "
witch USSR 1980 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 289. "'Listen, Natalie. There is an old Russian folktale. A young woman named Marushka was famous for being able to embroider fantastical designs. Her fame reached the attention of Kaschei the Immortal, an evil sorcerer, who fell in love with her and wished her to go away with him. She turned him down, despite his magic powers, for she was modest, and wished only to stay in the village where she was born...' " [More.]


witch, continued

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