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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Wicca, California

Wicca, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Wicca California: Los Angeles 1993 Shiner, Lewis. Glimpses. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 161. "'..Then once they had it they invited all their Wiccan friends to move in.'

'Their what friends?'

'Wiccans. Witches. Pagans, you know.'

Alex had always talked about being a witch in high school. She never called it wicca, though, and I'd never taken her very seriously.

'Are we talking Aleister Crowley and sacrificing animals and all that?'

'Basically they worship the Goddess and keep a low profile. They're trying to kick technology.'

'What about you? Are you into all this Goddess stuff?' I had a sinking fear that this woman, who had started out so interesting, would end up having some prefab belief system.

'If you want to have a religion, it seems better than most. It reveres women, for one thing, instead of being terrified or hostile like most of Western culture. It respects life and doesn't believe in [expletive] up the planet. I'm not real comfortable with the supernatural parts, but the here-and-now agenda sounds okay.' " [More.]

Wicca California: Los Angeles 1993 Shiner, Lewis. Glimpses. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 164. "'Lori told me you guys are witches.'

Her 'yeah' sounded like 'jah.' 'Pagans, witches, whatever you want to call us. We worship the Goddess, which basically is Gaia, the Earth. We see her as a living being. We try to live inside her rhythms. To be clean and peaceful and reverent.'

Jeff, on the other side of her, said, 'Sounds like the Boy Scouts.' Then we had to explain to her what Boy Scouts are and how they're different from Hitler Youth, which turned out to be tricky. "

Wicca California: Los Angeles 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 236. "The formation of the Witch's Cradle took the better part of a quarter-hour. In response to every change in direction, Bridget's gray mane flowed in great arcs around her head like storm-tossed waves crashing on an ancient, hidden shore.

'The world has never seen the likes of this,' she marveled. 'The greatest wpell any Wiccan could cast. The final battle with the Usurper.'...

'Now,' the crone said, drifting toward the altar, 'an invocation to the Goddess. Ann?' " [Other Wiccan or pseudo-Wiccan material in this part of the book, not in DB.]

Wicca New York: New York City 2075 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 22. "On the same discussion group, Wiccan High Priestess Sapphire Whitewater publicly offered McMannus an invitation to convert. 'McMannus is precisely the kind of woman my coven is looking for. Strong, self-reliant, and darling. Some might call those the qualities of a bitch, but I say they are the qualities of a witch.'

McMannus has not yet replied to Whitewater's offer. "

Wicca North Carolina 1998 Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Holly Lisle. In the Rift. New York: Baen (1998); pg. 6. "Worse, she'd lied when they asked her if she knew why anyone might want to hurt her. She wasn't about to admit to the police in a small North Carolina town that she'd been attacked because she was Wiccan--a witch. Freedom of religion might be a constitutionally protected right, but that didn't mean anything in most small towns if the believer belonged to the wrong religion, and Kate knew it. She'd learned the hard way to keep her mouth shut. So what she did know about her attackers--that they were after her because of her religion--the police didn't find out. As a result, they were all very caring but not very helpful. " [The main character is a Wiccan. Many refs. to Wicca, and to more fanciful fantasy-type paganism when she finds herself transported to a magical realm. Only some example refs. in DB. Only a few refs. to 'Wicca' by name, however. All such refs. are thought to be in DB.]
Wicca North Carolina 1998 Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Holly Lisle. In the Rift. New York: Baen (1998); pg. 14. "She had always prided herself on her ability to take the unexpected in stride. As a Wiccan, she accepted the reality of magic in the universe--she just hadn't anticipated having it intrude so blatantly on her. "
Wicca North Carolina 1998 Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Holly Lisle. In the Rift. New York: Baen (1998); pg. 179. "'I'm not a Satan worshipper, Lisa.'

'Then why did your family say you were?'

'They didn't. They said I practiced witchcraft.'

'And . . .?'

'They aren't the same.'

'They are as far as I'm concerned.. You a witch?'

Kate thought, I could fire her. I should fire her. Except then I'd have to pay her unemployment, and I don't think right now I want to be that generous. She said, 'In case you didn't realize this, I'll tell you that freedom of religion is guaranteed in the United States of America, and my religion is no more your business than yours is mine.

'Are . . . you . . . a witch?'

...'I'm Wiccan,' she said. 'Pagan.'

'I QUIT!' Lisa shrieked. 'Do you hear me? I quit! And if you want your horses fed, you can do it yourself!' "

Wicca Texas: Galveston 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 13. "'Are you telling me these are love potions?'

The reverend shifted uncomfortably... 'Mrs. Webster, please don't mistake me for a witch. The Church of Wicca are reactionaries. And no, these aren't love potions, not in the folklore sense...' "

Wicca United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Woolley, Persia. Queen of the Summer Stars. New York: Poseidon Press (1990); pg. 121. "The nausea returned as I sat up, and I patted Brigit's hand. It was she who had suggested that my upset stomach might be caused by pregnancy, if the wicca's charm had worked. "
Wicca United Kingdom: England 1982 Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. vi. [Acknowledgments.] "I have read, though not slavishly followed, the works of Margaret Murray and several books on Gardnerian Wicca. "
Wicca USA 2020 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 23. "My great-aunt Rebecca, Grandma Imogene's older sister, had been a witch, the recognized matriarch of a number of covens of the exponents of the ancient Wicca faith, who danced naked in the forests of the upper Midwest. Rebecca had been far less public about her talents and influence than some of the other extrawordly seekers and scoundrels of the family, and for good reason. Among us all, Rebecca seemingly had been the one with the most money. She'd lived in a big home with little gargoyles decorating the window panes and lots of animist paraphernalia around its dark interior. Instead of a lawn she had an extensive herb garden, and little flower pots growing sprigs of all sorts of unfamiliar flora had hung near al the entrances and exterior walkways of the big old place. Toward the end of her life she'd become interested in feng shui... "
Wicca USA 2020 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 24. "Before her death she'd [great-aunt Rebecca, a Wiccan] told my older sister, Minerva, that she was passing the mantle of her responsibilities on to her. Minerva, a mother of two who had served as an Army nurse in the War in Europe, and active in her local chapter of the Jaycees at the time, had been horrified. To this day, Minerva says, she is forever turning away from her door potential acolytes who appear looking for poultices and cures and blessings. "
Wicca world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 57. "Rhoda Chief, vocalist and apprentice witch, sampled some of her own Kool-Aid early in the evening. She wore... "
Wicca world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 48-49. "Rhoda Chief, the vocalist who sang with the Heads of Easter Island... A former Processene and Scientologist, currently going the Wicca route, the buxom Rhoda was renowned through show biz for..., a reputation which often provoked certain Satanists on the Linda Lovelace for President Committee to send very deadly vibes in her direction, all of which bounced off due to her Wicca shield. She was also possibly the greatest singer of her generation... Actually, the idea had been subtly planted in her consciousness by the leader of her Wiccan, an astonishingly beautiful woman with flaming red hair and smoldering green eyes who had once played a starring role in a Black Mass celebrated by Padre Pederistia... " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Wicca world 2093 Kube-McDowell, Michael. The Quiet Pools. New York: Ace (1990); pg. 233. "'I wanted to wish you happy holidays,' he said. 'Are you going to do anything special?'

'I don't celebrate winter holiday anymore, Christopher,' she said with a politely tolerant smile. 'I didn't believe in most of it, and the rest has been a disappointment. It's rained for Solstice Moon three years running. Santa Claus is just a nice old man with whiskers, and I'm still waiting for Jesus to decide he wants me. Hardly any point, wouldn't you say?' "

Wichita United Kingdom: London 1500 C.E. Moorcock, Michael. Gloriana. New York: Warner Books (1986; c 1978); pg. 254. "And from beyond Albion came Sir Hakan of Tauron, the Huron King, with his armour all decorated with warfeathers and beads; Sir Herlwin of Wicheetaw [Wichita]... "
Winnebago Minnesota 1998 Erdrich, Louise. The Antelope Wife. New York: HarperCollins (1998); pg. 127. "'...A Ho Chunk dog. A Sioux dog. Ojibwa dog, too... The Ho Chunk Winnebago dog says...' "
Winnebago USA 1975 Willis, Connie. "The Last of the Winnebagos " in Impossible Things. New York: Bantam (1994; story copyright 1988); pg. 32. "'Did you get the stuff on the Winnebago Indians?' I asked her.

'Yes. They were in Wisconsin, but they're not anymore. In the mid-seventies there were sixteen hundred of them on the reservation and about forty-five hundred altogether, but by 2000 the number was down to five hundred, and now they don't think there are any left, and nobody knows what happened to them.

I'll tell you what happened to them, I thought. Almost all of them were killed in the first wave, and people blamed the government and the Japanese and the ozone layer... and the last of the Winnebagos sat in a cage somewhere, and if I had been there, I would probably have taken his picture.

'I called the Bureau of Indian Affairs,' Ramirez said, 'and they're supposed to call me back, and you don't give a damn about the Winnebagos. You just wanted to get me off the subject...' "

Winnebago USA 1992 Simmons, Dan. "Sleeping with Teeth Women " in Lovedeath. New York: Warner Books (1993); pg. 122. "There were older enemies such as the Omahas, Otos, Winnebagoes, and Missouris, whose land the Ikce Wicasa had stolen... "
Winnebago USA 2000 Willis, Connie. "The Last of the Winnebagos " in Impossible Things. New York: Bantam (1994; story copyright 1988); pg. 32. "'Did you get the stuff on the Winnebago Indians?' I asked her.

'...In the mid-seventies there were 1,600 of them on the reservation and about 4,500 altogether, but by 2000 the number was down to five hundred... "

witch Alabama 1981 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 505. "'Anthony, tell me who you think wrote this:

Preachers . . . 'dead the advance of science as witches do the approach of daylight and scowl on the fatal harbinger announcing the subversion of the duperies on which they live.' '

...'Tell me who you think wrote that, Anthony.'

Harod shrugged. 'H. L. Mencken? Madalyn Murray O'Hair?'

Sutter shook his head. 'Jefferson, Anthony. Thomas Jefferson.' "

witch Antarctica 1999 Batchelor, John Calvin. The Birth of the People's Republic of Antarctica. New York: Dial Press (1983); pg. 258. "More seriously, most seriously, why did Lamba curse herself with the role of witchcraft? Abigail said it was her fear of Grandfather. Wise men might suggest that it had to do with the desertion of Zoe, Lamba's twisted way of both emulating and defying her scold of a father. "
witch Australia 2025 Egan, Greg. "Cocoon " in Isaac Asimov's Detectives (Gardner Dozois and Sheila Williams, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1994); pg. 68. "By keeping silent on the issue, she'd minimized the risk of being seen to have launched a witch-hunt. Telling me to go look for homosexual terrorists might have put LEI in a very unsympathetic light... "
witch Brazil: Nova Roma 1983 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 9: "Arena ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Nov 1983); pg. 8. Selene: "But how often have I heard you curse him and wish him dead? I can accomplish that task with ease. "; Marcus Domitius: "No, Selene. When Aquilla falls, I want it to be by my hand. I would rather not resort to your black arts. "; Selene: "The day will come, Roman--and sooner than you think--when my black arts may be your only hope of salvation, and victory! " [Other refs., not in DB.]
witch Brazil: Nova Roma 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 11: "Magma ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Jan 1984); pg. 4. Pg. 3: Selene: "Fortunately, however... my condition is easily rectified... albeit with the sacrifice of my loyal disciples. "; a commoner/disciple: "Priestess, no! "; other follower: "We served you well! "; other: "In mercy's name--spare us! "; [They are driven into the lava pit.] Selene: "With each death--each exquisite moment of agony--my youth and vigour are restored. Feel it, Danielle... the darkling ecstasy that sustains me. Is it not wonderful?! Do you not hunger for more?!? "; Danielle: "N-no... Yes, oh yes!! "; Selene: "We are bound--by name and blood--such a link can never be broken! As I make you mine, so shall I do the same with your fellow New Mutants. And together, we shall reach out across the world--to make it ours! "; pg. 4: Danielle: "I'm... no one's slave, witch! "; Selene: "Still, you defy me?! " [Many other refs., not in DB, throughout issue to Selene, a mutant who is also a witch.]
witch California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 104. "I can remember articles dealing to a mild religious group, somewhat like the Quakers (I was raised as a Quaker); except, it is stated, they held the strong belief that children should not be put in wooden cradles. This was their special heretical thrust. Also--and I can actually see the pages of the written article about them--it is said of them that 'ever now and then one or two wizards are born,' which has some bearing on their aversion to wooden cradles; if you put an infant or baby who is a wizard--a future wizard--into a wooden cradle, evidently he will gradually lose his powers. "
witch California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 107. "A sufficiently advanced technology would seem to us to be a form of magic; Arthur C. Clarke has pointed that out. A wizard deals with magic; ergo, a "wizard' is someone in possession of a highly sophisticated technology, one which baffles us. Someone is playing a board game with time, someone we can't see. "
witch California 1975 Dick, Philip K. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. New York: Timescape Books (1982); pg. 45. "'...The witch in Purcell's Dido and Aenaes.' "
witch California 1985 Bear, Greg. Blood Music. New York: Arbor House (2002; c. 1985); pg. 93. "As for Mother . . . " The tension in his hand wsa clear. "Witch. Witch and spook for parents. Changeling child. When small things make big changes. " [A few other refs., not in DB.]
witch California 1989 Dunn, J. R. "The Gates of Babel " in Omni Visions One (Ellen Datlow, ed). Greensboro, NC: Omni Books (1993; story copyright 1989); pg. 77. "They didn't have to wear medallions or flowing robes. McCune had seen them all since he had started at the Journal: Atlanteans, witches, flat-earthers. California bred 'em like oranges and the first place they headed was a newspaper. "
witch California 1994 Dick, Philip K. A Scanner Darkly. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1977); pg. 161. "She used to stand there and watch me do this... back then, flashing me 'Die!' messages, like they say in transactional analysis. Die. Do not be. Witch messages. A whole bunch of them... "
witch California 2025 Ziemianski, Dale D. "The Ebbing " in L. Ron Hubbard Presents The Best of Writers of the Future (Algis Budrys, ed.) Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (2000; c. 1985); pg. 101. "'What was it, anyway?' Kathy raised a hand to brush hair out of her eyes. 'It seemed so real!'

'Magic.'...

'You mean, real magic?... You believe in that?'

'Yes.' He supported her with one arm and steered her quickly away from the wreck and the corpses. 'I'm Native American. I believe in a lot of things you'd probably call magic or superstition.'

...'So what's the magic that's been out to get us today? A spell cast by an evil sorcerer?'

'Not likely.' Dave shook his head. 'Magic is based on nature. Everything in nature has a spirit, and sometimes spirits speak to us or give us visions. A human magician can call on these forces, and maybe focus them--but the real power comes from the Earth.' " [More.]

witch California 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 97. "Despite the Act's stated favoritism toward Original American rights, it was the Wiccans of Massachusetts who were the first to register under this Act, claiming their history of practice in America can be substantiated by the Salem witch trials. As more and more formally outlawed groups discovered ways to prove a history of practice, the Act has fallen under harsh criticism. Presidential candidate Etienne Letourneau (New Right) has vowed to find a way to 'strike a blow against this regressive Act and make America safe from the lunatic fringe.' "
witch California: Los Angeles 1986 Bear, Greg. The Serpent Mage. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1986); pg. 4. "'The way you look at customers. Friendly, but . . . Spooky. Distant. Like you're coming from someplace a hell of a long ways from here. They don't notice. I do. So does Juanita. She thinks you're a brujo, pardon my Spanish.'

Michael had learned enough Spanish... to puzzle out the brujo was the masculine for bruja, witch. 'That's silly,' he said, staring off at the cans on their gray metal shelves.

'I agree with her. Maybe even, pardon me, a dybbuk...' " [More, pg. 5, etc. Witches and magic are a major part of this novel.]

witch California: Los Angeles 1986 Bear, Greg. The Serpent Mage. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1986); pg. 86. "'You know I've always preferred Updike to Tolkien.'

Witches of Eastwick?' John asked with a small grin.

'It wasn't like Tolkien,' Michael said. "

witch California: Los Angeles 1986 Bear, Greg. The Serpent Mage. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1986); pg. 116. "'I'm not excited now about strangeness. I was. It seemed fantastic, people disappearing, fairies coming back to earth, old sorcerers battling it out with music. Now it just seems like maybe the Middle East. Terrorists. Murder. No different.' "
witch California: Los Angeles 1993 Shiner, Lewis. Glimpses. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 161. "'..Then once they had it they invited all their Wiccan friends to move in.'

'Their what friends?'

'Wiccans. Witches. Pagans, you know.'

Alex had always talked about being a witch in high school. She never called it wicca, though, and I'd never taken her very seriously.

'Are we talking Aleister Crowley and sacrificing animals and all that?'

'Basically they worship the Goddess and keep a low profile. They're trying to kick technology.' "

witch California: Los Angeles 1993 Shiner, Lewis. Glimpses. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 164. "'Lori told me you guys are witches.'

Her 'yeah' sounded like 'jah.' 'Pagans, witches, whatever you want to call us. We worship the Goddess, which basically is Gaia, the Earth. We see her as a living being. We try to live inside her rhythms. To be clean and peaceful and reverent.'

Jeff, on the other side of her, said, 'Sounds like the Boy Scouts.' Then we had to explain to her what Boy Scouts are and how they're different from Hitler Youth, which turned out to be tricky. "

witch California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 91. "'What kind of mediums?'...

Canov shrugged. 'Hispanic brujas, a team of psychics from USC, autistic kids, ghost-sniffing dogs... "

witch California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 292. "He remembered how she had bravely pretended to be eager to go witchcraft-shopping this morning, when he had been ready to sit holed up in the apartment all weekend... "
witch California: Los Angeles 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 71. "Golding sounded almost defensive. 'I'm merely saying that--historically--it's been downhill all the way, religion-wise. Besides, witchcraft per se is a craft, not a religion. It's a primitive form of scienc conducted by members of a religion. In much the same way Lysenkoism was a crude science conduced by members of the Marxist faith.' " [Some other refs. not in DB.]
witch California: San Francisco 1977 Leiber, Fritz. Our Lady of Darkness. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1977) [Book jacket] "Sometime during a three-year drunk in San Francisco, Franz Westen, a pulp author, bought two strange books. One was Megapolismancy--a 'science of cities'--by the black magician and socialite Thibaut de Castries; the other an early journal of Clark Ashton Smith, a writer of horror stories. As Westen tries to piece his life together, these books draw him to the ashes of a wealthy, brilliant and degenerate bohemian cult, and to a grotesque living world of technological curses. "
witch California: San Francisco 1977 Leiber, Fritz. Our Lady of Darkness. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1977); pg. 3. "novelizing the TV program 'Weird Underground,' so that the mob of viewers could also read, if they wanted to, something like the melange of witchcraft, Watergate, and puppy love they watched on the tube. "
witch California: San Francisco 1977 Leiber, Fritz. Our Lady of Darkness. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1977); pg. 168. "Hecate, or the Future of Witchcraft by Yeats ('Why did you have that book destroyed, William Butler?') "
witch Canada 1993 Katz, Welwyn Wilton. Come Like Shadows. Regina, Saskatchewan: Coteau Books (2001; 1993) [Book jacket] "Sixteen-year-old Kinny O'Neil lands a dream job at the famed Stratford Theatre Festival, assisting in the summer production of Macbeth. But the dream quickly becomes a nightmare, when the head witch is killed at the very first rehearsal. Is Macbeth really as cursed as everyone says it is?

An antique mirror used as a prop in the play seems to have a strange hold on Kinny, and the new lead witch also seems to wield some power over her.

Bad luck continues to dog the play as it tours to Scotland. There, Kinny must face a magical threat as old as the country itself. " [Witches are a central plot element throughout novel.]

witch Commonwealth 1001980 Wolfe, Gene. The Shadow of the Torturer. New York: Simon and Schuster (1980); pg. 19. "It lies south and west of the Witches' Keep, and is separated from the Grand Court. " [Also pg. 35, 83.]
witch Commonwealth 1001980 Wolfe, Gene. The Shadow of the Torturer. New York: Simon and Schuster (1980); pg. 20. "Male children small enough to stand upright beneath it are nurtured as our own... The females are rendered to the witches. So it has been since the days of Ymar... "
witch Commonwealth 1001980 Wolfe, Gene. The Shadow of the Torturer. New York: Simon and Schuster (1980); pg. 115. "'...It's no more than it seems, just a stake to immobilize the hands, and a thirteen-thonged scourge for correction. It used to stand in the Old Yard, but the witches complained, and the castellan made us move it down here. That was about a century ago.'

'Who are the witches?'

'I'm afraid we don't have time to go into that now. Severian can tell you when you're back in your cell.' "

witch Commonwealth 1001982 Wolfe, Gene. The Sword of the Lictor. New York: Timescape Books (1981); pg. 59. Pg. 59: "'On the way here, we--I'll explain some other time who I was traveling with--few in with a witch and her famula and her client, who had come to a certain place to reinspirit the body of a man long dead.' "; Pg. 60: "'...and then the client was dead, and the sick woman who had been with us also. And Apu-Panchau--that was the dead man's name--was gone again. The witches ran away, I think, though perhaps they flew...' ";

Pg. 62: "'...I think that you yourself were the witch you spoke of, and no doubt the sick person you mentioned was your client, and the woman your servant.'

'That's because I have neglected to tell you all the parts of the story that have any importance,' I said. I would have laughed at being thought a witch; but the Claw pressed against my breastbone, telling me that by its stolen power I was a witch indeed in everything except knowledge; and I understood...' " [May be other refs. not in DB, but not readily apparent.]

witch Commonwealth 1001983 Wolfe, Gene. The Citadel of the Autarch. New York: Timescape (1983); pg. 48. Pg. 50: "'May I see the talisman?'

I took it out and held it in the palm of my hand. He took it from me, examined both sides carefully, and tested the point against the ball of his finger. 'It doesn't look magical,' he said.

'I'm not sure magical is the right term for it. I've met magicians, and nothing they did reminded me of this or the way it acts. Sometimes it glows with light--it's very faint now, and I doubt if you can see it'

...'You said it didn't belong to you.'

I nodded again. 'It belongs to the priestesses here, the Pelerines.' ";

Pg. 51: "'Good. Have you heard of the mirrors of Father Inire? Do you know how they work?

'I've heard of Father Inire's Mirror, but I couldn't tell you where I heard about it. You're supposed to be able to step into it, like you'd step into a doorway, and step out on a star. I don't think it's real.' " [Many other refs., not in DB. Pelerines appear to be the primary religious group of the novel.]

witch Darkover 4025 Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Traitor's Sun. New York: DAW Books (1999); pg. 238. "I asked Aunt Liriel about it and she said that this woman was a kind of sorceress, that she could make your mind go all fuzzy and helpless... "
witch Darkover 4050 Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Deborah J. Ross. The Fall of Neskaya. New York: DAW Books (2001); pg. 243. Pg. 243: "Laranzu . . . wizard. "; PG. 401: "It was doubtless some consequence of their intervention, for they had succeeded in blocking Tramontana's spells. Perhaps some temporary drain of psychic energy kept them silent for a time. " [Other refs. not in DB.]
witch Darwath 1996 Hambly, Barbara. Mother of Winter. New York: Ballantine (1996); pg. 9. "'Oh, yes. Ingold Inglorion, Archmage of the wizards of the West, had a way of listening that seemed to touch everything in the charred and sodden waste of the city... Gil was as oblivious to magic as she was to ghosts--or fairies or UFOs for that matter... " [Refs. to wizards, magic throughout novel, not in DB.]
witch Darwath 1998 Hambly, Barbara. Icefalcon's Quest. New York: Ballantine (1998) [Book jacket.] "While chaos reigned in the Eastern Lands, the Keep of Dare stood as a bastion against war and bandits and the spawn of unnatural sorceries... With his sister Cold Death -- a sorcerer whose magic was as sharp as her tongue... " [Many refs. to wizards, sorcerers, magic throughout novel, not in DB.]
witch Dathomir -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 145. "Some of the domes had access sockets that Artoo could have plugged into and opened, but the sockets were far too rusted...

'...and they never came back,' Luke told Artoo.

The droid issued some beeps and clicks, reminding Luke of Yoda's message: 'Repulsed by the witches.' Luke could feel the disturbances in the Force here, like dark cyclones sucking in all light.

'Yeah,' Luke said. 'Whatever Yoda encountered on this planet, it's still here.' " [Many other refs. in novel, not in DB.]

witch Dathomir -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 146. "The girl stopped, and her mouth dropped in astonishment as she saw what he had done. Luke could feel her Force--powerful, wild, like that of no other woman he had ever met. Her brown eyes were flecked with orange...

'I won't hurt you,' Luke said.

The girl half-closed her eyes, whispered some words, and Luke felt a touch, a probing finger of Force that rippled through him. 'How can you work the magic, being only a man?' the girl said.

'The Force is in us all,' Luke said, 'but only those who are trained can become its Masters.'

The girl studied him skeptically. 'You claim to master the magic?'

'Yes,' Luke said.

'Then you are a male witch, a Jai, from beyond the stars?'

Luke nodded.

'I have heard of the Jai,' the girl said. 'Grandmother Rell says that they are unbeatable warriors...' "

witch Dathomir -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 147. [One of the witches of Dathomir captures Luke.] "Waytha ara quetha way. Waytha ara quetha way!' Lightning crackled overhead and a dozen small boulders blasted towards Luke, hurtling through the air... Repulsed by the witches.

'Wait!' Luke shouted. 'You can't just take men as slaves and mate with them any time you please!' Boulders thundered around the hull of the ship, hundreds of them... She held his jaw and shouted triumphantly, 'I am Teneniel Djo, a daughter of Allya, and you are my slave!' "

witch Dathomir -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 173. "Around him, the witches laughed and taught their daughter spells in the shadows. The young girls wore shirts and pants of simple hides, not the elaborate costumes of the fully trained witches. Yet the witches seemed more casual, more cozy around their children. They removed their headdresses and let their hair down. Without their full attire, they weren't so intimidating, and reminded Han only of rugged peasants.

The witches' husbands worked silently, dressed in tunics of woven plant fibers, serving meals to the women so quietly that Han almost felt as if they must be communicating telepathically. "

witch Dathomir -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 194. Pg. 194: "He studied the walls for a moment, saw that several huge stones had been cracked on the far side. Which meant that the witches had somehow broken a hole through the stone wall, hoisted the Falcon vertically over two hundred meters in the air, then resealed the wall once they had gotten the Falcon inside under the cover of fog. The witches had done a lot of work. Given the simple Iron Age technology of the place, all of these feats seemed impossible, and Isolder realized that somehow, in the back of his mind, he did not want to know how the women had accomplished so much. ";

Pg. 195: "...and after we crashed, a bunch of witches decided to start a war over who gets the wreckage of my ship. "

witch Dathomir -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 210. Pg. 201: "'I find it interesting,' Isolder said, 'that you treat your rancors as friends but treat men as slaves. You have an interesting power structure with men at the bottom, but I find it all rather barbaric.'

'It's often easier to see the barbarism in alien cultures than it is to see it in your own,' Luke said. 'The witches have built a hierarchy based on power, as do most cultures.' ";

Pg. 230: "Leia and Teneniel followed close behind, disguised as witches. Teneniel took his hand, urged him to walk close behind. Still, Luke stretched his senses to the maximum. They were getting closer to the witches' tower. He could feel them there, ahead. ";

Pg. 239: "A TIE fighter flipped over under the force of the onslaught, tumbled toward the Nightsisters. The witches ducked and raised their hands, gesturing a warding spell. "

witch Dathomir -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 287. "Han threw his arm in front of his eyes, tried to blind himself to the atrocities, but the vision persisted... Han saw Gethzerion's hand go up, blaster aimed as if he were staring through the laser sights, and she snapped a shot into the woman's back. Gethzerion's victim spun with the impact of the blast, then collapsed, stunned, as Gethzerion pulled off another shot. A man beside the dying woman raised his clasped hands, pleading to Gethzerion to spare them. The witch fired high into his right leg, and the prisoner was thrown to the floor to die slowly as he bled to death.

These fifty people are already dead, Gethzerion [the witch] said, forcing Han to continue viewing the murders. ...When my stormtroopers finish with them, I will round up five hundred more just like them, bring them to this room to die. "

witch Dathomir -99914 B.C.E. Anderson, Kevin J. Champions of the Force (Star Wars). New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 20. "She saw tall Kirana Ti, one of the witches of Dathomir whom Leia and Han had encountered during their whirlwind courtship. Kirana Ti stepped forward, flashing a bright smile at the twins... "
witch Dathomir -99910 B.C.E. Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Shadow Academy (Star Wars: Young Jedi Knights). New York: Berkley (1995); pg. 6. Pg. 6: "Muddled memories of stories her mother had told her as a child swirled through her sleep-fogged brain. She had never seen those terrifying forms before, but she knew what they were -- witches from Dathomir who had drawn on the dark side of the Force to work all manner of evil.

The Nightsisters.

But the last of the Nightsisters had been destroyed or disbanded long before Tenel Ka had even been born. Why should she dream of them now? The only Force-wielders left on Dathomir used the powers of the light side. ";

Pg. 57: "'Nightsisters? You mean like on Dathomir?' Jacen asked.

Jaina remembered the stories their friend Tenel Ka told when it was her turn to scare them before they practiced Jedi calming techniques--stories of the horrible evil women who had once twisted civilization on her world. " [Other refs. to the Nightsisters (Jedi witches), not in DB.]

witch Denmark 800 C.E. Anderson, Poul. War of the Gods. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 9. "West of Asgard lay Vanaheim, where dwelt the Vanir. They were gods of earth and sea, harvest and fishery, plow and ship, and love and birth but also of much that was dark and lawless. They knew not wedlock, but bedded whomever they liked. Their women were often witches. " [Also pg. 270.]
witch Denmark 800 C.E. Anderson, Poul. War of the Gods. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 10. "Forth from Vanaheim went Gullveig. So blindingly fair was she to behold that she became known as Heid, the Shining One. But she was the worst of witches. Madness she sowed in the minds of men, and to evil women she gave delight. Wickedness awakened anger, which led to woe. Having brought bane to Midgard, she dared cross the rainbow bridge to Asgard. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]


witch, continued

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