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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Vodoun, Haiti

Vodoun, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Vodoun Haiti 2200 Zelazny, Roger. This Immortal. New York: Ace Books (1966); pg. 38. "'Yes.' He gestured to indicate the onlookers. 'They are all pantheists, aren't they?'

I shook my head. 'Primitive animists.'

'What is the difference?'

'Well, that Coke bottle you just emptied is going to occupy the altar, or pe as it is called, as a vessel for Angelsou, since it has enjoyed an intimate mystical relationship with the god. That's the way an animist sees it. Now, a pantheist... "

Vodoun Haiti 2200 Zelazny, Roger. This Immortal. New York: Ace Books (1966); pg. 32-33. "...Myshtigo asked me, 'Is it true tha you are acquainted with several mambos and houngans here at the Port?'

'Why, yes,' I said. 'Why?'

...'I understand,' he said conversationally, 'that voodoo, or voudoun, has survived pretty much unchanged over the centuries.'

'Perhaps,' I said. 'I wasn't around here when it got started, so I wouldn't know for sure.'

'I understand that the participants do not much appreciate the presence of outsiders--'

'That too, is correct. But they'll put on a good show for you, if you pick the right hounfor and drop in on them with a few gifts.'

'But I should like very much to witness a real ceremony. If I were to attend one with someone who was not a stranger to the participants, perhaps then I could obtain the genuine thing.' "

Vodoun Idaho 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 291. "Tom Kindle had plugged in an electric heater, which was minimal help, but what really mattered, Beth thought, was that they had come over the cascades into the Land of the Functioning Wall Sockets. She guessed it was some Helper voodoo that kept the electricity working in all these derelict towns... "
Vodoun Latin America 1980 Anthony, Piers. Vision of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (1985; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 47. "He had intended to check out one of the most modern and vigorous of the world's great faiths: Voodoo. It had originated in Black Africa and spread to the Americas with slavery. Christianity had been imposed on the nonwhite population, so these people had compromised by merging their native Gods with the Catholic Saints, creating a dual purpose pantheon that permitted them to satisfy the missionaries while remaining true to their real beliefs. The truth, were it ever admitted, was that there were more voodoo worshipers in Latin America during the 20th Century than legitimate Christians, and the depth of their religious conviction and practice was greater. Brother Paul had flirted with the Caribbean Santeria, or regional Voodoo cult, while on a quest for his black ancestry, and found it both appalling and appealing. "
Vodoun Louisiana 1966 Geary, Patricia. Strange Toys. New York: Bantam (1989; c. 1987); pg. 53. Pg. 53: "What if I looked out the window one day and there it was: Marie Laveau's House of Voodoo? ";

Pg. 85: "Then for some vague reason, I had this strong sense about New Orleans. Maybe I could buy my own charms, my own amulets.

Didn't they have voodoo shops in New Orleans? "; Pg. 102: "You could purchase the spell, get your family to wear the amulets, and make positively sure, come hell or high water, that you never, ever drove to Marie Laveau's Voodoo Shop. " [More, pg. 92, 99, 132, 145-146, 166, 170-171, 178. Significant part of this novel actually takes place in New Orleans, and involves voodoo.]

Vodoun Louisiana 1987 Shepard, Lucius. Green Eyes. New York: Ace Books (1984); pg. 34. "'It's hardly a scholarly viewpoint.' Jocundra found the idea of playing voodoo priestess to Donnell's elemental spirit appealing in the manner of a comic book illustration.

...'Well... the voodoo concept of the soul has some resonance with your thesis. According to doctrine all human beings have two souls. The ti bon ange, which is more or less the conscience, the socialized part of the mind, and the gros bon ange, which is the undying part, the immortal twin. It's been described as the image of a man reflected by a dark mirror. You might want to read Deren or Metraux.' "[More here. Also pg. 166, 183-186. Many refs. to zombies in novel, without reference to voodoo by name.]

Vodoun Louisiana 1996 Smith, Dean Wesley. "Stillborn in the Mist " in The Ultimate X-Men (Stan Lee, ed.) New York: Berkley (1996); pg. 78-79. "'De Elixer o' Life?' Remy asked. For generations both the thieves' guild and the assassin's guild had fought over the Elixer of Life. It was the very reason Remy had been banned from his hometown.

Hayward laughed, dismissing Remy's question... 'Not hardly. You and your family made sure that wasn't possible. Besides, there was too much baggage with that Elixer.'

'Den how?'

Hayward laughed, but this time his laugh sounded hollow and strained, as if directed at his own personal demon. 'I mixed science with black magic,' he said. 'Simple, actually.'

'Voodoo?' Remy asked, his stomach sinking at the thought of zombies.

'Not really,' Hayward said. 'I just studied the principles behind the voodoo and zombie legends and applied science to them. By the time Cornelia died, I had the answer. I brought her back.

...So the young girl he'd picked up in the street had actually been dead. But somehow reanimated with life. Science or black magic, she was still a zombie. "

Vodoun Louisiana: New Orleans 1929 Rice, Anne. The Witching Hour. New York: Ballantine (1993; c. 1990); pg. 470. "They also said that Mary Beth was the person to whom the black servants turned when they were in trouble with the local voodooieness and Mary Beth knew what powder to use or candle to burn in order to counteract a spell, and that she could command spirits; and Mary Beth declared more than once that this was all that voodoo was about. Command the spirits. All the rest is for show. " [Likely there are some other refs., not in DB, as much of this novel takes place in New Orleans.]
Vodoun Louisiana: New Orleans 2014 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. Crescent City Rhapsody. New York: Tor (2001; c. 2000); pg. 4. "The top border of the screen shone with voudoun symbols: a snake, a drum, and the spirit of love, represented by concentric nesting hearts. Not that she knew anything about voudoun, though her name and heritage were intimately related to the practice. She was not superstitious; her rather scattered scientific and mathematical background precluded that. She had no truck with her family background of voudoun though her grandmere, a true believer in the hybrid of African religions and Catholicism, had sternly tried to bring her around until her dying day. The images on Marie's screen had been designed as a gift by a believing friend, of which there were many in New Orleans, and she used them because they were beautiful. " [Many other refs., not in DB. One of the main settings of the novel is New Orleans, and Voudoun is used featured extensively.]
Vodoun Louisiana: New Orleans 2014 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. Crescent City Rhapsody. New York: Tor (2001; c. 2000); pg. 6. "Beauty had blessed--or cursed--most of the women in Marie's family, quadroons and mistresses and then the free businesswomen who had laid the foundation for Marie's present fortune. One of them had been the sister of the famous second Marie Laveau, voudoun queen of New Orleans, and the name had made it sway down through several rings of cousins before alighting, solitarily, on Marie. "
Vodoun Louisiana: New Orleans 2014 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. Crescent City Rhapsody. New York: Tor (2001; c. 2000); pg. 56. "'Know anything about voudoun?' she asked Hugo.

'Loas. Legba. Baka. Gad.' His head was full of words.

'The last?'

'A guard,' he said without a trace of irony. 'in the form of a brown dwarf.'

'Zombies,' she said thoughtfully. 'Maybe I'm a zombie now.'

'I thought you were descended from the voudoun queen,' he said.

'Right, and their assembled ancestral knowledge waters my brain. Hugo, I know little or nothing about voudoun. Did you ever see me do anything with chickens except cook them in wine? And leaving a dead goat on the courthouse steps didn't seem like a very useful addition to all those lawsuits I seem to have been a party to. I've been too busy for voudoun. I do know that it's a real religion, not the cartoon that some people think it is. A mix of Catholicism and African spiritism. A New World hybrid. I seem to have a bit of spare time now. And I seem to be thinking odd thoughts...' " [Much more.]

Vodoun Louisiana: New Orleans 2027 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. Crescent City Rhapsody. New York: Tor (2001; c. 2000); pg. 191. Pg. 191-193, more.
Vodoun Mali 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 289. "Laura could see it working in her face--wondering if Laura was insane, or she herself was insane, or whether the bright television world was brewing something dark and awful in its deepest voodoo corners. 'It's as if they're magicians,' she said at last. 'And we're just people.' " [Also, pg. 340.]
Vodoun Metropolis 2010 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 11. "'I don't know about the science... Genetics is voodoo to me. I just knew...' "
Vodoun Missouri 2020 Watson, Ian. The Flies of Memory. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (1990); pg. 95. "As if on some elastic cord she's drawn back helplessly to the St Louis Number One Cemetary off Basin Street. She's dragged to a vault where crosses are chalked on the side for luck, an dother purposes. These magic crosses tell her whose sepulchre this is. The tomb belongs to the queen of voodoo, Marie Laveau...

'...Those demons o' yours ain't no voodoo loas. They is all your own selves.' "

Vodoun New Jersey 3417 Farmer, Philip Jose. Dayworld Rebel. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1987); pg. 30. "...a large crucifix dangled from the string of beads attached to it. He wore necklases from which were suspended a seal of Solomon, a crescent, a tiny African idol, a fou-leaved clover, a four-armed, fierce-faced figurine, and a symbolic eye on top of a pyramid. Jewish, Muslim, Voodoo, Irish, Hindu and Freemasonic. "
Vodoun New York 1988 Martin, George R. R. & John J. Miller. Wild Cards VII: Dead Man's Hand. New York: Bantam Books (1990); pg. 295. "Brennan... [looked at] the designs painted on the walls of the living room. 'What is that stuff?' he asked.

'Veve,' Jennifer said. Haitian religious designs. Symbols of the loas, the voodoo gods.' "

Vodoun Nicoji 2200 Bell, M. Shayne. Nicoji. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 188-189. "Maua had set himself up as a Macumba lord. Most Brazis and some Americans--even some company boys--went to him with their physical or spiritual ailments, and he'd perform voodoo and take money or nets or nicoji for it... He knew I didn't believe in Macumba. But I thought of Sam and what I was going to be able to do for him till a doctor came, which was not much. Sam did love Japanese mysticism. Maybe he wouldn't mind Brazilian voodoo. "
Vodoun North Carolina 1995 Lisle, Holly & Chris Guin. Mall, Mayhem and Magic. New York: Baen (1995); pg. 140. "'It's both. I don't know what kind of voodoo was going on in that toy store, but them Barbies were stacked like logs in the fireplace; those were Satanic goings on at that Kay-Bee. Take my word for it.' "
Vodoun Ontario: Toronto 1990 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Divide. New York: Doubleday (1990); pg. 78. "Spontaneous scars and wounds that appear in a religious trance are called 'stigmata.' The phenomenon occurs in faiths from Catholicism to Voodoo; an interaction between mind and body triggered by religious ecstasy. "
Vodoun Pennsylvania 1980 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 391. "'...We got two dead we ain't telling nobody about until we find the Voodoo Lady...' " ['Voodoo Lady' also mentioned pg. 393, 400, 417, 438, etc.]
Vodoun Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 277. "'It's a poem by Vachel Lindsay:

Mumbo-Jumbo, God of the Congo
And all of the other
Gods of the Congo,
Mumbo-Jumbo will hoo-doo you.' "

['Hoo-doo' is one of the variant forms of the word 'Vodoun.]

Vodoun Senegal 2015 Julian, Astrid. "Bringing Sissy Home " in L. Ron Hubbard Presents The Best of Writers of the Future (Algis Budrys, ed.) Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (2000; c. 1992); pg. 231. Pg. 231: "In the center of the stall is a small table where wooden gods sit smoking cigarettes. Voodoos. Their skin bleached white during their sojourn across the Atlantic. At their feet are ritual offerings. Bottles of Charlie and Estee Lauder perfume. Red and white packs of Marlboros. They demand tribute in the currency of the lands where they became cruel and evil. "; Pg. 233: "'A ceremony?' the voodoo woman asks me. 'I woman like you should be having three children already. Ten thousand francs and Mamissa will help.'... My heart feels like it wants to jump out of my chest. Like a voodoo animal about to be sacrificed. Calm down, I tell myself. Hadn't I lost one of my earrings? Yes. That one on the beach... It's suddenly very hot in the market. I fell ill again. The voodoo woman spills a smelly powder on me and my basket. " [More.]
Vodoun Singapore 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 193. "' 'An integrationist,' ' the Tamil quoted. He was mimicking her. He looked down deliberately. 'Oh, look--the nasty voodoo spoilt your nice coat.' "
Vodoun Singapore 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 230. "'Bullsh--,' the Aussie said. 'You think everybody's fire-wired. That 'spontaneous combustion' voodoo bullsh-- . . . They're good, but they're not that good.' "
Vodoun Spain 1963 Bishop, Michael. No Enemy But Time. New York: Timescape (1982); pg. 37. "Spoken to her face, the word bruja--witch--made Encarnacion cringe. This calumny, she well knew, derived from her singular appearance and her neighbors' astute surmise that her ancestors were Moriscos-that is, Christianized Moors--of uncertain steadfastness in their new faith. Disciples of Mahomet, the moors had come to Iberia from northern Africa. Yes, but what special allegiance had bound them before their conversion to Islam? Black magic, Encarnacion's neighbors would say. Mumbo jumbo. Voodooism. Imbued with misinformation and prejudice, they believed hera stalking horse for Satan. "
Vodoun Texas: Galveston 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 47. "A reflex from cave times when voodoo horrors stalked outside the firelight, things that smelled milk and knew young flesh was tender. "
Vodoun USA 1982 Norden, Eric. "The Curse of Mhondoro Nkabele " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 177. "Sure, people in Haiti can die of a voodoo hex, if they believe totally and fanatically in the power of voodoo. Psychosomatic medicine is still in its infancy... "
Vodoun USA 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 300. Pg. 299-300
Vodoun USA 1995 Randle, Kristen D. The Only Alien on the Planet. New York: Scholastic Inc. (1995); pg. 137. "'...The moment he began to talk to us, Russell's bomb went off, we very nearly lost him.'

'What are you saying? He nearly died? Last night?' The color had drained out of Caulder's face. I knew well enough what she was talking about. I'd nearly seen it happen out behind the school.

'I don't understand this,' Caulder said, shaking his head. 'You can't die from talking. Are we talking about voodoo, here? Are you saying Russell has som ekind of parakinetic powers or something?'

'Not Russell,' Dr. Woodhouse said. 'Smitty did it, himself. The body is very obedient. What the mind believes, the body will often make reality. People who are sick, if they believe they're going to die, often do -- on the other hand, if they believe they'll live, they can change conditions in their bodies dramatically...' "

Vodoun USA 2045 Sterling, Bruce. Distraction. New York: Bantam (1998); pg. 340. "'Well, it's something'. It's not just that they're foreigners [from Haiti]. Religious foreigners. Black, voodoo, religious, refugee foreigners who speak Creole. It's something lots weirder than that. Huey's done something strange to those people Drugs, I think. Genetics, maybe...' "
Vodoun USA 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 48. "The Holy Order of Vision, always hospitable to peaceful travelers, had entertained and assisted Shamans and Druids and other priestly representatives, never challenging their beliefs or religious authority. A Voodoo witch-doctor could not only find hospitality at the station, he could converse with Brothers of the Order who took him completely seriously and knew more than a little about his practice. Now this policy paid off for Brother Paul. "
Vodoun USA - West 2000 Gates, John. Brigham's Day. New York: Walter & Co. (2000); pg. 36. "...secret voodoo rituals... "
Vodoun Utah 1991 Young, Margaret Blair. "Outsiders " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1991); pg. 296. "I made voodoo lips. "
Vodoun world 1931 Anderson, Poul. The Boat of a Million Years. New York: Tor (1989); pg. 254. "Clara's eyes widened. 'Voodoo?'

'Voudun,' Laurace corrected. 'Not black magic. Religion. What has sustained human beings through some of the cruelst history on earth, and still does in some of its most hideous poverty and misrule. I remembered people here at home, and came back to Harlem... What I am organizing is--call it a society, somewheat on the African and Haitian model. Remember, those outfits aren't criminal, nor are they for pleasure; they are parts of the whole, the cultures, bone and muscle as well as spirit. Mine does contain elements of both religion and magic. In Canada I was exposed to Catholicism, which is one root of voudun...' "

Vodoun world 1990 Bear, Greg. Queen of Angels. New York: Warner Books (1994; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 419. "Acknowledgments

...Proviso

The vodoun described here is by no means orthodox. Goldsmith's Country of the Mind distorts the vodoun pantheon considerably, as might be expected; but I've also taken liberties with vodoun in an objective context, especially in John D'Arqueville's church. Vodoun is a fascinating, and fascinatingly changeable religion. I've tried to suggest some pathways it might take in the future. "
Vodoun world 1998 DeFalco, Tom & Adam-Troy Castro. X-Men and Spider-Man: Time's Arrow Book 2: The Present. New York: Berkley (1998); pg. 277. "Brother voodoo could only agree. 'It's like watching something long dead come back to life.' "
Vodoun world 2000 Knight, Damon. The Observers. New York: Tor (1988); pg. 44. -
Vodoun world 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 234. "'At least they got us out... It's better than waiting for those voodoo cannibals to poison us. . . .Or the globalist law courts. . . . The Islamics aren't so bad.' "
Vodoun world 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 258. "'...Nesta Stubbs is a psycho. A drug-crazed killer! A guy like that is voodoo, he could eat a dozen of you for breakfast.' "
Vodoun world 2030 Gibson, William. Neuromancer. New York: Ace Books (1984); pg. 5. "But the dreams came on in the Japanese night like livewire voodoo... "
Vodoun world 2250 Zelazny, Roger & Jane Lindskold. Donnerjack. New York: Avon (1998; c.1997); pg. 267. Pg. 14: "At first lumped together with the many short-lived cults of Virtu--Gnostic, Africa, Spiritualist, Caribbean--it [the fictional Church of Elish] had shown greater staying power and... "; Pg. 267: "He danced at a voudon ceremony, but none of the loa selected to ride him. "; Pg. 269: "The priest [of the Church of Elish] was actually claiming that the gods came among them, attended services, basked in the proximity of their worshipers.

Jay tried to decide if any other of the religions he had sampled had made such a blatant claim. Voudon's possession by a loa was the closest he could recall; all the other faiths contended themselves with some version of Christianity's 'Where two or three are gathered in my name, there will I surely be'... "

Vodoun world 2250 Zelazny, Roger & Jane Lindskold. Donnerjack. New York: Avon (1998; c.1997); pg. 348. "'Use land in the U.S. of A. They still have provision for freedom of religion in their Constitution. Plant a rumor that the attempts to clamp down on our celebrations are only the beginning of widespread restrictions on religious freedom. Lots of religions claim to manifest their gods--Catholic through the Eucharist, voudon through the loas. There are others. Make them our allies in this.' "
Vodoun world 3417 Farmer, Philip Jose. Dayworld Rebel. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1987); pg. 206. "...neckchains holding the dozen or so religious symbols. The crucifix, star of David, crescent, Thor's hammer, voodoo idol, and other figures... "
Volsci Italy -1000 B.C.E. Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 124. "Burton looked closely at the man. Could he actually be the legendary king of ancient Rome? Of Rome when it was a small village threatened by the other Italic tribes, the Sabines, Aequi, and Volsci? "
Volsci world -1000 B.C.E. Waltari, Mika. The Etruscan. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1956); pg. 299. [Year estimated.] "'...As the most courageous of the Roman women she was instrumental, with the help of her goddess, in persuading Coriolanus to lift the siege and depart with the Volscians.'

His brow darkened, he gripped the stick tightly and recollected, 'As the Volscians left they burned and plundered even the patricians' houses, so that I suffered great material loss.' Then he brightened again. 'But the land remains and we are rid of Coriolanus. The Volscians no longer trust him because he lifted the siege without a battle, although by dint of great effort they had built siege towards and battering rams with which to break down the gates...' " [Other refs., not in DB. See pg. 302-305.]

Vulcan* California: San Francisco 2310 Taylor, Jeri. Pathways (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1999; c. 1998); pg. 427. [Chapter 14, pg. 413-481, presents Tuvok's personal history, and contains extensive information on Vulcan culture and religion.] Pg. 427: "He spent inordinate quantities of time with Sophie Timmins during the last months of his senior year at the Academy, discussing the teachings of M'Fau, meditating communally, and discussing the profundities of cthia. He discerned that Sophie's fascination for things Vulcan was not merely an intellectual curiosity; she seemed to want, on some deeply felt level, to be Vulcan. She pored over Vulcan history, and studied Surak's writings assiduously.

She was the first true friend Tuvok had made among humans, and that only because she did everything she could to disavow her humanity and to inculcate Vulcanism.

...They had been studying the tenets of Kolinahr, the most rigorous of the mental disciplines of Vulcan, when suddenly... "

Vulcan* California: San Francisco 2323 Strickland, Brad & Barbara Strickland. Nova Command (Star Trek: TNG: Starfleet Academy). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 6. "Then, holding his right hand out, forming a V between his outspread index and middle finger on one side and ring finger and pinkie on the other, he said, 'I leave you with a Vulcan expression of farewell. Live Long and prosper.'

The cadets applauded again, so long that Admiral Silona at last had to hold up his hands for silence. 'Admiral Spock has time for a few questions...' " [Some other refs., not in DB. None of the major characters are Vulcan.]

Vulcan* California: San Francisco 2323 Strickland, Brad & Barbara Strickland. Nova Command (Star Trek: TNG: Starfleet Academy). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 8. "'...I would like to know, Admiral Spock, how it feels to be in combat.'

Spock's expression did not change. He said. 'Your question is illogical, Cadet Wells. I am a Vulcan. Our emotions--our feelings, as you put it--are under control at all times. Human emotions are on a different plane and of a different style. Therefore I can give you no clear idea of how you might feel in combat. However, let me say that my own mood at such times was always one of disappointment. Each time two sentient species fight, someone has failed. I urge you not to prefer combat to peaceful means of solving your problems.' "

Vulcan* Deep Space 9 2370 Peel, John. Field Trip (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 2. "Like most Vulcans, T'Ara was tall, slim, and very serious. She had long dark hair that was usually worn in a ponytail that freed her pointed ears and cut straight along her forehead, showing her slanted eyebrows. The Vulcan people didn't believe in allowing their emotions to rule their lives, and carefully kept their emotions hidden. Despite her maturity, T'Ara was only seven years old, and as a result her control over her emotions sometimes slipped. She was always ashamed when this happened, so her friends tried to pretend not to notice. " [Many other refs., not in DB. T'Ara is one of the main characters in book.]
Vulcan* France 2367 Taylor, Jeri. Pathways (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1999; c. 1998); pg. 230. "Tom had passed the time in her absence at the library, studying Vulcan cthia, the stoic approach to emotion control that had been formulated centuries ago by Surak. He found it mildly interesting but not enthralling, and by Sunday afternoon he felt justified in taking a break and heading for Sandrine's just a little early. "
Vulcan* galaxy 2151 Carey, Diane. Broken Bow (Enterprise). New York: Pocket Books (2001) [T'Pol, a Vulcan, is one of novel's main characters; and Vulcans are the novel's most important species, after humans.] [Date: Pg. 151: "'Enterprise starlog, Captain Jonathan Archer. April sixteenth, 2151 . . .'

Starlog.

'No, no--delete that. Begin recording . . . Captain's log, April sixteenth, 2151...' "

Vulcan* galaxy 2151 Smith, Dean Wesley & Kristine Kathryn Rusch. By the Book (Enterprise). New York: Pocket Books (2002) [T'Pol, a Vulcan, is one of the novel's main characters.]
Vulcan* galaxy 2260 Friedman, Michael Jan. Republic (Star Trek / My Brother's Keeper 1 of 3). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 27. "And what did the report evoke in the Vulcan . . . who had spent his life denying his emotions, training himself I the severe and spartan disciplines of the great Surak? What did he feel about his colleagues' deaths?

He felt nothing at all, of course. But then, emotions served no practical purpose. They were stumbling blocks, as Spock's father had frequently taken pains to point out.

If you wish to embrace the truth, Sarek had told him, find the cleanest, most direct path. That will be the one uncluttered with love and hate, the one free of jealousy, fear, and shame.

The path of logic.

But just this once, the Vulcan wished that he could break with tradition. He wished he could feel what others were feeling. Not out of base curiosity or even scientific interest, but because he was the first officer on this vessel and he had sworn to help his captain any way he could. " [Some other refs., not in DB. But Spock is a relatively minor character.]

Vulcan* galaxy 2268 Vardeman, Robert E. The Klingon Gambit (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1981); pg. 81. "The Vulcan meditated. He felt himself floating between worlds, soaring from sun to sun, drifting on the solar winds, plunging down into gravity wells and racing back into space. His body relaxed. The beating of his heart slowed until only a doctor trained in Vulcan anatomy could have detected a pulse.

His mind quieted and the disturbing emotions he had felt were eradicated. And once eliminated, the cause was examined in minute detail. Physical attraction? Absurd. It led only to jealousy and mind-twisting love. Discard it. Love? Only a name humans attached to a madness that seized them. Pon farr was on them continuously. An illogical way of administering to needs of a race. The seven year cycle was more logical.

Logic.

Quiet.

Meditative techniques a half million years old soothed his mind, allowed it to operate as it had been trained. " [More. Many Vulcan refs. not in DB; Vulcans play a major part in plot, and Spock is a major character.]

Vulcan* galaxy 2269 Bear, Greg. Corona (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2000; 1st ed. 1984); pg. 39. "Spock sat stolidly on his... stone meditation plank, eyes closed, deep in the mathematical exercises he had taken up lately, conditional to his entry into the third stage of Vulcan life at age 79. Kirk knew he wasn't interrupting his friend; Vulcans had the remarkable ability to devote their attention to several things at once.

'She is a most extraordinary Vulcan, Captain. I regret not knowing her better. She has pioneered new ways of logic, ways heretofore regarded as unacceptable by the Spyorna. She mated outside of family pre-arrangements.--'

'A tradition you've had difficulties with, if I recall,' Kirk said ruefully.

S...'In my case, the contamination of human blood could be brought to account. But T'Prylla is pure Vulcan, and in many ways her approach harks back to a very famous Vulcan... philosopher--named Skaren, who recommended the prevalence of inductive over deductive reasoning. Inductive reasoning is essential, but not a Vulcan's favorite.' "

Vulcan* galaxy 2269 Bear, Greg. Corona (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2000; 1st ed. 1984); pg. 52. "'They're the same basic stock as Commander Spock, aren't they?'

'They're part of the third octant Dakhrian migrations, if that's what you mean. The Vulcans, Romulans, Klingons and Kshatriyans are all related if you go back far enough.'

'And Spock doesn't feel funny, siding with humans against his own blood?'

'I'm afraid the ties go too far back for any of them to feel much kinship. Besides, who knows what Spock feels?'

'I don't understand.'

Uhura gathered up her gown and pulled a chair near to Mason's bed. 'He's a Vulcan. They have very rigid codes governing emotions.'

'Yes, I know that... But doesn't he hold opinions?'

'Not unless there's a lot of evidence behind them. Personal opinions are anathema to a Vulcan. In fact, anything having to do with petty personal traits is subdued during Vulcan education...' " [Many other refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]

Vulcan* galaxy 2269 Bear, Greg. Corona (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2000; 1st ed. 1984); pg. 39. "Spock sat stolidly on his... stone meditation plank, eyes closed, deep in the mathematical exercises he had taken up lately, conditional to his entry into the third stage of Vulcan life at age 79. Kirk knew he wasn't interrupting his friend; Vulcans had the remarkable ability to devote their attention to several things at once.

'She is a most extraordinary Vulcan, Captain... She has pioneered new ways of logic, ways heretofore regarded as unacceptable by the Spyorna. She mated outside of family pre-arrangements.--'

'A tradition you've had difficulties with, if I recall,' Kirk said ruefully.

S...'In my case, the contamination of human blood could be brought to account. But T'Prylla is pure Vulcan, and in many ways her approach harks back to a very famous Vulcan... philosopher--named Skaren, who recommended the prevalence of inductive over deductive reasoning. Inductive reasoning is essential, but not a Vulcan's favorite.' " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

Vulcan* galaxy 2270 Wright, Susan. One Small Step (Star Trek / Gateways: Book 1 of 7). New York: Pocket Books (2001) [Spock is a significant character in novel, although there is no particular focus on Vulcan culture and religion.]
Vulcan* galaxy 2271 Roddenberry, Gene. Star Trek: The Motion Picture. New York: Pocket Books (1979); pg. 126. "His seventh sense had long ago assured him of this, just as it was doing again now, that this relationship of consciousness and universe was the only reality which actually existed. The Masters of Gol, of course, spent much of their lives seeking to unravel the puzzle of how a living consciousness could at every moment be both part and All.... To Vulcans, the sense of oneness with the All, i.e., the universe, the creative force, or what some humans might call God. Vulcans do not, however, see this as a belief, either religious or philosophical. They treat it as simple fact which they insist is no more unusual or difficult to understand than the ability to hear or see. (The Vulcan sixth sense, referred to earlier, is merely the ability to sense the presence of or disturbance in magnetic fields--a sensory ability not uncommon among some Earth species, as well.) "
Vulcan* galaxy 2271 Roddenberry, Gene. Star Trek: The Motion Picture. New York: Pocket Books (1979); pg. 127. "Spock did not achieve the Kohlinahr level of meditation which he sought. He suspected that it was never to be his again. Had he achieved Kohlinahr, all remembrance of this life and these people would have become patterned logic without overtones of either pain or pleasure. Even having failed in Gol, he had hoped that the long study and disciplines would at least extirpate the emotions this vessel and its humans had once evoked in him. It was not to be--on arriving here, the mere sight of the Enterprise had increased his heart rhythms noticeably... " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
Vulcan* galaxy 2281 Duane, Diane. Spock's World (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1988); pg. 17. [2281 is the year the main story takes place, not the year that Surak wrote this.]

"The spear in the Other's heart
is the spear in your own:
you are he.

There is no other wisdom,
and no other hope for us
but that we grow wise.

--attributed to Surak " [The development of Vulcan philosophy and religion, and contemporary Vulcan religion, are central themes of the novel. Many refs., most not in DB.]

Vulcan* galaxy 2281 Duane, Diane. Spock's World (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1988); pg. 113. "Spock shook his head. 'No, Doctor, this is not a taboo subject. It would be taboo to ask about particulars--the way it affected a particular person. But you are asking in the abstract.'

He folded his hands, steepled the fingers. 'There is no context in your translation because it is probably the one concept in the language that must be continually reexperienced to be valid. You cannt freeze it into one form, any more than you would want to repeat the same breath over and over all your life. One must experience a'Tha differently every second. But that is not a tradition or a stricture imposed by people--merely a function of the structure of the universe. Your position in spacetime constantly changes: a'Tha must change as well.'

Jim shook his head. 'I'm missing something.'

'I think not,' Spock said. 'I think most human languages would render the concept as 'immanence,' or something similar...' "

Vulcan* galaxy 2281 Duane, Diane. Spock's World (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1988); pg. 114. "Jim sat quiet for a moment, absorbing it. It would certainly explain the uncanny--un-Earthly--calm and serenity of many of the Vulcans he had met: they all seemed to carry some certainty around with them that everything was all right. If this was the root of it, he understood at least some of that serenity at last. But there were problems still. 'Spock,' he said, 'in the light of this, how do you explain someone like Shath?'

Spock looked a little somber. 'Captain,' he said, 'I think I can understand your viewpoint. Humans have no innate certainty on this subject and therefore must hink it would solve a great deal. In some ways it does. But there are many, many questions that this certainy still leaves unresolved, and more that it raises. Granted that God exists: why then does evil do so? Why is there entropy? Is the force that made the Universe one that we would term good? What is good? And if it is, why is pain permitted?...' "

Vulcan* galaxy 2281 Duane, Diane. Spock's World (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1988); pg. 114. "'...You see,' he said, for McCoy was nodding, 'they are all the same questions that humans ask, and no omre answered by a sense of the existence of God than of His nonexistence. Some of the answers are frightening. If God exists, and pain and evil exist, while God still seems to care for creation--for that sense is also part of the experience--then are we effectively 'on our own' in a universe run out of the control of its creator? Such a view of the world leaves much room for anger and aggression. We spent millennia at war, Captain, Doctor, despite the fact that almost every Vulcan born knew that a Force then extant had created the Universe, and now maintained it, from second to second. It takes more than the mere sense of God to create peace. One must decide what to do with the information.'

McCoy nodded. 'And I suspect you're going to add that not all Vulcans experience a'Tha to the same extent.' "



Vulcan*, continued

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