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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Catholic, Brazil

Catholic, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Catholic Brazil 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 81. "'You were born in the wrong century,' said Bean. 'You could make Thomas Aquinas tear out his hair. Nietzsche and Derrida would accuse you of obfuscation. Only the Inquisition would know what to do with you--toast you nice and brown.'

'Don't tell me you've actually read Nietzsche and Derrida. Or Aquinas, for that matter.'

'You don't have to eat the entire turd to know that it's not a crab cake.'

'You are an arrogant impossible boy.' "

Catholic Brazil 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 94. "He knew that [Sister] Carlotta loved him but she loved Jesus more and anyway, she was old and thought of him as a child. "
Catholic Brazil 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 357. "'I'll have no wife, Petra. No babies.'

'Why not? If you tell me you've decided to become a priest I'll kidnap you myself and get you out of this Catholic country.' "

Catholic Brazil 2175 Wolverton, Dave. "On My Way to Paradise " in L. Ron Hubbard Presents The Best of Writers of the Future (Algis Budrys, ed.) Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (2000; c. 1987); pg. 323. "He told a long story about how his father did well in the wine business, until one day when he went to Mass he fell asleep. In a dream, the statue of the Virgin began weeping. Flaco's father asked the Virgin why she wept, and she told him it was because he sold wine when he should be selling hats to the Indians in the Amazon. Flaco's father became convinced he would make a great deal of money selling hats because, after al, the Virgin Mary had told him to do it. Then he sailed up the Amazon and was killed by a poisonous toad before he could sell a single hat. This incident greatly diminished the faith of everyone in Flaco's village--so much so that the villagers broke the offending statue with hammers. " [Other refs. not in DB. Other refs., to other groups, not are in DB only from previous indexing from the story's original publication.]
Catholic Brazil 2175 Wolverton, Dave. "On My Way to Paradise " in Writers of the Future: Volume III (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 386. "He told a long story about how his father did well in the wine business, until one day when he went to Mass and fell asleep. In a dream, the statue of the Virgin began weeping. Flaco's father asked the Virgin why she wept, and she told him it was because he sold wine when he should be selling hats to the Indians in the Amazon. Flaco's father became convinced he would make a great deal of money selling hats because, after all, the Virgin Mary had told him to do it. Then he sailed up the Amazon and was killed by a poisonous toad before he could sell a single hat. This incident greatly diminished the faith of everybody in Flaco's village--so much so that the villagers broke the offending statue with hammers. "
Catholic Brazil: Nova Roma 1983 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 10: "Betrayal ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Dec 1983); pg. 7. Roberto: "Blessed Saints--it's impossible! That woman with red hair--is she my mother?!! Dear Lord, let it be her. Let her be alive! "
Catholic Brazil: Nova Roma 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 11: "Magma ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Jan 1984); pg. 8. Roberto's thoughts: "Madonna! Among the prisoners--a woman with red hair! It's too dark, I can't see her face! Could she be my mother?! "
Catholic Brazil: Rio de Janiero 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 12: "Sunstroke ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Feb 1984); pg. 4. [Roberto triggers his Sunspot power, startling his father.] Emmanual DaCosta: "Blessed Madonna! "
Catholic Brazil: Rio de Janiero 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 12: "Sunstroke ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Feb 1984); pg. 11. "Nearby, Rahne Sinclair steps hesitantly--almost fearfully--into a church... "; Rahne's thoughts: "If Reverend Craig saw me now, he'd have a fit. To him, Catholics are agents of the devil. But we all b'lieve in God, an' read the same Bible--an' I can find no Scots Presbyterian cairk in the city... " [This entire scene, taking up all of page 11, takes place in a Catholic church. Stained glass windows, pews, etc. can be seen.]
Catholic Brazil: Rio de Janiero 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 12: "Sunstroke ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Feb 1984); pg. 13. Brazilian police officer, startled when Amara causes a volcano to erupt: "By all the Saints! "
Catholic California 1955 DeCandido, Keith R. A. "Diary of a False Man " in X-Men: Legends (Stan Lee, ed.) New York: Berkley Boulevard (2000); pg. 34. "For me, the beginning was St. Julian's Orphanage for Boys in Central City, California, or as I like to call it, hell. My first memory is getting beaten up by Johnny Brill, one of the older boys. So are most of the other memories. I was a scrawny, sickly, ugly little kid. I didn't have a real name. The nuns had me listed as Charles Sage, but they made that name up. When I was older, I broke into St. Julian's records, and found out that I'd been left at the orphanage as an infant, with a note saying, and I quote, 'tak kare of the boy.' " [Some other refs. to this orphanage.]
Catholic California 1962 Benford, Gregory. Timescape. New York: Simon & Schuster (1980); pg. 62. "He had a sudden mental picture of his [Jewish] mother in a black dress, walking down Girard Avenue in the yellow sunlight, peering in the windows of the shops, a full head shorter than everyone else going by. She would be as out of place as a nun in a nudist colony. "
Catholic California 1963 Freedman, Nancy. Joshua Son of None. New York: Delacorte Press (1973); pg. 23. "Born: Riverside, California
Religion: Catholic "
Catholic California 1964 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 23. "Once, in 1964, when Sanoz LSD-25 could still be acquired--especially in Berkeley--Fat had dropped one huge hit of it and had abreacted back in time or had shot forward in time or up outside of time; anyhow he had spoken in Latin and believed that the Dies Irae, the Day of Wrath, had come. he could hear God thumping tremendously, in fury. For eight hours Fat had prayed and whined in Latin. Later he claimed that during his trip he could only think in Latin and talk in Latin; he had found a book with a Latin quotation in it, and could read it as easily as he normally read English. Well, perhaps the etiology of his later God-madness lay there. His brain, in 1964, liked the acid trip and taped it, for future replay. " [Other refs. to Catholicism or Catholics by name: pg. 74, 112, 148, 204.]
Catholic California 1967 Koontz, Dean R. Lightning. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1988); pg. 100. "'...What do you think--I'm promiscuous?'

'Sheesh! Kiddo, two lovers in twenty-two years would not make you promiscuous even by the pope's definition...' "

Catholic California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 204. "'You got it. Jesus died; Asklepios died--they killed Mani worse than the killed Jesus, but nobody even cares; nobody even remembers. They killed the Catharists in southern France by the tens of thousands. In the Thirty Years War, hundreds of thousands of people died, Protestants and Catholics--mutual slaughter...' "
Catholic California 1971 Matheson, Richard. Bid Time Return. New York: Viking Press (1975); pg. 46. "Joan of Arc: 'The triumph of her career. A completely formed and finished jewel of characterization.' " [A review of stage performance by Latter-day Saint actress Elise McKenna/Maude Adams.]
Catholic California 1972 Dick, Philip K. "The Evolution of a Vital Love " in The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1972); pg. 173. "Kathy, who is a straightlaced little Catholic chick (but also very turned-on and hip) wouldn't approve. That's why it's in Latin. Kathy, I hope, will always be too lazy to get it translated. "
Catholic California 1972 Dick, Philip K. The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1972); pg. 34. "She did smoke grass once, but now she likes what she calls 'juice,' that is, legal, acceptable liquor. Her older sister Karen is now absolutely straight, has just become converted to the Roman Catholic Church -- after a wild period of acid-dropping and turning on. "
Catholic California 1974 Dick, Philip K. Radio Free Albemuth. New York: Arbor House (1985); pg. 63. "Perhaps I should speak further of Aramchek, in order to better clarify my own situation. Aramchek, an offshoot of the Roman Catholic Church, is devoted to the principle that the means justify the end. We therefore employ the highest means possible, with no regard to the end, knowing that God will dispose of that which mere man has proposed. "
Catholic California 1975 Dick, Philip K. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. New York: Timescape Books (1982); pg. 12. Pg. 12: "That is how you calculate wisdom: by who pays. I teach this. I should instruct the Sufis, and the Christians as well, especially for the Episcopalian bishops with their funds. Front me a hundred bucks, Tim. Imagine calling the bishop 'Tim.' Like calling the pope 'George' or 'Bill' like the lizard in Alice. ";

Pg. 29-30: "'Well, I am really pleased to hear you say this,' Kirsten said. 'Then you differ markedly from the Catholic Church.' She set down her wine glass. 'The pope--'

'The Bishop of Rome,' Bishop Archer said. 'That is what he actually is: the Bishop of Rome. The Roman Catholic Church: our church is a catholic church as well.'

'They won't ever ordain women, you think?' Kirsten said.

'Only when the Parousia is here,' Bishop Archer said. " [Other refs., e.g. pg. 57, 66, 175.]

Catholic California 1975 Dick, Philip K. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. New York: Timescape Books (1982); pg. 58. Pg. 58: "...at which time and place Wallenstein's fortunes were decided. gustavus II Adolphus, king of Sweden, died at Lutzen, but the Swedes won anyhow. The real significance of this victory lay, of course, in the fact that at no time again would the Catholic powers be in a position to crush the Protestant cause. Jeff, however, viewed it all in terms of Wallenstein. "; Pg. 80: "'...They ate anokhi and they drank anokhi and, as a result, they became anokhi. They became God Himself.'

'Which is what Christianity teaches,' I said, 'regarding the Mass.' "

Catholic California 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 95. "Lone Boy had heard this passage preached from a Catholic pulpit here in LaGrange... "
Catholic California 1985 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 32: "To the Ends of the Earth ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Oct. 1985); pg. 4. Roberto: "--only I can't get her [Karma's] cry out of my mind, like the wail of a condemned soul at the gates of Hell. I keep seeing her--as she was and as she is. And I am sick at heart. She deserved better, Sam--we all do! Madonna, we are children. It is not our place to risk our lives for a world that hates us simply because we are mutants... "
Catholic California 1985 Ing, Dean. Blood of Eagles. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 91. "'Wiley's like the Immaculate Conception,' Stu grinned. 'You either take him at face value or not at all...' "
Catholic California 1994 Dick, Philip K. A Scanner Darkly. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1977); pg. 119. Pg. 120: "'...Someday I have it planned I'm going over the Canadian border with four pounds of coke in it, in my snatch. I'll say I'm a Catholic and a virgin...' ";

Pg. 121: "'...What's there really in this world, Bob? It's a stopping place to the next where they punish us here because we were born evil--'

'You are a Catholic.'

'We're being punished here, so if we can get off on a trip now and then... doit...' "

Catholic California 1994 Dick, Philip K. A Scanner Darkly. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1977); pg. 205. "'I'm going to hell,' Donna said. She smiled suddenly, a broad, boyish grin. 'My Catholic upbringing.' "
Catholic California 1994 Ing, Dean. Spooker. New York: Tom Doherty Associates (1995); pg. 153. Pg. 153: "'Role model for the world's bimbos,' he said, and cackled as she pounded his right shoulder. 'All right, then, just the Catholic bimbos.' A muted squeal of comic outrage, and another mock pounding. 'The blondes? How about only the gorgeous, evil-bodied, blonde Catholics from Bakersfield?' ";

Pg. 220: "Jan, amused: 'Latin from my Ampa? Next you'll be doing 'The Bell Song' from Lakme.'

'Church Latin. Some things you never forget,' the old man said... "

Catholic California 1995 Powers, Tim. Earthquake Weather. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 13. "The waiter was Catholic, so he caught what she was muttering as she hurried past him: 'In the name of the Father, the Son, the Holy Ghost.' "
Catholic California 1995 Powers, Tim. Earthquake Weather. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 144. "I'll write him a pass, say we're going on a field trip . . . to early-morning mass at some Catholic church. I'll tell the guards that the old man thinks he's the Three Wise Men, overdue at Bethlehem. " [May be some other refs. not in DB.]
Catholic California 1995 Powers, Tim. Earthquake Weather. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 177. "...Cochran took from one of the dark drawers an old French-language Catholic missal, on one page of which Nina had written a lot of presumably important dates... "
Catholic California 1995 Powers, Tim. Earthquake Weather. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 355. "And Cochran saw the bruja of Solville make the Catholic sign of the cross. "
Catholic California 2002 Ing, Dean. Single Combat. New York: Tor (1983); pg. 38. "Gibson... was not too sanguine about Catholics, either; it was Mexican Catholics who occupied the ruins ringing the dead sites of L.A. and San Francisco. "
Catholic California 2020 Zelazny, Roger. Damnation Alley. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1969); pg. 18. "They left the office, and Mrs. Fiske opened her purse and took a rosary into her hands and bowed her head. She prayed for Boston, and she prayed for the soul of its departed messenger. She even threw in a couple for Hell Tanner. "
Catholic California 2053 Rucker, Rudy. Freeware. New York: Avon (1998; c. 1997); pg. 116. "'The customers caught their limit of rockfish, but they were cheap bastards. They were Baptist Heritagists from Texas... 'Moldies are Satan,' chirped the little DIM as it played its images.

'How bogus,' said Terri. 'How valley. And I notice they don't hate moldies too much to use a DIM for their gospel tract. Likely they don't realize that DIMs are small pieces of a moldie?'

'They [the Baptists] don't know sh--,' said Ike. 'When I mentioned that we're Catholic, they said that the Virgin Mary is a false idol. Whatevray... [i.e., whatever]' "

Catholic California 2103 Silverberg, Robert. Tom O'Bedlam. New York: Donald I. Fine, Inc. (1985); pg. 21. "She touched the face of her watch and the morning's schedule came scrolling up in clear glowing letters:

0600 Father Christie, A Cabin...

By five of six Elszabet was on her way up the steps of A Cabin, taking them two at a time. Father Christie was there already, slouched in the mindpick chair while Teddy Lansford bustled around him getting the pick set up.

Father Christie didn't look good. He rarely did, this hour of the morning. This morning he seemed even farther off center than usual: pale, sweaty-jowled, yellowish around the eyeballs, almost a little dazed-looking. He was a short plump man, forty-five or so, with a great mass of curling grayish hair and a soft pleading face. Today he was wearing his clerical outfit, which never managed to look as though it fit him. The collar was soiled, the black jacket was rumpled and askew as if he had buttoned it incorrectly. "

Catholic California 2103 Silverberg, Robert. Tom O'Bedlam. New York: Donald I. Fine, Inc. (1985); pg. 22. "But he [Father Christie] brightened as she entered: phony brightness, stage cheer. 'Good morning, Elszabet. What a lovely sight you are!'

'Am I?' She smiled. He was always full of compliments. Always trying for little peeks at her thighs and breasts, too, whenever he thought she wouldn't notice. 'You sleep well, Father?'

'I've had better nights.'

'Also worse ones?'

'worse also, I suppose.' His hands were trembling. If she hadn't known better, she would have guessed he'd been drinking. but of course that was impossible. You didn't drink any more, not even on the sly, once you had had a conscience chip implanted in your esophagus. " [Many other references to the character 'Father Christie' in book, not in DB. See for example also pg. 22-27, 54-56, 77, 87, 191-194, etc.]

Catholic California 2103 Silverberg, Robert. Tom O'Bedlam. New York: Donald I. Fine, Inc. (1985); pg. 25. "'...And then he came into view. I saw Him on his throne, Elszabet. Gigantic. Magestic. Lord of Lords, who else could that have been, with nine suns for His footstools. His brow--His forehead--light streamed from it, grace, love. More than that: holiness, sanctity, the divine force. That's what came from Him. A sense that I was seeing a being of the highest wisdom and power, a mighty and terrible god. I tell you, it was overwhelming. The sweat was pouring off me. I was sobbing, I was wailing, I thought I'd have a heart attack, it was so wondrous.' The priest paused and squinted at her quickly, a furtive worried glance. Then, without looking at her, he said in a low anguished voice full of shame, 'Just one thing, thought. You know, they say we're made in His image? It isn't so. He isn't anything like us. I know that what I saw was God: I am convinced of that as I am that Jesus is my Savior. But He doesn't look anything like us.' "
Catholic California 2103 Silverberg, Robert. Tom O'Bedlam. New York: Donald I. Fine, Inc. (1985); pg. 24-25. "'You promise you won't put this in my records?'

'I don't know,' she said...

'Then I might not tell you.'

'Is it that embarrassing?'

'It might be, if it got back to the archdiocese.'

'Church stuff? Well, I can be discreet about that. Your bishop doesn't have access to Center records...'...

'Do you want to tell me about the vision?'

...'What it was, I saw God in His heavens, Elszabet!... Don't you see, Elszabet, I have no faith. I have no faith. If I ever did, it went away from me long ago. Isn't that pathetic? Isn't that a joke? That classic clown, the priest who doesn't believe. The Church is just my job... And I'm not even very good at that, but I do my diocesan duties, I make my calls, I practice my profession the way a lawyer... does... Anyway, for God to come to me--not the pope, not to the cardinal, but to me, me without faith--!'

'What was it like, the vision? Can you say?'

'...It was the most vivid thing possible...' "

Catholic California: Berkeley 1995 Sawyer, Robert J. Frameshift. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1997); pg. 91. "'I can't marry you,' said Pierre.

'Why not? Is it because I'm not Catholic?'

Pierre laughed out loud. 'No, sweetheart, no.' " [He doesn't want to get marry because he may carry the gene for Huntington's disease.]

Catholic California: Berkeley 1995 Sawyer, Robert J. Frameshift. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1997); pg. 109. "Pierre was a lapsed Catholic; the whole idea of such a procedure still left him uncomfortable--tossing out viable embryos because they didn't pass muster. But that wasn't his main objection. "
Catholic California: Berkeley 1995 Sawyer, Robert J. Frameshift. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1997); pg. 111. "'Do you believe in God?' asked Molly.

Pierre looked down at the sidewalk. 'I don't know.'

'Oh?' said Molly, clearly intrigued.

Pierre sounded a bit uncomfortable. 'Well, I mean it's hard continuing to believe in God when something like this happens. You know: my Huntington's. I don't mean I started questioning my faith last month, when we finally did the test. I started doing that back when I first met my real father.' Pierre had explained all about his discovered paternity on another long walk.

Molly nodded. 'But you did believe in God before you found out you might have Huntington's?'

Pierre nodded... 'I guess. Like most French Canadians, I was raised Roman Catholic. These days I only go to Mass on Easter and Christmas, but when I was living in Montreal, I went every Sunday. I even sang in the church choir.' " [More.]

Catholic California: Berkeley 1996 Sawyer, Robert J. Frameshift. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1997); pg. 191. "Pierre was about to meet his mother-in-law and sister-in-law for the first time. Amanda was going to be baptized the next day; although the Bonds weren't Catholic, Molly's mother had insisted on being on hand for this, at least. "
Catholic California: Berkeley 1996 Sawyer, Robert J. Frameshift. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1997); pg. 280. "'Damn it, Pierre, who are you going to finger next? Ross Perot? He's got jug ears, after all. Or Patrick Stewart? There's a suspicious-looking bald buy. Or the pope?... guy's got an Eastern European accent...' "
Catholic California: Fresno 1994 Ing, Dean. Spooker. New York: Tom Doherty Associates (1995); pg. 100. "'Naw, that's what Jan did when she married him.'

...'Isn't he drying out in a funny farm back east?...'

'Close. What's worse is Jan's being brought up Catholic, married to a Freddie who's not dead enough to qualify for a plot, and not alive enough to divorce. Dumb mackerel snappers,' the old man muttered.

'You're Catholic,' Gary reminded him.

'I say I am. Priest has his doubts.' "

Catholic California: Gateway City 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 16. "'She's a menace.' [referring to Wonder Woman].

The words were spat into the air, hard, harsh, and Morris did not have to turn toward the speaker to know who it was. The Mother Superior, her pale face reddened with anger, her cobalt eyes narrowed to electric slits. 'She is evil, corruption made flesh.'

'Now you sound like that Chandler woman,' one of the waiting parents said, a young man Morris knew well, lean and drawn with the torment of his child's suffering.

'I have little patience for the Evangelicals,' Mr. Sweeney,' the Mother Superior snapped, not taking her eyes from the image on the screen, seeming, Morris thought, to be trying to melt the screen... 'But in this case I must agree. This so-called 'Wonder Woman' is an affront to all that is true and holy.' She turned her eyes away from the screen long enough to see Donald Morris. 'Don't you agree, Father?' "

Catholic California: Gateway City 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 66. "The sarcastic emphasis around Wonder Woman's name was not lost on [Father] Morris. 'You believe that Chandler woman? Why?'

'Why?' Johnston seemed shocked at the question. 'I thought you were a Catholic priest, Morris. Thought that would put you on Chandler's side automatically.'

'Not quite,' Morris said. The Catholic Church is not quite so rigid and unyielding as some people think. But the last thing I need right now is to get involved in a theological debate with people who take their religious lead from televangelists! "

Catholic California: Gateway City 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 13-14. "Father Donald Morris closed his pale gray eyes, leaning his deeply wrinkled brow against the cool glass of the door to the hospital's Intensive Care Unit. The weight of the nigh pressed close upon him. The long, vampire hours demanded at last their payment Teach us, good Lord, he thought, instinctively, remembering the oath of the Jesuit order, to which he did not, himself, belong, to serve you as you deserve, to give and not to count the cost, to fight and not to heed the wounds, to toil and not to seek for rest, to labor and not to ask for any reward save that of knowing we do you will. " [Many other refs. to Father Donald Morris in novel, a major character. Most other refs. not in DB.]
Catholic California: Gateway City 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 15-16. "'Oh, Father Morris!'

He turned. It was Sister Mary Anne, the one he always thought of as 'the pretty one,' her dark round face and big brown eyes seeming always on the verge of exploding from the constrictions of her habit. 'Yes, Sister?'

'They're showing Wonder Woman on the television,' Sister Mary Anne said... 'Live from Gateway City. I was going to fetch Sister Mary Angelica. she always likes to see Wonder Woman. I didn't expect to find you here.'

'I was with the little Dorrity girl,' Morris said, hating the sound of it, the accepted phrasing that seemed so diminishing, so dehumanizing. 'I believe Sister Mary Angelica is there now.'

'Thank you, Father' Sister Mary Anne stepped lightly past him, her habit floating about her. He went... to... where he knew the TV to be. A small group of sisters, doctors, and parents were gathered around the big, ugly color set, a donation from a patron who had never bothered to read the Sermon on the Mount. "

Catholic California: Gateway City 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 16-17. "'I haven't given it much thought,' Morris said. He watched now as the dancing, bouncing image showed Wonder Woman turning her captives over to uniformed police officers. 'It seems as though she performs a certain needed function. Much like the other super heroes.'

'Hardly like the others,' Mother Superior scowled. 'At least they have the proper respect to keep such differences to themselves. This 'Wonder Woman' preaches heresy and 'paganism.'

'Oh, hardly 'preaches,' Reverend Mother.' Mrs. Sweeney seemed, in Morris's estimation to be mustering all his inner strength to dispute the powerful forces contained in Mother Superior's small, stout form. 'She comes from a different culture, and she talks freely about it when asked.' "

Catholic California: Hollywood 1955 Bradbury, Ray. A Graveyard for Lunatics. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1990); pg. 13. "The man was either a resurrected Caesar or the German high pontiff of the Holy Roman Empire. "
Catholic California: Hollywood 1955 Bradbury, Ray. A Graveyard for Lunatics. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1990); pg. 51. [An actor talks about his time portraying Christ.] "'I came to this studio in 1927 when they made Jesus the King. I was a woodworker out back in those sheds. I cut and polished the three crosses on Calvary, still standing. There was a contest in every Baptist basement and Catholic backwash in the land. Find Christ!... I had a great ten-year Messiah run, until... Women felt it was blasphemy if they so much as breathed my air. Touching was terrible. Kissing a mortal sin. The act itself? Might as well leap in the burning pit with an eternity of slime up to your ears. Catholics, no. Holy Rollers were the worst...' "
Catholic California: Hollywood 1955 Bradbury, Ray. A Graveyard for Lunatics. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1990); pg. 117. "'I gave orders to cut Judas! I didn't want to make an anti-Semitic film!'

'What!' I exploded, jumping up. 'This film is being released next Easter, right? That week, one million Baptists will see it. Two million Lutherans?'

'Sure.'

'Ten million Catholics?'

'Yes!'

...'And when they all stagger forth on Easter Sunday and ask, 'Who cut Judas Iscariot out of the film?' how come the answer is: Manny Leiber!' "

Catholic California: Hollywood 1955 Bradbury, Ray. A Graveyard for Lunatics. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1990); pg. 218. "They carried the victims into the Catholic church nearby. Arbuthnot's church. Where he put money as his fire escape, his escape from hell, he said... "
Catholic California: Hollywood 1955 Bradbury, Ray. A Graveyard for Lunatics. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1990); pg. 223. Pg. 223: "Father Kelly laughed. 'As a young man I rote nine screenplays, none ever shot... Then I said to hell with it and joined the priesthood, late. It was hard. The church does not take such as me off the streets frivolously. But I sprinted through seminary in style, for I had worked on a mob of Christian documentary films...' "; Pg. 224: "'I think I will have a bit of this.' I picked up the snifter and sipped. 'Well . . . imagine that I were a Catholic--'

'I'm imagining.'

'In need of confession--'

'They always are.'

'And came here after midnight--'

'An odd hour.' But a candle was lit in each of his eyes. " [Other refs. to this Catholic character, not in DB. All refs. to 'Catholics' by name are thought to be in DB.]

Catholic California: Los Angeles 1971 Matheson, Richard. Bid Time Return. New York: Viking Press (1975); pg. 12. [Aboard the Queen Mary.] "More memorabilia... A mechanical pencil. Books for religious services; Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, Mormon, Christian Scientist--that old, familiar book. "
Catholic California: Los Angeles 1972 Ellison, Harlan, ed. Again, Dangerous Visions. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 135. [Introduction to "Time Travel for Pedestrians " by Ray Nelson] "Recently, here in Los Angeles... a sex film titled 101 Acts of Love was being shown in the area, with an X rating, meaning if you're a Catholic and go to see it, you'll burn in eternal hellfire. "
Catholic California: Los Angeles 1980 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 384. "He remembered reading The Exorcist years before and understanding the agnostic priest's glee at witnessing a power that could only be demonic in nature. The existence of demons suggested, if not proved, the existence of a God the priest had doubted. "
Catholic California: Los Angeles 1985 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 30: "The Singer & Her Song ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Aug. 1985); pg. 21. [Upon seeing a huge monster they must now fight in the Gladiator ring.] Roberto: "Blessed Madonna! "; Amara: "Father Jove defend us! "
Catholic California: Los Angeles 1985 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 31: "Saturday Night Fight ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Sep. 1985); pg. 4. Roberto: "...a punch thrown with all my strength--by the Saints?!! My fist--it's as thought I struck nothing but air... "
Catholic California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 91. "'What kind of mediums?'...

Canov shrugged. 'Hispanic brujas, a team of psychics from USC...; a renegade Catholic priest, two Buddhist monks...' "

Catholic California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 93. "In the glass case by the register were a lot of books with colored pictures of Jesus and Our Lady of Guadalupe and the Devil on the covers... "
Catholic California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 94. "This is the vein, all right, Elizalde thought dourly. All the creepy stuff that I was brought up to believe was orthodox Roman Catholicism.

She remembered her surprise when a fellow student at UCLA had mentioned being a Roman Catholic. Elizalde had asked him how an intelligent person could really believe, for example, that rolling a raw egg over a child would cure fever--and then she'd been humiliated when he'd assured her that there was nothing like that in Catholic doctrine, and asked her where she had got such an idea.

She had of course chosen to laugh it off as a joke, rather than tell him the truth: that her mother had viewed taking Communion at church, and curing afflictions by rolling eggs over sick people--or by burning cornflowers, or eating papers with incantations scrawled on them--as all part of the same faith. "

Catholic California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 96. "'...You must know as well as I do that your methods have no place in a modern hospital. Voodoo dolls!... And how many of these candles you have got on your shelves in there, the tall ones with . . . saints, and, and God, and the Virgin Mary painted on them? It's not helpful to...' "
Catholic California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 106. "'...You get his personality. They should have those priests make it, up here at St. Vibiana Cathedral on Second Street--spoke the stuff with some sanka-titty.'

For a moment Kootie pictured a breast that was heavy with decaf coffee, then realized that Raffle must have meant sanctity. "



Catholic, continued

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