Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Utah, Utah: Utah County

Utah, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Utah Utah: Utah County 1993 Hoffman, Diana Lofgran. "Other Time " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 85. Pg. 85: "Sandy wandered through the parking lot of Utah Valley Regional Medical Center, sipping a carton of milk and eating a muffin... "; Pg. 97: "She... drove north, into American Fork Canyon, the parking lot of Timpanogos Cave... " [This entire story takes place in Provo and surrounding Utah County. Other refs. to the region, especially the forested mountains surrounding Provo, but not to any locations by name.]
Utah Utah: Utah County 2005 Bell, M. Shayne. "The Shining Dream Road Out " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 71-72. "...I'd gotten one quick glimpse of the Utah County net, and it was all color, not city: I saw the sun glinting off Utah Lake and the green spring wheatfields and orchards around Alpine and a tall mountain south still on the top and I-15 heading south to that mountain... " [Many other refs. to Utah County in story, not all in DB.]
Utah Utah: Utah County 2051 Worthen, M. W. "You Can't Go Back " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 113. "I was in a small, light blue room with a huge wall screen full of menu choices. I knew exactly what I wanted. 'Computer Allocation Directory,' I said. 'List files. Anderson, Claudius A., SSN 259-67-8927-45.' All his files appeared on the screen; most had names like Provo.L, Orem.L, AmericanFork.L, PleasantGrove.L, and so on, and each file occupied hundreds and thousands of megabytes.

'What the hell could this old man possibly be doing?' I whispered to myself... The '.L' indicated that the files were linked together... I said 'Cross-reference the following words: Provo, P-R-O-V-O, Orem, O-R-E-M . . . ' I read off the rest of the names in Gus's file list... "

Utah Utah: Utah County 2051 Worthen, M. W. "You Can't Go Back " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 113-114. "A window appeared at the bottom of the encyclopedia screen. 'Names given are all names of cities and towns in Utah and Wasatch Counties, Utah, extant before the Intercontinental Nuclear Strike (aka the Eight Hours' War). Two of the smaller towns, Heber and Midway, still exist to some extent. No effort has been made to rebuild the others... So Gus was naming files after old towns in central Utah.

Just then, the 'Provo.L' file turned bright red, indicating that it was in use for the moment.

'File 'Provo.L' ' I said. 'Source of program activation.'

Another window. 'Terminal 3199A. Location, room 3199, quarters of Anderson, C.A.' " [This entire story is about a person living off-world in the future who recreates central Utah in a virtual reality computer environment. Many other refs., most not in DB.]

Utah Utah: Utah County 2051 Worthen, M. W. "You Can't Go Back " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 125-126. "We were going north on 500 West which later became State Street when we got to Orem. In Orem we turned right on 400 South. This was an area where there was a mixture of different kinds of houses... a day later Gus took me to the same area in Orem and showed me a white colonial... a few weeks after that... in a place called Kiwanis Park in the eastern part of Provo. We were sitting in a pavilion at an old wooden picnic table, and it was twilight. "
Utah Utah: Utah County 2095 Heinlein, Robert A. "'If This Goes On--' " in Revolt in 2100. New York: Baen (1981; story copyright 1940); pg. 72. "Nevertheless I lay flat in the ditch every time a truck or a ground car came along and I left the road and took to the fields again before it entered the city proper. I swung wide and entered a dimly lighted side street. It lacked two hours of curfew; I needed to carry out the first part of my plan before the night patrol took to the streets. "
Utah Utah: Utah County 2095 Heinlein, Robert A. "'If This Goes On--' " in Revolt in 2100. New York: Baen (1981; story copyright 1940); pg. 72. "I wandered around dark residential streets and avoided any direct encounters with people for an hour before finding what I wanted--some sort of flier I could steal. It turned out to be a Ford family skycar, parked in a vacant lot. The house next to it was dark.

I sneaked up to it, keeping to the shadows, and broke my penknife jimmying the door--but I got it open. The ignition was locked, but I had not expected that sort of luck twice. I had had an extremely practical education at taxpayers' expense which included detailed knowledge of I.C. engines, and this time there was no hurry; it took me twenty minutes, working in the dark, to short around the lock.

After a quick reconnoiter of the street I got in and started the electric auxiliary and glided quietly down the street... Then I drove away as openly as a farmer returning from prayer meeting in town... "

Utah Utah: Utah County 2095 Heinlein, Robert A. "'If This Goes On--' " in Revolt in 2100. New York: Baen (1981; story copyright 1940); pg. 74. "I stayed at the controls, overriding the pilot and avoiding towns, until we were better than a hundred miles south of Provo. From there south, past the Grand Canyon and almost to the ruins of the old '66' roadcity, people are awfully scarce; I decided that I could risk some sleep. So I set the pilot on eight hundred feet, ground altitude, told it firmly to watch out for trees and bluffs, went back to the after passenger bench and went at once to sleep. "
Utah Utah: Vernal 1997 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 390. "'I'm taking the Mist trail up to Vernal and Nevada falls. Never been there.' " [Here, and in other references, 'Vernal Falls' is referred to. Apparently has nothing to do with Vernal, Utah, although Utah is mentioned in the same chapter. See also pg. 391-396.]
Utah Washington, D.C. 2005 Bell, M. Shayne. "Mrs. Lincoln's China " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000; c. 1995); pg. 21. "The potatoes finished cooking, and I whipped them by hand with butter that hadn't quite spoiled yet and canned Sego milk, which works in potatoes when you don't have anything else. " [An intentional reference to Sego lily, the state flower of Utah.]
Ute Colorado 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 193. "So Cal had come to the Victory Parade. He watches a troop of buckskin-clad cowboys ride past on their skittish horses, followed by a band of sad-looking Utes on foot. Two of the Utes are doing random dance steps that appear to have no connection with anything else going on. "
Ute galaxy 4600 Weber, David & Steve White. In Death Ground. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 34. [Name of starships] "'Tutu and Ute?' he asked harshly.

'Yard jobs, both of them.' " [Also pg. 35-36.]

Ute North America 1270 C.E. Shuler, Linda Lay. She Who Remembers. New York: Arbor House (1988); pg. 12. Pg. 12: "But Kwani's emotions of compassion and kinship were mingled with distaste because he was Ute. "; Pg. 18: "Muttering, he polished the arrow. He, a Ute, whose tribe was master of vast distances, master hunters, master warriors--he, who should be roaming free, squatted in a cave like a sow boar... "
Ute North America 1270 C.E. Shuler, Linda Lay. She Who Remembers. New York: Arbor House (1988); pg. 21. "Crooked Foot yearned for a son, who would be the swiftest runner, the strongest and best of all Utes, whose legs would be strong and straight. Then, he and his son would return to the tribe in triumph, assuming its leadership as son and grandson of the shaman.

If only he could return to his clan!

...Never would he, a Ute, be burdened with an Anasazi squaw! "

Ute North America 1270 C.E. Shuler, Linda Lay. She Who Remembers. New York: Arbor House (1988); pg. xi. "'Utes,' 'Apaches,' and other tribes mentioned are ancestors of those who came later; names given are today's. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
Ute USA 1992 Simmons, Dan. "Sleeping with Teeth Women " in Lovedeath. New York: Warner Books (1993); pg. 122. "And down from the mountains to hunt on the plains came the Ute and the Flathead and the Pend d'Oreille, and while they might not have the courage to raid a Lakota village, they would kill a lone Lakota brave to show what big men they were. "
Ute Utah 1869 Bethke, Bruce. Wild Wild West. New York: Warner Books (1999); pg. 151. "'We're too far north to be in Apache territory,' West went on, 'too far from the mountains for the Utes, and the ground is way too dry for the Pueblos.' "
Utilitarianism China 2012 Baxter, Stephen. Manifold: Time. New York: Ballantine (2000); pg. 358. "Negative utilitarianism, Xiaohu told herself, reducing evil rather than maximizing good. Perhaps that was all that had ever been possible in this flawed world. "
Utilitarianism galaxy 2198 Panshin, Alexei. Rite of Passage. New York: Ace Books (1973; first ed. 1968); pg. 148. "I finished off utilitarianism before we landed.

Ethics is the branch of philosophy that concerns itself with conduct, questions of good and evil, right and wrong. Almost every ethical system--and there are a great many of them, because even people who supposedely belong to the same school don't agree a good share of the time...--can be looked at as a description and as a prescription. Is this what people actually do? Is this what people ought to do?

Skipping the history and development of utilitarianism, the most popular expression of the doctrine is 'the greatest good for the greatest number,' which makes it sound like its relative, the econimc philosophy communism which, in a sense, is what we live with in the Ship. The common expression of utilitarian good is 'the presence of pleasure and the absence of pain.' "

Utilitarianism galaxy 2198 Panshin, Alexei. Rite of Passage. New York: Ace Books (1973; first ed. 1968); pg. 148. "Speaking descriptively, utilitarianism doesn't hold true, though the utilitarian claims that it does. People do act self-destructively at times--they know the pleasureful and choose the painful instead. The only way that what people do and what utilitarianism says they do can be matched is by distorting the ordinary meanings of the words 'pleasure' and 'pain.' Besides, notions of what is pleasurable are subject to training and manipulation. The standard is too shifting to be a good one. "
Utilitarianism galaxy 2198 Panshin, Alexei. Rite of Passage. New York: Ace Books (1973; first ed. 1968); pg. 149. "I don't like utilitarianism as a prescription, either. Treating pleasure and pain as quantities by which good can be measured seems very mechanical, and people become just another factor to adjust in the equation.. Pragmatically, it seems to make sense to say One hundred lives saved at the cost of one?--go ahead! The utilitarian would say it every time--he would have to say it. But who gave him the right to say it? What if the one doesn't have any choice in the matter, but is blindly sacrificed for, say one hundred Mudeaters whose very existence he is unaware of? Say the choice was between Daddy or Jimmy and a hundred Mudeaters. I wouldn't make a utilitarian choice and I don't think I could be easily convinced that the answer should be made by use of the number of pounds of human flesh involved. People are not objects. "
Utilitarianism Sweden 1975 Batchelor, John Calvin. The Birth of the People's Republic of Antarctica. New York: Dial Press (1983); pg. 47. "Charity Bentham was a utilitarian. She advocated the principle of utility, or goodness. She maintained that only Good is Good, that only Good is desirable, that the correct action among many possibilities is the one that produces the greatest amount of Good, and that one can recognize what is Good by the fact that Good causes happiness, while that which is not Good causes unhappiness. She further maintained that common morality, common decency, and common sense are intrinsically utilitarian concepts. Rational men and women are said to know that only by doing Good can one be happy and make others happy. " [Much more about utilitarian philosophy, pg. 47-50, etc.]
Utilitarianism world 1837 Fry, Stephen. Making History. New York: Random House (1996); pg. 251. "'Benjamin Disraeli... Anti-Whig, anti-utilitarian...' "
Utilitarianism world 1946 Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: HarperCollins (1999; c. 1932, 1946); pg. x. [Forward by Huxley.] "If I were to rewrite the book... Religion would be the conscious and intelligent pursuit of man's Final End, the unitive knowledge of the immanent Tao or Logos, the transcendent Godhead or Brahman. And the prevailing philosophy of life would be a kind of Higher Utilitarianism, in which the Greatest Happiness principle would be secondary to the final End principle--the first question to be asked and answered in every contingency of life being: 'How will this thought or action contribute to, or interfere with, the achievement, by me and the greatest possible number of other individuals, or man's Final End?' "
Utilitarianism world 2000 Barad, Judith & Ed Robertson The Ethics of Star Trek. New York: HarperCollins (2000) [Non-fiction. Page numbers from book's index.] xvi, 271-95, 318, 327, 328, 329, 332-33, 336, 347-49, 351
utlanning galaxy 5248 Card, Orson Scott. Speaker for the Dead. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 38. Demosthenian Hierarchy of Exclusion described: "...Demosthenes' History of Wutan in Trondheim... The Nordic language recognizes four orders of foreignness. The first is the otherlander, or utlanning, the stranger that we recognize as being a human of our world, but of another city or country. The second is the framling... This is the stranger that we recognize as human, but of another world. The third is the raman, the stranger that we recognize as human, but of another species. The fourth is the true alien, the varelse, which includes all the animals, for with them no conversation is possible. They live, but we cannot guess what purposes or causes make them act. "
utlanning galaxy 5275 Card, Orson Scott. Xenocide. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 35. "'...Hierarchy of Foreignness. Utlannings are strangers from our own world...' "
Utraquists Czech Republic 1600 Piercy, Marge. He, She and It. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1991); pg. 214. "All seek an enemy. They are cut into sharp jagged factions, religious, economic, political, that bang against each other seeking a flaw. There are Roman Catholics, Hussites, Utraquists and lately some Lutherans, all enemies. "
Uygur Tibet 1999 Pattison, Eliot. The Skull Mantra. New York: St. Martin's Minotaur (1999); pg. 49. "...knots of Tibetan prisoners. Shan studied the others, a dozen Chinese and Moslem Uyghurs not usually seen on the road crews. "
Uygur world 2036 Besher, Alexander. Mir: A Novel of Virtual Reality. New York: Simon & Schuster (1998); pg. 170. "The only reason that strangers came to Mirkan: Sukotai, the old Uighur shaman. Their parents, who were peering from the flaps to their yurts, not venturing out, had warned them. "
Uzbek Afghanistan 1970 Anderson, Poul. The Shield of Time. New York: Tor (1990); pg. 21. "Everard recalled hovels, medieval ruins, impoverished farmers and herders, mostly Turkic-Mongolian Uzbegs. But that was in Afghanistan, 1970, not far below the Soviet border. "
Uzbek Gaia 2046 Bear, Greg. Eternity. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 151. Pg. 151: "...gave them all the fuel they needed, and maps of the Kazakh, Kirghiz and Uzbeki territories of Nordic Rhus. "; Pg. 153: "waiting for the Nordic Rhus Uzbek and Kazakh watchtowers to sense them. "
Uzbek galaxy 4600 Weber, David & Steve White. In Death Ground. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 589. [Pg. 589-590: A starship named Uzbek]
Uzbek Russia 2005 Bear, Greg. Eon. New York: Bluejay (1985); pg. 212. "The Soviets stood in silence as Chaplain Cook and Yitshak Jacob, acting as a rabbi, administered last rites and kaddish. A Soviet Uzbek Moslem stepped forward to offer his prayers. "
Uzbek Turkmenistan 2005 Aldiss, Brian. Somewhere East of Life. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (1994); pg. 332. "'Yeah, and an Uzbek is always an Uzbek... We don't owe the Uzbeks a thing, so it's no good you being weak with them...'

Someone else said this, if you can believe it: 'And what about what happened in 1916? A million Kirghizi were slaughtered, by Russians and by these same Uzbeks.'

'That's a million years ago, you fool!' I shouted. But they shouted louder... On either side of our lttle stream, enemy territories sprang up, in which Uzbeks saw us as cheats and oppressors and we saw them as murderers. " [Uzbeks are mentioned in other places in this book.]

Uzbek Ukraine 2010 Anthony, Patricia. Cold Allies. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1993); pg. 3. "There in the southern town of Brebonki the ANA [Arab National Army] lay hidden: Iranians, Iraqis, along with the more familiar killers--Uzbeks, Azerbaijanis, and Muslim Cossacks. "
Uzbek United Kingdom: London 1987 Cassutt, Michael. "Legends " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 451. "The driver was a young Uzbek from the Embassy whose professional specialty was economic analysis, but whose greatest virtue was his ability to keep his mouth shut. His total lack of interest in Polyakov's activities and the challenge of navigating London's busy streets allowed Polyakov and Tachyon some privacy. "
Uzbek Uzbekistan 2030 Anthony, Patricia. "Coyote on Mars " in Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997; c. 1990); pg. 105. "'I thought that if I walked far enough, I would get home. I was right, of course, but I pictured not arriving in Uzbekistan, but in Siberia, instead. Isn't that strange?...' "
Uzbek world 2018 Bova, Ben. Voyager II: The Alien Within. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 212. Pg. 212: "'Naturally. It would interfere with their markets. They've learned how to deal with Moscow. Let them try trading with the Uzbeks!'

'I'm going to have a try,' Jo said. 'Vanguard Industries has contracted to build the fusion power station just outside Tashkent. . . .' "; Pg. 213: "'The political uncertainties have opened the door to unparalleled opportunities for corruption. Our devout Moslem friends may be ready to give their lives for Allah, but they are even more ready to sell anything to the highest bidder.' "

Uzbek world 2018 Bova, Ben. Voyager II: The Alien Within. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 267. "'The International Peacekeeping Force? How does one fight them? They are not a nation. Do we attack their headquarters in Oslo? Do we attack their field stations scattered across central Africa? Every nation in the West and most of the Third World nations in Africa and Asia would rise up against us. The Uzbeks and Kazakhs and Ukrainians would love that, wouldn't they?' "
Uzbek world 2018 Bova, Ben. Voyager II: The Alien Within. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 338. "'Farmers in Chad want to be as rich as farmers in Kansas. Uzbeks and Ulstermen want to be free of distant governments that make bad decisions for the. Every group of people in the world is trying to achieve what Western society already has: economic plenty and individual freedom.' "
vampire Africa 3000 Williamson, Jack. Terraforming Earth. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 130. Pg. 130: "...forgot the vampires in Africa... "; Pg. 138: "Had the forest somehow possessed him, the way the black vampires possessed their hosts? " [Other refs, e.g., pg. 157-158.]
vampire Arizona 1991 Fillerup, Michael. "Lost and Found " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1991); pg. 193. "Not Hamster, but a giant rat leaped onto his collarbone and bit into his neck. Like a vampire. "
vampire Brazil: Nova Roma 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 11: "Magma ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Jan 1984); pg. 16. Amara: "The Black Priestess had drained my life away. But, somehow, the touch of the Earth restored me! My friends--Selene, the Priestess, she is a psychic vampire! She plans to make Dani a creature like herself! "
vampire California 1994 Dick, Philip K. A Scanner Darkly. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1977); pg. 124. "He could see her dimly. They sleep like Count Dracula, he thought, junkies do. Staring straight up until all of a sudden they sit up... "
vampire California: Gateway City 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 13-14. "Father Donald Morris closed his pale gray eyes, leaning his deeply wrinkled brow against the cool glass of the door to the hospital's Intensive Care Unit. The weight of the nigh pressed close upon him. The long, vampire hours demanded at last their payment "
vampire California: Hollywood 1955 Bradbury, Ray. A Graveyard for Lunatics. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1990); pg. 4. Dracula mentioned pg. 4, 18, 157, 282.
vampire California: Los Angeles 1988 Freeman, Judith. "Family Attractions " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1988); pg. 215. "They were watching a program on vampire bats on the public television station. "
vampire California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 102. "...and a few supporting roles in films like We're Not Married and Vampires Over London... "
vampire California: San Francisco 2036 Besher, Alexander. Mir: A Novel of Virtual Reality. New York: Simon & Schuster (1998); pg. 109. "Midnight at the Brain Wash Cafe & Laundromat on Folsom Street was prime time for the South of Market vampires and Valkyries to do their laundry. This was a pagan rite of cleansing that Trevor felt compelled to participate in. "
vampire California: San Francisco 2036 Besher, Alexander. Mir: A Novel of Virtual Reality. New York: Simon & Schuster (1998); pg. 139. "The children never imagined such torment, their childhood flowing out of their eyes and hearts, to add--what?--a few years to the life spans of these VR vampires. "
vampire Colorado 1988 Simmons, Dan. "Metastasis " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1988); pg. 167. "'I can see the whole damn spectrum below 100 angstroms. So can they. I banked on the cancer vampires being drawn to the stuff I'd irradiated just like the tumor slugs were. I came here last night--to the wards--to check on it. They do come, kiddo, but it doesn't kill them. They flock around the irradiated stuff like moths to a flame, but it doesn't kill them. Even the tumor slugs need high dosages if you're going to get them all...' " [More. Although not named as such until well into the story, the central plot device of the story is the cancer vampires.]
vampire Colorado 1988 Simmons, Dan. "Metastasis " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1988); pg. 170. "The score of cancer vampires in the room had finished feeding but Louis could feel his own body still weighted with slugs... The cancer vampire in front of him staggered, leaned far forward, and looked even more spiderish as its impossibly long fingers stretched to keep it from falling... The cancer vampire arched its back and raised its feeding mouth in a scream that was audible to Louis as someone scraping their teeth down ten feet of blackboard.

The slugs ripped free of the vampire's shredded belly, dumping themselves on the floor and writhing in a bath of ultraviolet blood... " [More.]

vampire Connecticut 1988 Byrne, John L. Fearbook. New York: Warner (1988); pg. 170. "'How can we be sure? No one has ever lived through anything like this before. No one has ever had to deal with a damned Catalog that shows something different to everyone who looks into it. No one has ever had to deal with something that preys on their lives. Sucks them dry. Like a vampire.' "
vampire Deep Space 9 2376 Martin, Michael A. & Andy Mangels. Cathedral (Star Trek: DS9; "Mission: Gamma " #3 of 4). New York: Pocket Books (2002); pg. 312. "The idea made her insides squirm in revulsion. She wondered if becoming joined to one of those ageless Trill brain-vampires, as frightening as the notion had always struck her... "
vampire Ecuador 1986 Vonnegut, Kurt. Galapagos. New York: Delacorte Press (1985); pg. 132. "...depicting the birds as '. . . ideal pets for Count Dracula.' This entirely fictional count, she knew, was a far more significant person to most of her students than George Washington, for instance, who was merely the founder of their country.

They were better informed about Dracula, too, so that Mary could expand her joke admitting that he might not enjoy Geospiza difficilis as a pet after all, since he, whom she then called 'Homo transylvaniensis,' slept all through the daytime, whereas Geospiza difficilis slept all through the night. 'So perhaps,' she would decide with mock sadness, 'the best pet for Count Dracula remains a member of the family Desmodontidae--which s a scientific way of saying 'vampire bat.' ' "

vampire Europe 1478 C.E. Ford, John M. The Dragon Waiting. New York: Timescape Books (1983); pg. 144. Pg. 144, 278.
vampire Europe 1897 Stoker, Bram. Dracula. New York: Bantam (1981; c. 1897); pg. 211. "'...In trance she died, and in trance she is Un-Dead, too. So it is that she differ from all other. Usually when the Un-Dead sleep at home'--as he spoke he made a comprehensive sweep of his arm to designate what to a vampire was 'home'--'their face show what they are, but this so sweet that was when she not Un-Dead she go back to the nothings of the common dead. there is no malign there, see, and so it make hard that I must kill her in her sleep.' This turned my blood cold, and it began to dawn upon me that I was accepting Van Helsing's theories; but if she were really dead, what was there of terror in the idea of killing her? "
vampire Europe 1897 Stoker, Bram. Dracula. New York: Bantam (1981; c. 1897); pg. 238. "Can it be that his instinct is satisfied as to the vampire's ultimate triumph? Stay; he is himself zoophagous, and in his wild ravings outside the chapel door... "
vampire Europe 1897 Stoker, Bram. Dracula. New York: Bantam (1981; c. 1897); pg. 298. Pg. 298: "But by this time the Professor had gained his feet, and was holding towards him the envelope which contained the Sacred Wafer. The Count suddenly stopped, just as poor Lucy had done outside the tomb, and cowered back. Further and further back he cowered, as we, lifting our crucifixes, advanced. " [More. The Catholic objects are able to ward off Count Dracula.]; Pg. 299: "'Jonathan is in a stupor such as we know the Vampire can produce. We can do nothing with poor Madam Mina for a few moments till she recovers herself; I must wake him!' "
vampire Europe 1897 Stoker, Bram. Dracula. New York: Bantam (1981; c. 1897); pg. 375. Pg. 375: "Of course he wanted to be with me; but then the boat service would, most likely, be the one which would destroy the . . . the . . . the . . . Vampire. (Why did I hesitate to write the word?) "; Pg. 376: "'...Have you felt the Vampire's lips upon your throat?' "; Pg. 386: "I began to fear that the fatal spell of the place was upon her, tainted as she is with that Vampire baptism. "
vampire Europe 1897 Stoker, Bram. Dracula. New York: Bantam (1981; c. 1897); pg. 391. "She lay in her Vampire sleep, so full of life and voluptuous beauty that I shudder as though I have come to do murder... and delay, till the mere beauty and the fascination of the wanton Un-Dead have hypnotise him; and he remain on and on, till sunset come, and the Vampire sleep be over. Then the beautiful eyes of the fair woman open and look love, and the voluptuous mouth present to a kiss--and man is weak. And there remain one more victim in the Vampire fold; one more to swell the grim and grisly ranks of the Un-Dead! . . . "
vampire Europe 1918 Newman, Kim. The Bloody Red Baron. New York: Carroll & Graf (1995); pg. 271. Book jacket: "It is 1918. Graf von Dracula, expelled from Britain, is commander-in-chief of the armies of Germany and Austria-Hungary, while Lord Ruthven, his former disciple and now enemy, is Prime Minister of Britain. Over the Western Front, Allied aces fall to the feared flying monster, Baron von Richthofen. But the War of the Great Powers in Europe is also a war between the living and the dead, ancient magic and modern science, oppression and freedom.

Embroiled in the greater and lesser conflicts are Edwin Winthrop, a young intelligence officer... Charles Beauregard, Edwin's mentor and an old enemy of Dracula; Kate Reed, a radical vampire journalist; and the resurrected Edgar Allan Poe, commissioned by German High Command to write a fabulous biography... the Bloody Red Baron. "; Pg. 271: "The ones who wanted the living penned as cattle, who felt vampirism made them Darwinian aristocrats, princes of the earth. " [Vampire refs. throughout novel.]

vampire Europe 1918 Newman, Kim. The Bloody Red Baron. New York: Carroll & Graf (1995); pg. 9. "Vampires were as comfortable in the night as he was on Brighton pier at midday. With their adapted eyes, the undead were suited to night-flying, to night-fighting. Thanks to them, this was the first round-the-clock war in history... Of course, without vampires (specifically without the brute now calling himself the Graf von Dracula) the war would not have been fought at all. The Graf's latest attempt at European power had led to a conflict that seemed to involve every nation on the globe. Even the Americans were in now. The Kaiser said modern Germans must embody the spirit of the ancient Hun, but it was Dracula, proud of blood kinship with Attila, who most epitomised twentieth-century barbarism. " [More, throughout novel.]
vampire France 1918 Newman, Kim. The Bloody Red Baron. New York: Carroll & Graf (1995); pg. 4. "Even for vampires, the pilots were unnerving. Like the French Groupe des Cigognes, Condor was a squadron of survivors... With a deal of clumping, a young vampire dragged himself down a twisted staircase. His limbs were bent out of true but he got around capably. He wiped his red mouth with a white scarf. From his flush, Winthrop knew he had just fed. Away from the lines, there were usually grateful, if pricey, French girls. If not, there was livestock... Ball pulled himself across the room, making monkey-use of hand-holds on the beams. He settled comfortably into a chair by the gramophone, eyes swimming in blood. Some vampires lulled in repletion, like snakes. In the old days, when nosferatu were hunted like plague rats, they were at their weakest after feeding and hid in coffins or graves. Ball slumped, mouth slightly open, a smudge of red on his chin. "


vampire, continued

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