Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Utah, galaxy

Utah, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Utah galaxy 2030 Hogan, James P. Entoverse. New York: Ballantine (1991); pg. 162. [2] [A planet apparently named after Utah.] Pg. 162: "'It seems that for some reason our mystical friend is attaching a lot of importance to Uttan, doesn't it? What would he want with an airless, waterless, inhospitable ball of rock like that, light-years from anywhere? It makes you think there must be something about that planet that we're not aware of--and from the blithe way they're reacting, something that the Thuriens aren't aware of, either.' ";

Pg. 307: "'...and on Uttan there's a caretaker crew of Thuriens expecting a shipload of religious pacifists who'll dismantle the military installations.' " [Many other refs. to Uttan, not in DB.]

Utah galaxy 2368 Wright, Susan. Sins of Commission (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1994); pg. 47. "'The details are unknown, sir. The Crockett was in the Qizan Qal'at system when they relayed a message to Starbase 1 that a Klingon warship had arrived. When the Crockett didn't respond to subsequent messages, Starfleet sent the Bridger to investigate.' Data paused... 'When the Bridger arrived, they found only debris in the area.' " [The starship Bridger is named after Jim Bridger, who was famous for his early ventures into Utah territory.]
Utah galaxy 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 178. "I peered out through the gap between wagon wood and fabric as we rumbled along the saltway. This vehicle thoroughfare appeared to be a strip of rock-hard salt between the villages clustered along the raised canal and the reticulated desert stretching as far as I could see. 'Waste Wahhabi,' whispered Dem Ria as we picked up speed and headed south along the saltway. " [This sounds like a description of the Bonneville Salt Flats of Utah.]
Utah Hawaii 1925 Sanders, William. "Billy Mitchell's Overt Act " in Alternate Generals (Harry Turtledove, ed.) New York: Baen (1998); pg. 161. "One exception to the whimsical atmosphere can be found at Hickam Field, where General Billy Mitchell has a bunch of big Flying Fortress bombers. I had a chance to watch them work over the old battleship Utah, which is used as target practice. They came in low and fast and they planted their bombs with the precision of top banderilleros. "
Utah Keramos 2500 Willis, Connie & Cynthia Felice. Promised Land. New York: Ace (1997); pg. 169. "Sometimes it seemed to Delanna that they could gave gotten out and walked faster than the solarises could drive through the Salt Flats. The tires squeaked most of the time because they were constantly tuning and probably also because the top layer of salt was so damp from moisture-laden air. Usually it was dry in the Salt Flats, they had told her, but the storm stuck over there on the horizon was pushing a mass of warm, wet air before it, and the high pressure behind them was just holding it in place..

'That will cut two days off the best record ever through the Salt Flats,' Sonny said... " [Other refs. The authors live in Colorado, and may have based this location in their novel on the famed Bonneville Salt Flats of Utah.]

Utah Paradise: Provo 2170 Knight, Damon. "Strangers on Paradise " in One Side Laughing. New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; 1986); pg. 13. [A planet named Paradise.] Pg. 2: "...waiting to get to the place he had dreamed of with hopeless longing all his life: a place without disease, without violence... "; [The author names the town on the planet Paradise after Provo, Utah, and partially patterns his fictional Provo after the real Provo:] Pg. 13: "They passed mile after mile of growing crops--corn, soybeans, then acres of beans, squash, peas... The forests stopped at the borders of the fields as if they had been cut with a knife.

Provo was now a town of about a hundred thousand; when Eleanor Petryk had first lived there, it had been only a crossroads at the edge of the boonies. Selby got off the tube in the late afternoon. "

Utah Paradise: Provo 2170 Knight, Damon. "Strangers on Paradise " in One Side Laughing. New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; 1986); pg. 13. "A woman in blue stepped forward. 'Mr. Selby.'

'Yes.'

'I'm Karen McMorrow. Was your trip pleasant?'

'Very pleasant.'

She was a little older than she had looked on the holotube, in her late fifties, perhaps. 'Come with me, please.' No monorails here; she had a little impulse-powered runabout. They swung off the main street onto a blacktop road that ran between rows of tall maples.

'You were Miss Petryk's companion during her late years?'

'Secretary. Amanuensis.' She smiled briefly.

'Did she have many friends in Provo?'

'No. None. She was a very private person. Her we are.' She stopped the runabout, they were in a narrow lane with hollyhocks on either side.

The house was a low white-painted wooden building half-hidden by evergreens. Miss McMorrow opened the door and ushered him in. There was a cool, stale odor, the smell of a house unlived in. " [More takes place in Provo, on the planet Paradise, patterned after Provo, Utah.]

Utah USA 1995 Siddoway, Richard. The Christmas Wish. New York: Harmony Books (1998; c. 1995); pg. 100. "Will smiled at Renee, who had begun to laugh with delight. 'And there's triceratops, protoceratops, pteranodon, dimetrodon, pterodactyl, Utahraptor, velociraptor, and anklylosaurus!' "
Utah Utah 1869 Bethke, Bruce. Wild Wild West. New York: Warner Books (1999); pg. 45. "'I am leaving for Utah in the morning. The Union Pacific railroad-construction crews are about to meet at Promontory Point.' Grant pointed across the room, to a large map of the United States. Two railroad lines had been drawn in, one in blue and one in red, with a small gap between them. " [Many refs. to Utah. Much of the novel takes place in Utah, at the time of the completion of the cross-country railroad, commemorated with the 'Golden Spike' celebration portrayed in the book and film.]
Utah Utah 1869 Bethke, Bruce. Wild Wild West. New York: Warner Books (1999); pg. 106. "'Amazonia, Munitia, Lippenreider--' Rita realized the names weren't registering, and tried again. 'Loveless's women. They talk. 'What's it going to be like in Utah?' ' Rita said, imitating someone. ' 'Can you get a drink there?' ' She shifted her voice down a key and into a Germanic accent. 'I 'I vonder if my hair vill get frizzy in zis Shpyder Canyon?' 'Mais oui, and what is so especial about this Promontory Point?' '

...Coleman was relaxing... when West and Gordon rushed aboard the Wanderer. 'Get this train movin'!' West barked. 'What's the fastest track to Utah?'

...Gordon cut in. 'Coleman? There is a homicidal madman with a gun and a grudge on his way to Utah to meet President Grant.' "

Utah Utah 1869 Bethke, Bruce. Wild Wild West. New York: Warner Books (1999); pg. 151. "'We're in Navajo territory?'

Wes nodded. 'I think so.' As an afterthought, he added, 'I sure hope so.'

Gordon sagged, and plunked down on a convenient rock outcropping. 'You hope so?'

West came over and sat down next to him. 'It's like this. We were in Texas. We were on our way to Utah. That means there's only about a half dozen places where Loveless could have dumped us.' West... looked around. 'This don't look like Cherokee country.' "

Utah Utah 1869 Bethke, Bruce. Wild Wild West. New York: Warner Books (1999); pg. 211. "The crowd pulled a string and the names of Colorado, Utah, Kansas, and Nevada fell away, to be replaced by 'Loveless Land.' " [The bad guy intends to name this region of the country after himself.]
Utah Utah 1869 Bethke, Bruce. Wild Wild West. New York: Warner Books (1999); pg. 177. "'No,' West said, a touch too quickly. 'I mean, this is definitely Utah, and we are definitely in the right part of the Promontory Mountains. I can tell you that we are really close to Spider Canyon. But--' "
Utah Utah 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 119. [Chapter 28] The train, on leaving Great Salt Lake at Ogden, passed northward for an hour as far as Weber River, having completed nearly nine hundred miles from San Francisco. From this point it took an easterly direction towards the jagged Wahsatch Mountains. It was in the section included between this range and the Rocky Mountains that the American engineers found the most formidable difficulties in laying the road, and that the government granted a subsidy of forty-eight thousand dollars per mile, instead of sixteen thousand allowed for the work done on the plains. But the engineers, instead of violating nature, avoided its difficulties by winding around, instead of penetrating the rocks. One tunnel only, fourteen thousand feet in length, was pierced in order to arrive at the great basin.
Utah Utah 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 119. [Chapter 28] The track up to this time had reached its highest elevation at the Great Salt Lake. From this point it described a long curve, descending towards Bitter Creek Valley, to rise again to the dividing ridge of the waters between the Atlantic and the Pacific. There were many creeks in this mountainous region, and it was necessary to cross Muddy Creek, Green Creek, and others, upon culverts.
Utah Utah 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 20. "'Sam!' Clay Herndon spoke sharply. 'Sam, you're wool-gathering again.'

'The devil I am,' Samuel Clemens replied, though his friend's comment did return his attention to the cramped office of the San Francisco Morning Call. 'I was trying to come up with something for tomorrow's editorial, and I'm dry as the desert between Great Salt Lake and Virginia City. I hate writing editorials, do yo know that?' "

Utah Utah 1942 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Upsetting the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1996); pg. 128. "Eastern Washington, as seen from US 410, reminded him of Utah: very fertile when next to a river or irrigated, otherwise pale alkali flats with not much more than sagebrush growing on them. He'd always thought of Washington as full of pines and moss and ferns, with water dripping everywhere all the time. This part of the state didn't live up to the description. " [Jens Larssen's thoughts]
Utah Utah 1942 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Upsetting the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1996); pg. 162. "Yeager thought of all the pulp science-fiction stories he'd read where an inventor had an idea one day, built it the next, and mass-produced it the day after that, generally just in time to save the world from the Martians. He'd always taken those with a grain of salt about the size of the Great Salt Flats outside Salt Lake City. Real life didn't work that way. " [Jens Larssen's thoughts]
Utah Utah 1942 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Upsetting the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1996); pg. 222. "He scratched absently at a flake of peeling skin on his wrist. Back in Ogden, Utah, that doctor--Sharp, that was his name--had said some small-town doc might have some sulfa to give him to get rid of the clap. He'd tried once or twice on his way here, but no sawbones had any, or been willing to use it on somebody just passing through. As long as he was here, he figured he might as well ask this one, too. If he heard no, he heard no. He'd heard it before. " [Jens Larssen's thoughts. Apparently Larssen, a major character in the novel, is from Utah. Larssen is a nuclear physicist with the Metallurgical Laboratory.]
Utah Utah 1948 Bell, M. Shayne. "Lock Down " in Starlight 2 (Patrick Nielsen Hayden, ed.). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 78-79. "...March 19, 1948... You watch Marian Anderson try to hold the train of her burgundy satin gown out of wet snow as Franz Rupp, her accompanist, helps her climb out the window of her room in Hotel Utah and start down the fire escape. Franz follows her out. Bessie George, Marian's servant and friend, closes and latches the window behind them, then takes the stairs down and exists through the hotel's main doors.

You'd already followed them as they'd boarded the Great Northern in Vancouver for Salt Lake City the day after Marian's concert on March 15, and you'd locked that down, and you'd been the team that locked down their arrival in Salt Lake on March 18... you'd followed her in the taxi through heavy snow and almost impassable streets to Hotel Utah... They hadn't know where else to go in a blizzard or if anywhere in Salt Lake would treat them any better. "

Utah Utah 1950 Dick, Philip K. Radio Free Albemuth. New York: Arbor House (1985); pg. 13. [Phil Dick narrating] "A person like Nicholas Brady could never go to Alaska; he was a product of Berkeley and could only survive in the radical student milieu of Berkeley. What did he know of the rest of the United States? I had driven across the country; I had visited Kansas and Utah and Kentucky, and I knew the isolation of the Berkeley radicals. They might affect America a little with their views, but in the long run it would be solid conservative America, the Midwest, which would win out. And when Berkeley fell, Nicholas Brady would fall with it. "
Utah Utah 1952 Dick, Philip K. Radio Free Albemuth. New York: Arbor House (1985); pg. 17. "'...No one knows where it'll turn up next.'

'In Berkeley,' Nicholas said.

'In Kansas City,' I said. 'In the heartland. In Salt Lake City--anywhere. Fremont can form anti-Aramchek cadres, youth groups on the right dedicated to fighting it wherever it manifests itself...' "

Utah Utah 1953 Knight, Damon. The Man in the Tree. New York: Berkley Books (1984); pg. 16. Pg. 16: "She shook her head. 'We don't have any family in Oregon. I have a sister in Iowa, and Don's brother lives in Utah.' "; Pg. 28: "Cooley put the file down and began to turn over the cards at the back of the box. 'Canada,' he said. 'Wyoming. Utah...' "
Utah Utah 1954 Knight, Damon. The Man in the Tree. New York: Berkley Books (1984); pg. 49. "He remembered that his Uncle Bruce lived in Provo, Utah; that had stuck in his mind because of the funny name. He got the number from the operator and called on a Saturday afternoon.

'Hello?' A woman's voice.

'Hello, is this--Does Bruce Anderson live there?'

'Yes, he does, but he's not home right now. Can I help you?'

'Well, this is Gene Anderson, I'm his nephew--'

'Why, Gene! It's real nice to hear from you. How's your mom and dad?'

'That's what I was wondering. You haven't heard from them?'

'Why, no. Is there anything the matter?'

'Well, it's just that--I was away from home, and they kind of moved...' " [More of this conversation, pg. 50.]

Utah Utah 1956 Dick, Philip K. "Orpheus with Clay Feet " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1963); pg. 297. "'Because there's going to be a hydrogen war. The future's black. Who wants to write about it? Keeerist.' He shook his head. 'And anyhow who reads that stuff? Adolescents with skin trouble. Misfits. And it's junk. Name me one good science fiction story, just one. I picked up a magazine on a bus once when I was in Utah. Trash! I wouldn't write that trash even if it paid well, and I looked into it and it doesn't pay well...' " [More.]
Utah Utah 1972 Dick, Philip K. The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1972); pg. 7. [PKD writes autobiographically.] "A couple of weeks before I left California I said to Kathy, 'You know, one day you're going to come over here and I'll be gone. And you won't know where, until you get a letter from me.' 'You've been all over the country, haven't you?' I told her about Colorado and Utah. 'I think I dig it,' Kathy said. 'where your head is. You go tripping around all day; I see you go by my place in you Pontiac. You're just here with me now, with us, gathering material for a book. And then you'll go tripping on somewhere else and blend in there like you do here.' "
Utah Utah 1974 Disch, Thomas M. Camp Concentration. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1968); pg. 19. "'It's a regional edition. Time comes out in different regional editions. For advertising purposes. And we get the mountain states edition. The mountain states are Idaho, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado . . .' "
Utah Utah 1976 Matheson, Richard. What Dreams May Come. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1978); pg. 235. "'Thank you for the memories of things we did together and with the children... Thank you for all the lovely national parks we saw together. For Sequoia and Yosemite, Lassen and Shasta, Olympic and Mount Ranier, Glacier and Yellowstone, Grand Canyon and Bryce...' "
Utah Utah 1978 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 183. "To most people, he reflected, the complex world of human society was the entire universe, somewhere disengaged from the physical underpinning of things. Most people never formed any sense of perspective: the understanding that the whole of their lives was contained in a thin slice of air coating a small, spinning ball of rock, that their awareness was confined to a thin flashbulb slice of geological time, that they inhabited a universe which had emerged from, and was inexorably descending into, conditions unimaginably different from those with which they were familiar.... If spaceflight gives us nothing else than an awareness of our true nature, he thought, then that alone will justify its cost.

...Morton Thiokol sent a car to meet him at the airport. The driver--a young, breezy, anonymous behind mirrored sunglasses--introduced himself as Jack, and loaded Dana's bags into the trunk, although Dana kept his briefcase with him. "

Utah Utah 1978 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 183. "Jack drove onto the freeway heading north, toward Brigham City. The driver told him that he was to be taken straight to the first test firing of the SRB, the new Saturn VB-class Solid Rocket Booster... The car delivered him to the Wasatch Division of Morton Thiokol, a few miles outside Brigham City. With a touch of Dana's elbow, Jack led the way to a small prefabricated office module set on trestles a little way from the dusty road. " [An extended scene at Morton Thiokol takes place on pg. 182-188.]
Utah Utah 1978 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 182-183. "Friday, December 8, 1978

WASATCH, UTAH

As he flew into Salt Lake city Gregory Dana got a spectacular view of the lake. Freeder streams glistened like snail tracks, and human settlements were misty gray patches spread along ribbons of road. The morning was bright and clear, the sky huge and transparent and appearing to reach all the way down to the desert surface far below the plane.

Dana allowed himself briefly to imagine that he was landing on some foreign planet, a world of parched desert and high, isolated inland seas. "

Utah Utah 1978 King, Stephen. The Stand. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1978); pg. 124. "He was a poet who sometimes taught Free University classes or traveled in the western states of Utah, Nevada, and Arizona, speaking to high school English classes... "
Utah Utah 1978 King, Stephen. The Stand. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1978); pg. 529. "He would follow I-25 to Cheyenne and then move west toward whatever waited for him beyond the mountains. His skin, dry with age, nonetheless crawled and goosebumped a little at the thought. I-80 west, into Salt Lake City, then across Nevada to Reno. Then he would head north again, but that hardly mattered. Because somewhere between Salt Lake and Reno, maybe even sooner, he would be stopped, questioned, and probably be sent somewhere else to be questioned again. And at some place or ther, an Invitation might be issued. "
Utah Utah 1978 King, Stephen. The Stand. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1978); pg. 720. "They're coming . . . they're almost in Utah now . . .

...Now the land below began to change. The highway ran straight through. The Bonneville Salt Flats lay to the far north. Skull Valley somewhere west...

Now the highway below was I-70. The towns were huddled lumps, deserted except for the rats and the cats and the deer that had laredy begun to creep in from the forests as the scent of man washe away. Towns with names like Freemont and Green River and Sego and Thompson and Harley Dome... "; Pg. 722: "He slept well that night, and in the morning he sent out word that the watch on the roads between Utah and Nevada was to be tripled. "

Utah Utah 1978 King, Stephen. The Stand. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1978); pg. 726. "They made their camp that night close to the Utah line...

'It's going to get bad in Utah,' Ralph remarked. I guess that's where we're going to find out if God is really watchin over us. There's one stretch, better than a hundred miles, without a town or even a gas station and a cafe.' He didn't seem particularly disturbed by the prospect. " [A double quote is missing, a typographical error, after 'Ralph remarked.' and before 'I guess...']

Utah Utah 1978 King, Stephen. The Stand. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1978); pg. 729. "...Larry's mileometer clicking off the miles as the highway switched lazily back and forth down the gentling Western Slope towad Utah. Shortly after noon they left Colorado behind them. That evening they camped west of Harley Dome, Utah. For the first time the great silence impressed them as being oppressive and malefic. " [Much more of the story takes place in Utah; refs. not all in DB.]
Utah Utah 1978 King, Stephen. The Stand. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1978); pg. 748. Pg. 748: "It actually took them less than six hours to reach Vegas. It lay in the middle of the desert like some improbable gem. there were a lot of people on the streets; the workday was over, and people were enjoying the early evening cool on lawns and benches and at bus stops, or sitting in the doorways of defunct wedding chapels and hockshops. They rubbernecked the Utah S.P. cars as they went by and then went back to whatever they had been talking about. "
Utah Utah 1978 King, Stephen. The Stand. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1978); pg. 777. Pg. 754: "He was remembering Trask, how Trask's leg had started to look like a Kentucky Friend Chicken dinner after a while. "; Pg. 777: "'It was the bad man killed Nick. Tom knows. But God fixed that bad man. I saw it. The hand of God came down out of the sky.' There was a cold wind whistling over the floor of the Utah badlands, and Stu shivered violently in its clasp. 'Fixed him for what he did to Nick and to the poor Judge...' "
Utah Utah 1978 King, Stephen. The Stand. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1978); pg. 789. Pg. 789: "Tom kept him clean. And dragged him around the lobby of the Utah Hotel. And waited for the night when he would awake, not because Stu had raving in his sleep, but because his labored breathing had finally ceased... For the next two days, Stu did little but sleep. Tom had to struggle to wake him up enough to take his pills and sugar cubes from the restaurant attached to the Utah Hotel. "; Pg. 797: "'...I would hav died of pneumonia or the flu or whatever it was back there in the Utah Hotel. I don't know how you picked the right pills . . . if it was Nick or God or just plain old luck, but you did it...' "
Utah Utah 1978 King, Stephen. The Stand. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1978); pg. 790. "On October 28 Green River was dusted with nearly five inches of snow. 'If we don't make our move soon, Stu told Tom as they looked out at the snow, 'we'll be spending the whole damn winter in the Utah Hotel.' " [Apparently a reference to the famed 'Hotel Utah.']
Utah Utah 1980 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Miracle Monday. New York: Warner Books (1981); pg. 102. "When Lois Lane next saw daylight, the Rocky Mountains, swathed in an eight-foot base of snow, flowed majestically beneath them. Lois thought Superman had changed his mind about where they were gong.

'Aha,' she said. 'The bathing suit was just a clever ploy. You were planning on forcing yourself mercilessly upon me in the wilderness along, you cad you.'

'It is a wilderness, my dear Miss Lane,' he said, 'but I am capable of getting quite a lot more merciless than this.'

'Can't tell by me,' she said, shedding the cape when they landed on a rock outcropping near a bubbling spring. 'What is this place?' " [Superman takes Lois Lane to go swimming and eat dinner in a secluded spot in Utah. See other entries in DB.]

Utah Utah 1980 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Miracle Monday. New York: Warner Books (1981); pg. 103. "A narrow stream of water flowed from a crack between two rocks on the mountainside into a mostly frozen river that was no more than six or eight long strides across. When the stream hit the river, there was a constant hiss of steam. Around the intersection of the two flows of water were a few square meters of snowless scrub grass, with a heated pool half the width of the otherwise frozen river on one side, and on the other side unearthly configurations of ice that were made directly from steam. It was a valley boxed in on all sides by six peaks, a misty oasis in this crisp frigid desert.

'Welcome to my newest discovery,' Superman bowed at the waist, his cape draped over one arm. 'Our own private hot spring.'

'It's stunning. Where are we?'

'Near the northeast corner of Utah. I think this place is really undiscovered. It would be pretty tricky to get even a helicopter through the air currents into this valley...' "

Utah Utah 1980 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Miracle Monday. New York: Warner Books (1981); pg. 103. [Superman has brought Lois Lane to a hot spring in Utah for dinner and a swim.] "'...May I dust off your seat?' He [Superman] grinned as he clapped the cape over a flat rock and then reached into the pocket in the cape's lining for Lois's studiedly scanty swimsuit.

'What else've you got in there?'

'A handful of marbles, a rabbit's foot, two frogs and a road map to Metropolis.'

While she changed into the swimsuit he turned his back, ostensibly in order to dig in the nearby snow for a small floating table and the picnic dinner that he had buried there a few hours earlier. The now melted at the touch of hands which were still warm from friction. Dinner was his own concoction, made out of mushrooms, walnuts and fresh vegetables, with a mixture of fruit juices that Martha Kent had once taught him how to make. He defrosted and cooked the platter with the wink of an eye. He sat down in the steam-heated pool, surrounded by winter... " [More, pg. 103.]

Utah Utah 1980 Tucker, Wilson. The Year of the Quiet Sun. New York: Ace (1970); pg. 39. "...the first few columns were solidly rooted in the census figures of 1970, while the following columns on the following pages were his projections going forward to 2050...

Births: legitimate and otherwise, predicted annually by race and by geographical area (down sharply along the Atlantic seaboard below Boston... figures did not include unpredictable numbers of laboratory-hospital births by artificial means; figures did not include unpredictable number of abnormal births in Nevada and utah due to accumulation of radioactive fallout).

Deaths: with separate figures for murders and known suicides... figures did not include infant mortalities in Nevada-Utah fallout area... "

Utah Utah 1980 Tucker, Wilson. The Year of the Quiet Sun. New York: Ace (1970); pg. 136. "'...What did you think of 1980, mister?'

'I don't like it, and I'll be liking it even less when I'm living in it. That milquetoast was re-elected and the country is going to hell in a handbasket. A forty-eight state sweep! Did you see the election results?'

'I saw them, and by this time Williams has passed the news to Seabrooke and Seabrooke is calling the President. He'll celebrate tonight. But I'm not going to vote for him, mister--I know I didn't vote for him. And if I'm living Stateside then... I'm going to choose one of those three states that voted for the other fellow, old What's-his-name, the actor fellow.'

'Alaska, Hawaii, and Utah.'

'What's Utah like?'

'Dry, lonely, and glowing with radioactivity.'

'Make it Hawaii...' "

Utah Utah 1981 Shiner, Lewis. "Epilogue: Third Generation " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 394. "He turned on his side and pulled his knees up toward his chest. What would it be like? When he was eight he'd driven through Utah with his parents and he'd made them stop at Vernal. They'd gone on the Prehistoric Nature Trail, and Arnie had run ahead to be by himself with the life-sized dinosaur models. Dinosaur Island would look like that, he thought, the rugged brush-covered hills in the background, the diplodocus big enough that he could walk under its belly, the struthiomimus like a huge, scaly ostrich, the pteranodon crouched like it had just glided in for a landing. "
Utah Utah 1984 Heinlein, Robert A. Job: A Comedy of Justice. New York: Ballantine (1984); pg. 232. "Suddenly... the ceiling lowered abruptly and changed to a beam-and-plaster construction, one wall became a picture window looking out at mountains that belonged in Utah (not Texas), the wall opposite it now carried a massive stone fireplace with a goodly fire crackling in it, the furniture changed to the style sometimes called 'mission' and the floor changed to flagstones covered with Amerindian rugs. "
Utah Utah 1985 Dick, Philip K. In Milton Lumky Territory. Pleasantville, NY: Dragon Press (1985); pg. 39. Pg. 39: "'...She took care of the house and Taffy while I was down in Mexico. Walt's in Utah, in Salt Lake City. He's been there for almost a year... I need somebody I can depend on. I don't have Walt -- I used to depend on him. He's in the galvanized pipe business...' "; Pg. 45: "'Walt's on the road a lot, too, like you. Over to Salt Lake City and over to the Coast, to L.A. in particular. That's strange, isn't it . . . to think of you both driving around. He's a factory representative. Conferences and sales meetings.' "

Pg. 114: "'You mean a long trip?'

'Maybe to L.A. Or to Salt Lake City. Or Portland. Some place where I can find something warehoused...' " [Looking for wholesale typewriters.]

Utah Utah 1985 Swanwick, Michael. "Anyone Here From Utah? " in Another Round at the Spaceport Bar (edited by George H. Scithers and Darrell Schweitzer). New York: Avon Books (1989; c 1985); pg. 157-162. [1] "It was early evening when I dropped into Manayunk. The fog was coming across the canal from the Schuylkill and creeping slowly up the hillside. A red neon sign over Keely's buzzed and crackled. I found a space not twenty yards away, under the elevated, and parked.

Keely's is a corner tappie of the old school, the kind that still has a side-door ladies' entrance. The old women of the neighborhood use it, too, huddling over their glasses of beer in the back room, never daring to go up front where the men are.

It's a quiet place. No television over the bar. A jukebox, only it wasn't in use. Monday being a slow night. There's a pool table in the back.

Midway through my first beer the little guy came in. He poked his head through the door, taking a quick peek, then pause, and then his round little face reappeared. He blinked rapidly, and nervously scanned the shelves over the bar. I craned my head to look, and saw only the usual assortment of bottles and such. "

Utah Utah 1985 Swanwick, Michael. "Anyone Here From Utah? " in Another Round at the Spaceport Bar (edited by George H. Scithers and Darrell Schweitzer). New York: Avon Books (1989; c 1985); pg. 157-162. [2] Finally the little guy actually entered the bar, took a stool to one side of me, & ordered a draught. We both drank in silence for a bit.

Then he nodded at the shelves over the bar. "No TV here, " he said. And when I nodded, "Have you ever noticed how a TV set will suck you in? So that no matter how hard you try to ignore it, you always end up watching? "

He was an odd duck. There was a whiff of the streets about him, a hard, ingrained layer of poverty & grime. And yet he wore an expensive "Thinsulated " windbreaker at least two hundred bucks in any store downtown, & though it was old and worn, it was worn to his body; he hadn't acquired it secondhand. "Why not tell me about it? " I suggested.

He eyed me nervously, then said. "Okay, listen. You ever notice how some pieces of technology seem like they're too good for us? Like you wonder how they can even exist, because they look as out-of-place as a Greyhound bus would in third-century Rome? "

Utah Utah 1985 Swanwick, Michael. "Anyone Here From Utah? " in Another Round at the Spaceport Bar (edited by George H. Scithers and Darrell Schweitzer). New York: Avon Books (1989; c 1985); pg. 157-162. [3] "No, " I said carefully. "Can't say that I have. "

"Then you're not paying attention, " he said angrily. "Take a look at computers--they've been around less than thirty years and already they're so small you can wear then on your wrist, for Chrissake. Then take a look at your car, and ask yourself why it only gets some four percent efficiency and falls apart before the payments are done. Are you trying to tell me the same people produced both? "

"Hey, now, " I said soothingly.

The little guy clutched his glass so hard his knuckles whitened. "We go a country that can't produce a decent solar cell when the Arabs have got us up against the ropes, and yet we can transmit pictures through the air--and in color, too. And where did it come from? Television just appeared one day, complete and perfected! It didn't evolve the way that, say, films did. "

Utah Utah 1985 Swanwick, Michael. "Anyone Here From Utah? " in Another Round at the Spaceport Bar (edited by George H. Scithers and Darrell Schweitzer). New York: Avon Books (1989; c 1985); pg. 157-162. [4] "There was radio. "

"Radio! I can make a radio out of a safety pin, an eraser and a chunk of quartz. But have you ever met anybody who actually understands television, who could build one from scratch? "

"Well . . . "

"And if you read up on it, it gets even weirder. Do you know what you see when you look at a TV screen? "

"Pictures, I presume. "

"Wrong. You see this one little dot of light. It travels along all 525 lines of your screen sixty times a second, agetting brighter and darker, and your mind puts this all together to form a picture. But there is no picture, only this little glowing dot that's like hypnotizing you, get it? And because the picture is assembled inside your head, it's gotten past your mental censors before you know what it is. You believe it even when what it tells you contradicts what you actually experience. "

"I take it you don't watch much television, huh? "

Utah Utah 1985 Swanwick, Michael. "Anyone Here From Utah? " in Another Round at the Spaceport Bar (edited by George H. Scithers and Darrell Schweitzer). New York: Avon Books (1989; c 1985); pg. 157-162. [5] He sighed, buried his nose in his drink. "I used to watch it just like everybody else--four, maybe five hours a night. I went on a camping trip in the Grand Tetons of Wyoming so I could be by myself and I took along a battery portable. Without even thinking about it.

"Second day out, I accidently kicked the think over a cliff. Boy, was I mad at myself! I almost turned around and went home. But I'd spent so much on the trip I went on without it. And you know what? After a week or so, I felt a lot better without the constant yammer-yammer-yammer of that damned box. My vision was better, I had more energy, and I thought a lot more clearly. But I was out in the wilderness all this time. When I came out again and picked up my car, I found out the truth. "

"What was the truth? "

"Well, first of all, I wasn't in Wyoming. I was in Ohio. "

I couldn't help it. I laughed.

Utah Utah 1985 Swanwick, Michael. "Anyone Here From Utah? " in Another Round at the Spaceport Bar (edited by George H. Scithers and Darrell Schweitzer). New York: Avon Books (1989; c 1985); pg. 157-162. [6] The little guy glared. "Okay, okay--but it was damned scary to find that in the shpos and lodges and tourist places people all talked as though we were in Wyoming, but out on the street, everyone was in Ohio. And if you asked them about this, they got this really blank expression, like zombies, and just walked away. " He stared disconsolatelly into his beer. "After a while I noticed that people were a little less vague if they'd been away from the TV for a fe hours, and I made the connection.

"I figured that somebody was controlling our reality for some reason, and I set out to discover just what was going on. I drew out my savings from the bank and hit the road. " He smiled self-deprecatingly. "Looking for America, you know? Only I for sure didn't find it. You do much traveling? "

Utah Utah 1985 Swanwick, Michael. "Anyone Here From Utah? " in Another Round at the Spaceport Bar (edited by George H. Scithers and Darrell Schweitzer). New York: Avon Books (1989; c 1985); pg. 157-162. [7] "...You do much traveling? "

"I'm a salesman. I get around. "

"Well, have you noticed how about ten years ago the quality of life in New York City took a nosedive? I mean, it used to be the Queen of Cities, the Big Apple, right? How did it get so dirty and slummy and mean so fast? I went to New York City and looked, and you know what I found? "

"You tell me, " I said.

"A crater. About a mile across and radioactive as hell. You stand on the lip and stare down through these wispy little clouds of steam and there's this blue glow down at the bottom. That's all that's left of Manhattan. "

"Now wait a minute. I was there just last week. "

He shook his head firmly. "Nope. That was Newark. They shifted the business and financial centers there, changed a few road signs, and brainwashed everyone to think they were in New York. "

"Aw, come on. Millions of people go in and out of New York every day--you couldn't hush something like that up. "

Utah Utah 1985 Swanwick, Michael. "Anyone Here From Utah? " in Another Round at the Spaceport Bar (edited by George H. Scithers and Darrell Schweitzer). New York: Avon Books (1989; c 1985); pg. 157-162. [8] "You could if you controlled television. Listen, I've seen things that could practically fry your brains. Did you know that there are Communist Chinese troops in North Dakota? The entire state I sunder occupational rule! They've got concentration camps and slave labor and . . . And Utah--have you ever met anyone from Utah? "

"Well, not actually . . . "

He nodded emphatically. "Damn straight you haven't! My God, the things I've seen. I was in Los Angeles last month whn the President of the United States presented the key to the city to Adolf Hitler--in public Except for this little crowd who applauded, nobody seemed to notice. "

"Reagan would never-- " I began, but he cut me off.

"No, no, not that damned cowboy actor--the real President. Richard Nixon. " He paused, stared thoughtfully into his drink. "Hitler was in a wheelchair, wearing a white suit. I think he was senile. "

Utah Utah 1985 Swanwick, Michael. "Anyone Here From Utah? " in Another Round at the Spaceport Bar (edited by George H. Scithers and Darrell Schweitzer). New York: Avon Books (1989; c 1985); pg. 157-162. [9] I'd heard enough. "So what are you doing about this? " I asked, cutting him off. "I presume you're doing something. "

The little guy looked crestfallen. "Actually, " he confessed, "I don't know what to do. I'm not the hero type. I just go around to bars--when I can find one without an infrnal television set-and strike up conversations. I tell people that if they can just give up the TV for a few short weeks, they can set themselves free. Maybe if there were a lot of us, we could do something. "

"I see. Made many converts? "

Now he looked downright heartbroken. "Not a one. "

"Tell you what, " I said. "If it makes you feel any better I'll give it up--right here and now! "

The little guy looked me full in they eye, and there was a kind of dignity in defeat to him at that moment. "No you won't, " he said. "You'll promise to, and you'll go back home to your hotel room tonight, and you'll switch it on without even thinking about it. "

Utah Utah 1985 Swanwick, Michael. "Anyone Here From Utah? " in Another Round at the Spaceport Bar (edited by George H. Scithers and Darrell Schweitzer). New York: Avon Books (1989; c 1985); pg. 157-162. [10] He finished his drink, and left a quarter on the bar for a tip. "But at least I've tried, and God knows that's all one man can do. "

He slid off his barstool.

"Oh, Sammy? " I said casually. "I'd like to show you something. "

He turned, puzzled. "How did you know my-- " I pulled the device frommy pocket. It was small, about the size of a pack of cigarettes, and it had a two-inch-square screen.

"Ever see one of these? " I asked. "It's hot off the assembly line. A year from not everybody will have one. " I waved it back and forth gently. He tried to look away, but could not. HIs eyes were riveted to the little moving dot.

"Pretty nifty, huh? " I smiled. His trail had been cold when I picked it up in Utah. I had ever reason to feel pleased with myself.

Sweat beaded up on his forehead. He clenched his teeth, but could not look away. "Who are you people " he asked chokingly.

Utah Utah 1985 Swanwick, Michael. "Anyone Here From Utah? " in Another Round at the Spaceport Bar (edited by George H. Scithers and Darrell Schweitzer). New York: Avon Books (1989; c 1985); pg. 157-162. [11] "Who are we, Sammy? We're the ones who matter. The power behind the multinationals. The guys who keep things going. The little voice in your ear, " I said mockingly. What do you care who we are? "

I didn't know how much he would hear. His eyes were glazing over quickly. But to my surprise he managed to say, "And now you kill me. " He didn't sound as if he much cared anymore. "

"Sammy, Sammy. " I tousled his hair. "Imagine that you run a kennel and you find one of your dogs has borrowed halfway out. He's caught under the wire and is squirming to get free. Do you kill him? "

I waited for an answer, got none. "No, you do not, " I answered for him. "Here. " I placed the set in his hand. "It's a gift. "

He stood there, numbly staring at it. All the contradictions, the fears and unacceptable memories were fading gently away.

On the way out, I paused to say, "Show it to your friends. "

Utah Utah 1987 Spencer, Darrell. "I am Buzz Gaulter, Left-hander " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1987); pg. 138. "My first night there, I asked him about the sign above the register. It says, 'Gary Gillmore drank here.' I said, 'Is that true?'

He said, 'Often.'

He keeps a stack of The Executioner's Song on the counter. A big thick book. One day I'll buy one. I asked him if it was true. He said, 'It happened.' "

Utah Utah 1988 Foster, Alan Dean. To the Vanishing Point. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 14. "Pity they were driving from L.A. instead of, say, Utah. They could have driven through the Grand Canyon or Zion or Bryce instead of this boring, eventless terrain. "
Utah Utah 1988 Foster, Alan Dean. To the Vanishing Point. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 26. "'Vanishing Point.' His brows drew together in thought. 'A lot of little towns up the interstate between Vegas and Salt Lake. Never gone that far north ourselves, but I see them on the mpa. Cedar City, St. George, even a place called Hurricane.' He tried to see the fine detail on the map stuck to the dash. 'Vanishing Point doesn't ring any bells.'...

'Vanishing Point. Nevada or Utah?'

'Yes,' she said, replying without answering...

'I bet I've seen it on the Utah map.'

'We're only goin gas far as Las Vegas,' Alicia informed their rider. "

Utah Utah 1988 Foster, Alan Dean. To the Vanishing Point. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 152. "The last thing he expected to see was an off ramp.

It was coming up fast on the right, and he slowed quickly. The sign nearby said CEDAR CITY. Alicia was sitting across from him now and he looked anxiously at her.

'Seems okay.' She glanced back. 'Burnfingers?'

Begay came forward, studied both the sign and ramp. 'Might as well. If it's half right we're a long ways from Vegas and longer still from Regulus.'

Licking his lips, Frank flipped his turn signal and slowly started down pavement no thicker than plastic wrap.

There was a stop sign at the bottom of the off ramp. A normal-looking, battered red and yellow sign. As he hit the brakes the light changed, late afternoon replacing the awesome universal night around them. It was reality, snapping back like a rubber band.

'We've fallen through a crack,' said Burnfingers.

'We're back!.' Alicia let out a long sigh. 'Thank God, we're back!' "

Utah Utah 1988 Foster, Alan Dean. To the Vanishing Point. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 153. "The sign by the dirty asphalt read WELCOME TO CEDAR CITY, UTAH. Ahead they could see structures of wood and stucco, clinging to the lower slopes of snow-capped peaks. On a telephone pole nearby, a hawk saw examining the motor home. As they approached, it took wing in search of vermin. The air was warm but not desert hot, refreshingly devoid of pollutants or other surprises. Frank lowered his window, sucked in mountain air.

'Smells right. Looks right. Could we be back where we belong, back on the right reality line?'... "

Utah Utah 1988 Foster, Alan Dean. To the Vanishing Point. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 153. "'What will you do?' Mouse asked him curiously.

He considered, hardly daring to believe their ordeal was nearing its end. 'I dunno. I guess we'll find a motel.' Now Alicia smiled. 'An ordinary chain motel where we can get some rest. Then I'm calling a taxi, or a limo, or something. The outfit that rented us this machine can come and get it. I don't give a damn if the taxi has to come all the way down from Salt Lake. I ain't doing any more driving. We'll head for the nearest airport. I'll beg, borrow, or steal a charter plane to fly us home. We're not even going into Salt Lake for a regular airline. I just want out of here as fast as possible.' "



Utah, continued

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