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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Tibetan Buddhism, Oceania

Tibetan Buddhism, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Tibetan Buddhism Ontario 2002 Sawyer, Robert J. Hominids. New York: Tor (2002); pg. 349. "Invitations sent to Ponter Boddit for all-expense-paid visits received c/o the Sudbury Star: Disneyland... Buckingham Palace; the Kennedy Space Center... Also submitted: offers of meetings with the French and Mexican presidents; the Japanese prime minister and royal family; the Pope; the Dalai Lama; nelson Mandela; Stephen Hawking, and Anna Nicole Smith. "
Tibetan Buddhism Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 187. "Of course, phone calls poured in requesting interviews with me--approximately one every three minutes, according to the logs... I'd told Dana, the departmental assistant, that unless the Dalai Lama or the pope called, not to bother me. I'd been joking, but representatives of both were on the phone to the ROM within twenty-four hours of Salbanda's revelations in Brussels. "
Tibetan Buddhism Solar System 2050 Bova, Ben. "Sam and the Prudent Jurist " in Sam Gunn Forever. New York: Avon (1998; c. 1997); pg. 268. "'...And what happens if the environmentalists or some other corporation or the Dalai Lama complains that Wankle's taking too much out of the Jupiter system?...' "
Tibetan Buddhism Switzerland 1995 Kurtz, Katherine & Deborah Turner Harris. Dagger Magic. New York: Ace Books (1995); pg. 29. "The traditions governing these observances dated back to ancient Tibet. This monastic community, however, was located not amid the towering crags of the Himalayas, but deep in the heart of the Swiss Alps. Most inhabitants of the neighboring villages assumed that this settlement was merely an extension of the respected and much better-known Buddhist colony located at Rikon, near Zurich. "
Tibetan Buddhism Switzerland 1995 Kurtz, Katherine & Deborah Turner Harris. Dagger Magic. New York: Ace Books (1995); pg. 31. "The liturgy was conducted in the language of Tibet. The abbot himself led the chanting in a voice devoid of any trace of a Western accent. To the chorus of voices was added the occasional music of a small consort of Tibetan instruments--reed-like gyalings and trumpet-like ragdongs, played to the rhythm of a pair of kettledrums...

'Pardon if I intrude, Rinpoche, but Karkar-la and Nagpo-la have returned. I am instructed to ask if you will speak with them now or at some later time.' " [Central fictional group in novel is the Phurba--a evil group which has descended from Tibetan Buddhism, but split from its normative expression. Many refs. to Tibetan Buddhism throughout novel. Other refs. not in DB.]

Tibetan Buddhism T'ien Shan 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 283. "Very few will understand the implications when they do hear it. The word comes from a monk named Chim Din who has just returned from the capital of Potala, where he works as a teacher in the Dalai Lama's Winter Palace. Luckily, Chim Din also works alternate weeks as a bamboo rigger at Hsuan-k'ung Ssu, the 'Temple Hanging in Air,' Aenea's project, and hails us in Phari Marketplace as he is on his way to the Temple.

'Five ships, Chim Din had said. 'Several score of Christian people. About half of them warriors in red and black. About half of the remaining half are missionaries, all in black. They have rented the old Red Hat sect gompa near Rhan Tso, the otter Lake, near the Phallus of Shiva. They have sanctified part of the gompa as a chapel to their triune God. The Dalai Lama will not allow them to use their flying machines or go beyond...' " [Extensive many refs. to Tibetan Buddhism starting here, in Part II. Most refs. not in DB.]

Tibetan Buddhism T'ien Shan 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 291. "But the urge to stand and gaze is strong in me, as it always is when I stand at the cableway terminus of K'un Lun Ridge and look out over the Middle Kingdom and the world of the Mountains of Heaven... torchlit brilliance of Potala, Winter Palace for His Holiness the Dalai Lama and home of the magnificent stone architecture of the planet... "
Tibetan Buddhism T'ien Shan 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 308. "'The Dugpas saw something they couldn't explain today,' continued Rachel. 'The speck of your ship against Chomo Lori, I mean. But eventually they explain everything in terms of tendrel, so it that won't be a problem.'

'What are tendrel?' I said. 'And who are the Dugpas?'

'Tendrel are signs,' said Rachel. 'Divinations within the shamanistic Buddhist tradition prevalent in this region of the Mountains of Heaven. Dugpas are the . . . well, the word translates literally as 'highest.' The people who dwell at the upper altitudes. They are also the Drukpas, the valley people . . . that is, the lower fissures . . . and the Drungpas, the wooded valley people . . . mostly those who live in the great fern forests and bonsai-bamboo stands on the western reaches of Phari Ridge and beyond.'

'So Aenea's at the Temple?' I said stubbornly, resisting following the young woman's 'suggestion' for hiding the ship. "

Tibetan Buddhism T'ien Shan 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 315. "'...I'd supervised the construction of a Taoist temple over near Potala when I first arrived, and the Dalai Lama thought that I might be able to finish work on the Temple Hanging in Air. It's frustrated a few would-be renovators over the past few decades.' " [Much of Part II focus on Tibetan Buddhism, including an extended visit with the Dalai Lama.]
Tibetan Buddhism T'ien Shan 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 324. "Others wandered in and were introduced--the foremen George Tsarong and Jigme Norbu, two sisters who were in charge of much of the decorative railing work--Kuku and Kay Se, Gyalo Thondup in his formal silken robes and Jigme Taring in soldier's garb, the teaching monk Chim Din and his master, Kempo Ngha Wang Tashi, abbot of the gompa at the Temple Hanging in Air, a female monk named Donka Nyapso, a traveling trade agent named Tromo Trochi of Homu, Tsipon Shakabpa who was the Dalai Lama's overseer of construction here at the Tempe, and the famed climber and paraglide flyer Lhomo Dondrub... one of the few flyers who would drink beer or break bread with Dugpas, Drukpas, or Drungpas. "
Tibetan Buddhism T'ien Shan 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 363. "...gold pillars rising to a frescoed ceiling twenty meters above us, blue-and-white tiles underfoot with elaborate, inset images from the Bardo Thodrol, the Tibetan Book of the Dead, as well as illustrations of the vast seedship migration of the Buddhist Old Earth emigres, huge gold arches under which we pass to enter the reception room... "
Tibetan Buddhism T'ien Shan 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 401. "'The Bible lies. The Koran lies. The Talmud and Torah lie. The New Testament lies. The Sutta-pitaka, the nikayas, the Itivuttaka, and the Dhammapada lies. The Tiptaka lies. All Scripture lies . . . just as I lie as I speak to you now.

'All these books lie not from intention or failure of expression but by their very nature of being reduced to words; all the images, precepts, laws, canons, quotations, parables, commandments, koans, zazen, and sermons in these beautiful books ultimately fail by adding only more words between the human being who is seeking and the perception of the Void Which Binds.' "

Tibetan Buddhism Texas: Dallas 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 7-8. "...another vast conspiracy, headed by the Dealy Lama, an old mystic who lives in the sewers below Dealy Plaza, Dallas, and seemingly plots irrationality, mysticism, anarchy, and Total Liberation of Everybody. " [A pun.]
Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 1940 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. The Bones of Time. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 150. "It took Lynn's eyes a long time to travel across it, for it was a behemoth, a legacy of the age when lamas ruled Tibet with their exotic blend of Buddhism, superstition, and raw power. It seemed quite as splended as pictures of the Potalaoma in Lhasa, her archetype of Tibetan architecture. "
Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 1949 Pattison, Eliot. The Skull Mantra. New York: St. Martin's Minotaur (1999); pg. 281. "The pages were not uniform. Some were lists, some were like encyclopedia entries. The very first word in the book was a date. 1949, the year before the Communists began to liberate Tibet.

'It is a catalog of what was here before the destruction,' Shan spoke in awe. It wasn't just lists of gompas and other holy places, it also held descriptions of the numbers and names of monks and nuns, even the dimensions of buildings. For many sites, first-hand narratives by survivors had been transcribed, telling of life at the place. "

Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 1985 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 133-134. "...the religious networks, where, with sustained and general excitement, the Message [from extraterrestrials] was being discussed... The Message, Ellie believed, was a kind of mirror in which each person sees his or her own beliefs challenged or confirmed... a new Bodhisattva proclaimed herself in Tibet. "
Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 1999 Pattison, Eliot. The Skull Mantra. New York: St. Martin's Minotaur (1999); pg. 214. "She pulled a worn photograph from inside her dress and held it to her forehead, then set it in front of her on the blanket. It was a photo of the Dalai Lama. "
Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 1999 Pattison, Eliot. The Skull Mantra. New York: St. Martin's Minotaur (1999); pg. 291. "'For a few dollars extra we'll let the Americans put on robes and spin prayer wheels. Soundtracks of mantras will play in the background. For a few more dollars we'll offer a one-hour course on how to meditate like a Buddhist.'

'Sort of a Buddhist amusement park.'

'Precisely! We think so much alike!' Li exclaimed, then sobered. 'Which is why I had to speak to you, Comrade...' "

Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 1999 Pattison, Eliot. The Skull Mantra. New York: St. Martin's Minotaur (1999); pg. 314. "'The Second?' Shan asked in confusion.

'The Second Dalai Lama.'

'But that was nearly five hundred years ago.'

'Yes. There have been fourteen Dalai Lamas. But only nine of our gomchen.'

...'It is hard to explain,' Trinle said. 'The Great Fifth, he said the gomchen was like one brilliant diamond buried in a vast mountain. Our abbot, when I was young, said the gomchen was all that was trying to be inside us, without the burden of wanting.

'You said there was a trust. A gompa that protects the gomchen.

'It has always been our great honor.' "

Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 1999 Pattison, Eliot. The Skull Mantra. New York: St. Martin's Minotaur (1999); pg. 62-63. "A file was already on his desk at the prison administration office. It had been delivered personally by Madame Ko, and was captioned 'Known Hooligans/Lhadrung County.' It was an old file, dog eared from use, and was separated into four categories. Drug cultists... Youth gangs... Criminal recividists... Cultural agitators. It was by far the longest list. For every name either a gompa or the label 'unregistered' was listed. They were all monks. Many had been detained during the Thumb Riots five years earlier. A dozen of the unregistered monks had an added notation. Suspected purba. He puzzled over the labe. A purba was a ceremonial dagger used in Tibetan rituals. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 1999 Pattison, Eliot. The Skull Mantra. New York: St. Martin's Minotaur (1999), book jacket. [Book jacket.] "When a headless corpse is found by a prison work gang on a windy Tibetan mountainside, veteran police inspector Shan Tao Yun might seem the perfect man to solve the crime--except Shan himself is in that very Tibetan prison for offending the Party in Beijing. Desperate to close the case before an American tourist delegation arrives, the district commander has no choice but to grant a temporary release from prison to the brilliant and embittered Shan, while confronting him with an ultimatum: solve the case fast and in a politically expedient fashion or the Tibetan priests in Shan's work brigade will be punished. " [Clearly, there are refs. to Tibetan Buddhism throughout novel. Only a few are in DB.]
Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 1999 Pattison, Eliot. The Skull Mantra. New York: St. Martin's Minotaur (1999), book jacket. [Book jacket, continued.] "When the early evidence shows that the killer was an ancient Buddhist demon and party officials try to thwart Shan's investigation by arresting an innocent monk, Shan is thrown into a maelstrom of political and religious intrigue involving American mining interests, Tibetan sorcerers, corrupt party officials, a secret illegal monastery, and the Buddhist resistance movement.

Set against the astonishing landscape of this beleaguered Himalayan country and the epic struggle of the Tibetan people, Shan's difficult and twisted journey to the truth becomes a passage through the many layers of tragedy inflicted by China on Tibet and its people. "

Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 2000 Clarke, Arthur C. "The Nine Billion Names of God " (first published 1953) in Other Worlds, Other Gods: Adventures in Religious Science Fiction (Mayo Mohs, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971); pg. 163. [Actual year this story takes place is unknown.] "'Call it ritual, if you like, but it's a fundametal part of our belief. All the many names of the Supreme Being--God, Jehovah, Allah, and so on--they are only man-made labels. There is a philosophical problem of some difficulty here, which I do not propose to discuss, but somewhere among all the possible combinations of letters which can occur are what one may call the real names of God. By systematic permutation of letters, we have been trying to list them all.' "
Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 2000 Clarke, Arthur C. "The Nine Billion Names of God " (first published 1953) in Other Worlds, Other Gods: Adventures in Religious Science Fiction (Mayo Mohs, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971); pg. 165. "The view from the parapet was vertiginous, but in time one gets used to anything. After three months, George Hanley was not impressed by the two-thousand-foot swoop in to the abyss or the remote checkerbord of fields in the valley below... This, thought George, is the craziest thing that had ever happended to him. 'Project Shangri-La,' some wit at the labs had christened it. "; Pg. 166: "One of his recurring nightmares was that there would be some change of plan, and that the High Lama... would suddenly announce that the project would be extended to approximately 2060 A.D. "
Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 2000 Clarke, Arthur C. "The Nine Billion Names of God " (first published 1953) in Other Worlds, Other Gods: Adventures in Religious Science Fiction (Mayo Mohs, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971); pg. 168. "Well, this isn't Louisiana, in case you hadn't noticed. There are just two of us and hundreds of these monks. "
Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 2002 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Lathe of Heaven. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1971); pg. 99. "Are there really people without resentment, without hate, she wondered. People who never go cross-grained to the universe? Who recognize evil, and resist evil, and yet are utterly unaffected by it?

Of course there are. Countless, the living and the dead. Those who have returned in pure compassion to the wheel, those who follow the way that cannot be followed without knowing they follow it, the sharecropper's wife in Alabama and the lama in Tibet and the entomologist in Peru... and all the others. There are enough of them, enough to keep us going. Perhaps. "

Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 2010 Swanwick, Michael. "The Edge of the World " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1989); pg. 650. "'This wasn't sophisticated stuff like the Tantric monks in Tibet or anything, remember...' "
Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 2034 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. The Bones of Time. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 152. "'...We went through two villages this morning, and it looked to me as if the names were in Tibetan... Look, I have the Dalai Lama's speech here, the last one he gave before he died--but there are other kinds of lamas, too--' "
Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 2034 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. The Bones of Time. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 172. "'We Tibetans are pretty persistent, and our philosophical system is too. This isn't the first time the Chinese have tried to smash Tibet, but Tibetan Buddhism is extremely hardy. It's survived other areas of Chinese domination, for longer than this one.' "; Pg. 173: "'As for me being the Dalai Lama, I certainly have a strong sense of duty toward humanity, in terms of feeling it necessary to help all people in any way that I possibly can. Of course, the traditional role of the lamas was to bring all people still living in the cycle of death and rebirth to enlightenment so that they could forsake the cycle...' "
Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 2050 Scarborough, Elizabeth Ann. Last Refuge. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 5. Pg. 5: "'...the elders retold the story of how Shambala, Kalapa, and the world came to be as they were now...' "; Pg. 6: "For thousands of years, life in Shambala was relatively untouched and unobstructed by events in the outside world. Occasionally, straying travelers would find their way here by accident, but usually newcomers who would become a part of Shambala were guided here by the Terton, a saintly being or bodhisattva, as such people are called in the Buddhist faith... "
Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 2050 Scarborough, Elizabeth Ann. Last Refuge. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 17. "'...Other times I know things that Chime cannot know. Is this so difficult to believe? Have you not read of the Dalai Lama? He too recalled all his previous incarnations.'

'You are not the Dalai Lama, Chime Cincinnati, and whether or not you are the Terton remains to be seen. I do know that you are a girl who has made cruel and thoughtless remarks about sick babies, and you embarrassed Isme in front of everyone with that joke you played on her...'

'Ah, Isme!... I am simply so comfortable here among my own people that I forgot to guard my speech as I had to in past lives to conceal my identity.'

'Chime Cincinnati!' he cried, exasperated with her. 'That's just the kind of thing I'm talking about. Look, whether or not you're the Terton, Father says it will be generations before it's safe to go into the outer world...' " [More. Many refs. throughout DB. Tibetan Buddhism is the novel's central religious culture.]

Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 2050 Scarborough, Elizabeth Ann. Last Refuge. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 18. "'No, I'm serious. Being spiritual is all very well, but a person can hardly earn good karma if they don't take care of their tasks in their present life. You know how to pay attention to the moment. That's very god. Everyone says you are a very useful person, a great help to the older en, especially your father.' "
Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 2050 Scarborough, Elizabeth Ann. Last Refuge. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 43. "The design was of a circle on a pedestal, and in the center of the pedestal was the Rin-chen gDugs, the Precious Parasol--his father had dug up several other examples of this first of the Eight Auspicious Symbols once used as altar bronzes throughout Shambala... They were Buddhist symbols, as his father had at one time been a Buddhist lama or teacher, though Buddhism was practiced by very few of the residents of Kalapa. Too many people had lived too long under the materialism of the PRC. "
Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 2050 Scarborough, Elizabeth Ann. Last Refuge. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 62. "...and said in a much deeper intonation that Mike would have believed could come from her, 'Homage to the gurus, the three kayas,' the first lines of the Tibetan Book of the Dead, or the Great Liberation Through Hearing, as it was known to Buddhists. "
Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 2050 Scarborough, Elizabeth Ann. Last Refuge. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 82. "of course, not all of this could be blamed on the ultimate nuclear disaster. A lot of it had been happening since the mid-twentieth century. Rather than heeding the suggestion of the fourteenth Dalai Lama that Tibet be used as a peace zone and a great international refuge and park, China had continued her degradations in the country until the early twenty-first century, when several countries began using Tibet not as a peace zone but as a battleground. "
Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 2050 Scarborough, Elizabeth Ann. Last Refuge. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 1-2. "...backdrop of the horned peaks of the guardian mountain, Karakal.

Prayer flags fluttered from lines strung between the chorten's dome and nearby buildings, the wind carrying the prayers to the heavens. Mike bowed to the chorten, in memory of the heroes it represented, and turned to talk down the steep path winding from the uppermost point in Kalapa--the chorten--through the compound on the ruins of the ancient mystic city. The old city and the current compound were located on a small mountain set within a valley ringed by ranges of larger mountains... "

Tibetan Buddhism Tibet 3000 Hubbard, L. Ron. Battlefield Earth. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 540. Pg. 540-541: "And this was Chief Monk Ananda. The man was wearing a reddish-yellow robe. He was big with a very peaceful face. He was a Tibetan and they had a monastery in caves. Any other Tibetans that remained in the country considered him their chief: You see, even before the Psychlo invasion, the Chinese had driven the Tibetans out of their country and they had gone to other lands. The Chinese had suppressed Buddhism--Ananda was a Buddhist--but the caves were very hard to reach, being way up a ravine in a peak, and the Psychlos had never succeeded in rooting them out. The Tibetans were pretty much starved. They were unable to come out to flat places and grow much food and even in this last summer had not been able to grow much due to lack of seeds. " [More about this monk. Other refs. to Buddhism by name.]
Tibetan Buddhism United Kingdom: Scotland 1995 Kurtz, Katherine & Deborah Turner Harris. Dagger Magic. New York: Ace Books (1995); pg. 48. "Julia's sea-blue eyes turned quizzical as she lowered her guidebook. 'Didn't I read somewhere that Tibetan Buddhists recently bought that island? It strikes me as odd, you know, that Buddhists would want to buy a Christian holy site.' "; Pg. 49: "Peregrine... considering Julia's comment about Buddhist interest in a Christian holy site. "
Tibetan Buddhism United Kingdom: Scotland 1995 Kurtz, Katherine & Deborah Turner Harris. Dagger Magic. New York: Ace Books (1995); pg. 204. "'...If you want to know more in detail, you should talk to my old teacher, Lama Tseten Rinpoche.'

'I sincerely hope you aren't suggesting that I catch the next flight out to Tibet,' Adam said with a smile.

'Not at all,' Julian assured him with a chuckle. 'Rinpoche came to this country years ago. You can probably find him at the Samye Ling Tibetan Centre, down in Dumfriesshire.'

Adam was familiar with the community's existence. 'What's his name again?'

'Tseten,' Julian repeated, and gave him the Anglicized spelling. 'Rinpoche is the appropriate honorific. It's pronounced Rin-po-shay, and translates roughly as 'precious master.' The name Tseten means 'possessing long life'--a fitting appellation, I might add. He must be nearly a hundred.' "

Tibetan Buddhism United Kingdom: Scotland 1995 Kurtz, Katherine & Deborah Turner Harris. Dagger Magic. New York: Ace Books (1995); pg. 211. "Shaking his head, Adam cast his eyes over the figure of a princely male form seated cross-legged on a low throne. It reminded him at once of the votive images to be found amongst the shrines and holy places of India--except that the figure's face was blank. It wore the flowing robes of a bodhisattva, they had crowned with a peaked hat reminiscent of a bishop's mitre. But one hand cupped a drinking bowl made form a human skullcap; the other grasped an implement that Adam recognized as a stylized thunderbolt symbol, shaped something like a small, openwork dumbbell with pointed ends. The hands themselves were sheathed in gauntlet-like gloves which, like the robes and the mitre, had been given a watercolor wash of emerald green. "
Tibetan Buddhism United Kingdom: Scotland 1995 Kurtz, Katherine & Deborah Turner Harris. Dagger Magic. New York: Ace Books (1995); pg. 219. "Then Jigme returned his gaze to Adam, and all the manifold images coalesced into the single image of a simple Buddhist monk, not nearly as young as Peregrine had first supposed...

He shed his anorak as they climbed, revealing a sleeveless gold jacket over his maroon skirt. Upstairs, passing a closed door bearing a color poster of the Dalai Lama, Adam saw Peregrine do a double take.

...Everything was scrupulously clean, the walls newly whitewashed where they were not adorned with paintings of various Buddhas. One corner was dominated by the presence of a graceful bronze Buddha seated in an attitude of serene contemplation on a low stand in the form of a blossoming lotus. "

Tibetan Buddhism United Kingdom: Scotland 1995 Kurtz, Katherine & Deborah Turner Harris. Dagger Magic. New York: Ace Books (1995); pg. 229. "'Apart from this [Nazi] flag--whose connection I must confess escapes me--all the other evidence you have shown me points to a debased and evil offshoot of that branch of Tibetan spiritual practice sometimes labeled 'dagger magic.' some say it is pre-Buddhist in its origins--and in the wrong hands, even anti-Buddhist.'

He indicated Peregrine's drawing of the falling Scanlan and the detail of the triple-edged blade piercing his back.

'Central to Tibetan dagger magic is the Phurba itself,' the lama continued, 'a blade endowed with mystical properties. The name can mean 'flyer' or 'rocket.' Amongst legitimate adherents to our doctrines, such daggers are relatively common as objects of devotion. Allow me to show you one.' "

Tibetan Buddhism United Kingdom: Scotland 1995 Kurtz, Katherine & Deborah Turner Harris. Dagger Magic. New York: Ace Books (1995); pg. 231. "'To those who embrace the Dagger Cult, the Phurba is both an object and a meditational framework. We would call it a deity, but that term does not have quite the same meaning for us that it has in a Western perspective. In righteous hands, the Phurba can be a powerful force for good; turned to evil, a formidable weapon. Even his Holiness the Dalai Lama recognizes the Phurba practice. He is known to have a Phurba lama in his entourage,' Jigme conceded. "
Tibetan Buddhism United Kingdom: Scotland 1995 Kurtz, Katherine & Deborah Turner Harris. Dagger Magic. New York: Ace Books (1995); pg. 214-215. "'...The Holy Island Project is in the running for an important conservation award, and the organizers like to have a photo essay on each entry. I was doing some shooting over at Samye Ling yesterday. A fascinating place, very peaceful and serene. The Dalai Lama's speaking there next year...'

...'Seedlings... I expect you know that the Buddhists are very ecology-minded. The Samye Ling people are doing a lot of tree-planting on the island--which is where my interest comes in. They hope to reestablish a fruit orchard on the same site where the old Christian monastic community had theirs, over a thousand years ago.' "

Tibetan Buddhism USA 1972 Nelson, Ray. "Time Travel for Pedestrians " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 141. "...the first Bardo from the Tibetan Book of the Dead as translated by Timothy Leary. That's the chapter all about Ego Death. The Book of the Dead was the 'In Thing' at that time, if you recall. "
Tibetan Buddhism USA 1990 Dick, Philip K. The Man in the High Castle. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1962); pg. 216. "Bardo Thodol existence, Mr. Tagomi thought. Hot winds blowing me who knows where. This is visio--of what? Can the animus endure this? Yes, the Book of the Dead prepare us: after death we seem to glimpse others, but all appear hostile to us... "
Tibetan Buddhism USA 1992 Dick, Philip K. Ubik. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1969); pg. 11. "'I was dreaming,' Ella said. 'I saw a smoky red light, a horrible light. And yet I kept moving toward it. I couldn't stop.'

'Yeah,' Runciter said, nodding. 'The Bardo Thodol, the Tibetan Book of the Dead, tells about that. You remember reading that; the doctors made you read it when you were--' He hesitated. 'Dying,' he said then. "

Tibetan Buddhism USA 1992 Dick, Philip K. Ubik. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1969); pg. 122. "But this old theory--didn't Plato think that something survived the decline, something inner not able to decay? The ancient dualism: body separated from soul. The body ending as Wendy did, and the soul--out of its nest the bird, flown elsewhere. Maybe so, he thought. To be reborn again, as the Tibetan Book of the Dead says. It really is true. "
Tibetan Buddhism USA 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 45. "'...The time and place will be determined by computer conflation of Western Hemisphere skin cancer rates and the Tibetan Book of the Dead--' "
Tibetan Buddhism USA 2004 Hand, Elizabeth. Catwoman. New York: Ballantine (2004). Based on screenplay by John Rogers, Mike Ferris, and John Brancato; pg. 105. There were certanly many books here, but there were even more artifacts, plunder from a lifetime of travel and collecting and research. Painted leather shadow puppets, carven Garudas, bronze Buddhas and silver Hindu deities; silk kites shaped like butterflies and dragonflies and phoenixes; Bunraku figures and Tibetan prayer flags and Oaxacan skulls of plaster and human hair.
Tibetan Buddhism Washington, D.C. 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 128. Pg. 128: "'So your old man and Richard Nixon and the de' Medicis and I guess the Dalai Lama are all in on this together...' "
Tibetan Buddhism world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 205. Pg. 205: "It was Hassan's cynical judgment (and many Illuminated beings, such as the Lamas of Tibet, have agreed with him) that most people have no aspiration or capacity for much spiritual and intellectual independence. "; Pg. 209: "A sympathetic account of the Tibetan system, which goes far toward justifying it, can be found in Alexandra David-Neel's The Hidden Teachings of Tibetan Buddhism; an unsympathetic account by a skeptical mystic is available in The Confessions of Aleister Crowley. "
Tibetan Buddhism world 1976 Matheson, Richard. What Dreams May Come. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1978); pg. 269. [Bibliography] "Evans-Wentz, W. Y. The Tibetan Book of the Dead. New York: Oxford University Press, 1960. "
Tibetan Buddhism world 1989 Willis, Connie. "Time Out " in Impossible Things. New York: Bantam (1994; story copyright 1989); pg. 312. "'I've got to pick up Andrew Simons.'

...'Who's Andrew Simons?'

'He's coming from Tibet,' Dr. Young said... 'He's with Duke University. Been studying the cultural aspects of time perception in a lamasery in the Himalayas. He's perfect. I read a monograph of his on deja vu three months ago and got in touch with Duke.' " [More, pg. 327, 331, 351, 365, 368.]

Tibetan Buddhism world 1993 DeChance, John. MagicNet. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 183. "I looked again. It no longer looked like a castle. More like a Tibetan monastery. I began to wish that the demigod in charge would make up his or her mind. "
Tibetan Buddhism world 1996 Bova, Ben. "The Great Moon Hoax or A Princess of Mars " in Twice Seven. New York: Avon Books (1998; c. 1996); pg. 76. "The Martians are extremely sensitive about their dealings with other living creatures. Not hurt a fly? Hell, they'd make the Dalai Lama look like a bloodthirsty maniac. "
Tibetan Buddhism world 1999 Hand, Elizabeth. Glimmering. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 88. Pg. 88: "'His room was your typical Tibetan monk's cell. But he had set up this sort of--laboratory--in it. Not exactly state-of-the-art, either... he's just sort of jury-rigged everything with--well, you can imagine the kind of sh-- you'd find in a Tibetan monastery, right? No electricity whatsoever...' "; Pg. 89: "'He's a kind of saint, Jack. I mean, a real, live saint, like Mother Teresa, or--well, I don't know. Thomas Merton, maybe? The Dalai Lama? I mean, I've met the Dalai Lama, Jack, and it wasn't like this.' "; Pg. 90: "'Padmasambhava. He's a Tibetan magician, this legendary yogi. Anyway, that's who Dr. Hanada looks like.' "; Pg. 208: "The only persons who it appeared would not be at the Pyramid on New Year's Eve were the Pope, the Dalai Lama, and John 'Jack' Finnegan, if he chose not to go. "
Tibetan Buddhism world 2008 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 65. "'...Our own government had prepared an elaborate [landing] site [for the alien visitors] at Edwards Air Force Base where access could be controlled despite pleas from scientists, New Agers, UFO believers, science fiction writers, and the Dalai Lama...' "
Tibetan Buddhism world 2010 Brunner, John. The Sheep Look Up. New York: Harper & Row (1972); pg. 97. "He [Austin Train] had given up books, even his favorites: the Bible, the Bhagavad-Gita, the Precepts of Patanjali, the I Ching, the Popul Vuh, the Book of the Dead . . . "
Tibetan Buddhism world 2015 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 85. "After her expulsion from college, Ruby Goldenberg virtually disappeared for more than twenty years. Tibetan monasteries, Catholic orders, and a host of other claimants later advanced proofs of hospitality, none of which stood up to investigation. "
Tibetan Buddhism world 2030 Jablokov, Alexander. Nimbus. New York: Avon Books (1993); pg. 164. "There was a time when Club Le Moustier became outrageously forward shock, and everyone was desperate for an invitation. Incensed, since he knew that only a small fraction of the people who wanted to get in were interested in the music, Sheldon let everyone in and then oppressed them with an endless concert of droning Tibetan chants performed by alcoholic alley nomads. The climax came when the white-bearded priest directing the choir puked noisily in the lap of a well-dressed woman sitting in the front row. Le Moustier did not stay forward shock for long. "
Tibetan Buddhism world 2032 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 94. Excerpt from papal encyclical signed by "John Paul XXV, Easter 2032: Earth-Moon-Mars New Network, " which emphasizes that the Catholic Church now supports artificial birth control (in light of new techniques that extend human life and years of fertility), but still opposes abortion: "'The Church is wise enough not to fight against the inevitable, especially in this radically changed situation. I will shortly be issuing an encyclical that will contain guidance on these matters. It has been drawn up, I might add, after full consultation with my colleagues the Dalai Lama, the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Chief Rabbi, Imam Mahommud, and the Prophet Fatima Magdelene. They are in complete agreement with me. "
Tibetan Buddhism world 2034 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. The Bones of Time. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 167. "'I'm just a bit surprised,' she said. 'Zen roshis are almost always men, although there are a few women now. Maybe five percent. And from what I gathered about Tibetan Buddhism--which isn't much--it seemed that there weren't even any nuns at all.'

'Pretty much true,' said Sattva. 'In the past, but not now. Things are changing. Everywhere. All kinds of things...' "

Tibetan Buddhism world 2034 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. The Bones of Time. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 169. "'How do they know she's the Dalai Lama?'...

He smiled. 'That's the best part. You know how they used to find the Dalai Lama after the old one died? They believed the Dalai Lama would reincarnate immediately, so they'd go all over the country with things the old one had used. If a kid could tell which ones belonged to the old one, they figured that kid must really be the old one, reincarnated. At least that was one of the things they did.'

'That's what they did with Sattva?'

'Not exactly. She got a bachelor's degree in Beijing and then got a scholarship at Harvard. The Dali Lama lived near Boston the last three years before died and lots of Tibetans lived there. She was friends with all of them and spent a lot of time at the center, the old guy's house. Anyway, she was at the center one day and went in the library and started pulling books out of the shelves; she didn't know why exactly. They bothered here, she said.' "

Tibetan Buddhism world 2034 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. The Bones of Time. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 171. "'Just what did he tell you?'

'That you think you're the Dalai Lama,' Lynn said.

'Slightly incorrect. I don't know what to think. All the evidence says that, yes, and I'm enough of a scientist to be open-minded enough to believe the theorem until a better one comes along. I'm deep into the business of changing paradigms, actually.'

'But others think you're the Dalai Lama? I mean, the reincarnation of the Buddha?' Lynn persisted.

Sattva shrugged. 'They do. I certainly don't consciously remember having had other lives; they know that I don't. It's a bit disappointing, actually, but that's the way it goes. I'm not trying to pull the wool over anyone's eyes. I try to keep myself as demythologized as much as possible. I apprecate the spiritual training. It's very intense...' "



Tibetan Buddhism, continued

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