Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to televangelism, Alabama

televangelism, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
televangelism Alabama 1981 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 498. Pg. 497-498: "Now the Reverend Sutter hopped down to the lowest set level, a series of carpeted ramps and semicircular extensions of the main set that allowed the director to use angles from the recessed camera positions to show Sutter in the same shot as the six hundred members of the audience. This studio was used for the daily 'Bible Breakfast Hour Show' as well as the longer 'Bible Outreach Program with Jimmy Wayne Sutter' now being taped. Shows requiring the larger cast or bigger audience were taped in the Palace of Worship or on location.

'I'm only a modest, backwoods preacher,' Sutter said in a sudden shift to a conversational tone, 'but with God's help and your help, we'll put these trials and tribulations behind us. With God's help and your help, we will pass through these times of persecution so that God's Word will come through LOUDER and STRONGER and CLEARER than ever before.' "

televangelism Alabama 1981 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 498. "Sutter mopped his sweaty brow with a silk handkerchief. 'But if we are to stay on the air, dear friends . . . if we are to continue bringing you the Lord's message through His gospels . . . we need your help. We need your prayers, we need your defiant letters to those Big Gov'ment bureaucrats who hound us, and we need your love offerings . . . we need whatever you can give in Christ's name to help us keep the Word of God coming to you. We know that you will not let us down. And while you are calling in those pledges--addressing those love-offering envelopes that Kris and Kay and brother Lyle have sent to you this month--let's hear Gail and the Gospel Guitars along with our own Bible Outreach Singers reminding you that--'You Don't Need To Understand, You Just Need To Hold His Hand.' ' " [Much more about this televangelism telecast, pg. 498-509.]
televangelism Alabama 1981 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 504. "'Jimmy Wayne, for two days you've been showing me around this fundamentalist Disneyland and every... thing I've seen is designed to separate some provincial moron's money from his genuine imitation cowhide wallet. You've got machines sorting the letters from checks from the empty ones, you've got computers scanning the letters and writing their own replies, you've got computerized phone banks, direct mail campaigns... and televised church services that make Mr. Ed reruns look like highbrow programming . . .' "
televangelism Alabama 1981 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 650. "To hear the Reverend Jimmy Wayne put words in Paul's mouth, the current climate in the U.S. was one of prayerlessness, pornography, creeping secular humanism, inculcating defenseless youth in the secret rites of sinful socialism, permissiveness, promiscuity, demonic possession advanced by rock videos and by Dungeons and Dragons games, and a general and pervasive rottenness manifested most visibly by the sinfuls' refusal to accept Christ as their personal Savior while giving generously to such urgent Christian causes as Bible Outreach, 1-800-555-6444.

When the Outreach Gospel Choir had sung their final triumphant chord and the red lights were out on the nine massive cameras, the Reverend Jimmy Wayne swept through the private corridors to his office, accompanied only by his three bodyguards, his accountant, and his media consultant... " [More, pg. 649-652, 716-721, 730-735, 739-746, etc.]

televangelism Alabama 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 293. "Smiling joyfully, the Reverend Billy Bob Calder extended his right hand to welcome the man striding onto the set. With his left, the televangelist urged his studio not just to clap but to shout and stomp. They did, obediently. The cameras swung around to focus on some beatific faces in the crowd--overweight young women with piled-high sprayed hair, men with shiny satin neckties, bewildered children--then back to the Reverend Billy Bob as he pumped the hand of Senator Eugene Borman and welcomed him to the Tower of Prayer broadcast. " [This begins an extensive passage showing a televangelist's broadcast and actions, pg. 293-299 Most not in DB.]
televangelism Alabama 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 294. "'They're going to let you have it,'... He was huddled with Anne & Charles in the New York office, on Sunday evening, watching a television... tuned to the hour-long show known simply as The Billy Bob Hour.

...In the studio-church in Birmingham, the crowd continued to applaud happily. The senator and the pastor sat down and beamed back at them, as if amazed at their fervor.

The studio was furnished as a combination talk-show set & electronic sanctuary. The Reverend Billy Bob sat behind a desk, with a couch to his right. This contained the grinning, overstuffed Senator Borman seated beside a smiling blond woman, the pastor's wife, who answered to the nickname Mrs. Billy Bob. She wore a red satin dress, with a tan suede vest and calf-high white boots. To the pastor's left was a stage with a lectern flanked by two small potted palms. A pleasing array of flowers, offerings from the congregation, formed a floral background both for the lectern and the sanctuary. "

televangelism Alabama 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 294. "'Senator Borman! It's just so good of you to come all the way down here from Washin'ton to be with us for Sunday evening services. We praise God for your safe arrival.'

'Thank you, Reverend Billy Bob. Thank you for the invitation to share this worship hour with you. Thank you for the opportunity to sit down with God's people.'

For those who had not beheld Senator Borman before, he presented a disturbing apparition. Obese and rumpled, he was scarcely able to squeeze into his chair; and once wedged into it, he would balloon out like a cartoon caricature of a glutted politician... "

televangelism Alabama 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 295. "Reverend Billy Bob was handsome, with a Roman profile, a fixed smile, and a dramatic flair. His blue eyes, as clear and transparent as the sky above his native Alabama, compelled trust and confidence. Yet he displayed certain peculiarities that tended to raise the hair on the back of Bert's neck: an unfailing theatricality, a messianic urge, a master of imagery; the oratorical artillery, the brains, and the guile to create a great deal of mischief should a fortuitous conjunction of events arise.

But the televangelist's dominant feature was his voice. It was a voice of extraordinary resonance and power, sonorous but primordial, a voice such as is seldom heard on earth, such as one expects to hear call sinners to the Last Judgment. "

televangelism Alabama 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 295. "'Among the greatest needs of mankind,' Reverend Billy Bob began, 'is communication. That's what this hour is all about--communication. We communicate with words, but it takes more than words to communicate God's message . . . uh. It's not jus the words we use . . . uh . . . but the meanings; not just the phrases . . . uh . . . but the spirit; not just the sermon . . . uh . . . but the heart.'

Senator Borman nodded silent but vigorous amens.

The reverend turned to Borman. 'Now they're trying to revoke our means of communication. They're trying to strangle us! . . . to choke off our voice! They're trying to take away our television outlets! Isn't that right, Senator?'

'I'm afeared you're right, Reverend,' Borman confirmed. 'We tried to stop them. We thought maybe we could stop them. But now it looks like we cain't. I'm afeared we've lost.' "

televangelism Alabama 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 295. "Reverend Billy Bob's face clouded with a terrible wrath, a reflection supposedly of god's wrath. 'No, Senator! It isn't over!' he declared, his voice breaking like thunderclaps. 'Praise Jesus, we're gonna continyuh, we're gonna press on, we're gonna rally the Lord's people. . . . And in the end, we're gonna broadcast this hour to more people than ever watched it before. . . . Praise the Lord!'

The congregation erupted into shouting, stamping applause. "

televangelism Alabama 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 298. "'Eighteen million people . . . uh! Eighteen million Christians--God-fearing, Jesus-loving . . . uh . . . people! That's how many . . . uh . . . watch this telecast! And with their prayers . . . uh . . . all of them praying . . . Praise the Lord! God's people . . . uh . . . Jesus's people . . . uh . . . will prevail!

'And now we will smite the anti-Christ . . . uh! We will smite the sodomite . . . uh! We will smite the purveyor of lewdness and filth . . . uh! And we will keep the miracle of television in God's service . . . uh!'

Anne shook her fist at the television set. 'Turn the blasted thing off, Bert,' she said. 'Enough is enough.' She spoke into the telephone to Richard. 'See what we're fighting?' "

televangelism Alabama 1988 Simmons, Dan. "Vanni Fucci Is Alive and Well and Living in Hell " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1988); pg. 67. [1] "...campus of Brother Freddy's Hallelujah Bible College and Graduate School of Christian Economics seemed to solidify out of the predawn Alabama gloom. Far to the east, just visible above the pecan groves, rose the artificial mountain of the Mount Sinai Mad Mouse Ride in the Bible Land section of Brother Freddy's Born Again Family Amusement Complex and Christian Convention Center. Much closer, the great dish of a Holy Beamer, one of six huge satellite dishes on the grounds of Brother Freddy's Bible Broadcast Center, sliced a black arc from the cloud-laden sky. Brother Freddy glanced at the rain-sullen weather and smiled. It did not matter what the real world beyond his office window offered. The large 'bay window' on the homey set of the Hallelujah Breakfast Club was actually a $38,000 rear-projection television screen which played the same 52 minute tape of a glorious May sunrise each morning. On Brother Freddy's Hallelujah Breakfast Club, it was always spring. "
televangelism Alabama 1988 Simmons, Dan. "Vanni Fucci Is Alive and Well and Living in Hell " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1988); pg. 68. [2] "'What's the line-up like?' asked Brother Freddy as he took a sip of his coffee...

'First half hour you got the usual lead-in from Brother Beau, your opening talk and Prayer Partner plea, six-and-a-half minutes of the Hallelujah Breakfast Club Choir doing 'We're On the Brink of a Miracle' and a medley of of-Broadway Christian hits, and then your Breakfast Guests come on,' said Brother Billy Bob Grimes, the floor director.

'Who we got today?' asked Brother Freddy.

Brother Billy Bob read from his clipboard. 'You've got Matt, Mark, and Luke the Miracle Triplet Evangelists, Bubba Deeters who says he wants to tell the story again how the Lord told him to throw himself on a grenade in 'Nam, Brother Frank Flinsey who's pushing his new book After the Final Days, and Dale Evans.' " [The whole story is about Protestant/Born-Again/Evangelical (so-called 'Christian') televangelism. Many refs. throughout story, only a few examples in DB.]

televangelism Alabama 1988 Simmons, Dan. "Vanni Fucci Is Alive and Well and Living in Hell " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1988); pg. 68. [3] "'Who we got today?' asked Brother Freddy.

Brother Billy Bob read from his clipboard. 'You've got Matt, Mark, and Luke the Miracle Triplet Evangelists... and Dale Evans.'

Brother Freddy frowned slightly. 'I thought we were going to have Pat Boone today,' he said softly. 'I like Pat.'

Brother Billy Bob blushed and made a notation on his thick sheath of forms. 'Yessir,' he said. 'Pat wanted to be here today but he did Swaggart's show last night, he has a personal appearance with Paul and Jan at the Bakersfield Revival this afternoon, and he has to be up at tomorrow's Senate hearing testifying about those Satanic messages you can hear on CDs when you aim the laser between the grooves.'

Brother Freddy sighed. It was four minutes until air time. 'All right,' he said. 'But try to get him for next Monday. I like Pat. Donna Lou? How're we doing with the Lord's work these days, little lady?' "

televangelism Alabama 1988 Simmons, Dan. "Vanni Fucci Is Alive and Well and Living in Hell " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1988); pg. 69. [4] "Sister Donna Lou Patterson adjusted her glasses. As comptroller of Brother Freddy's vast conglomerate of tax-exempt religious organizations, corporations, ministries, colleges, missions, amusement parks and the chain of Brother Freddy's Motels for the Born Again, Donna Lou was dressed appropriately in a beige business suit, the seriousness of which was lightened only by a rhinestone Hallelujah Breakfast Club pin which matched the rhinestones on her glasses. 'Projected earnings for this fiscal year are just under $187 million, up three per cent from last year,' she said. 'Ministry assets stand at $214 million with outstanding debts of $63 million, give or take .3 million depending upon Brother Carlisle's decision on replacing the Gulfstream with a new Lear.' "
televangelism Alabama 1988 Simmons, Dan. "Vanni Fucci Is Alive and Well and Living in Hell " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1988); pg. 69. [5] "Brother Freddy nodded and turned toward Sister Betty Jo. There were three minutes left until air time. 'How'd we do yesterday, Sister?'

'Twenty-seven broadcast share Arbitron, twenty-five point Nielsen,' said the thin woman dressed in white. 'Three new cable outlets; two in Texas, one in Montana. Current cable reaches 3.37 million homes, up .6 per cent from last month. The mail room handled 17,385 pieces yesterday, making a total of 86,217 for the week. Ninety-six per cent of the envelopes yesterday included donations. Thirty-nine per cent requested your Intercession Prayer. Total envelope volume handled this year is 3,585,220, with an approximate 2.5 million additional pieces projected by the end of the fiscal year.'

Brother Freddy smiled and turned his gaze on George Cohen, legal counsel for Brother Freddy's Born Again Ministries. "George?' Two minutes remained until air time. "

televangelism Alabama 1988 Simmons, Dan. "Vanni Fucci Is Alive and Well and Living in Hell " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1988); pg. 69. [6] "The thin man in the dark suit unhurriedly cleared his throat. 'The IRS continues to make threatening noises but they don't have a leg to stand on. Since all of the ministry affiliates are under the Born Again Ministries exemption, you don't have to file a thing. The Huntsville papers have reported that your daughter's house has been assessed at one million five and they know that it and your son's ranch were built with a three million dollar loan from the ministry, but they're just guessing when it comes to salaries. Even if they found out . . . which they won't . . . your official annual salary from the Board comes to only $92,300, a third of which you tithe back to the ministry. Of course, your wife, daughter, son-in-law, and seven other family members receive considerably more liberal incomes from the ministry but I don't think . . .'

'Thank you, George,' interrupted Brother Freddy... "

televangelism Alabama 1988 Simmons, Dan. "Vanni Fucci Is Alive and Well and Living in Hell " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1988); pg. 70. [7] "'Sister Betty Jo, you said there were several thousand request for the Personal Intercession Prayer?'

'Yes, Brother,' said the woman in white, laying her small hand on the console next to her chair.

Brother Freddy smiled at George Cohen. 'I told these folks I'd personally pray over their letters if they'd send a love offering,' he said. 'Might as well do it now. I've got thirty second before Brother Beau goes into his intro. Betty Jo?'

The woman tapped a button and smiled as the list of thousands of names flashed on the color monitor. After each name was a code relating to the category of problem for which intercession was requested according to the checklist proved on the Love Offering form: H-health, MP-marital problems, $-money problems, SG-spiritual guidance, FS-forgiveness of sins... There were 27 categories... " [Refs. to televangelism throughout story, all of which takes place during or right before a televangelical broadcast by Brother Freddy.]

televangelism Alabama 1988 Simmons, Dan. "Vanni Fucci Is Alive and Well and Living in Hell " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1988); pg. 71. "Brother Freddy knew there was a problem 18 minutes into the program when he introduced Dale Evans only to watch a tall, dark-skinned man with long, black hair walk onto the set. Brother Freddy knew at once that the man was a foreigner; the stranger's long hair was curled in ringlets... Brother Freddy knew that some mistake had been made; his born again guests--despite their personal wealth--went in for polyester blends, pastel shirts, and South Carolina haircuts if for no other reason than to stay in touch with their video faithful.

...The Hallelujah Breakfast Club prided itself on being live in three time zones. Brother Freddy smiled at the advancing intruder and wished that they had gone with the tape-delayed programs his competitors preferred. Brother Freddy usually prided himself on the fact that he wore no earphones to hear the director's instructions and comments, trusting instead on Brother Billy Bob's hand signals & his own well-honed sense of media timing. "

televangelism Alabama 1988 Simmons, Dan. "Vanni Fucci Is Alive and Well and Living in Hell " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1988); pg. 75. "The silent audience was silent no longer. Even the cameraman gasped. Brother Freddy glanced at the monitors and closed his eyes as he realized that his very own Hallelujah Breakfast Club, the top-rated Christian program in the world except for the occasional Billy Graham Crusade, would be the first program in TBN and CBN history to allow the word 'sh--' to go out over the airwaves. He imagined what the Ministry Board of Trustees would say. The fact that seven of the eleven Board members were also members of his own family did not make the image any more pleasant. "
televangelism Alabama 1988 Simmons, Dan. "Vanni Fucci Is Alive and Well and Living in Hell " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1988); pg. 78. "Brother Freddy realized that he might be dealing with a demon here. After almost forty years of preaching about demons, teaching about demons, finding the spiritual footprints of demons in everything from rock music to FCC legislation, warning against demons being in the schools and kids' games and in the symbols of breakfast cereal boxes, and generally making a fair-sized fortune by being one of the nation's foremost experts on demons, Brother Freddy found it a bit disconcerting to be sitting three feet from someone who might very well be possessed by a demon if not actually be one. The closest he could recall to coming to one before this was when he was around the Reverend Jim Bakker's wife Tammy Faye when her 'shoppin' demons were hoppin' ' back before the couple's unfortunate publicity. "
televangelism Alabama 1988 Simmons, Dan. "Vanni Fucci Is Alive and Well and Living in Hell " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1988); pg. 84. "Later that night, the Nightline video replay drew a sixty-share. On the same show, Dr. Carl Sagan went on record with Ted Koppel as saying that the entire event could be attributed to natural causes.

That week Brother Freddy's Hallelujah Breakfast Club Prayer Partner sent in Love Offerings totaling $23,267,894.79.

Except for the occasional Billy Graham Crusade, it set a new weekly record. "

televangelism Alabama 1996 McDevitt, Jack. Ancient Shores. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 220. "The Reverend William (Old-Time Bill) Addison, former beer truck driver, former real-estate salesman, former systems analyst, was the founder and driving force of the television ministry he called Project Forty, a reference to the years in the desert and the flagship TV channel which carried his show. He was also pastor of the Church of the Volunteer, in Whitburg, Alabama. Bill was a believer. He believed the end was near, he believed people were intrinsically no damned good and needed divine help every step of the way, and he believed Bill Addison was an exception to the general rule.

He was a recovered sinner. He had been a womanizer. He had known the evils of drink, and he had hotwired more than one Chevrolet during his adolescent years in Chattanooga. He had defied authority in all its manifestations. Even the divine. " [More about Rev. Addison, pg. 221-223, 251-252, 271, etc..]

televangelism Alabama 2020 Simmons, Dan. "E-ticket to 'Namland " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1987); pg. 216. Pg. 216: "The guide had put them on a simulated patrol down a narrow jungle trail. Sayers was in the lead, paying little attention to the trail, talking to Reverend Dewitt, an airwaves minister from Dothan, Alabama...

'Excuse me, Reverend.' The Vietnamese guide came forward... The Reverend Dewitt and Tom Newton each received a yellow WIA armband. ";

Pg. 226: "'One of them ran. the Reverend opened fire...' " [Some other refs. to this character, not in DB.]

televangelism Australia 1987 Bryant, Edward. "Down in the Dreamtime " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 260. "'...A man named Leo Barnett.'

'The TV evangelist?'

Alcala nodded.

'The ace-baiting, intolerant, psychotic, species-chauvinist son of a bitch,' said Rettig with sudden passion. 'That TV evangelist? Fire-breather, some call him?' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

televangelism Australia 1987 Bryant, Edward. "Down in the Dreamtime " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 271. "'I'm going to Australia with a guy from GF&G to try and buy a satellite ground station before it gets scarfed up by a TV preacher.'

'Ah,' said Tachyon. 'Would that evangelist by Leo Barnett, by chance?'

Cordelia nodded.

'I hope you succeed.' Tachyon frowned. Our friend Fire-breather's power is growing at a dangerously exponential rate. I, for one, would prefer to see the growth of his media empire retarded.'

'Just yesterday,' said Peregrine, 'I heard from Chrysalis that some of Barnett's youth-group thugs are hanging out in the Village and beating the stuffing out of anybody they think is a joker and vulnerable.'

'Die Juden,' Tachyon murmured. The two women glanced questioningly at him. 'History.' He sighed, then said to Cordelia, 'Whatever help you need in competing with Barnett, let us know. I think you'll find a great deal of support from both aces and jokers.' "

televangelism Australia 1987 Bryant, Edward. "Down in the Dreamtime " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 287. "'Murga-muggai hates European holy men, especially the American who comes from the sky. His name is Leo Barnett.'

'Fire-breather,' said Cordelia. 'He is a TV preacher.'

'He would save our souls. In doing so he will destroy us all, as kin and as individuals. No more tribes.'

'Barnett . . .' Cordelia breathed. 'Marty wasn't one of his people.' "

televangelism California 1965 Cart, Michael. "Starry, Starry Night " in Tomorrowland: 10 Stories About the Future (Michael Cart, ed.) New York: Scholastic Press (1999); pg. 194. [Author's Note] "Yeas later, when I had grown up and moved to California, I saw television evangelists for the first time and was even more intrigued by the mesmerizing power they exerted over their audience. What would have happened to me if I had encountered one of them when I was a lonely teenager? I wondered. Might I have ended as a true believer in a Jonestown or a Waco? It was such speculation that inspired the story 'Starry, Starry Night.' "
televangelism California: Los Angeles 1974 Disch, Thomas M. Camp Concentration. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1968); pg. 141. "The Reverend Augustus Jacks, formerly of Watts, continues to enjoy his extraordinary popular success in the Lost Angeles area. National television networks still refuse Jacks permission to broadcast the 'Address to a White Conscience' that catapulted the former evangelical minister to overnight fame, on grounds that it is 'inflammatory.' Their refusal has not prevented most of the nation from having already had an opportunity to hear the address, either on the radio or over local, unaffiliated television stations. The sophomore from the University of Maryland who tried last week to set fire to Jacks' $90,000 Beverly Hills home has consented to accept Jacks' offer of legal aid, after receiving a visit from the Negro minister in his cell in the Los Angeles county prison. "
televangelism California: Los Angeles 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 16-17. "'So maybe you know me. And maybe I know the Reverend Emil Zacharias.' Some name--it sounded as fake as the one I'd picked for myself...

'I seem to have a reputation that precedes me.'

'I watch the news. Your breakdown got a lot of airplay. Not many other evangelists announce on live television that the earth is occupied territory and challenge God to mee them in battle to take it back.'

'It was a momentary lapse, I assue you.'...

I pointed to the chair across the desk. He preferred to stand, leaning forward on an expensive-looking antique walking stick. It would have suited his image if it housed a sword dipped in curare. he seemed nothig like an evanglist.

...He stared directly at me. 'I want someone... Killed. I want someone killed... The job will entail great difficulties, but the reward will be commensurate, I assure you.'

'Out of the pocketbooks of the faithful, I suppose?' "

televangelism California: Los Angeles 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 35-36. "Zacharias intrigued me. He didn't act insane, but then neither did politicians. He just talked crazy. A famous TV evangelist who had preached the word of god for years to the nation via satellit enow wanted Him out of the way... The same satellites that brought the Right Reverend Emil Zacharias and his Hallelujah House into people's living rooms permitted... "
televangelism California: Los Angeles 2005 Gibson, William. Virtual Light. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 23. "Sublett had seen her too, but it only kicked him into some kind of motormouthed ecstasy of religious dread, every horror-movie he'd ever seen tumbling over into Reverend Fallon's rants about witches, devil-worshippers, and the living power of Satan. He'd gone through his week's supply of gum, talking nonstop, until Rydell had finally told him to shut... up. "
televangelism Kansas 1989 Denton, Bradley. Buddy Holly Is Alive and Well on Ganymede. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1991); pg. 169. "Along with their anger over the lack of regular programming, various citizens were also concerned about the details of the Buddy Holly broadcast itself. One of the loudest of these, as I had expected, was the Reverend William Willard of OKRAP fame. His voice blared from the Jaguar's death with the following words:

'When I saw that my ministry, the Resurrection Television Network, was being crippled by this disruption, I prayed. And when I prayed, the Lord answered, saying, 'William, this Satanic rock and roll broadcast is a sign of the Last Days. The figure on your television screen is a Cuban atheist who has disguised himself as a dead man by means of a rubber mask He is the herald of the Antichrist, and with his own words he has identified the Antichrist himself--Oliver C. Vale of Topeka, Kansas.' Thus, our course is clear. We must do battle with the Beast and destroy him.' "

televangelism Kansas 1989 Denton, Bradley. Buddy Holly Is Alive and Well on Ganymede. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1991); pg. 180. "'...you've rented out SkyVue to the Bill Willyites! They're calling your boy the Antichrist, did you know that?... these people are fanatics!' Khruschev cried. 'The ordained psychopaths of the Corps of Little David could hurt somebody!' "
televangelism Mars 2094 Sladek, John. Tik-Tok. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1985; 1st printed 1983); pg. 85. "Every other house seemed to be some kind of tabernacle. The television channels were clogged with ranters, chanters, rollers, healers. A Bible was probably being thumped, somewhere on Mars, every two seconds. "
televangelism Nevada 1981 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 546. "'And what does God say on this issue?' Barent asked quietly.

'This man may well be the Antichrist,' said Sutter, his voice drowning out the faint hum of the jet engines. 'God says we must find him and root him out. We must smite him hip and thigh. We must find him and find his minions . . . '. . . the same shall drink the wine of the wrath of God; and he shall be tormented with fire and brimstone in the presence of the holy angels, and in the presence of the Lamb; and the smoke of their torments ascendeth up for ever and ever.' '

Barent smiled slightly. 'Jimmy, I presume from what you say that you are not in favor of negotiating with Willi and offering him a membership in the Club?'

The Reverend Jimmy Wayne Sutter took a long sip of his bourbon and branchwater. 'No,' he said so quietly that Harod had to lean forward to hear him, 'I think we should kill him.' " [More about this televangelist Rev. Sutter, pg. 541-547, 550.]

televangelism New Mexico 1965 Ing, Dean. The Big Lifters. New York: Tor (1988); pg. 4. "Nell had explained to Johnny that she had misgivings about encasing God-made beauty in man-made plastic, but high technology was no abomination when it was used to reveal a higher way. Johnny had asked, like evangelists on TV? Well, she'd admitted, like some of them. "
televangelism New York: New York City 2023 Simmons, Dan. "Vexed to Nightmare by a Rocking Cradle " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1985); pg. 85. Pg. 85: [Author's introduction to story] "This is another story about televangelists.

Wait! Before you close the book or decide that my only form of recreation is harpooning this particular brand of helpless sea slug, let me explain... " [The story doesn't focus on televangelism nearly as much as the previous one in this collection. It takes place 25 years after a major catastrophe of 1998, which immersed New York City under water. A visiting televangelist arrives from Alabama, sets up a satellite receiver, and, at the end of the story, murders a an innocent little girl.]

televangelism New York: New York City 2023 Simmons, Dan. "Vexed to Nightmare by a Rocking Cradle " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1985); pg. 88. "Brother Jimmy-Joe Billy-Bob brought the Word to the New Yorkers on the eve of Christmas Eve, paddling his long dugout canoe east up the Forty-second Street Confluence... The sunset was red and beautiful--as all sunsets had been for the two-and-a-half decades since the Big Mistake of '98... Behind him nestled across the thwarts like some great cooking pot, lay the Sacred Dish, it's God's Ear raised to the burning sky as if already poised to catch the first emanations from the Holy Beamer that Brother Jimmy-Joe Billy-Bob had left in Dothan, Alabama, fourteen months earlier. Set behind the Sacred Dish, crated and cradled, was the Holy Tube, and behind it, wrapped in clear plastic, the Lord's Bike [for generating electricity]. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
televangelism North Dakota 1996 McDevitt, Jack. Ancient Shores. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 270. "The opportunity to rent it to the TV preacher on a short-term basis arrived at precisely the right moment. It never occurred to him that the action would cause a permanent rift with his neighbors, who were mostly Methodists and Lutherans, and who preferred a more sedate form of worship than the hosannahs and oratorical thunder provided by Old-Time Bill. "
televangelism North Dakota 1996 McDevitt, Jack. Ancient Shores. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 286. "Bill's enemies were the mainstream press, liberal politicians, and left-leaning churches, which is to say all the various forces that were conniving in the moral collapse of the American people. They accused him of every conceivable crime but concentrated particularly on fraud and hypocrisy. They charged that he used religion to solicit donations, that he was a theological con artist, that he probably didn't even believe in God.

None of this, strictly speaking, was true. To deal with the last first, Bill didn't think seriously enough about theology to worry about details, but he sincerely believed that, as he often preached, everyone had a direct line into God's study. Don't hesitate to use the phone, he said; say what you really mean, and God will never put you on hold.

He sincerely believed in his own uprightness... " [More, pg. 286-289.]

televangelism Ohio 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 159. "'...I need hardly tell you that the whole broadcast industry faces a serious challenge from certain vocal religious sects, not only that we broadcast hour after hour of their programming but that we do it on the basis of what they call 'the Christian discount.' We had that problem in Dayton. Our predecessor management had been unable to resist the pressures, I guess. Anyway, we were overloaded with that programming. Now, the Christian fundamentalists may be wild with enthusiasm, but that audience is small, and since the evangelist is off the air, they don't stay with you. Televangelism was costing money.' "
televangelism Ohio 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 160. "'I flew out to Dayton three weeks ago, and we sat down with the members of the Dayton Ministerial Association. We offered the ministers two hours every Sunday morning, free. We will broadcast from their churches on a rotating basis, on a schedule that they set up. A rabbi asked if we could do something for his people, so we gave the Jewish congregations a Saturday hour. They are not going to want to broadcast services apparently, but some films and lectures on Jewish history and culture. As of that day, we cancelled all the televangelists--I mean, all of them. We are meeting our community obligation in a more effective way, by broadcasting the services of mainline churches.'

Thad paused and smiled faintly. 'I need hardly tell you, the Bible-bangers are shrieking their heads off. You have anything to add, Bob?'

The station manager flashed a triumphant grin. 'They threatened to sue us...' "

televangelism Ohio 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 160. [After the station started broadcasting from mainline churches rather than offering airtime to televangelists.] "'They [the televangelists] threatened to sue us. They threatened to boycott any business that associates with us. We've simply told them to talk to the Ministerial Association. They can get on the schedule with the other denominations. One of them, who calls himself Brother Simon Lackwater, protested that the ministerial Association is nothing but a front for secular humanism, that it is infiltrated with communists.' "
televangelism Ohio 1999 Willis, Connie. "Epiphany " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 266. "'And how do I know these things are coming?' the radio said. 'I'll tell you how. The Lord came to me in a dream, and He said, 'These shall be the signs of my coming. There will be wars and rumors of wars.' Iraq, my friends, that's what he's talking about. The sun's face will be covered, and the godless will prosper. Look around you. Who do you see prospering? Abortion doctors and homosexuals and godless atheists. But when Christ comes, they will be punished. He's told me so. The Lord spoke to me, just like he spoke to Moses, just like he spoke to Isaiah. . . .'

He switched off the radio, but id didn't do any good. Because this was what had been bothering him ever since he started out. How did he know his vision wasn't just like some radio evangelist's. "

televangelism Ohio 1999 Willis, Connie. "Epiphany " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 280. "...and opened the Bible to the Book of Revelation.

The radio evangelists made I sound like the story of the Second Coming was a single narrative, but it was actually a hodge-podge of isolated scriptures... " [Also pg. 284, 298.]

televangelism Oregon 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 20. "It was Miriam's opinion tht the local churches... misrepresented the Bible. Miriam believed in God, but she did not have what the television evangelists called 'a personal relationship with Him.' "
televangelism Tennessee 1999 Cerasini, Marc. Godzilla 2000. New York: Random House (1997); pg. 218. Pg. 218: "Things began to fall apart all across the United States the moment Godzilla stepped out of San Francisco Bay. It was one of the blackest days in the nation's history. "; Pg. 219: "In Nashville, Tennessee, a popular and much respected televangelist began around-the-clock live broadcasts. The preacher--formerly the spiritual counselor of presidents, governors, and captains of industry--called his broadcast 'love coverage of Armageddon.' He claimed, in a calm, reasonable tone, that his show would soon be the only program on the air.

Godzilla, the evangelist declared, was the Beast of Revelations. Judgment Day was at hand. "

televangelism Texas 2005 Gibson, William. Virtual Light. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 9. "Sublett was Texan, a refugee from some weird trailer-camp video-sect. He said his mother had been getting ready to deed his ass to the church, whatever that meant.

Sublett wasn't too anxious to talk about it, but Rydell had gotten the idea that these people figured video was the Lord's preferred means of communicating, the screen itself a kind of perpetually burning brush. 'He's in the de-tails,' Sublett had said once. 'You gotta watch for Him close.' Whatever form this worship had taken, it was evident that Sublett had absorbed more television than anyone Rydell had ever met, mostly old movies on channels that never ran anything but. "

televangelism Texas 2005 Gibson, William. Virtual Light. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 19. "'Mama saw Cyrinda Burdette. In this mall over by Waco. Got her autograph, too. Kept it up on the set with the prayer-hankies and her hologram of the reverend Wayne Fallon. She had a prayer-hanky for every damn thing. One for the rent, one to keep the AIDS off, the TB . . .' "

...Something about the postcards gave Rydell the creeps; they made the guy look like a cross between Elvis and some kind of Catholic saint, skinny and with his eyes too big.

...Sublett shuddered. 'Reverend Fallon always said--'

'Screw Reverend Fallon,' Rydell said, hitting the ignition. 'Son of a bitch just makes money selling prayer-hankies to people like your momma. You knew that was all bull----, didn't you, otherwise why'd you come out here?' "

televangelism USA 1952 Heinlein, Robert A. "Concerning Stories Never Written: Postscript " in Revolt in 2100. New York: Baen (1981); pg. 212. "I imagined Nehemiah Scudder as a backwoods evangelist who combined some of the features of John Calvin, Savonarola, Judge Rutherford and Huey Long. His influence was not national until after the death of Mrs. Rachel Biggs, an early convert who had the single virtue of being the widow of an extremely wealthy man who shared none of her religious myopia--she left Brother Scudder several millions of dollars with which to establish a television station. Shortly thereafter he teamed up with an ex-Senator from his home state; they placed their affairs in the hands of a major advertising agency and were on their way to fame and fortune. Presently they needed stormtroopers; they revived the Ku Klux Klan in everything but the name--sheets, passwords, grips and all. It was a 'good gimmick' once and it still served. Blood at the polls and blood in the streets, but Scudder won the election. The next election was never held. "
televangelism USA 1977 Niven, Larry & Jerry Pournelle. Lucifer's Hammer. Chicago, IL: Playboy Press (1977); pg. 109. "Woe to you, my people! For have you not raised the abomination of desolation across the earth?... Hear the words of the Prophet Malachi: 'For, behold, the day cometh, that shall burn as an oven'... Thank you, Reverend Armitage. You have hard the Reverent Henry Armitage and 'the Coming Hour.' "
televangelism USA 1977 Niven, Larry & Jerry Pournelle. Lucifer's Hammer. Chicago, IL: Playboy Press (1977); pg. 156. "'O my people! Hear the words of Matthew! Does he not say that the sun shall be darkened, and the moon shall not give off her light, and the stars shall fall from heaven? And does this not come to pass even in this very hour?... You have heard the Reverend Henry Armitage on 'The Coming Hour.' This and all broadcasts of 'The Coming Hour' have been made possible by your donations, and we ask the Lord to bless those of you who have given so generously. No further donations will be needed. The hour comes and is now at hand.' "
televangelism USA 1981 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 506. "'By 1988 or '92, however, the way will be prepared for a real Christian candidate.' [for U.S. President]

'You?' said Harod. 'Aren't there others in line before you?'

[Rev.] Sutter scowled. 'Who, for instance?'

'Whatsisname,' said Harod, 'the Moral Majority guy Falwell.'

Sutter laughed. 'Jerry was created by our right-wing friends in Washington. He's a golem. When his financing dries up, everybody may notice that he's a man-shaped heap of mud. And not very smart at that.' "

televangelism USA 1981 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 506. "'What about some of those older guys [as a Christian U.S. Presidential candidate],' said Harod, trying to remember the names of the faith healers and snake charmers he had flipped by on L.A. cable. 'Rex Hobart . . .'

'Humbard,' corrected Sutter, 'and Oral Roberts, I suppose. Are you out of your mind, Anthony?'

'What do you mean?'

...'We're talking about people where with cowflop still sticking to their boots,' said the Reverend Jimmy Wayne Sutter. 'We're talking about good old boys who go on TV and say, 'Put your sick or ailing body part against the television screen, friends, and I will heal it!' Can you image, Anthony, all the hemorrhoids and boils and sores and yeast infections . . . and the man who blesses all that biology meeting foreign dignitaries, sleeping in Lincoln's bedroom?'

'It boggles the mind,' said Harod... "

televangelism USA 1981 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 507. [Considering who could run for U.S. President, who is also a well-known Born-Again Christian] "'...What about some of the others. You know, your competitors?' [Other televangelists]

The Reverend Sutter linked his hands behind his head again and smiled. 'Well, there's Jim and Tammy [Bakker], but they're up sh-- creek half the time with the FCC . . . makes my troubles look pretty pidlin'. Besides they take turns having nervous breakdowns. I don't blame Jim. With a wife like that, I would too. Then there's Swaggart over in Louisiana. he's a smart 'un, Anthony. But I think he really wants to be a rock 'n' roll star like his cousin . . .'

'His cousin?' said Harod.

'Jerry Lee Lewis,' said Sutter. "

televangelism USA 1981 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 507. [Considering who could run for U.S. President, who is also a well-known Born-Again Christian] "'So who else is there? Pat Robertson, of course. My guess is that Pat will run in '84 or '88. He's formidable. His network makes my little Outreach project look like a tin can and a bunch of strings going nowhere. But Pat has liabilities. Folks sometimes forget that he's supposed to be a minister and so does Pat . . .'

This is all very interesting,' said Harod, 'but we're getting away from the reason I came down here.'

Sutter... removed the cigar from his mouth, and stared. 'You came down here, Anthony, because your useless ass is in a sling and unless you can get some help on your side, the Club is going to end up using you for one of its after-dinner amusements on the Island.

'Hey,' said Harod. 'I'm a full-fledged member of the Steering Committee now.'

'Yes,' said Sutter. 'And Trask is dead... and Brother C. was embarrassed by the fiasco in Philadelphia.' " [More.]

televangelism USA 1981 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 550. "'I have known Jimmy [Rev. Sutter, the Christian Fundamentalist/Evangelical televangelist] for many years. The first time I saw him preach was in a tent revival in Texas four decades ago. His ability was unfocused but irresistible; he could make a tent full of sweating agnostics do whatever he wanted them to and do it happily in the name of God. But Jimmy is getting old and he uses his real persuasive powers less and less while relying upon the apparatus of persuasion he's built. I know he had you out at his little fundamentalist magic kingdom last week . . .' Barent held up his hand to cut off Harod's explanation. 'That's all right, Jimmy must have told you that I would know . . . and understand. I don't believe that Jimmy wants to upset the applecart, but he senses a possible shift in power and wants to be on the correct side when the shifting subsides...' "
televangelism USA 1985 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 92. "...and, of course and above all, the latest styles in skimpy swim and sports wear. The Christian community is unhappy because WMOA charges television preachers the same price that every other sponsor pays. When the Reverend Jimmy-John wants air time, he has to pay the same scale as the sponsors of Lieutenant Lynda.' "
televangelism USA 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 318. "Everyone knows that broadcasting pornography is unlawful--though Harding's fundamentalist friends may define pornography differently than Catlett does. CCE stations have never been convicted of broadcasting pornography. This means they are innocent, under the law, of the charges brought by certain televangelists. "
televangelism USA 1988 Godwin, P. Waiting for the Galactic Bus. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 65. "Reverend Falwell was right: certain things just shouldn't be brought into your living room where you might have company or children. "
televangelism USA 1989 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 73. "Tom Gavin spinning off to his new fundamentalist realities. If God spoke to you while you were up there alone in the command module, Tom, why didn't you tell Dave and me during the flight back? Or mention it during debriefing? Why wait all those years to announce it on the PTL Club? " [Other refs. to Tom Gavin and his religious direction, not in DB.]
televangelism USA 1989 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 88. "The cable TV's program had been one of the many clones of the PTL Club that filled the fundamentalist network's schedule. The set was done in K-Mart gothic, the host's gray hair perfectly matched the gray polyester of his suit, and a ten-digit phone number remained permanently affixed on the screen in case a viewer was suddenly moved to pledge money and had forgotten the address which the host's white-wigged wife displayed every few minutes. "
televangelism USA 1989 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 89. "The wife [of the televangelist/host] seemed to be afflicted with some neurological disorder which set her off on crying jags for no apparent reason. During the ten minutes that Baedecker watched before Tom Gavin appeared, the woman cried while reading letters from viewers who had repented and converted while watching the program, she cried after the paraplegic ex-country western singer gave a rendition of 'Blessed Redeemer,' and she cried when the next guest told of a miraculous disappearance of an eight-pound tumor from her neck. Incredibly, the wife's mascara--which looked to have been applied with a trowel--never ran. "
televangelism USA 1989 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 89. "Baedecker was in his pajamas and was rising to turn the TV off when he saw his ex-crewmate.

'Our next guest has seen the glory of God's creation in a way which few of us have been privileged to witness,' said the host. The man's voice had taken on a sonorous, serious-but-not-quite-solemn tone which Baedecker had heard all his life from successful salesmen and middle-level bureaucrats.

'Praise Jesus,' said the wife. "



televangelism, continued

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