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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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simian, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
simian world 1998 Clarke, Arthur C. The Fountains of Paradise. New York: Ballantine (1980; 1st ed. 1978); pg. 70-71. [Lecture given at BYU, Utah by El Hadj Mohammed ben Selim, Professor of Comparative Religion, 1998] "'If we find that religion occurs exclusively among intelligent analogs of apes, dolphins, elephants, dogs, etc...' "
simian world 1999 Bear, Greg. Darwin's Radio. New York: Del Rey (1999); pg. 122. Pg. 122: "'How are we going to treat this, Frank? Hell, my people have found SHEVA in every ape from green monkeys to highland gorillas.' "; Pg. 133. A lab chimpanzee named Kiki. [Other refs., not in DB.]
simian world 2008 McDonald, Ian. Evolution's Shore. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1995); pg. 237. chimps; monkeys
simian world 2009 Sawyer, Robert J. Flashforward. New York: Tor (2000; c. 1999); pg. 182. [Recounting a scene from one of the 'Planet of the Apes' movies.] "Caesar, son of the chimpanzee scientists Zira and Cornelius, sets the world on a path of interspecies brotherhood, hoping to avoid Earth's destruction by nuclear holocaust. "
simian world 2010 Swanwick, Michael. "The Edge of the World " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1989); pg. 650. "It was classic beta male jealousy, straight out of Primate Psychology 101. "
simian world 2011 Sawyer, Robert J. The Terminal Experiment. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 92. "...now three extand species of humanity: Homo sapiens, Homo troglodytes, and Homo paniscus. Human rights were divided into two broad categories: those, such as the entitlement to life, liberty, and freedom from torture, that applied to all members of genus Homo, and other rights, such as pursuit of happiness, religious freedom, and ownership of land, that were reserved exclusively to H. sapiens.

Of course, under Homo rights, no one could ever kill a chimp again for experimental purposes--indeed, no one could imprison a chimp in a lab. And many nations had modified their legal definitions of homicide to include the killing of chimps... Even though chimps were no longer captured for labs, zoos, or circuses, some were still living in human-operated facilities. The U.K., Canada, the U.S., Tanzania, and Burundi jointly funded a chimpanzee retirement home in Glasgow... for chimps that couldn't be returned to the wild. "

simian world 2011 Sawyer, Robert J. The Terminal Experiment. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 198. "'...We just lost Cornelius, one of our oldest residents [at the retirement home for chimpanzees in Glasgow]. He had a heart attack; chimps normally don't get those, but he'd been used for years in smoking research... Anyway, we got the recordings you wanted. I'm sending the data over the net tonight.'

'Did you look at it?'

said Peter.

'Aye,' she said. 'Chimps have souls.' Her voice was bitter, as she thought about her lost friend. 'As if anyone could have ever doubted that.' "

simian world 2011 Sawyer, Robert J. The Terminal Experiment. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 309. "NET NEWS DIGEST... Gaston, a free chimpanzee formerly with the Yerkes Primate Institute, in an exclusive interview conducted in American Sign Language on CBS's Sixty Minutes, claimed that he 'knows God', and looks forward to 'life after life.' "
simian world 2011 Sawyer, Robert J. The Terminal Experiment. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 91-92. "'When Peter Hobson had taken a university elective in taxonomy, the two species of chimpanzees had been Pan troglodytes (common chimps) and Pan paniscus (pygmy chimps).

But the split between chimps and humans had occurred just 500,000 generations ago, and they still have 98.4% of their DNA in common. In 1993, a group including evolutionist Richard Dawkins and best-selling science ficiton writer Douglas Adams published the Declaration on Great Apes, which urged the adoption of a bill of rights for our simian cousins.

In took thirteen years, but eventually their declaration came to be argued at the UN. An unprecedented resolution was adopted formally reclassifying chimpanzees as a member of genus Homo, meaning there were now three extand species of humanity... "

simian world 2015 Ellison, Harlan. "I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1967); pg. 707. "Benny had been a brilliant theorist, a college professor; now he was little more than a semi-human, semi-simian. He had been handsome, the machine had ruined that. "
simian world 2018 Bova, Ben. Voyager II: The Alien Within. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 78. "All of the bodies An Linh saw were animals, from baby mice to a full-grown chimpanzee lying on a cold slab, faint traces of frost glistening on the hairs of its face. "
simian world 2025 Varley, John. Titan. New York: Berkley (4th ed. 1981; 1st pub. 1979); pg. 9. "August had told Cirocco once that the five of them had only one close friend while growing up, and that had been a Rhesus monkey with a souped-up brain. He had been dissected when the girls were seven. "
simian world 2027 McAllister, Bruce. "The Girl Who Loved Animals " in Omni Visions One (Ellen Datlow, ed). Greensboro, NC: Omni Books (1993; story copyright 1988); pg. 16. "A woman could have carried a Gorilla gorilla beringei to term without a care in the world a hundred, a thousand, a million years ago. " [Other refs. to gorillas in story. See also refs. for this same story in Vanishing Acts.]
simian world 2027 McAllister, Bruce. "The Girl Who Loved Animals " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000; story copyright 1988); pg. 93. "A woman could have carried a Gorilla gorilla beringei to term without a care in the world a hundred, a thousand, a million years ago. The placenta would have known what to do; the blood would never have mixed. The gestation was the same nine months. The only thing stopping anyone that winter day in '97 when Cleo, the last of her kind on the face of this earth, died of renal failure in the National Zoo in DC, was the thought of carrying it.

It had taken three decades, a well-endowed resurrection group, a slick body broker, and a skinny twenty-one-year-old girl who didn't mind the thought of it. " [Other refs. not in DB.]

simian world 2039 Jones, Gwyneth. White Queen. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 138. Pg. 138: chimpanzees; Pg. 275: baboons
simian world 2050 Oliver, Chad. "King of the Hill " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 175. "Someone had once said that one chimpanzee was no chimpanzee. It was true; they were social animals. But how about ten thousand chimpanzees caged in a square mile? That was no chimpanzee also--that was crazy meat on a funny farm. " [Also pg. 180.]
simian world 2075 Anderson, Poul. Genesis. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 16. "Let's split the difference and call the date three-point-six-five billion B.C.E., he thought. Then one day stands for ten million years. Life began when January the first did, and this is midnight December the thirty-first, the stroke of the next new year.

So . . . along about April, single cells developed, nuclei, ribosomes, and the rest. The cells got together, algae broke oxygen free into the atmosphere, and by November the first trilobites were crawling over the sea floor. Life invaded the land around Thanksgiving. The dinosaurs appeared early in December. They perished on Christmas Day. The hominids parted company with the apes at noon today. Primitive Homo sapiens showed up maybe fifteen minutes ago. Recorded history had lasted less than one minute. And here they were, measuring the universe, ranging the Solar System, planning missions to the stars. "

simian world 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 35. "She would have to have been a gibbon in the slow-learner class not to realize that the Turkish pose was just that, a pose. "
simian world 2166 Farmer, Philip Jose. "Riders of the Purple Wage " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1967); pg. 663. "The beasts in the foreground are those that have been exterminated by man or survive only in zoos and natural preserves. The dodo, the blue whale, the passenger pigeon, the quagga, the gorilla, orangutan... "
simian world 2179 Sawyer, Robert J. Golden Fleece. New York: Time Warner (1990); pg. 88. Pg. 88: "'Which of the following is a singer for the pop group Hydra North: One. Tomolis, an orangutan. Two. Malcolm 'The Wanker' Knight. Three Lester Pearson. Four. Bobo, a dolphin.'

'I know that anyway. It's Tomolis--he does the high bits.'

'Yes, but would Aaron Rossman be aware of that? Disengage your own memory banks and try again.' "; Pg. 149: "She had a silly fondness for Hydra North, that vapid pop group immensely popular with the all-important eighteen to thirty-five age group when we had left Earth. The voices of the two men and the women weren't bad, really, but I just couldn't stand the keening of Tomolis, the orangutan who sang the high bits. "

simian world 2237 Butler, Octavia E. Dawn. New York: Warner Books (1997; c. 1987); pg. 107. "...a book about an ape being taught sign language and one about the space race of the 1960s. "
simian world 2500 Boulle, Pierre. Planet of the Apes. New York: Ballantine (2001; c. 1963). Translated by Xan Fielding.; pg. 67. Book jacket: "They soon discover the terrifying truth: On this world humans are savage beasts, and apes rule as their civilized masters. "; Pg. 67: "The hunters, all of them gorillas, led the advance. I noticed that they had weapons, which gave me a little hope. Behind them came the loaders and beaters, among whom there was a more or less equal number of gorillas and chimpanzees... "; Pg. 100: "'My dear orangutan, how happy I am to find myself at last in the presence of a creature who exhales wisdom and intelligence!...' " [As the title indicates, there are refs. to simians throughout novel.]
simian world 2500 Boulle, Pierre. Planet of the Apes. New York: Ballantine (2001; c. 1963). Translated by Xan Fielding.; pg. 127. "'You were saying Zira . . . a line of great thinkers, all of them chimpanzees.'

...'Almost all the great discoveries,' she stated vehemently, 'have been made by chimpanzees.'

'Are there different classes among the apes?'

'There are three distinct families, as you have noticed, each which has its own characteristics: chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans. The racial barriers that used to exist have been abolished and the disputes arising from them have been settled, thanks mainly to the campaigns launched by the chimpanzees. Today, in principle, there is no difference at all between us.'

'But most of the great discoveries,' I persisted, 'were made by the chimpanzees.'

'That is true.'

'What about the gorillas?'

'They are meat eaters,' she said scornfully. 'They were overlords and many of them preserved a lust for power. They enjoy organizing and directing. They love hunting and life in the open air...' " [More.]

simian world 2599 Piper, H. Beam. Little Fuzzy in Fuzzy Papers (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1962); pg. 14. Pg. 14: "It was mammal... but beyond that he was stumped. It wasn't a primate, in the Terran sense... " [Many refs., most not in DB. The novel is about the discover of 'Fuzzies,' a somewhat chimp-like, primitively sentient species, and human's attempts to determine if the Fuzzies are sentient. There are many references to the intelligence of chimps.] Pg. 30: "'I've seen Terran [Earth] monkeys and Freyan Kholphs that liked to watch [TV] screens and could turn them on and work the selector.' "
simian world 3000 Strugatsky, Arkady & Boris Strugatsky. Tale of the Troika in Roadside Picnic and Tale of the Troika. New York: MacMillan Publishing Co. (1977); pg. 184. "'Tonight the club presents a lecture on Darwinism Versus Religion by Candidate of Sciences Vyalobuev-Frankenstein with a live demonstration of the humanizing of an ape!...' "
simian world 500000 Aldiss, Brian W. "The Worm that Flies " in Immortals (Jack Dann & Gardner Dozois, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1968); pg. 81. [Story takes place far in the future. Actual year unknown.] "He passed another of his kind, an old ape wearing a red mask hanging almost to the ground; they barely gave each other a nod of recognition. "
simian Xanth 1993 Anthony, Piers. Demons Don't Dream. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 261. "Humfrey turned the pages of his tome. 'D,' he muttered as he did so. 'Demagogue, demon, depraved, desire. Ardent, bestial, confused, decayed, foolish . . . most. Ape, baboon, canary . . . human. Player, game. Female. Young. Kim.' "
simian Zaire 2030 Sawyer, Robert J. Flashforward. New York: Tor (2000; c. 1999); pg. 158. [Things that happened by the year 2030] "It was now a capital crime to kill a gorilla in Zaire. "
simian Zambia 2010 Baxter, Stephen. Manifold: Time. New York: Ballantine (2000); pg. 75. "At the side of the road, there was a baboon squatting on the rim of a rusty trash can. He held himself there effortlessly with his back feet while he dug with his forearms into the trash.

Emma was stunned. She'd never been so close to a nonhuman primate before--not outside a zoo, anyhow. The baboon was the size of a ten-year-old boy, lean and gray and obviously ferociously strong, eyes sharp and intelligent. So much more human than she might have thought. " [More about the baboon, pg. 75.]

Sinhalese India: Bombay 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 34. "...crowds of people of many nationalities--Europeans, Persians with pointed caps, Banyas with round turbans, Sindes with square bonnets, Parsees with black mitres... "
Sinhalese Sri Lanka 1987 Simons, Walton. "The Teardrop of India " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 223. "'Welcome to Sri Lanka. I'm G. C. Jayewardene...' Jayewardene spoke English, Sinhalese, Tamil, and Dutch. Hs position in the government required it. "
Sinhalese Sri Lanka 1987 Simons, Walton. "The Teardrop of India " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 230. "Later in the day a busload of extras, mostly Sinhalese with a few Tamils and Muslims, was scheduled to arrive. "
Sinhalese Sri Lanka 1987 Simons, Walton. "The Teardrop of India " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 242. "'...The Indians support the Tamils, since they have the same cultural heritage. The Sinhalese majority looks at this as support for the Tamil Tigers, a terrorist group... It is a conflict with no winners and too many victims.' "
Sinhalese world 2038 Brin, David. Earth. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 126. "One his way back to Auckland... Buses and minivans threaded the resort's narrow ways, hauling Australian families..., gushing Sinhalese newleyweds, serene-looking Inuit investors... "
Sioux California: San Francisco 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 106. [Chapter 25] As he was going out, he met Passepartout, who asked him if it would not be well, before taking the train, to purchase some dozens of Enfield rifles and Colt's revolvers. He had been listening to stories of attacks upon the trains by the Sioux and Pawnees. Mr. Fogg thought it a useless precaution, but told him to do as he thought best, and went on to the consulate.
Sioux Colorado 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 126. [Chapter 29] It was here that the Union Pacific Railroad was inaugurated on the 23rd of October, 1867, by the chief engineer, General Dodge. Two powerful locomotives, carrying nine cars of invited guests, amongst whom was Thomas C. Durant, vice-president of the road, stopped at this point; cheers were given, the Sioux and Pawnees performed an imitation Indian battle, fireworks were let off, and the first number of the Railway Pioneer was printed by a press brought on the train. Thus was celebrated the inauguration of this great railroad, a mighty instrument of progress and civilisation, thrown across the desert, and destined to link together cities and towns which do not yet exist. The whistle of the locomotive, more powerful than Amphion's lyre, was about to bid them rise from American soil.
Sioux Colorado 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 129. [Chapter 29] Colonel Proctor and Mr. Fogg, revolvers in hand, hastily quitted their prison, and rushed forward where the noise was most clamorous. They then perceived that the train was attacked by a band of Sioux.

This was not the first attempt of these daring Indians, for more than once they had waylaid trains on the road. A hundred of them had, according to their habit, jumped upon the steps without stopping the train, with the ease of a clown mounting a horse at full gallop.

The Sioux were armed with guns, from which came the reports, to which the passengers, who were almost all armed, responded by revolver-shots.

Sioux Colorado 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 129-130. [Chapter 29] The Indians had first mounted the engine, and half stunned the engineer and stoker with blows from their muskets. A Sioux chief, wishing to stop the train, but not knowing how to work the regulator, had opened wide instead of closing the steam-valve, and the locomotive was plunging forward with terrific velocity.

The Sioux had at the same time invaded the cars, skipping like enraged monkeys over the roofs, thrusting open the doors, and fighting hand to hand with the passengers. Penetrating the baggage-car, they pillaged it, throwing the trunks out of the train. The cries and shots were constant. The travellers defended themselves bravely; some of the cars were barricaded, and sustained a siege, like moving forts, carried along at a speed of a hundred miles an hour.

Sioux Colorado 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 130. [Chapter 29] Aouda behaved courageously from the first. She defended herself like a true heroine with a revolver, which she shot through the broken windows whenever a savage made his appearance. Twenty Sioux had fallen mortally wounded to the ground, and the wheels crushed those who fell upon the rails as if they had been worms. Several passengers, shot or stunned, lay on the seats.

It was necessary to put an end to the struggle, which had lasted for ten minutes, and which would result in the triumph of the Sioux if the train was not stopped. Fort Kearney station, where there was a garrison, was only two miles distant; but, that once passed, the Sioux would be masters of the train between Fort Kearney and the station beyond. [Many other refs., not in DB.]

Sioux galaxy 2368 Neason, Rebecca. Guises of the Mind (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 128. "Then Data had talked to others, including Yeoman Joshua Stern who followed the ancient Earth religion of Judaism, and with Chief Thomas Greycloud whose heritage was Amerindian of a tribe called Sioux. Each of them had shared with Data some of the rich tapestry of legends that made up the history and definition of their cultural backgrounds.

Data found both the disparity and similarities a fascinating study, but none of the vast influx of information he had gained from his readings and from contact with his crewmates had provided any form of personal enlightenment. "

Sioux galaxy 2375 David, Peter. Excalibur: Restoration (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 52. "The warriors seemed to be lacking the kind of weaponry that would account for the destruction surrounding them... Standing in the midst of it all, looking around with a distasteful eye, was Doctor Kosa. A pure-blooded Sioux, Kosa was jowly and gray-haired, and seemed to like it that way. " [Many other refs. to this character, not in DB.]
Sioux galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 421. "Like the Sioux with rifles/ horses/
blankets/ knives/ and beads/
you accepted them/
embraced them/
embraced us
and lost yourselves\\
But like the white man
distributing smallpox blankets/
like the slave owner on his
plantation...
we lost ourselves.
"
Sioux Hawaii 1994 Simmons, Dan. Fires of Eden. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1994); pg. 152. "'Your ancient culture?' said Paul.

'Pre-Christian Europe,' said Eleanor. 'The mystical Scots. And some of my lineage is Native American . . . Sioux, I believe.' "

Sioux Minnesota 1850 Erdrich, Louise. The Antelope Wife. New York: HarperCollins (1998); pg. 3. "Deep in the past during a spectacular raid upon an isolated Ojibwa village mistaken for hostile during the scare over the starving Sioux... "
Sioux Minnesota 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 34. "'...and also spurred by the Sioux uprising in Minnesota, the USA had thrown swarms of soldiers across the prairie, subduing the aborigines by numbers and firepower even if not with any great military skill. These days, the Indians could only stand and watch as the lands that had been theirs served the purposes of a stronger race.

Roosevelt looked for the Indians to head into one of the saloons sprouting like mushrooms along Broadway. Instead, they tied up their horses in front of Houlihan's establishment and went in there. Roosevelt's head bobbed up and down in approval: Indians who needed hammers or saw blads or a keg of nails were Indians on the way to civilization. He'd heard the Lord's Prayer had been translated into Sioux, whichhe also took as a good sign. "

Sioux Minnesota 1998 Erdrich, Louise. The Antelope Wife. New York: HarperCollins (1998); pg. 127. "'...A Ho Chunk dog. A Sioux dog. Ojibwa dog, too...' "
Sioux New York: New York City 1987 Jacobs, Harvey. "Stardust " in Omni Visions One (Ellen Datlow, ed). Greensboro, NC: Omni Books (1993; story copyright 1987); pg. 42. "'My mother ran away with a Sioux Indian activist named Fat Otter who she met while doing good works...' "
Sioux North America 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 10. "'Give me the Sioux any day, up in Minnesota and Dakota and Wyoming,' Tom Custer said. 'They fought hard, and only a few of them ran away into Canada once we'd licked them.'

'And the Canadians disarmed one ones who did,' Custer added. "

Sioux North America 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 121. Pg. 121: "There were even a few who shared buffalo-hide teepees that might easily have belonged to the Sioux. "; Pg. 213: '...a war of extermination harsher than any we ever waged against the Sioux.' "
Sioux North Dakota 1996 McDevitt, Jack. Ancient Shores. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 53. Pg. 53: "She'd circled back and encountered the Sioux reservation along the south shore of Devil's Lake... Subsequently she became interested in the tribe, made some friends, and in time acquired what she liked to think of as a Sioux perspective: I would live where the sky is open, where fences are not, and where the Spirit walks the earth.One of the friends was Andrea Hawk, a Devil's Lake talk show host, who captured for April the sense of a people bypassed by history. April was saddened by the poverty she saw on the reservation and by Andrea's frustration. 'We live too much on the largesse of the whites,' Andrea had told her. 'We have forgotten how to make do for ourselves.' Andrea pointed out that Native-American males die so young, from drugs and disease and violence, that the most prosperous establishment on many reservations is the funeral home. " [More.]
Sioux North Dakota 1996 McDevitt, Jack. Ancient Shores. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 78. "'Who's the chairman?' asked Max.

'The head of the local Sioux,' said Lasker. 'Name's James Walker.'

'The head of the Sioux is a chairman?'

'Movie Indians have chiefs,' said Redfern. 'Now tell me about the boat.' " [Extensive references to Sioux characters and major events of the novel taking place on a Sioux reservation. More, pg. 100, 126, 186-187, 214, 218, etc.]

Sioux North Dakota 1996 McDevitt, Jack. Ancient Shores. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 278. "Adam and Max went back in pressure suits to retrieve Arky's body. They said good-bye to him two days later in a quiet Catholic ceremony at the reservation chapel. The priest, who was from Devil's Lake, said the ancient words of farewell in the Sioux tongue. "
Sioux North Dakota 2018 Thornley, Diann. "Thunderbird's Egg " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 141. "Captain Eddie Fox was a Sioux from South Dakota. Though the languages and customs of our respective Peoples were as different as they were from the white culture, we still found we had much in common. We shared histories and legends, and in time we discovered that we were in love.

'In the old days,' I had asked him once, 'was it just the young men of your people who had visions, or could girls have visions, too?'

Eddie had laughed at that. 'Among my People,' he said, 'if a girl claimed to have a vision, she'd be accused of drinking too much whiskey! Why? Do Navajo women have visions?'

I remembered fourteen-year-old Thomas waving Uncle's whiskey bottle. 'No,' I sighed. 'Everyone would accuse a Navajo woman of being drunk, too.' " [Other refs. to Capt. Fox, who marries the protagonist. Other refs. not in DB.]

Sioux Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 48. "'Lucky you,' said Two Clouds, not snidely. 'I'm real happy for you if you feel like that, but to me mud's mud. I didn't go in for it that much at home either.' Two Clouds, poised gracefully on the bench in her beautiful skin, was a full-blooded Sioux who they all knew to have lived in urban complexes her entire life prior to the three years of mission training. If anything, she was more at home in artificial environments than most Sixers, and in the days before constant companionship had worn away their ability to surprise one another had rather enjoyed confounding expectations to the contrary. Certainly, every animal and plant to enter her lab kitchens had been turned into raw materials beforehand: skinned, sectioned, cleansed of mud and blood. " [Two Clouds is a semi-significant character in the novel.]
Sioux Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 64. "'...Their name for the planet sounded to one Friend, who's an amateur anthropologist and up on Amerindians, like the Sioux Indian name for the great Spirit: Tanka Wakan. They liked that when we explained it, so now that's what we and they both call the planet when we talk about it together. It's quite a good term, in fact--sometimes when we say 'Tanka Wakan' they seem to mean what we might mean by God, which isn't unrelated to the Sioux meaning either, I gather.' She suddenly looked rather sad. 'We ought to stop saying Pennterra altogether, I guess, but somehow we never do.'

'Our Chief of Food Processing is a full-blooded Sioux,' said Maggie, 'but I doubt she could shed any light on the question.' "

Sioux Pennterra 2234 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 380. "The two communities are to keep apart for the time being and wait and see about the future. (But note: Bob Wellwood was electrified to hear that the Sixers' Chief of Food Processing is a beautiful, young, female, full-blooded Sioux Indian named Elizabeth Two Clouds!) "
Sioux South Dakota 1955 Knight, Damon. "You're Another " in Far Out. New York: Simon and Schuster (1961; c. 1955); pg. 134. Sioux Falls
Sioux South Dakota 1989 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 22. "'There's a place near where my grandparents live in western South Dakota,' she said. 'A volcanic cone north of the Black Hills, on the edge of the prairie. It's called Bear Butte. I used to climb it when I was little while Grandad and Memo waited for me down below. Years later I learned that it was a holy place for the Sioux. But even before that--when I stood up there and looked over the prairie--I knew it was special.' "
Sioux South Dakota 1989 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 269. Pg. 269: "'Are you a Sioux?' he asked, not knowing whether the question was polite but wanting to know the answer.

Robert Sweet Medicine shook his head. 'Cheyenne.'

'Oh, for some reason I thought the Sioux lived in this part of South Dakota.'

'They do,' said the old man. 'They ran us out of this region long ago. They think this mountain is sacred. So do we. We just have to commute farther.' "; Pg. 270: 'You say the mountain is also sacred to the Sioux?'

The old man shrugged. 'The Arapahoes received a medicine here they could burn to make sweet smoke for their rituals. The Apache received the gift of a magic horse medicine; the Kiowas the sacred kidney of a bear. The Sioux say they received a pipe from the mountain...' " [More.]

Sioux United Kingdom 1994 Holdstock, Robert. The Hollowing. New York: Roc (1994); pg. 49. "'Nebraska. A small town called Watanka Lake. I'm Lakota Sioux. Not pure blood, but not far off. I've lived in Brazil for four years, and here in the U.K. for over a year now...' " [a major character]
Sioux United Kingdom 1994 Holdstock, Robert. The Hollowing. New York: Roc (1994); pg. 354. "'Of course! Helen Silverlock is an almost pure blood Lakota. Or did she say Dakota? Minnesota? Anyway, she's Sioux. I think. Maybe Cherokee.' "
Sioux United Kingdom: London 1500 C.E. Moorcock, Michael. Gloriana. New York: Warner Books (1986; c 1978); pg. 98. "...the Queen [Gloriana] received the rest of her guests:... Lord Tatanka Iyotakay, ambassador from the great Sioux Nation, in eagle feathers and white beaded buckskins; the Lady Yashi Akuya... "
Sioux USA 1869 Bethke, Bruce. Wild Wild West. New York: Warner Books (1999); pg. 44. "'...the Navajo, the Cheyenne, the Apaches, the Nez Perce, and up in Dakota Territory, Sitting Bull and all those thousands of unhappy Sioux. "
Sioux USA 1869 Bethke, Bruce. Wild Wild West. New York: Warner Books (1999); pg. 154. Pg. 154: "'...But that was mostly up in Minnesota and Dakota territory, against the Sioux.' "; Pg. 155: "'...Between '63 and '65, the U.S. Army fought nearly ninety battles with the Sioux, the Nez Perce, the Apaches, the Cheyenne...' " [More.]
Sioux USA 1876 Sanders, William. "Custer Under the Baobab " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 9. "'Colonel Custer, was it not your mission to pursue and punish the savages?'

'I learned that their forces were overwhelmingly superior to mine. I saw no reason, sir, to lead my men to certain defeat.'

'And on what basis did you make this evaluation?'

'My Crow scouts reconnoitered the Sioux encampment and reported it contained thousands of warriors.'... June 24, 1876... "



Sioux, continued

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