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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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Sikhism, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Sikhism California 2005 Gibson, William. Virtual Light. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 234. "...said that the manager, Benny Singh, was going to be showing up and they couldn't stay in there anymore... " [Possible Sikh character.]
Sikhism California: San Francisco 2376 Greenberger, Robert. Doors into Chaos (Star Trek: TNG / Gateways: Book 3 of 7). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 18. "The space was lined with holo-emitters in the usual crisscross pattern, all deactivated. A small console was on the far side of the room with a lieutenant, small in form, dark-skinned and utterly silent, standing by. And it was empty. Picard frowned in mild confusion.

'Singh, is the captain in the building yet?'

'Yes, sir, he's just beamed down and should be here in three minutes.' " [Character named Singh, but not identified explicitly as a Sikh.]

Sikhism Canada 2027 Atack, Chris. Project Maldon. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 49. Pg. 49: "'Singh, escort the Deputy Premier to his car if you would.' " [No indication that this character is a Sikh.]; Pg. 136: "The SoCy equations of Drs. Singh and Hartley offered some certainty, in a cold way. "
Sikhism galaxy 2075 Card, Orson Scott & Kathryn H. Kidd. Lovelock. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 50. [Year is estimated.] "Those groups [aboard the colony ship] with too few practitioners to maintain villages of their own--Baha'i, for instance, and Sikh, animist, atheist, Mormon, Mithraist, Druse, native American tribal religions, Jehovah's Witnesses--were either thrown together in a couple of catch-all villages or were 'adopted' as minorities within fairly compatible or tolerant villages of other faiths. "
Sikhism galaxy 2075 Card, Orson Scott & Kathryn H. Kidd. Lovelock. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 51. [Year is estimated.] "A man might be a brilliant scientist, but he was still a Hindu, and there was no hope of him living peacefully with a Sikh... " [Referring to the reason for separating the colony ship into villages by faith group.]
Sikhism galaxy 2267 Sargent, Pamela & George Zebrowski. Across the Universe (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 30. "...would try to take over his ship, as Khan Noonien Singh had tried to do. The future of Khan's people on the world where they had been exiled, Ceti Alpha V, was still to be decided. " [Also pg. 36.]
Sikhism galaxy 2285 Friedman, Michael Jan. "James T. Kirk " in War Dragons (Star Trek; "The Captain's Table " Book 1 of 6). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 271. "He returned to active duty in 2285 when Khan Noonien Singh hijacked the starship Reliant and stole the Genesis Device... "
Sikhism galaxy 2285 McIntyre, Vonda N. Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. New York: Pocket Books (1982); pg. 39. "Chekov's breath sighed out in a soft, desperate moan.

'Khan. . . .'

The man had changed: he appeared far more than fifteen years older. His long hair was now white, streaked with iron gray. But the aura of power and self-assurance was undiminished; the changes meant nothing. Chekov recognized him instantly.

Khan Singh glanced toward him; only then did Chekov realize he had spoken the name aloud. Khan's dark, direct gaze made the blood drain from Chekov's face.

...'He's from . . . twentieth century.'.... Khan Singh's only reaction to Chekov's statement was a slow smile. " [Nothing in the Star Trek episode that introduced Khan Singh, nor the movie that re-introduced him, indicates that he is a practicing Sikh. Also, he never identifies himself as a Sikh, although a crew member guesses that he is. He is the main villain throughout the rest of the novel.]

Sikhism galaxy 2285 McIntyre, Vonda N. Star Trek III: The Search for Spock. New York: Pocket Books (1984); pg. 11. "His old enemy, Khan Singh, had murdered all the members of the Genesis team except carol and David. " [Some other refs. to him in this novel (e.g. pg. 36, 111), but he was mainly important in the previous movie/novel.]
Sikhism galaxy 2370 Dillard, J. M. & Kathleen O'Malley. Possession (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 18. Pg. 18: "'Janice's Academy roommate is on board,' Beverly said... 'She told me that Janice had made some technical blunder right after she'd been assigned here. The senior officer, Lieutenant Singh, handled it properly, but it was the first major error Janice had made in her career...' "; Pg. 19: "'You're taking this very hard, sir. As hard as D. Crusher. As hard as Lieutenant Singh, Ensign Ito's senior officer...' " [Other refs. to Lt. Singh, not in DB. He is not explicitly identified as a Sikh, but might be.]
Sikhism galaxy 2370 Thompson, W.R. Infiltrator (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 16. "After four centuries the human race still remembered Khan Noonien Singh's conquests, and they feared that genetic supermen like him would attempt to dominate humanity again. " [Other refs. to Khan, not in DB.]
Sikhism galaxy 2375 Shatner, William; Judith Reeves-Stevens & Garfield Reeves-Stevens. Dark Victory (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2000; c. 1999); pg. 83. "She had had the same lessons. 'Captain Kirk and Khan Noonien Singh.' "
Sikhism galaxy 2375 Weddle, David and Jeffrey Lang. Abyss (Star Trek: DS9/Section 31 #3). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 85. "'...It symbolized the rule of Khan Noonien Singh.'

'Khan?' Ezri said. 'But he's dead. Isn't he?'

Bashir nodded his head. 'He is, but apparently his spirit isn't entirely. Locken has appropriated his icon.' " [Also pg. 249.]

Sikhism galaxy 2400 Anderson, Poul and Gordon R. Dickson. "The Adventure of the Misplaced Hound " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 85. [Year estimated.] Pg. 85 "'Bring me the big map of Toka, Rajat Singh,' said Alex.

'At once, sahib,' the servant bowed again and disappeared. Geoffrey looked his surprise.

'He's been reading Kipling,' said Alex apologetically. It did not seem to clear away his guest's puzzlement. "; Pg. 86: "'Well... the Hokas are unique. Only in the last few years have we really begun to probe their psychology. They're highly intelligent... and fantastically literal-minded. They have difficulty distinguishing fact from fiction, and since fiction is so much more colorful, they don't usually bother. Oh, my servant back at the office doesn't consciously believe he's a mysterious East Indian; but his subconscious has gone overboard for the role...' "

Sikhism galaxy 2414 Drake, David. The Tank Lords. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 380. "Perhaps the first case of this occurred in 2414 when Monument equipped four thousand Sikh rebels from Ramadan and shipped them to Portales to take over that planet's tobacco trade, but there were many other examples. "
Sikhism galaxy 2599 Piper, H. Beam. Little Fuzzy in Fuzzy Papers (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1962); pg. 141. "'People of the Colony of Baphomet versus Jamshar Singh, Deceased, charge of arson and sabotage, A.E. 604,' the Honorable Gustavas... Brannhard interrupted.

Yes, you could find a precedent in colonial law for almost anything. "

Sikhism galaxy 2700 Harrison, Harry. "The Streets of Ashkelon " in Stainless Steel Visions. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 16. [Year unknown.] "'What are you doing here, Singh?' he shouted toward the mike. 'Too crooked to find a planet of your own so you have to come here to steal an honest trader's profits?'... And what was behind that concealed hint of merriment in Singh's voice... The man turned toward him and Garth saw the clerical dog collar and knew just what it was that Singh had been chuckling about...

'Father Mark,' he said... " [More refs. to Singh, not identified as a Sikh.]

Sikhism galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 55. Pg. 52: "'Admiral? asked Gladstone...

Admiral Singh touched his closely trimmed beard. 'General Morpurgo is correct...' ";

Pg. 55: "'Admiral,' she said, 'is it pertinent that the Swarm waited until Task Force 87.2 translated in-system?'

Singh touched his beard. 'Are you asking if it was a trap, CEO?'

'Yes.'

The Admiral glanced at his colleagues and then at Gladstone...

'Can they do it?' asked Gladstone...

'No,' said Admiral Singh. " [Many other refs. throughout this novel to this character, not identified explicitly as a Sikh. Pg. 472: First name is 'Kushwant']

Sikhism galaxy 3000 Simmons, Dan. "Remembering Siri " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1983); pg. 105. "...but we knew from Shipmaster Singh's briefings and the moans of our Shipmates that the only groundtime we had to look forward to... " [Character not actually identified as a Sikh. This character also mentioned pg. 123, 138.]
Sikhism galaxy 4000 Harrison, Harry. Bill, the Galactic Hero. New York: Avon (1975; c. 1965); pg. 92. Pg. 92: "'I bet you're hungry, darling. Why not try Giuseppe Singh's neo-Indian curried pizza? You're just a few steps from Singh's, directions are on the back of the card.' "; Pg. 93: "'C'mon down to Singh's where the food is good and cheap. Try Singh's yummy lasagna with dhal and lime sauce.'

Bill went, not because he wanted some loathsome Bombay-Italian concoction, but because of the map and instructions on the back of the card... The food was incredibly expensive and far worse than he had ever imagined... "

Sikhism galaxy 4500 Felice, Cynthia. Downtime. New York: Bluejay International (1985); pg. 85. "D'Omaha put his cape up before his face, and when he took it away, Singh was standing before them saluting.

'What news?' Calla asked.

'Aquae Solis is gone,' Singh said dispassionately... 'A terrible forest fire, sir. It took every building and all the contents. Nothing was saved.'

It was according to plan, but D'Omaha was glad that Stairnon did not have to hear how well it had gone. Singh seemed to expect some kind of acknowledgment. D'Omaha nodded so that he would go on. " [Many other refs. to the character named Singh, not in DB. Other examples include pg. 161.]

Sikhism India 1838 Stirling, S.M. "The Charge of Lee's Brigade " in Alternate Generals (Harry Turtledove, ed.) New York: Baen (1998); pg. 73. "The man had an excellent reputation as a soldier in India--during the conquest of Afghanistan, and in the Sikh War, both of them prolonged and bloody affairs. "
Sikhism India 1848 Moore, William. Bayonets in the Sun. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978; first pub. 1974); pg. 19. "The Sikh closing in for the kill could feel the power of his splendid gelding surging into his knees. A gentle pressure on the left rein and he would swing clear of the English soldier's feeble sword. Eleven feet of bamboo tipped with steel moved smoothly to align itself on a spot inches below the hatless head of the fleeing dragoon. The Sikh's arm muscles tensed.

'Salaam, feringhee,' he yelled... "

Sikhism India 1848 Moore, William. Bayonets in the Sun. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978; first pub. 1974); pg. 37. "It was at about the time of the Spanish Armada--an event which made no impact on contemporary India--that the iron entered the soul of the Sikhs. Up to that time they had been a peaceful, devout Hindu sect following the teachings of devout gurus. But when the Muslim Emperor Jahangir tortured and executed their leader, his successor, Guru Hargobind, spurned the hereditary necklace symbol. In future, he announced, his sword belt would serve in its place. He proceeded to crreate a force resembling the Knights Templar and led them against the Mogul emperors until his death. "
Sikhism India 1848 Moore, William. Bayonets in the Sun. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978; first pub. 1974); pg. 12-13. "They seemed to have been trailing backwards and forwards on the fringe of the Sikh host for a lifetime... If some of his staff were bored, Cureton was not. He had enjoyed the past few days, trying to tempt Shere Singh to stay south of the Chenab so that the Commander-in-Chief might fall upon the Sikh flank while he was absorbed with the smaller force. " [Many other references to Sikhs throughout this novel, which is about the Sikh war of 1848-49 in India. Nearly every page mentions Sikhs, although usually usually in reference to Sikhs as opponents in a war, not in reference to the religion. Most refs. not in DB. This is a historical novel.]
Sikhism India 1848 Moore, William. Bayonets in the Sun. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978; first pub. 1974); pg. 14-16. "The 14th had arrive in the theatre of operations too late to take part in the First Sikh War and had missed the medal and the prize-money... "; Pg. 15: "A swarm of white-robed Sikh irregulars wheeled and cantered in loose formation, the legs of their horses hidden in a low haze... "; Pg. 16: "So far there had been no casualties. The Sikhs had sent cavalry over the river to protect the last of their retreating columns as the British approached... The gorchurras were trying to lure them within range of the efficient Sikh artillery without success. "
Sikhism India 1848 Moore, William. Bayonets in the Sun. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978; first pub. 1974); pg. 37-38. "The great Guru Gobind completed the transformation of the warlike sect in the early part of the eightenth century. Wine, tobacco and the smoking of hemp were abjured. The Sikhs disavowed caste, worshipped one god and at meat to keep up their strngth as befitted warriors. Every man had to take the name Singh--meaning lion or champion.

True devotees wore the five Ks. There was the kesh, the unshorn beard and hair. There was the kungha, the comb; kara, the steel or iron bangle on the right wrist; the kuchcha, or shorts, and most important of all, the kirpan, the sword. Such a powerful and dedicated minority soon attracted the attention of authority. The Emperor Abdul Samad Khan suppressed them ruthlessly and they fled to the hills. "

Sikhism India 1890 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "The Sign of Four " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1890); pg. 232. At Agra there were the Third Bengal Fusiliers, some Sikhs, two troops of horse, and a battery of artillery. A volunteer corps of clerks and merchants had been formed, and this I joined, wooden leg and all.
Sikhism India 1890 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "The Sign of Four " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1890); pg. 234. I was selected to take charge during certain hours of the night of a small isolated door upon the south-west side of the building. Two Sikh troopers were placed under my command, and I was instructed if anything went wrong to fire my musket, when I might rely upon help coming at once from the central guard. As the guard was a good two hundred paces away, however, and as the space between was cut up into a labyrinth of passages and corridors, I had great doubts as to whether they could arrive in time to be of any use in case of an actual attack.
Sikhism India 1890 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "The Sign of Four " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1890); pg. 234. "Well, I was pretty proud at having this small command given me, since I was a raw recruit, and a game-legged one at that. For two nights I kept the watch with my Punjabees. They were tall, fierce-looking chaps, Mahomet Singh and Abdullah Khan by name, both old fighting men, who had borne arms against us at Chilian Wallah. They could talk English pretty well, but I could get little out of them. They preferred to stand together, and jabber all night in their queer Sikh lingo. For myself, I used to stand outside the gateway, looking down on the broad, winding river and on the twinkling lights of the great city. The beating of drums, the rattle of tomtoms, and the yells and howls of the rebels, drunk with opium and with bang, were enough to remind us all night of our dangerous neighbours across the stream. "
Sikhism India 1890 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "The Sign of Four " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1890); pg. 234. Every two hours the officer of the night used to come round to all the posts to make sure that all was well.

"The third night of my watch was dark and dirty, with a small driving rain. It was dreary work standing in the gateway hour after hour in such weather. I tried again and again to make my Sikhs talk, but without much success. At two in the morning the rounds passed and broke for a moment the weariness of the night. Finding that my companions would not be led into conversation, I took out my pipe and laid down my musket to strike the match. In an instant the two Sikhs were upon me. One of them snatched my firelock up and levelled it at my head, while the other held a great knife to my throat and swore between his teeth that he would plunge it into me if I moved a step. [May be other refs., not in DB.]

Sikhism India 1890 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "The Sign of Four " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1890); pg. 235. "'How can I decide?' said I. 'You have not told me what you want of me. But I tell you now that if it is anything against the safety of the fort I will have no truck with it, so you can drive home your knife and welcome.'

"'It is nothing against the fort,' said he. 'We only ask you to do that which your countrymen come to this land for. We ask you to be rich. If you will be one of us this night, we will swear to you upon the naked knife, and by the threefold oath which no Sikh was ever known to break, that you shall have your fair share of the loot. A quarter of the treasure shall be yours. We can say no fairer.'

Sikhism India 1890 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "The Sign of Four " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1890); pg. 236. "'No; Dost Akbar must have his share. We can tell the tale to you while we wait them. Do you stand at the gate, Mahomet Singh, and give notice of their coming. The thing stands thus, sahib, and I tell it to you because I know that an oath is binding upon a Feringhee, and that we may trust you. Had you been a lying Hindoo, though you had sworn by all the gods in their false temples, your blood would have been upon the knife and your body in the water. But the Sikh knows the Englishman, and the Englishman knows the Sikh. Hearken, then, to what I have to say.
Sikhism India 1890 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "The Sign of Four " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1890); pg. 240. ...and there was the fat man, running like the wind, with a smear of blood across his face, and close at his heels, bounding like a tiger, the great black-bearded Sikh, with a knife flashing in his hand. I have never seen a man run so fast as that little merchant. He was gaining on the Sikh, and I could see that if he once passed me and got to the open air he would save himself yet. My heart softened to him, but again the thought of his treasure turned me hard and bitter. I cast my firelock between his legs as he raced past, and he rolled twice over like a shot rabbit. Ere he could stagger to his feet the Sikh was upon him and buried his knife twice in his side. The man never uttered moan nor moved muscle but lay where he had fallen. I think myself that he may have broken his neck with the fall. You see, gentlemen, that I am keeping my promise. I am telling you every word of the business just exactly as it happened, whether it is in my favour or not. "
Sikhism India 1890 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "The Sign of Four " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1890); pg. 240. "Well, we carried him in, Abdullah, Akbar, and I. A fine weight he was, too, for all that he was so short. Mahomet Singh was left to guard the door.

We took him to a place which the Sikhs had already prepared. It was some distance off, where a winding passage leads to a great empty hall, the brick walls of which were all crumbling to pieces. The earth floor had sunk in at one place, making a natural grave, so we left Achmet the merchant there, having first covered him over with loose bricks. This done, we all went back to the treasure.

Sikhism India 1974 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 128. Pg. 128: "An imposing male guard, whom Seven identified as a Sikh by the man's uncut beard, steel wristband, and ritual dagger, stood by watchfully outside the cage, along with Williams, who fidgeted impatiently... "; Pg. 129: "The guard shrugged philosophically. Clearly, quieting restless lab animals did not fall within his job description. Seven shared the Sikh's fatalistic attitude toward their mildly cacophonous surroundings... ";

Pg. 171: She turned her attention to the guard in charge of the storeroom. 'Bhajan, please keep a close eye on the prisoner. Summon me immediately if there is any change in his condition.'

'Yes, Director,' the burly Sikh agreed. ";

Pg. 189: "Kaur sighed in disappointment. 'I see.' Roberta tried not to take it personally as Kaur apparently decided to make do with Roberta instead. 'Thank you for informing me, Bhajan. I will be there shortly.' " [May be other refs. to Bhajan, the Sikh guard.]

Sikhism India 1974 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 211. Pg. 211: "He was much more concerned about Kaur's predominantly Sikh security force; the ancient brotherhood of the Sikhs had been famous for their military prowess and discipline since at least the seventeenth century, and had frequently formed the backbone of the subcontinent's defense force. "; Pg. 212: "Almost a dozen men ran on foot ahead of two more guards riding a compact motorized vehicle... Most of the men appeared to be Sikhs, but Seven spotted a couple of European and Asian individuals running alongside the bearded and turbaned Indian guardsmen... The soldiers on foot were forced to scatter and scurry for safety... 'Watch out!' he shrieked in Punjabi. " [More refs. to the Sikh guards.]
Sikhism India 1974 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 246. "'We should definitely keep an eye on the children, of course,' Seven added, clearly thinking ahead. 'Particularly that little Indian boy you mentioned, the son of Sarina Kaur. The genetically enhanced offspring of Kaur is not someone we can afford to ignore.' Leaning forward, he scribbled a note to himself on a piece of blank stationery. 'What was his name again?'

'Noon,' Roberta answered. The boy's dark, intelligent eyes gazed up from the depths of her memory, holding the promise--or the threat--of the man he would someday become. A chill ran through her, despite the pleasant springtime weather. 'Short for Khan Noonien Singh.' " [Thus Khan is named for the first time in this novel, not named, and hardly mentioned, until half way through the book, although he is the title character, and pictured on the cover. Many refs. to him and his parents, who are explicitly identified as Sikhs in this book.]

Sikhism India 1974 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 247. "His new foster parents, distant relations of his deceased mother, were kind enough, and capable of providing him with a comfortable home environment. Prabhot Singh worked as an civil engineer [sic] for the city, while his wife Sharan illustrated children's books. Childless themselves, they doted on the newly orphaned Noon, marveling at his obvious talent, strength, and precariousness. Neither Prabhot nor Sharan were his intellectual equals, naturally, but the challenge of exploring a brand-new world, as well as the Singhs' admirably well equipped library, were provided him with sufficient mental stimulation, at least for the time being. "
Sikhism India 1984 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 261. "Nai Sarak Bazaar
Delhi, India
November 1, 1984

Monsoon season was over, but another storm was brewing. Fourteen years old, Khan Noonien Singh could feel the tension in the air as he sifted through the used books piled high in one of the many stalls lining the crowded market street.. " [From this point (page 261) until the end (page 404), the novel focuses heavily on Khan, a Sikh character.]

Sikhism India 1984 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 262. "Yesterday, only slightly more than twenty-four hours ago, India's controversial prime minister, Indira Gandhi, had been assassinated in her garden by her own Sikh bodyguards, who had reportedly filled her body with over thirty bullets. The killing had been in retaliation for Mrs. Gandhi's military assault on Sikhism's holiest site, the Golden Temple in Amritsar. Thousands had been killed in the attack, and a library of sacred scriptures incinerated, and Noon feared that the sectarian bloodshed had only begun. "
Sikhism India 1984 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 262. "His [Khan] friends back at the university, where he was working toward a doctorate in engineering, had cautioned the young prodigy not to leave the campus this morning, given the heated emotions raised by the prime minister's murder, yet Noon had never been one to let fear determine his actions. Now, however, he began to wonder if his pride had overcome his judgment. He stroked his cheek thoughtfully; although his first beard was just beginning to come in, his sparsely whiskered face, along with his turban and steel wristband, clearly identified him as a Sikh, albeit one barely grown. "
Sikhism India 1984 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 263. "Without warning, the book merchant snatched a dog-eared history text out of Noon's hands. 'Get out of here, you filthy Sikh,' the man barked at Noon, spittle flying from his lips. His eyes burned with murderous hatred. 'Get away from my books!'

Caught off guard by the ferocity of the vendor's bile, Noon stepped backward into the street. How dare he speak to me like that? he thought, ire rapidly overtaking surprise. Without meaning to, he jostled a passing pedestrian, who shoved him back roughly. 'Watch where you're going, you murdering dog!' the other man said, then spit at Noon's feet. 'You've got your nerve, showing your ugly face today!'

An angry retort sprang to Noon's lips, but he held his tongue... "

Sikhism India 1984 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 263. "Noon's hand went instinctively to the silver-plated dagger tucked in his belt. Until today he had only carried the brightly-polished kirpan for tradition's sake; never before had he needed it for self-defense. He hesitated to draw the blade, though, lest that provoke the mob further. 'Leave me alone,' he warned. His adolescent voice cracked, undermining his show of defiance. 'I mean you no harm.'

But it was already too late to avoid violence. The smell of burning timbers grew stronger and Noon glimpsed tendrils of ash and smoke rising above the sales banners festooning the buildings less than a block away. He heard gunshots, and the horror-stricken cries of men and women, as the angry shouting drew nearer. 'Blood for blood!' roared many raging voices, sending a shiver down Noon's spine. Although he had lived a fairly sheltered life since his mother's death..., he knew a riot when he heard one. 'Death to all Sikhs!' " [Much more about anti-Sikh sentiment in India, not in DB.]

Sikhism India 1984 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 265. "Scouring his brain, he recalled a gurudwara, a Sikh temple, on Chandni Chowk, maybe half a dozen blocks away. Would such a site provide sanctuary, he wondered, or merely serve as even greater target for the rioters' wrath? Probably the latter, he feared, but there was also a police station on the same street, only a few doors down from the temple. Perhaps the police could provide the gurudwara with some measure of protection, even in the face of total chaos and anarchy?

It was a slim chance, but the best one that presented itself. He paused momentarily to get his bearings, using his knife to fend off any looters who might want to spill more Sikh blood. 'Keep away from me!' he threatened, slashing the air with his blade. "

Sikhism India 1984 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 320. "Light mosquito netting covered the wrought-iron posts of his unmade bed, while the Nishan Sahib, the scarlet pennant of the Sikh people, adorned the monsoon-blue wall above his desk. "
Sikhism India 1987 Martin, George R. R. "From the Journal of Xavier Desmond " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 218. "...India... In this quasi-nation of Hindu and Moslem and Sikh, the vast majority of jokers seem to be Hindu, but given Islam's [anti-joker] attitudes, that can hardly be a surprise... today you find Hindu and Muslim and Sikh living side by side on the same street, and jokes and nats and even a few pathetic deuces sharing the same hideous slums. It does not seem to have made them love each other any more, alas. "
Sikhism India 2000 Knight, Damon. Rule Golden in Three Novels. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1954); pg. 53. Pg. 53: "We landed at Srinagar, in the Vale of Kashmir... I saw a group of white-turbaned figures standing at the gate. I squinted at them through the glare; heatwaves made them jump and waver, but in a moment I was sure. They were bush-bearded Sikh policemen, and there were eight of them.

I pressed Aza-Kra's arm sharply and held my breath.

A moment later we picked our way through the sprawled line of passengers to the huddle of bodies at the gate. The passport examiner, a slender Hindu, lay a yard beyond the Sikhs. I plucked a sheet of paper out of his hand. ";

Pg. 54: Amritsar

Sikhism India 2000 Knight, Damon. Rule Golden in Three Novels. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1954); pg. 59. "Late the same day, a clash between Sikh and Moslem guards on the India-Pakistan border near Sialkot resulted in the annihilation of both parties. "
Sikhism India 2010 Bury, Stephen. Interface. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 146. "Dr. Radhakrishnan was looking around uneasily, hoping to make eye contact with someone who knew who this lady was, why she was here, how she had gotten in past all those Sikh commandos at the front gate, all of those .50-caliber machine-gun nests. "
Sikhism India 2060 Russell, Mary Doria. The Sparrow. New York: Ballantine (1996); pg. 44. "So the Society brough in Father Singh, an Indian craftsman known for his intricate braces and artificial limbs, who fabricated a pair of near-prostheses to strengthen and help control Sandoz's fingers. " [Father Singh is a Catholic clergyman, but, based on his name, possibly has a Sikh family background. He is an important character in the book.]
Sikhism India 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 169. "'Where will India make its move?' asked Peter. 'The obvious thing would be war with Pakistan.'

'Again?' said Bean. 'Pakistan would be in indigestible lump. It would block India from further expansion, just trying to get the Muslims under control. A terrorist war that would make the old struggle with the Sikhs look like a child's birthday party.' "

Sikhism India 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 324. "More gunfire.

'Maybe,' said Sayagi, 'we ought to disperse.'

He was walking toward the door when it opened and Achilles came in, followed by six Sikhs carrying automatic weapons. 'Have a seat, Sayagi,' said Achilles. 'I'm afraid we have a hostage situation here. Someone made some libelous assertions about me on the nets, and when I declined to be detained during the inquiry, shooting began. Fortunately, I have some friends and while we're waiting for them to provide me with transportation to a neutral location, you are my guarantors of safety.' "

Sikhism India 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 324. "Immediately, the two Battle School grads who were Sikhs stood up and said, to Achilles' soldiers, 'Are we under threat of death from you?'

'As long as you serve the oppressor,' one of them answered.

'He is the oppressor!' one of the Sikh Battle Schoolers said, pointing to Achilles.

'Do you think the Chinese will be any kinder to our people than New Delhi has?' said the other.

'Remember how the Chinese treated Tibet and Taiwan! That is our future, because of him!'

The Sikh soldiers were obviously wavering.

Achilles drew a pistol from his back and shot the soldiers dead, one after the other. The last two had time to try to rush at him, but every shot he fired struck home.

The pistol shots still rang in the room when Sayagi said, 'Why didn't they shoot you?'

'I had them unload their weapons before entering the room,' Achilles said... "

Sikhism India: Calcutta 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 98. "...The officer's broad helmet bobbed as he shouted. I thanked all of the gods that he was not a Sikh. He was screaming at us in a West Bengali dialect. He punctuated his shouts with blows to Sanjay's door with his heavy lathi stick. A Sikh--and most metropolitan police tend to be Sikhs--would have been using the club on our heads. They were strange people, Sikhs. "
Sikhism India: Calcutta 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 143. "'A gentleman has been waiting to see you, sir,' said the assistant manager... I turned to the lobby expecting to find Krishna, but the man who rose from the plum0colored sofa was tall, turbaned, and bearded--obviously a Sikh.

'Mr. Luck-zack?'

'Loo-zack. Yes.'

'I am inspector Singh of the Calcutta Metropolitan Police.' He showed me a badge and a faded identity photo behind yellowed plastic.

'Inspector?' I did not offer to shake hands.

'Mr. Luczak, I would like to speak to you concerning a case which our department is investigating... The disappearance of M. Das.' " [More about this character, without referring to Sikhism by name, pg. 245-257, 260-266, 271-274, more.]

Sikhism India: Calcutta 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 144. "It was darker in the bar, but as I ordered a gin and tonic and the Inspector asked for just tonic, I was able to take time to appraise the tall Sikh.

Inspector Singh carried himself with the unselfconscious authority of a man who was used to being obeyed. His voice held the echo of years in England, not the Oxbridge drawl but the clipped precision of Sandhurst or one of the other academies. He wore a well-tailored tan suit that fell just short of being a uniform. The turban was wine-red.

His appearance confirmed what little I knew about Sikhs. A minority religious group, they made up possibly the most aggressive and productive segment of Indian society. As a people they tended to understand machinery, and although the majority of Sikhs inhabited the Punjab, they could be found driving taxis and operating heavy equipment throughout the country. "

Sikhism India: Calcutta 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 145. "Amrita's father had said that ninety percent of his bulldozer operators had been Sikhs. It was also the Sikhs who made up the upper echelons of the military and police forces. From what Amrita had told me, only the Sikhs had capitalized on the Green Revolution and modern agricultural technology to make a go of their extensive cooperative farms in the north of India.

It had also been the Sikhs who were responsible for many of the massacres of Muslim civilians during the partition riots. " [More pg. 145-147.]

Sikhism India: Punjab 1943 Ondaatje, Michael. The English Patient. London, UK: Bloomsbury (1996; c. 1992); pg. 271. "They move through the night, they move through the silver door to the shrine where the Holy Book lies under a canopy of brocades. The ragis sing the Book's verses accompanied by musicians. They sing from four in the morning till eleven at night. The Granth Sahib is opened at random, a quotation selected, and for three hours, before the mist lifts off the lake to reveal the Golden Temple, the verses mingle and sway out with unbroken reading.

Kip walks her beside a pool to the tree shrine where Baba Gujhaji, the first priest of the temple, is buried. A tree of superstitions, four hundred and fifty years old. 'My mother came here to tie a string onto a branch and beseeched the tree for a son, and when my brother was born returned and asked to be blessed with another. There are sacred trees and magic water all over Punjab.' " [More.]

Sikhism India: Punjab 2110 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Green Mars. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 327. "India has been interested, and went through the program with Sikhs in the Punjab... "
Sikhism Italy 1943 Ondaatje, Michael. The English Patient. London, UK: Bloomsbury (1996; c. 1992); pg. 76. Pg. 76: "'How did you get through the war?' Caravaggio laughs.

'I grew up in India, Uncle. You wash your hands all the time. Before all meals. A habit. I was born in the Punjab.'

'I'm from Upper America,' she says. ";

Pg. 78: "The padre cradled the rifle and swept it over to the corner, and the flare died.

He returned the rifle to the young Sikh. " [Many other refs. to this Sikh character, not in DB. But the word 'Sikh' is mentioned explicitly only a few times.]

Sikhism Italy 1943 Ondaatje, Michael. The English Patient. London, UK: Bloomsbury (1996; c. 1992); pg. 87. "The sapper's nickname is Kip. 'Get Kip.' 'here comes Kip.' The name had attached itself to him curiously. In his first bomb disposal report in England some butter had marked his paper and the officer had exclaimed, 'What's this? Kipper grease?' and laughter surrounded him. He had no idea what a kipper was, but the young Sikh had been thereby translated into a salty English fish. Within a week his real name, Kirpal Singh, had been forgotten. He hadn't minded this. Lord Suffolk and his demolition team took to calling him by his nickname, which he preferred to the English habit of calling people by their surname. " [This Sikh is a major character in the novel.]
Sikhism Kondra 2050 Charnas, Suzy McKee. "Listening to Brahms " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000); pg. 24. "She works very hard with a whole team of Kondrai under Dr. Boleslav Singh, preparing a cultural surround for the babies she's developing. She comes in exhausted from long discussions with Dr. Boleslav Singh and Dr. Birgit Nilson... "
Sikhism Malaysia 1940 Ondaatje, Michael. The English Patient. London, UK: Bloomsbury (1996; c. 1992); pg. 217. "The sapper says this, his eyes closed tight, mocking the metaphor. 'Japan is a part o Asia, I say, and the Sikhs have been brutalized by the Japanese in Malaya. But my brother ignores that. He says the English are now hanging Sikhs who are fighting for independence.' "
Sikhism Mars 2130 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Blue Mars. New York: Bantam Books (1996); pg. 284. "Often the emigrants [to Mars] were members of ethnic or religious minorities who were dissatified with their lack of autonomy in their home countries, and so were happy to leave. In India the elevator cars of the cable that touched down at Suvadiva Atooll, south of the Maldives, were constantly at capacity, full of emigrants all day every day, a stream of Sikhs and Kashmiris and Muslims and also Hindus, ascending into space and moving to Mars. "


Sikhism, continued

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