Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Scientology, Canada

Scientology, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Scientology Europe 2030 McAuley, Paul J. Fairyland. New York: Avon Books (1997; c 1995); pg. 137. "There are shrines to the unborn Messiah and to the UFO corn cult; a shingle advertises E-metering; scribbled tags proclaim that Elvis Lives! or Bob Knows!... "
Scientology galaxy 2075 Anthony, Piers. Faith of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (10th printing 1986; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 186. "Jeanette, sitting closely beside the Reverend Siltz: Scientology and Communist united at last. But not the Swami, who remained unconscious. "
Scientology galaxy 2075 Anthony, Piers. Faith of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (10th printing 1986; 1st ed. 1980); pg. vii. "Brother Paul is sent to Planet Tarot by his superior, the Reverend Mother Mary, to discover whether the Deity manifesting there is or is not God... He is the guest of the Reverend Siltz of the Second Church Communist, whose son wishes to marry Jeanette, a Scientologist; Siltz is strongly opposed. " [Other refs. in book, not in DB.]
Scientology galaxy 2075 Anthony, Piers. Vision of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (1985; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 19. "She was a slip of a girl with dark hair flaring out like an old style afro though her skin was utterly fair, and she fairly radiated indignation. She was not beautiful, but well-structured, and her emotion made her attractively dynamic.

'My house guest, Bother Paul...,' Reverent Siltz said with ironic formality. 'Jeanette, of the Church of Scientology.'

'The investigator from Planet Earth?'

'Your son's--?' Brother Paul spoke at the same time as the girl.

'The same,' Reverend Siltz agreed, answering both. " [Book has many references to Scientology, not all in DB.]

Scientology galaxy 2075 Anthony, Piers. Vision of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (1985; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 20. "'You have no right!' Siltz roared. 'He is my son, a dedicated Communist! He will marry a good, chaste, Communist Church maid.'

Jeanette's eyes blazed... 'Do you claim I am no chaste?'

It was evident that Siltz realized he had gone too far but he carried on gamely. 'Your whole religion is unchaste!' he retorted. 'Your O meters, your clouds--'

'That's E meters and clears!' she cried. 'Instruments and classifications to facilitate the achievement of perfection in life.'

'Instruments and means to separate fools from their money!'

'There is no money here on Planet Tarot, and your son is no more fool than you are, being of your blood!' "

Scientology galaxy 2075 Anthony, Piers. Vision of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (1985; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 20-21. "Siltz said hotly. 'What good could come from the old inventions of a science fiction writer turned psychologist and finally Messiah? I believe in the separation of Church and Fiction.'

'You believe in the separation of Church from common sense!' she cried. 'Do you throw away good wood because it may have been harvested by a crew of another religion?'

Siltz blanched, evidently recalling his recent conversation with Brother Paul. 'No, I would not got that far. I seek a superior Communist way to utilize it, however.'

'If you think Communism is so much better, why doesn't Ivan agree?'

'My son does agree! He's a good Communist!'

'Then why not let him marry me? He might make a convert!'

...'Never!... you would surely subvert him. That is why he must remain with his own--'

'Where?' she demanded. 'Where is there a maid of your faith [Communism] for him with with half as much to offer as I have?' "

Scientology galaxy 2075 Anthony, Piers. Vision of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (1985; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 21-22. "'Enough,' Siltz said. 'I must admit you have some recommendations. But in what Church would those grandsons be raised?' [Communism or Scientology]

She stared at him, abruptly silent.

'What Church?' Siltz repeated.

With an effort, now, she spoke. 'I shall not deceive you. The Church of Scientology. They must be Clears.'

'Perhaps some compromise--' Brother Paul began.

'No! she flared. 'No compromise! Not in religion!'

'But as you pointed out,' Brother Paul said, 'common sense--'

'To Hell with common sense! You don't know anything about it!' She spun about and marched out.

...Siltz said thoughtfully. 'She is a good girl, better than I thought. She has good heredity, and she refuses to compromise her faith. She neither lies nor crawls, and she is intelligent. Did you observe the way she attacked me without ever actually insulting me? Never in the heat of argument did she forget her objective, which is to sell me, not alienate me..' "

Scientology galaxy 2075 Anthony, Piers. Vision of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (1985; 1st ed. 1980); pg. vii. "Brother Paul becomes the guest of the Reverend Siltz of the Second Church Communist, whose son has taken up with a Scientologist... "
Scientology Germany 1987 Milan, Victor W. "Puppets " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 349. "The driver flashed a grin over his shoulder. He resembled a smaller edition of Tom Cruise, though more ferret faced. "
Scientology Haiti 2048 Bear, Greg. Queen of Angels. New York: Warner Books (1994; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 368. "'Pardon my curiosity, but I thought this was a florist's--'

''It is,' the woman said. 'But we get a call around here for santeria and vodoun goods, herbs, that sort of thing. We cater to oriental mystery patrons, Urantia, Rosicrucian, Rites of Hubbard Schismatics, Sisters of Islam Fatima. You name it, we can get it.' "

Scientology Illinois 1940 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: In the Balance. New York: Ballantine (1994); pg. 12. "...who got out his Astounding and started to read. The newest Heinlein serial had ended the month before, but stories by Asimov, Robert Moore Williams, del Rey, Hubbard, and Clement were plenty to keep him entertained. "
Scientology Kansas 1989 Denton, Bradley. Buddy Holly Is Alive and Well on Ganymede. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1991); pg. 50. "The only way to escape this truth is to deny the reality from which it has been created, to exist in some other universe altogether.

So it is time to believe in flying saucers. Dianetics is worth serious consideration. Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone. "

Scientology Massachusetts: Boston 1997 Lobdell, Scott & Elliot S. Maggin. Generation X. New York: Berkley (1997); pg. 99. "'Everett, why don't you show these nice people how you can lift them up off the ground using your mind? John Travolta's got nothing on this dude.' " [A reference to the film Phenonemon, starring Travolta, an member of the Church of Scientology.]
Scientology New York: New York City 1956 Knight, Damon. "A Likely Story " in The Best of Damon Knight. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976; c. 1956); pg. 224. "'Or like Lobbard discovering Scatiology?' " [Reference to L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology]
Scientology New York: New York City 1966 Shiner, Lewis. "The Long, Dark Night of Fortunato " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 238. "Paracelsus, Aleister Crowley, Mehmet Karagoz, L. Ron Hubbard. "
Scientology New York: New York City 1976 Silverberg, Robert. Dying Inside. New York: Ballantine (1976; c. 1972); pg. 153. "She must have gone on to dianetics, Velikovsky, Bridey Murphy, and Timothy Leary... "
Scientology New York: New York City 1994 Leigh, Stephen. "The Color of His Skin " in Wild Cards: Book II of a New Cycle: Marked Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Baen (1994); pg. 61. "'...As you know, our original schedule had Elephant Girl, Tom Cruise, and Cosmos & Chaos. They've consented to appear on a later show because of the importance of what we're going to talk about tonight.' "
Scientology New York: New York City 2002 Millar, Mark. Ultimates Vol. 1: Super-Human. New York: Marvel Comics Group (2002) [Graphic novel reprint of The Ultimates #1-6]; pg. Chap. 3, pg. 20. Dr. Bruce Banner/Hulk: "No, and she isnt my ex, Stark. We're just in the middle of a separation. Besides, aren't you supposed to be here with Jennifer Tilly? "; Tony Stark/Iron Man: "Oh, yes. But you always have to keep your options open with these Hollywood heartbreakers, Bruce. One minute they're on you like Oprah on a Twinkie and the next they're a cover-story for some limp-wristed Scientologist. "
Scientology Ontario: Toronto 1998 Wilson, Robert Charles. "Divided by Infinity " in Starlight 2 (Patrick Nielsen Hayden, ed.). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 28. "'There's a couple of tests I apply,' she said, 'whenever I read this kind of book. First, is it likely to improve anyone's life? Which is a tricker question than it sounds. Any number of people will tell you they found happiness with the Scientologists or the Moonies or whatever, but what they usually means is they narrowed their focus...' "
Scientology Tarot 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 105. "'You see, his son is serious about a young woman of the Church of Scientology,' Deacon Brown continued. 'The two young people worked together this spring on a tree-harvest mission, and the Cup overflowed.'

No doubt about the Tarot reference this time! Cups were not only the suit of water; they signified religion--and love. A difficult juxtaposition here, it seemed. 'You do not permit marriage between churches?'

'It is permitted by some sects, and forbidden by others...'

'...There must be some reasonable compromise.'

'There is some,' Deacon Brown agreed. 'But not enough. We understand Reverend Siltz's position; none of us would wish our children to marry Scientologists, or Baha'is, or any other heathen offspring...' "

Scientology Tennessee: Memphis 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 135. "Evidently Truitt knew that his celebrity appeal was limited, and did not fear to venture out in public when it was likely he would not be noticed. Perhaps even Tom Cruise could do this when he was someplace where he was not expected. Even so, Trick was grateful that he did not resemble Tom Cruise--this much celebrity was enough! "
Scientology Texas 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 229. "'This is Fort Stockton,' said Trick, a mile or so before a city limits sign came into view. 'My sister Mary Rose lives here. She and her husband Ronnie Hubbard just had their first baby. Rosie's thirty-eight, and she's getting a lot of grief about being 'Old Mother Hubbard.' " [Some more about these characters. It is likely that the author named the character 'Ronnie Hubbard' after L. Ron Hubbard, founder of Scientology.]
Scientology United Kingdom: England 1987 Adams, Douglas. Dirk Gentley's Holistic Detective Agency. New York: Simon and Schuster (1987); pg. 180. "The [Electric] Monk watched in transfixed awe. The man, he believed with an instant effortlessness which would have impressed even a Scientologist, must be a God of some kind to arouse such fervor. "
Scientology USA 1972 Dick, Philip K. "The Evolution of a Vital Love " in The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1972); pg. 179. "In Canada I did P. R. work for a large heroin rehabilitation organization somewhat like Synanon in the U.S., a full residence place where you go in with your mind burned out by smack, dry out cold turkey, get a lot of group therapy of an abusive attack sort that tears down old personality structures and exchanges for them new ones built up by the relentless group in a process by which you are never left alone, are hounded night and day. " [More.]
Scientology USA 1978 King, Stephen. The Stand. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1978); pg. 224. "The kind of phonograph constructed with 45 singles in mind--the ones made by the Leif Garrett, John Travolta, Shaun Cassidy. "
Scientology USA 1980 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Miracle Monday. New York: Warner Books (1981); pg. 32. "Aluminum foil lined the bedroom walls and the ceiling was papered with posters of John Travolta, Christopher Reeve and Jack Nicholson. "
Scientology USA 1982 Knight, Damon. The Man in the Tree. New York: Berkley Books (1984); pg. 234. "'...In my opinion, the bill won't pass, and if it should, it will be struck down by the courts--this... commission is a transparent device to evade the Constitution. In any event, they're obviously out to get the Moonies and Hare Krishnas, Church of Scientology, people like that; I don't see how it affects us.' "
Scientology USA 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 289. "In fact, the road to mental self-sufficiency is paved with broken glass. There's nothing that will make the trip easier. And along the side of the road are the carcasses of vehicles that were designed to make the trip go faster: EST, Scientology, Transcendental Meditation, New Age Crystal Therapy. "
Scientology Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 167. "'What's this? John Travolta's suit from Saturday Night Fever?' "
Scientology world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 30. "'...Then there's the Discordian Movement--another splinter faction, but they're almost as bad as the Illuminati. They're sort of like a cross between followers of Ayn Rand and Scientologists...' "
Scientology world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 48. "Rhoda Chief, the vocalist who sang with the Heads of Easter Island... A former Processene and Scientologist, currently going the Wicca route, the buxom Rhoda was renowned through show biz... "
Scientology world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 20. "There were actually two separate SF conduits. The first was the debased Freudianism of SF writer L. Ron Hubbard, who introduced the pseudoscience of Dianetics (aka the 'religion' of Scientology) in the May 1950 issue of Astounding Science Fiction. " [More, pg. 21.]
Scientology world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 44. Pg. 44: "So say legions of UFO abductees. So say, as well, other SF true believers of various faiths--those who believe we must terraform Mars, those who've slid from science fiction into Scientology... "; Pg. 53: "...the pilgrims to Roswell, New Mexico, that Oz of UFO believers; the buffs of Atlantis and Mu; the followers of L. Ron Hubbard... All these cults owe their origins, more or less directly, to the specific fabulations of SF writers. Even the Roswell case, which would seem a genuine instance of 'mistaken identity'... "
Scientology world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 139. [Pg. 138-140: Recounts some of the history of L. Ron Hubbard, Dianetics, and Scientology.]; Pg. 139: "A number of SF writers have commanded their on small legion of true believers: L. Ron Hubbard, most conspicuously, but also Robert Heinlein, Theodore Sturgeon, Phil Dick, J. G. Ballard, and Frank Herbert. "
Scientology world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 146. "Most New Age prophets and profiteers derive whatever systematic theology they have to the scheme set forth in Science and Health: Only the spiritual world is real; the physical world... is an illusion... The most enduringly successful of Christian Science-descended religions in our time has been Scientology, the brainchild of the hack writer L. Ron Hubbard. As an SF writer, Hubbard had a negligible impact on the field, and it is doubtful that without the controversies surrounding Scientology and its immense success, his fiction would be read or remembered today. " [Extensive discussion of Hubbard and Scientology, pages 146 to 152.]
Scientology world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 150. "In its May 6, 1991, issue, Time magazine devoted a cover story to... Scientology... given the size the organization has grown to (by Time's estimate, 50,000 active members; by the church's, 8 million). "
Scientology world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 150. "In its May 6, 1991, issue, Time magazine devoted a cover story to... Scientology... given the size the organization has grown to (by Time's estimate, 50,000 active members; by the church's, 8 million). "
Scientology world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 150. "These are immemorial religious traditions, and so it's little wonder that the National Council of Churches and the Catholic church have entered amicus briefs in support of Scientology in many court battles. "
Scientology world 2003 Knight, Damon. The Observers. New York: Tor (1988); pg. 175. "'Okay, just suppose that the original parasite had some standard way of dealing with the hosts--to make them more docile, or more efficient, or whatever. The new generation doesn't know any of that, so they've got to wring it. And listen, this is what I think is scary. All they know is what they get from our minds. Suppose they pick up some system, Marxism or Scientology, and start trying to convert everybody, without knowing it won't work?' "
Scientology world 2004 Knight, Damon. Why Do Birds. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 149. "'How about different religions, though?'

'We've got to have religious leaders behind us, no question. Well, for every religion there's some kind of handle. With Christians it's heave, with Muslims, it's paradise, same difference. The Chinese and Japanese and Scientologists are going to join their ancestors, the Indians are going to achieve Nirvana...' "

Scientology world 2010 Bishop, Michael. "The Bob Dylan Tambourine Software & Satori Support Services Consortium, Ltd. " (published 1985) in The Norton Book of Science Fiction (Ursula K. Le Guin & Brian Atterbery, editors). New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1993); pg. 619. "But of late, worldwide, either a terrible secularization... had been going forward, and few of those with access to commercial recording equipment... had consciously made use of it to stem the rising tides of materialism and narcissism. Ronald Reagan and the Moral Majority hadn't done the trick; nor had the Ayatollah Khomeini and his Islamic cohorts; nor had various Hindu swamis, Marxist priests, self-proclaimed Oriental messiahs, and reclusive ex-sci-fi writers who were also tax-finessing founders of various 'rational' 'religions.' "
Scientology world 2036 Besher, Alexander. Mir: A Novel of Virtual Reality. New York: Simon & Schuster (1998); pg. 34. "It looked like the Germans, then. The chancellor of the Fourth Reich, Rudolf Wessel, was impressed by the way the neuro-gulag program had succeeded in quelling social deviance and unrest in Russia. He was an old-school Scientologist, so he could understand the metaphysical implications of technology. And its limits, of course. "
Scientology world 3417 Farmer, Philip Jose. Dayworld Rebel. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1987); pg. 53. "'I started out as a Roman Catholic priest. Then it occurred to me that Catholic meant universal. But was I truly universal? Was I not actually limited, confined by one church, which was not really universal? Was I not rejecting other religions, all of which and every one of which God must have founded, put on Earth through the minds of their founders? Would they exist if the Great Spirit regarded them as false? No, they would not. Therefore, proceeding both on divine revelation and logic, which have never before had anything to do with each other, I became the first truly universal, therefore catholic, priest.

'But I did not found a new eclectic religion. I have no ambition to compete with Moses, Jesus, Mohammed, Buddha, Smith, Hubbard, etcetera. There is no competition... I am elected and entitled to practice any and all religions and to serve God, humbly or proudly, as the case requires...' "

Scythian Afghanistan -209 B.C.E. Anderson, Poul. The Shield of Time. New York: Tor (1990); pg. 48. "'What more? Any strangers who called themselves Libyans, Egyptians, Jews, Armenians, Scythians--any kind of exotic--but didn' seem quite to fit the nationality?' "
Scythian Gaia 2046 Bear, Greg. Eternity. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 152. "In fifty years, that empire had vanished like a dream of blood and smoke, and the Skythians and Nordic Rhus had moved into the void. "
Scythian Roman Empire 500 C.E. Garfinkle, Richard. Celestial Matters. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 77. "The twenty-five-year-old dressed in the red tunic and skirt of a Skythian was a young celestial navigator named Pandos. he was a normally pleasant-voiced young man with a reputation as a gregarious socializer. " [Other refs. not in DB.]
Scythian Roman Empire 620 C.E. Douglas, L. Warren. The Veil of Years. New York: Baen (2001); pg. 396. -
Scythian Tran 1996 Pournelle, Jerry & Roland Green. Tran. New York: Baen (1996); pg. -5. [Political Glossary] "The Westmen are nomadic horse barbarians from beyond the High Plains, ultimately descended from Scythians. "
Scythian Tran 1996 Pournelle, Jerry & Roland Green. Tran. New York: Baen (1996); pg. 356. "...had brought in Achaean Bronze Age warriors. Romans from the time of Septimius Serverus, and again from the Byzantine period. Franks. Celts. Scythians. Cultures mixed together... "
Scythian Transylvania 1897 Stoker, Bram. Dracula. New York: Bantam (1981; c. 1897); pg. 30. "'...Here, too, when they came, they found the Huns, whose warlike fury had swept the earth like a living flame, till the dying peoples held that in their veins ran the blood of those old witches, who, expelled from Scythia had mated with the devils in the desert...' "
Scythian United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 143. "'Why, it is indeed a strange saddle . . . what are the long leather strappings?'

'The Scythians wear them--they are called stirrups. My foster-father took me on pilgrimage, and I saw them in their country. Even the Roman legions had no such cavalry, for the Scythians with these can control and stop their horses in mid charge, and that way they can fight from horseback... and even in the light armor the horsemen wear, an equestrian knight is invincible against anyone on foot.' "

Scythian USA 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 15. "'She can't be expected to do that. Those guys don't even speak English. All they speak is Bosnian or Moldavian or something.'

'Moravian,' said Mrs. Santucci in her Distant Early Warning Voice...

'The language is Crotobaltislavonian, a modern dialect of Old Scythian,' announced Sarah... "

Scythian USA 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 67. "'They hate rats. You should read some Scythian mythology. In Crotobaltislavonia it's a capital crime to harbor them. That's why they had a revolution! The old regime stopped handing out free rat poison.' "
Scythian Washington, D.C. 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 126. "'Research, mostly. Very obscure, totally useless research... Sacrificial rituals of the ancient Scythians. The secret meaning of the Book of Genesis...' " [Also pg. 129]
Scythian world -1000 B.C.E. Waltari, Mika. The Etruscan. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1956); pg. 135. [Year estimated.] "...But not even Darius could vanquish Scythians.'

'Keep your mouth closed, physician, since you know nothing about warfare. No one can vanquish the Scythians because they wander with their herds from place to place. They have no true kingdom, and a victory of the Scythians would not bring honor to a soldier...' " [Other refs. not in DB.]

Scythian world -1000 B.C.E. Waltari, Mika. The Etruscan. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1956); pg. 314. [Year estimated.] "Mikon also had betrayed me. Even the Scythians declared that the Greeks are better suited to be slaves and servants than free men. "
Scythian world -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 281. Pg. 281: "...the trail from Bactria to the east is not passable because of the Scythian tribes. "; Pg. 292: "...but the fair hard face that she turned toward me was that of a Scythian warrior. All she lacked was the mustache. " [There may be other refs., not in DB.]
Scythian world 1989 Kress, Nancy. "Renaissance " in The Aliens of Earth. Sauk City, Wisconsin: Arkham House Publishers (1993; 1st pub Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, mid-December 1989); pg. 227. [1989 is year of story publication.] "The Sumerians, Assyrians, Babylonians, Chaldeans, Egyptians, Mycenaeans, Indo-Iranians, Syrians, Scythians, and Greeks all had griffins. "
Scythian world 1997 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 339. "'It's funny, but in all of this, I've been thinking of you and Marty, and . . . my book. The Huns and Mongols and Scythians and Indo-Europeans . . . All those people and my book. I'll never get it finished.'

'Don't be so sure,' he said...

'Do you think these probes are like the hordes? Migrating, ravaging, pushed on by famine or overpopulation?' "

sects USA 1998 Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin (1986); pg. 247. "'It was before the sectarian roundups began in earnest. As long as you said you were some sort of a Christian and you were married, for the first time that is, they [Christian Fundamentalist regime that gained control of the country] were still leaving you pretty much alone. They were concentrating first on the others. They got them more or less under control before the started in everybody else.

'I was underground it must have been eight or nine months. I was taken from one safe house to another, there were more of those then. They weren't all Quakers, some of them weren't even religious. They were just people who didn't like the way things were going.' "

sects USA 1998 Dick, Philip K. Time Out of Joint. New York: Random House (2002; c. 1959); pg. 20. "In the banks, in insurance companies, big electric companies... He had seen them as assistant professors teaching some recondite subject--survey of heretical Christian sects of the fifth century--and simultaneously inching their path up with all their might and main. "
sects USA 2010 Brackett, Leigh. The Long Tomorrow. New York: Ballantine (1974); pg. 8. "They were almost all New Mennonites, differing from Len and Esau only in size and in the splendid beards that fanned across their chests, though their upper lips were clean shaven. A few, however, wore full whiskers and slouch hats of various sorts, and their clothes were cut to no particular pattern. Len stared at these furtively, with an intense curiosity. These men or others like them--perhaps even still other kinds of men that he had not seen yet--were the ones who met secretly in fields and woods and preached and yelled and rolled on the ground. He could hear Pa's voice saying, 'A man's religion, his sect, is his own affair. But these people have no religion or sect. They're a mob, with a mob's fear and cruelty, and with half-crazy, cunning men stirring them up against others.' "
sects USA 2010 Brackett, Leigh. The Long Tomorrow. New York: Ballantine (1974); pg. 78. "The New Mennonites frowned on the use of any artificial power, but the riverboat men belonged to different sects and had different problems. "
sects USA 2010 Brackett, Leigh. The Long Tomorrow. New York: Ballantine (1974); pg. 79. "There were few Amish or Mennonites in Refuge. The people mostly belonged to the Church of Holy Thankfulness, and were called Kellerites after the James P. Keller who founded the sect. Len and Esau had found that there were few Mennonites anywhere in the settlements that lived by commerce rather than by agriculture. And since they were excommunicate themselves, with no wish to be traced back to Piper's Run, they had long ago discarded the distinctive dress of their childhood faith for the nondescript homespuns of the river towns. They wore their hair short and their chins naked, because it was the custom among the Kellerites for a man to remain clean-shaven until he married, when he was expected to grow the beard that distinguished him more plainly than any removable ring. They went every Sunday to the Church of Holy Thankfulness, and joined in the regular daily devotions of the family they boarded with... "
sects USA 2010 Brackett, Leigh. The Long Tomorrow. New York: Ballantine (1974); pg. 165. "Len watched the New Ishmaelites.

'Where did they come from?' he asked, trying to remember what he had heard about them. They were one of the very earliest extreme sects, but he didn't know much more than that.' "



sects, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus
Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.