Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to science fiction - Verne, Luna

science fiction - Verne, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
science fiction - Verne New York: New York City 1935 Barnes, Steven. Far Beyond the Stars (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 35. "There was a library at his school, and in it were books by a man named Jules Verne. And Mr. Verne told wonderful stories of ships that traveled beneath the water, and through the air, and through space. Men like Nemo, Rebor, and Cavor lived in young Benny Russell's dreams. For years he longed to be like them: to create wonderful inventions, to travel to far planes, and to experience miraculous adventures. But everyone told him that that dream, the dream of traveling in such things was far beyond what a colored man might achieve in this world. "
science fiction - Verne New York: New York City 1971 Bryant, Edward & Leanne C. Harper. "Down Deep " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 312. "When he opened the last door, he stood aside and waved Bagabond and the cast inside. He smiled proudly as they stared around the long room.

'You are younger than you look. That was my reaction too. Reminded me of Captain Nemo's stateroom . . .'

'20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.'

'Yeah, right. You saw it too. One of the first movies I ever saw over to the parish theater.' "

science fiction - Verne New York: New York City 1976 Silverberg, Robert. Dying Inside. New York: Ballantine (1976; c. 1972); pg. 141. "And these are his books... The archaeological strata of his reading can readily be isolated and examined. Jules Verne, H. G. Wells, Mark Twain, Dashiell Hammett at the bottom. "
science fiction - Verne Oceania 1984 Heinlein, Robert A. Job: A Comedy of Justice. New York: Ballantine (1984); pg. 14. "And a cache I had hidden 'perfectly' in our attic disappeared. Worse, the works of Mr. H. G. Wells and M. Jules Verine and some others were taken out of our public library. "
science fiction - Verne United Kingdom 1895 Farmer, Philip Jose (written as Harry Manders). "The Problem of the Sore Bridge--Among Others " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 51. "That was 1895, three years before Mr. Wells' War of the Worlds was published. It was true that Mr. Verne had been writing his wonderful tales of scientific inventions and extraordinary voyages for many years. but in none of them had he proposed life on other planets or the possibility of infiltration or invasion by alien sapients from far-off planets. The concept was, to me, absolutely staggering. "
science fiction - Verne United Kingdom 1969 Aldiss, Brian. "Nothing in Life is Ever Enough " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001; c. 1999); pg. 83. "...reading books I found in the library, old-fashioned books: romances by Dumas and Jules Verne... "
science fiction - Verne United Kingdom: London 1995 Ryman, Geoff. 253. New York: St. Martin's Press (1998); pg. 217. "In case you live on the moon or somewhere similar such as West Los Angeles, Barings bank, the guarantor of David Niven's trip Around the World in 80 Days and less salubrious imperial activities, met its end at the hand of one of its own traders, Nick Leeson... "
science fiction - Verne USA 1940 Hubbard, L. Ron. Fear. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1991; c. 1940); pg. 8. "..attic floor with indifference; Swift, Tennyson, Carroll, Verne, Dumas, Gibbon, Colonel Ingram, Shakespeare, Homer, Khayyam and the unknown creators of myth and legend of all lands had been his advisers and companions and playmates... "
science fiction - Verne USA 1984 Heinlein, Robert A. Job: A Comedy of Justice. New York: Ballantine (1984); pg. 227. "'Jerry, you're talking about flying to the moon, aren't you? Like Jules Verne.'

'Yes. Close enough.' "

science fiction - Verne USA 2011 Baxter, Stephen. Manifold: Time. New York: Ballantine (2000); pg. 103. "She glided at the heart of the Nautilus, where the water that passed through her mantle, over her gills, was warmest, richest... "; Pg. 110: "We think Nautilus should be able to return enough water to fuel a further twenty to fifty NEO exploration missions... " [The spacecraft Nautilus in this novel, piloted by an intelligent squid, is of course named after the submarine from the Jules Verne classic Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea. This craft is referred to throughout the rest of the novel.]
science fiction - Verne Venezuela 1947 Bear, Greg. Dinosaur Summer. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 249. "Peter saw a fuzzy glow ahead. He imagined phosphorescent moss and a scene out of H. G. Wells or Jules Verne, vast caverns with multihued pillars and a huge chamber filled with servile gray creatures, and governing it all, something like the Grand Lunar. The imagined scene almost scared him witless and he felt his face tighten into a terrified mask. "
science fiction - Verne Virginia 1970 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 60. "Gregory was saying, 'Even the basic thinking about interplanetary travel has hardly advanced since Jules Verne.'

Dana guffawed. 'Oh, come on, Dad; that's hardly fair.' The lunar voyagers of Jules Verne's nineteenth-century science fiction had been fired at the Moon out of a huge cannon, situated in Florida. 'Even Verne could have worked out that the gun's acceleration would have creamed his travelers against the walls of their projectile.'

Gregory waved his pipe. 'Oh, of course. But that's just a detail. Look--Verne launched his travelers with an impulse: a shock, a blow, imparted by his cannon. After that brief moment, the spacecraft followed an elongated orbit about the Earth, without any means of directing itself.' "

science fiction - Verne Washington 1905 Gloss, Molly. Wild Life. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000); pg. 21. "Sat'y 25 Mar '05

The death of Jules Verne was reported in the morning papers--a great loss to France and to the world. When I read this news, I confess I was briefly startled into tears--just had to sit down and cry. Generally I am not much of a one for tears, and so my youngest son, named Jules for that ver man, came and climbed on me, pulling my hair... while I held the newspaper out in front of us and read:

Death Relieves Jules Verne
Calmly Foresaw His End and Discussed It with His Family

He had suffered from cataracts and deafness and diabetes, this was something I knew. And seventh-seven. Well, it shouldn't have been a surprise; I don't suppose it was. but something about it was unexpected, a jolt, he leaves large work, long years of glorious writing; and now is dead. " [Much more.]

science fiction - Verne world 1935 Knight, Damon. "Forever " in One Side Laughing. New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; 1981); pg. 225. "The popular author Jules Verne, in collaboration with the German Hermann Oberth, immediately began to draw plans for a cosmobile in which to visit the Martians. "
science fiction - Verne world 1964 Asimov, Isaac. "Introduction " in The Rest of the Robots. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1964); pg. xii. "In the 1920s science fiction was becoming a popular art form for the first time, and no longer merely a tour de force I the hands of an occasional master such as Verne and Wells. "
science fiction - Verne world 1985 Ing, Dean and Leik Myrabo. "The Future of Flight: Comes the Revolution " in Firefight 2000. New York: Baen (1987; c. 1985); pg. 100. -
science fiction - Verne world 1994 Bradbury, Ray. "Unterderseaboat Doktor " in Quicker Than the Eye. New York: Avon Books (1996; c. 1994); pg. 14. "Me and my wild enthusiasm for a psychological future and the fame of this incredible captain from beneath Nemo's tidal seas. "
science fiction - Verne world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 58. Pg. 58-61, more.
science fiction - Verne world 2008 McDonald, Ian. Evolution's Shore. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1995); pg. 391. "...up off the Jules Verne and the ESA HOTOL that docked yesterday... " [A spacecraft named after the author.]
science fiction - Verne world 2011 Baxter, Stephen. Manifold: Time. New York: Ballantine (2000); pg. 169. "At JPL, at the appointed time, Dan logged on for his daily uplink to the Nautilus.

... and the multi-poster on the partition that cycled through classic Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea scenes. "

science fiction - Verne world 2012 Clarke, Arthur C. The Ghost from the Grand Banks. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 211. "The decor for the interior of the world's only deep-diving tourist submarine had been borrowed straight from Disney's classic 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. "
science fiction - Verne world 2166 Farmer, Philip Jose. "Riders of the Purple Wage " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1967); pg. 618. "If Jules Verne could really have looked into the future, say 1966 A.D., he would have crapped his pants. And 2166, oh, my!

--from Grandpa Winnegan's unpublished Ms.
How I Screwed Uncle Sam & Other Private... " [Other refs. to science fiction in story, some may not be in DB.]
science fiction - Wizard of Oz California 1966 Geary, Patricia. Strange Toys. New York: Bantam (1989; c. 1987); pg. 21. Pg. 21: "The Disneyland Hotel was like Oz. The monorail came right to your door. "; Pg. 82: Tin Woodsman
science fiction - Wizard of Oz California 1995 Powers, Tim. Earthquake Weather. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 277. "'Courage,' echoed Kootie, and the word reminded him of the Cowardly Lion of Oz. The memory of watching that innocent movie on television in Solville... "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz California 1995 Powers, Tim. Earthquake Weather. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 332. "'This is like the--end of the--[expletive] Wizard of Oz,' Cody panted away tears. 'Everybody leaning in to see if the--little girl is okay. After her knock on her head.' "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz California: Hollywood 1955 Bradbury, Ray. A Graveyard for Lunatics. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1990); pg. 49. "He was hardly larger than one of the Singer's Midgets who played Munchkins in The Wizard of Oz. "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 110. "'Mayor of the Munchkin City,' recited Raffle in a high, solemn voice as he cranked the starter, 'in the county of the land of Oz.' The engine caught, and the car shook.

'Follow the yellow brick road,' quacked Kootie.

...One last quote from The Wizard of Oz occurred to him. 'I don't think we're in Kansas anymore, Toto,' he told Fred softly and self-consciously. "

science fiction - Wizard of Oz California: Los Angeles 2038 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. Crescent City Rhapsody. New York: Tor (2001; c. 2000); pg. 351. Pg. 351: "...asked a woman who looked like young Judy Garland as she fell in next to him. A little Toto ran along at her feet. Light voices saying, 'We're out of the woods, we're out of the dark, we're out of the night--' "; Pg. 352: 'Over the Rainbow.'
science fiction - Wizard of Oz California: Orange County 2027 Robinson, Kim Stanley. The Gold Coast. New York: Tor (1995; c. 1988); pg. 229. "The booming voice carries on, more fatuous by the second. Angele leans over Sandy to whisper heavily to them all, 'I am the Great and Powerful Wizard of Oz,' and with the vocal style of the narrator pegged they can't restrain themselves, they got more hysterical at every sentence... "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz California: San Francisco 1991 Blaylock, James P. The Paper Grail. New York: Ace Books (1991); pg. 73. "The glue looked like an old hippie--the brother of the Patchwork Girl from Oz. "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz California: San Francisco 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 249. "With his badge and bag of pamphlets and program guides came a note from Sand:

Kemp and I will meet you in Oz at 5:30. Drinks on Kemp.
--D.S.

Oz, Samshow learned from a desk clerk, was the bar and disco at the top of the 'new' tower of the St. Francis. " [More about this establishment, pg. 250-251.]

science fiction - Wizard of Oz Colorado 2049 Knight, Damon. A For Anything. New York: Tor (1990; 1959); pg. 175. "Dick paused to read a few of the titles: Treasure Island; Ozma of Oz; Pepper and Salt. "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz Europa 2060 Collins, Ron. "Out of the Blue " in Writers of the Future: Volume XV (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1999); pg. 231. "Sara walked between the rover's ruts like Dorothy following the yellow brick road, pulling Toto behind in her sled. But in her world there was no Scarecrow, no Tin Man, and no Cowardly Lion to help her cope. And in her world, clicking her heels together would not send her back home. "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz Europe 1984 Farmer, Philip Jose. "A Scarletin Study " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 210. Pg. 210: "Chapter VI
FOLLOW THE YELLOW
BRICK ROAD ";

Pg. 215 "Chapter VII
NO EMERALD CITY FOR ME "

science fiction - Wizard of Oz Europe 1984 Farmer, Philip Jose. "A Scarletin Study " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 203. Pg. 203: "'...He is learned in both German and English literature and has a fondness for the works of Frank Baum and Lewis Carroll. He often uses characters from them in his paintings. Both writers, by the way, were fond of puns.' "; Pg. 205: "'But first let us consider that Scarletin is equally at home in German or English. He loves the pun-loving Carroll and Baum. So, perhaps due to the contingencies of the situation, he is forced to pun in both languages.' "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz Europe 1984 Farmer, Philip Jose. "A Scarletin Study " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 210-211. "Following it was a man in a leopard loincloth with two large apes at his heels... Across the road was a large hot-air balloon with a bald-headed man in the wicker basket. On the side of the bag in large letters were O.Z. " [The painting has a representation of Tarzan and the Wizard of Oz.]
science fiction - Wizard of Oz France 2038 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. Crescent City Rhapsody. New York: Tor (2001; c. 2000); pg. 398. "'Who is Illian anyway?' asked Hugo impatiently. 'She reminds me of the Wizard of Oz.'

'I've never read that book,' said Kita. 'Americans seem very excited about it.'

'Well, you never hear or see the great and powerful Oz until the end, and then you find that he's just an ordinary human being.'

Kita laughed. 'Illian is not an ordinary human being. For one thing, she has the unusual DNA sequence that has cropped up here...' "

science fiction - Wizard of Oz Gaea 2025 Varley, John. Titan. New York: Berkley (4th ed. 1981; 1st pub. 1979); pg. 111. "She had a rich, clear alto that worked best with old folk music, ballads, and Judy Garland songs... They sang drinking songs... songs from the hit parade, from cartoons and old movies. One quickly became their favorite, considering their circumstances. It spoke of a yellow brick road and the wonderful wizard of Oz. They bellowed it every morning when they set out, shouting all the louder when the forest shrieked back at them. "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz Gaea 2025 Varley, John. Titan. New York: Berkley (4th ed. 1981; 1st pub. 1979); pg. 185. "They set out, the Titanides singing a traveling song that the women joined as best they could. When that one ended they learned another. Then Cirocco eased into 'the Wonderful Wizard of Oz,' following it up with 'The Caissons Go Rolling Along,' and 'Off We Go Into the Wild Blue Yonder.' The Titanides were delighted, they had not known the humans had songs. "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz galaxy 1992 Snodgrass, Melinda M. Wild Cards X: Double Solitaire. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 190. "Despite the portentous expressions it was tough to take any of it seriously. They were all so tiny, and so improbably dressed. Jay kept expecting them to burst into song like the Mayor of Munchkin Land welcoming Dorothy. It actually wasn't a half-bad analogy, the detective mused, Tachyon as Dorothy.

'Meadows is definitely the scarecrow,' Jay muttered. 'I'll be the tin woodsman. Too bad the cowardly lion didn't have the stones to board the ship.' "

science fiction - Wizard of Oz galaxy 2268 Gilden, Mel. The Starship Trap (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 22. "'Captain, I know of no Earth proverb concerning the dropping of houses.'

Kirk smiled and said, 'Tell him, Uhura.'

'It's not a proverb, Mr. Spock. The captain was referring to a classic children's novel called The Wizard of Oz. In it the heroine arrives in a fantasy world aboard her farmhouse, which falls out of the sky onto a wicket witch.'

'Fascinating,' Spock said with amazement.

'I believe it is based on a Russian fairy tale,' Chekov said thoughtfully. 'It concerns a tractor falling out of the sky onto an evil commisar.'

'The text is available in the ship's memory banks,' Uhura said. "

science fiction - Wizard of Oz galaxy 2294 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 283. "...McCoy... 'What's with the greenness?' he asked. 'I feel like I'm in the Emerald City of Oz, or maybe in an undersea city on Celadon Prime.' "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz galaxy 2370 Hawke, Simon. Blaze of Glory (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 107. "Most of the buildings along the crowded street... garishly illuminated with signs advertising bars and nightclubs, tattoo and piercing emporiums... exotic show clubs, some of which openly advertised acts that were illegal throughout most of the Federation. Looking at one of the signs, which displayed a colorful and shocking representation of what went on inside, La Forge could only shake his head and mutter, 'I definitely get the feeling we're not in Kansas anymore.' "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz galaxy 2375 Durgin, Doranna. Tooth and Claw (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 2. Pg. 1-2: "Night in the Fandrean jungle.

'Lions and tigers and bears,'
said Geordi La Forge, more or less under his breath.

Entirely without inflection and without missing a beat, Lieutenant Commander Data said, 'Oh, my.'

Silence fell over the conference room. Geordi, who had not intended that his comment garner quite so much attention, winced.

Data faced that attention without any apparent concern. 'The Wizard of Oz, MGM 1939. I believe Geordi was making an analogy between the imagined threat of the beasts in the movie, and the very real beasts on the planet . . .' And finally he trailed off, taking in Captain Picard's thinly veiled impatience, Deanna Troi's quiet amusement, the spark of humor in Will Riker's eye. 'But you knew that,' he concluded.

'They knew that,' Geordi confirmed. The movie was, after all, still quite popular enough to list in the holodeck programs.

'We did,' Troi confirmed, as solemnly as possible. "

science fiction - Wizard of Oz galaxy 2375 Durgin, Doranna. Tooth and Claw (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 123. "'...Are you off on another slang kick?'

'Not precisely. I am running an experiment. After so many off the officers in the briefing indicated a familiarity with The Wizard of Oz, I thought I would see how many other twentieth-century phrases and allusions people would respond to... "

science fiction - Wizard of Oz galaxy 3099 Simmons, Dan. Endymion. New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 417. "The girl smiled and touched both our hands. 'The Tin Woodsman and the scarecrow,' she said. 'I don't deserve such friends.'

'It was my turn to smile. Grandam had told me that old story. 'Where's the Cowardly Lion?' I said.

...'That's me,' she said very quietly. 'I'm the cowardly one.' "

science fiction - Wizard of Oz Georgia: Atlanta 2040 Bishop, Michael. Catacomb Years. New York: Berkley (1979); pg. 87. "'...Up against you I look like the . . . the Wicked Witch of the North.' Which was a Glinda-the-Good lie if she'd ever told one. "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz Illinois 1960 Simmons, Dan. Summer of Night. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1991); pg. 229. "'Just a moment,' said the voice. Dale blinked sweat out of his eyes and thought of the scene in the Wizard of Oz movie where the guy at the door to the Emerald City, the guy who was really the Wizard unless they were just using the same actor to save money . . . where the guy made Dorothy and her friends wait after all their dangerous travels to get there. "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz Iowa 1996 Rusch, Kristine Kathryn. "Faith " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 208. "Her name was Dorothy, appropriate, I thought, in this post-Wizard of Oz age. "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz Kansas: Smallville 1993 Stern, Roger. The Death and Life of Superman. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 226. "When the Kents returned home to Smallville, everything in Kansas seemed gray... Just staring out the truck window at the plains, stretching out to a gray horizon, had reminded him of the drab little Kansas farm in The Wizard of Oz, and the many times he and Martha had read that book to their son. "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz Landover 1994 Brooks, Terry. The Tangle Box. New York: Ballantine (1994); pg. 42. "'No, Biggar. You've short-circuited again. That was Oz. Oz isn't a real place. It's a make-believe place.'

'With the wizard and all? With the witches and the flying monkeys? That wasn't a story. That as real.'

'It was a story, Biggar! A story!' "

science fiction - Wizard of Oz Louisiana: New Orleans 2039 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. Crescent City Rhapsody. New York: Tor (2001; c. 2000); pg. 517. "A Bee blew past overhead. They always reminded her of the woman bicycling through the sky in The Wizard of Oz. So incongruous. But everything was--now. "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz Mars 2003 Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles. New York: Bantam (2000; c. 1958); pg. 88. "...they hammered together a clean, neat little town by the edge of the stone canals. On Sunday nights you could see red, blue, and green stained-glass light in the churches and hear the voices singing and the numbered hymns. 'We will now sing 79. We will now sing 94.' And in certain houses you heard the hard clatter of a typewriter, the novelist at work; or the scratch of a pen, the poet at work; or now sound at all, the former beachcomber at work. It was as if, in many ways, a great earthquake had shaken loose the roots and cellars of an Iowa town, and then, in an instant, a whirlwind twister of Oz-like proportions had carried the entire town off to Mars to set it down without a bump . . . "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz Mars 2005 Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles. New York: Bantam (2000; c. 1958); pg. 108. "'You know the law. Strict to the letter. No books, no houses, nothing to be produced which in any way suggests ghosts, vampires, fairies, or any creatures of the imagination... You've caused us a lot of trouble, Mr. Stendahl. It's in the record. Twenty years ago. On Earth. You and your library.'

'Yes, me and my library. And a few others like me. Oh, Poe's been forgotten for many years no, and Oz and the other creatures. But I had my little cache. We had our libraries, a few private citizens, until you sent your men around with torches and incinerators and tore my fifty thousand books up and burned them...' "

science fiction - Wizard of Oz Mars 2005 Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles. New York: Bantam (2000; c. 1958); pg. 111. "The robots, clothed in hair of ape and white of rabbit, arose: Tweedledum following Tweedledee... pepper-elves, Tik-tok [from Baum's books], Ruggedo, St. Nicholas... "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz Mars 2011 Zubrin, Robert. First Landing. New York: Ace Books (2002; c. 2001); pg. 47. "'There's no place like home?'

'Yeah, that's it.' Was she like Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz, both ready and lost? "

science fiction - Wizard of Oz Massachusetts 1997 Lobdell, Scott & Elliot S. Maggin. Generation X. New York: Berkley (1997); pg. 221. "They knew nothing would work. The ceiling would fall in. The Earth would give way. The air supply would fail. The trees would come alive like the ones on the yellow brick road and strangle and suffocate them in their sleep. "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz Massachusetts 1998 Sterling, S. M. Island in the Sea of Time. New York: Penguin (1998); pg. 608. "...in this Mediterranean expedition everyone was talking about. Oh, we're off to see the Pharaoh, the wonderful Pharaoh of . . . " [A variation on the song lyrics 'We're off to see the Wizard']
science fiction - Wizard of Oz Massachusetts: Boston 1997 Lobdell, Scott & Elliot S. Maggin. Generation X. New York: Berkley (1997); pg. 165. "Everett twitched his nose back and forth like Samantha the witch, and he loosened the skin around his nose like Skin did sometimes, and suddenly he looked like the Wicked Witch of the West. "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz Massachusetts: Boston 1999 Hand, Elizabeth. Glimmering. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 137. "'...He is a collector of Americana. But very eclectic... He owns Judy Garland's dress from The Wizard of Oz...' "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz Minnesota 1991 Douglas, Carole Nelson. Seed Upon the Wind. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 87. "A vision of Dorothy's dangerous poppy field snicked into the moviola of her mind. But the smell invigorated rather than enervated. "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz Missouri: St. Louis 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 68. "'This is dedicated to the memory of Gene Rodenberry.' In a surprisingly beautiful, if breathy, soprano voice she sang 'Somewhere Over the Rainbow' so tenderly that trick could hear sniffles from the audience. "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz Nevada: Las Vegas 1992 Powers, Tim. Last Call. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1992); pg. 11. "...a sunlit walk around the grounds of the Flamingo a few months ago and piping out, 'Look, Daddy! Those leaves are the same color as the city of Oz!' "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz Nevada: Las Vegas 1992 Powers, Tim. Last Call. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1992); pg. 78. Pg. 78: "'...and he's generally black or gray or even metallic. That little round robot Tik-Tok in the Wizard of Oz stories, that's him, a portrait of him.' "; Pg. 80: "'And something about . . . the Wizard of Oz, you said...' "
science fiction - Wizard of Oz New York 2000 Roman, Steven A. X-Men/Doctor Doom: The Chaos Engine. New York: BP Books (2000); pg. 69. "'...I wonder if there's a lending library here? I've never seen Buddy Ebsen's performance as the Tin Man in The Wizard of Oz. Jack Haley might never have gotten the chance to play the part in the final version of Ebsen hadn't been allergic to the silver makeup...' "


science fiction - Wizard of Oz, continued

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