Adherents.com Home Page

Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to science fiction - Star Trek, USA

science fiction - Star Trek, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
science fiction - Star Trek USA 1975 Russ, Joanna. The Female Man. New York: G. K. Hall (1977; 1975); pg. 60. "...get old films of Mae West or Marlene Dietrich (who is a Vulcan; look at the eyebrows)... "
science fiction - Star Trek USA 1976 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 127. Pg. 127: "Still sleepless, she turned on the TV.

An old Star Trek rerun was flickering through its paces. The warp engines were in trouble again, and Mr. Scott was crawling through some kind of glass tube with a wrench.

'If only it was as easy as that,' Mike mumbled.

His head was lifted off the pillow, and, bleary, he was squinting at the TV.

'I didn't mean to wake you, Scotty.' ";

Pg. 128: "He stubbed out his cigarette and watched her; on the TV screen, ignored, Captain Kirk was facing another crisis. "

science fiction - Star Trek USA 1987 Carroll, L. E. "The Very Last Party at #13 Mallory Way " in Writers of the Future: Volume III (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 123. Pg. 123: "I sent her upstairs after eliciting a promise that she would never touch my computer, even when her father was playing Star Trek on hers and refused to surrender it to homework time. "

Pg. 127-128: "Wednesday morning I found a note taped to my study door. Lori's handwriting. Long by her standards.

MOM. HAD TO USE JUNIOR. DAD WOULDN'T GIVE UP MINE IN THE MIDDLE OF A KLINGON INVASION. YOU REALLY SHOULD GET A NEW ONE WITH BUILT IN FAN. SORRY. TALK TO YOU LATER... LORI "

science fiction - Star Trek USA 1989 Willis, Connie. "Time Out " in Impossible Things. New York: Bantam (1994; story copyright 1989); pg. 337. "'Wow, neat!' Matt said, racing over to look at the temporal oscillator. 'Star Trek: The Next Generation!'

Carolyn laughed. She leaned forward. 'Do you like Star Trek?' "

science fiction - Star Trek USA 1990 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 2. "...among the celebrities watching the launch today in the VIP enclosure are... Neil Armstrong,... Clint Eastwood, Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, William Shatner... "
science fiction - Star Trek USA 1990 De Haven, Tom. Walker of Worlds. New York: Doubleday (1990); pg. 100. "Would John Forsythe have a Mickey Mouse telephone on his desk, a 'Star Trek' poster on the wall? "
science fiction - Star Trek USA 1993 Simmons, Dan. The Hollow Man. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 320. "Jaunting, she sends.

'Jaunting? What's that?'

You remember that Jacob and I talked about The Stars My Destination by Alfred Bester?

Jeremy shakes his head even as he shares her memory of it. A sci-fi novel?

Science fiction, Gail corrects him automatically.

He is trying to remember. Yeah, I sort of remember. You and he were both sci-fi fans, it turns out. But what does 'jaunting' have to do with anything . . . it was a sort of 'Beam me up, Scotty' teleportation thing, wasn't it?'

...No,' she says, her voice carrying the slight defensive she always uses when discussing science fiction or religion, 'it wasn't 'Beam me up, Scotty.' It was a story about a man who learned to teleport all by himself. . . .' "

science fiction - Star Trek USA 1993 Turrow, Scott. Personal Injuries. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1999); pg. 212. "One night in May of Evon's sophomore year... They were just silly. They were imitating people on childhood TV shows ('Oh, Mr. Grant!') and then Star Trek stuff, al the different species who were human except for a single trait that had been amplified or mutated, or replaced. Spock, without emotion.

'I see your aura,' said Hilary across the room, pretending to be a character from the Canis galaxy, who supposedly had the ability of dogs to see the halo of emotional discharge around a human being. 'I see your awe-rah,' she said and waved her hands swami-like as she approached. Evon had collapsed on Hilary's bed... "

science fiction - Star Trek USA 1995 Chalker, Jack L. The Cybernetic Walrus (Book One of The Wonderland Gambit). New York: Ballantine (1995); pg. 66. "A do-it-yourself God simulator. The universe's neatest toy, but about as attainable at this stage of our knowledge as antigravity or a Star Trek transporter. "
science fiction - Star Trek USA 1995 Chalker, Jack L. The Cybernetic Walrus (Book One of The Wonderland Gambit). New York: Ballantine (1995); pg. 96. "I had to agree, even though a whole ton of science fiction, including not only movies but TV, even the old Picard Star Trek, had delved into something like this. Or, at least, I thought it was something like this, anyway. "
science fiction - Star Trek USA 1995 Chalker, Jack L. The Cybernetic Walrus (Book One of The Wonderland Gambit). New York: Ballantine (1995); pg. 140. "I mean, to describe it sounds like that room they went into in Star Trek to get away from it all. It's all that and a lot more, but all anybody who could understand it would say was that it was a neat concept. "
science fiction - Star Trek USA 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. -3. "ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

It would be impossible to re-create the atmosphere of a science fiction convention without recognizing some f the benchmark creations of the genre. Some trademark names, characters, figures of speech, and fictional incidents may have been used in this original story to lend authenticity to the convention scenes. The following are gratefully acknowledged:

STAR TREK is a Registered Trademark of Paramount Pictures.
STAR WARS is a Registered Trademark of Lucasfilm Ltd... "

science fiction - Star Trek USA 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 92. "Finally, there were those for whom their science fiction/fantasy interest was totally consuming--they spent every waking moment immersed in it. These were the individuals whom William Shatner had once admonished in a Saturday Night Live skit to 'get a life!' "
science fiction - Star Trek USA 1999 Willis, Connie. Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 327. [Author's list of top 12 Christmas movies.] "7. A Christmas Carol... a jillion versions of this... from Alastair Sim to Captain Picard to Bill Murray... "
science fiction - Star Trek USA 2002 Bear, Greg. Vitalis. New York: Ballantine (2002); pg. 236. An unpretty child. I rolled that around, savoring it. 'You swallow Mudd's little sparkly pills and you're suddenly lovely' I asked.

She didn't get the reference. A woman marries a scientist but doesn't watch Star Trek? No wonder Rob had become suspicious. "

science fiction - Star Trek USA 2008 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 10. [Referring to the alien visitors.] "'...On a more prosaic level, some information on new metal alloys and rocket engines. No warp drives, sorry Captain Kirk. Their engines are practical examples of technology we've already thought about...' "
science fiction - Star Trek USA 2009 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 308. "Earl handed it [the video tape] to Alex, who read the label on the edge. 'Star Trek: The Third Generation.'

'You'll find a couple of episodes at the beginning,' Aaron said. 'About halfway through, you'll find the good stuff. I taped the conversation I had with Janessa and her shyster...' "

science fiction - Star Trek USA 2010 Bury, Stephen. Interface. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 354. "The armrests of Ogle's chair were huge, like the captain's chair on the bridge of the Enterprise. The right one was covered with small keys, like on a computer keyboard. "
science fiction - Star Trek USA 2010 Bury, Stephen. Interface. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 441. "He had made a comfortable living playing a cowboy patriarch in various Westerns and an admiral on Star Trek: The Next Generation. "
science fiction - Star Trek USA 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 221. "...the Burrows, which were still inhabited by people devoted to such peaceful pursuits as gaming, computer programming, research and Star Trek reruns. "
science fiction - Star Trek USA 2025 Chang, Glenn. "In the Blood " in The Edge of Space. New York: Elsevier/Nelson Books (1979); pg. 106. "Things began happening that night. I'd spent the afternoon trying to chase down the other Board members and had gone one for three: James T. Kirkland was an overweight, overweening, overeducated fop, a black emigre from Cambridge in the wake of the British food-riots of 2009 who'd obviously ridden the coattails of the then-recent Equality Act into his present position... "
science fiction - Star Trek Washington 1999 Bear, Greg. Darwin's Radio. New York: Del Rey (1999); pg. 407. "Mitch took Stella from Kaye. The baby squirmed and looked up at him, brows wrinkled. Mitch could have sworn she became brighter, and that someone was calling her name, either in the room or outside. Now he was really spooked.

'Maybe she is out of Star Trek,' he said. He sniffed her again and his lips curled.

'Right,' Kaye said skeptically. 'She isn't psychic.' "

science fiction - Star Trek Washington, D.C. 1998 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 20. "Like so many physicists, David Zachary Murphy fell in love with science by reading science fiction.

His love affair began when he was ten years old and saw Star Trek on TV. That sent him straight to his elementary school library, where he discovered... "

science fiction - Star Trek Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 73. "'And I'm here to tell you, dear friends, that those of God's creation who have met with his favor have been given gifts beyond our wildest imagining! They can span the distance! They can travel the stars and reach other galaxies! They can close the infinite gulf until it is meaningless!'

There was a skeptical snort from the back. 'More of that Star Trek nonsense.' "

science fiction - Star Trek Washington, D.C. 2314 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 68. "but it had no more basis in reality than the average Star Trek episode. "
science fiction - Star Trek world 1810 Powers, Tim. The Anubis Gates. New York: Ace (1983); pg. 74. "'What ship did you arrive on?' Charles asked skeptically. 'That's no American accent I ever heard.'

'The, uh, Enterprise,' Doyle answered. In his confused fumbling for a name he'd almost said Starship Enterprise.

'You see, my dear, he's a fraud,' said Charles proudly. 'There may be an Enterprise, but no such ship has landed here lately...' "

science fiction - Star Trek world 1973 Morrison, David. "Epilog to Carl Sagan's Cosmic Connection " in Carl Sagan's Cosmic Connection: An Extraterrestrial Perspective. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2000; c. 1973); pg. 289. "...and the menagerie of creatures like the leonine Wookie in the Star Wars trilogy... "
science fiction - Star Trek world 1974 Dick, Philip K. Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said. New York: Doubleday (1974); pg. 55-56. [Note how 'captain kirk' is used here as with lowercase characters as a common word.] "'You want to go watch a captain kirk?' Kathy asked.

'Whatever,' he said, briefly.

'There's a good one on at Cinema Twelve. 'It's set on a planet that's in the Betelgeuse System, a lot like Tarberg's Planet--you know, in the Proxima system. Only in the captain kirk, it's inhabited by minions of an invisible--'

'I saw it,' he said. As a matter of fact, a year ago they had had Jeff Pomeroy, who played the captain kirk in the picture, on his show; they had even run a short scene: the usual flick-plugging, you-visit-us deal with Pomeroy's studio. He had not liked it then and he doubted if he would like it now. And he detested Jeff Pomeroy...' "

science fiction - Star Trek world 1979 Clarke, Arthur C. "The Songs of Distant Earth " in The Sentinel. New York: Berkley Books (1983; c. 1979); pg. 198. [Author's introduction.] "And that was not the only thing bugging me. I had just seen two spectacular and high successful space movies--Star Wars, Close Encounters of the Third Kind--and Star Trek was still doing reruns all over the planet. They were well done and I greatly enjoyed them, but hey all had one thing in common. They were not, in the strictest sense, science fiction, but fantasy. " [More.]
science fiction - Star Trek world 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 116. "Star Trek started going downhill in '68, it stank on ice in '69, and its been an embarrassment to humanity ever since. " [Other refs. not in DB. See also pg. 129.]
science fiction - Star Trek world 1984 Adams, Douglas & John Lloyd. The Meaning of Liff. New York: Harmony Books (1984); pg. 16. "Clackavoid (n.) Technical television term for a page of dialogue from Star Trek. "
science fiction - Star Trek world 1986 Clarke, Arthur C. The Songs of Distant Earth. New York: Ballantine (1986) [Author's Note] "This novel is based on an idea developed almost thirty years ago... However, this version was directly--and negatively--inspired by the recent rash of space-operas on TV and movie screen. (Query: what is the opposite of inspiration--expiration?)

Please do not misunderstand me: I have enormously enjoyed the best of Star Trek and the Lucas/Spielberg epics, to mention only the most famous examples of the genre. But these works are fantasy, not science fiction in the strict meaning of the term. It now seems almost certain that in the real universe we may never exceed the velocity of light. Even the very closest star systems will always be decades or centuries apart; no Warp Six will ever get you from one episode to another in time for next week's installment. "

science fiction - Star Trek world 1996 Fry, Stephen. Making History. New York: Random House (1996); pg. 84. "Revolving RNA. Fractal geometry. Teri Hatcher naked... Tight close-up of a Cardassian warlord announcing the invasion of Earth. "
science fiction - Star Trek world 1996 Fry, Stephen. Making History. New York: Random House (1996); pg. 165. "'Find my way home'--simpler, finer words were never written. The Odyssey, The Incredible Journey, Star Trek: Voyager. In the end, it all comes down to finding your way home. "
science fiction - Star Trek world 1996 Fry, Stephen. Making History. New York: Random House (1996); pg. 253. "'...The force may be with you, young Skywalker, but you are not a Jedi yet... The Truth Is Out There. Hasta la vista, baby. Catch-22... The name's bond, James Bond... Beam me up, Scotty. I shall return...' "
science fiction - Star Trek world 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 12. "'Is there a United Nations anthem?' asked Frank.

'Not as far as I know, sir,' said the captain.

'Anybody got the theme from Star Trek on tape?' asked Clete.

The captain looked at him.

Clete shrugged. 'Just a thought.' "

science fiction - Star Trek world 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 28. "Finally the lander connected with the mothership's hull, clamping onto it just behind the bulbous habitat module; Clete could hear the clanging of docking clamps connecting with the ship. No clamshell-doored hanger deck like on the original starship Enterprise. Clete had always found that unbelievable anyway--it required pumping so much air in and out. "
science fiction - Star Trek world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 14. Pg. 13-14: "Indeed, the SF that reaches the largest audiences--earns the biggest grosses, and establishes its archetypes most firmly in the collective mind not just of the nation but of the globe--is not published at all; it is broadcast over TV and screened in movie theaters. One could dismiss such work as being aimed at the 'lowest common denominator,' but one could dismiss the Gospels on the same ground. Blessed are the poor in spirit? Well, then, blessed are the Trekkies, too. Theirs is the Kingdom of Heaven. ";

Pg. 37: "If elitism means that one prefers ballet to hip-hop, Wallace Stevens to Rod McKuen, or Saul Bellow to a Star Trek novelization, then a case can be made for elitism--even without consigning all that is demonic or popular to perdition. For the fact of the matter... is that highbrow and lowbrow are differences not of essential merit but of demographics. " [Many other Star Trek refs.]

science fiction - Star Trek world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 97. [Chapter 5, pages 97-114, titled 'Star Trek, or the Future as a Lifestyle', deals with Star Trek extensively but not exclusively.]
science fiction - Star Trek world 1999 Banks, Iain. The Business. New York: Simon & Schuster (1999); pg. 43. "She also gave the impression of having a combined Transporter Room and Tardis buried somewhere in the house at her command, as she seemed to possess the gift of materialising at will wherever and whenever she wanted. The only difference was that in Star Trek or Doctor Who there was a cheesy sound effect and a vaguely human-shaped shimmer--or the sudden appearance of a Metropolitan Police box--to give you a few seconds' warning; Miss H had perfected the art of arriving instantly and without a sound. "
science fiction - Star Trek world 2000 Cox, Greg. X-Men & the Avengers: Gamma Quest: Book 3: Friend or Foe?. New York: Berkley Boulevard (2000); pg. 89. "Iron Man had yet to meet a Skrull who couldn't understand English, but his hail elicited no response. Where is Lt. Uhura now that I need her? he thought, setting his comm unit to repeat his warning at five second intervals. "
science fiction - Star Trek world 2000 Cox, Greg. X-Men & the Avengers: Gamma Quest: Book 3: Friend or Foe?. New York: Berkley Boulevard (2000); pg. 153. "Now it was the Leader's turn to blink in surprise. His bushy black eyebrows arched halfway up his billboard-size brow. The convolutions of his bulging brain throbbed like the swollen domes of the evil telepaths in that old Star Trek episode, the one about the alien zoo. "
science fiction - Star Trek world 2009 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 267. "'...What did you tell them about our culture?'

'Everything they asked about... Human culture, the various types, the differing lifestyles, structure of community, the whole spectrum of human life on Earth... The great books, writings on religion and philosophy, both Eastern and Western, technological development--they got it all. And our popular culture, comics, movies, television, books, theater, the sports culture, the art culture, music, the whole enchilada. Mostly after our own Miranda Sena brought that part up, of course. If you remember, one of the most famous images to come out of the [alien] ship was of them watching an episode of Star Trek.' "

science fiction - Star Trek world 2110 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 10. "It had often been suggested that Goliath's bridge had been copied from the starship Enterprise: after a century and a half, Star Trek was still affectionately revived from time to time. It was a reminder of the naive dawn of the Space Age, when men dreamed it might be possible to defy the laws of physics and race across the Universe more swiftly than light itself. But no way of avoiding the speed limit set by Einstein had been discovered--and although 'wormholes in space' had been proved to exist, nothing even as large as an atomic nucleus could pass through them. Yet despite this, the dream of really conquering the interstellar gulfs had not wholly died. "
science fiction - Star Trek world 2179 Sawyer, Robert J. Golden Fleece. New York: Time Warner (1990); pg. 94. "...the first reusable spaceship, the Shuttle Enterprise, did not go into space at all... "
science fiction - Star Trek world 2200 Arnason, Eleanor. A Woman of the Iron People. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 350. "I frowned, looking toward the shore. It was a grey line now. 'Do you mean the policy of nonintervention?'

'No. It is a term invented by writers. American writers, I think. Prime something.'

'The Prime Directive.'

'Agopian told me about it. He is full of information about America and science fiction.' "

science fiction - Star Trek world 3001 Clarke, Arthur C. 3001: The Final Odyssey. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 32. "And whoever had put this collection together must have had a sense of humor, or they would not have included episodes from each Star Trek series. As a very small boy, Poole had met both Patrick Stewart and Leonard Nimoy: he wondered what they would have thought, could they have known the destiny of the child who had shyly asked for their autographs. "
science fiction - Star Wars Alabama 1981 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 499. "Harod was wearing jeans, his favorite snakeskin cowboy boots, an open red silk shirt, and his R2-D2 belt buckle. "
science fiction - Star Wars California 1985 Bear, Greg. Blood Music. New York: Arbor House (1985); pg. 125. "'Nobody to follow,' she told herself on the fourth level. She tried singing 'Michelle' again, but the rhythm didn't match her steps, so she whistled a march by John Williams. " [Reference to the famed composer of music for the "Star Wars " films, among many other films.]
science fiction - Star Wars California 1988 Koontz, Dean R. Lightning. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1988); pg. 203. Pg. 203: "'You're crazy about Star Trek, Star Wars, Batters Not Included, all that stuff, so maybe what I've got here is the kind of background expert I seek when I'm writing a novel. You're my resident expert in the weird.' ";

Pg. 345: "...he told them all about Indiana Jones and Luke Skywalker and Han Solo... "

science fiction - Star Wars California 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 282. "...who was out on the West Coast wrangling a Lucasfilm convention deal... "
science fiction - Star Wars California: Los Angeles 1984 Bear, Greg. "Book One: The Infinity Concerto " (c. 1984, substantially rewritten for this edition) in Songs of Earth & Power. New York: Tor (1996; 1st ed. 1994); pg. 10. "...and the soundtrack albums for the original King Kong, Star Wars and Citizen Kane. "
science fiction - Star Wars California: Los Angeles 1985 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 29: "Meanwhile, Back at the Mansion... ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (July 1985); pg. 9. [Sam and Illyana have teleported to Los Angeles. Word balloons from crowd, as they fly away:] "What the--?! "; "Lookithat! "; "Where's my camera? "; "Where's George Lucas? "; "Must be filming a movie! "; "Neat! "
science fiction - Star Wars California: Los Angeles 1993 DeChance, John. MagicNet. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 123. "With its telescopic sight and flaring, futuristic lines, it looked like something out of Star Wars. "
science fiction - Star Wars California: Los Angeles 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 145. "'Dick Van Dyke? Tom Cruise? George Lucas? Paul Newman? Did you check to see how closely their real footprints match the cement impressions?' "
science fiction - Star Wars California: Los Angeles 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 176. "Dale rose and moved to the lectern. He paused for a moment, letting the drama build, then, in that Darth Vader voice of his, he boomed out, 'The defense calls Hask.' "
science fiction - Star Wars California: Los Angeles 2040 Willis, Connie. Remake. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 70. "In between I drank champagne, which had apparently been in every movie ever made, and cursed Mayer, and deleted beakers and flasks from the cantina scene in Star Wars. "
science fiction - Star Wars California: Los Angeles 2040 Willis, Connie. Remake. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 110. "MOVIE CLICHE #419: The Blocked Escape. Hero/Heroine on the run, near escape with bad guys, eludes them, nearly home free, villain looms up and suddenly, asks, 'Going somewhere?'

SEE: The Great Escape, The Empire Strikes Back, North by Northwest, The Thirty-Nine Steps. "

science fiction - Star Wars California: Los Angeles 2040 Willis, Connie. Remake. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 51-52. "'Look at the screen,' he said, and the tourates all moved so they could see it. Storm troopers blasted away, and Luke Skywalker appeared, standing in a doorway over a dropoff, his arm around a blank blue space in the screen.

I left Alis watching and pushed through the crowd to the menu. Stagecoach, The Godfather, Rebel without a Cause.

'Okay, now,' James Dean said, typing into a keyboard. The female tourate appeared on the sceen next to Luke. 'Kiss him on the cheek and step off the box. You don't have to jump. The data harness'll do everything.'

'Won't it show in the movie?'

'The machine cuts it out.'

...'Okay, roll 'em,' James Dean said. The fat tourate smooched empty air, giggled, and jumped off the box. On the screen, she kissed Luke's cheek, and they swung out across a high-tech abyss. "

science fiction - Star Wars Colorado 1993 Simmons, Dan. "Entropy's Bed at Midnight " in Lovedeath. New York: Warner Books (1993); pg. 13. "There were other sleds leaning against a wall with names such as SKYWALKER, X-15, and BLUE LIGHTNING inked on their undersides. "
science fiction - Star Wars Darwath 1998 Hambly, Barbara. Icefalcon's Quest. New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 271. "Gil returned to his mind, the intensity of her blue eyes in the glowing magelight as she wove her tales of men who could fly through the air and princesses who led armies through starry darkness to victory with the help of farmboys and smugglers and men wrought of metal and wire. "
science fiction - Star Wars France 2030 McAuley, Paul J. Fairyland. New York: Avon Books (1997; c 1995); pg. 147. "The peeper's goggles film over, like little mirrors, then clear. He says, 'Death Star guards on the way,' and runs off toward the lights of the interface. "
science fiction - Star Wars galaxy -4990 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Elven Star. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 286. "'The vessel needs a new name! Something more appropriate to a starship. Apollo? Gemini? Enterprise. Already taken. Millennium Falcon. Trademarked. All rights reserved. No! Wait, I have it! Dragon Star! That's it!...' "
science fiction - Star Wars galaxy 2100 Bear, Greg. Anvil of Stars. New York: Warner Books (1992); pg. 283. "'Many Smells [an alien] watched some of our movies. We tried to interpret for him.'

'The Longest Day,' Giacomo said. 'Ben-Hur. Patton. He was particularly confused by The Godfather and Star Wars...' "

science fiction - Star Wars Illinois 1989 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 52. "'Did you make the models?' asked Baedecker. Shelves were filled with gray plastic dreadnoughts from Star Wars, Star Trek, and Battlestar Galactica. Two large space shuttles hung from dark thread in a corner. "


science fiction - Star Wars, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus
Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.