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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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science fiction - Sagan, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
science fiction - Sagan world 3332 Attanasio, A. A. Radix. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1981); pg. 17. "Blinded by the headlights, Sumner Kagan lunged off the road and... " [This character's name may be a variation on 'Carl Sagan.']
science fiction - Star Trek Africa 2002 McDonald, Ian. Evolution's Shore. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1995); pg. 27. Pg. 27: "This one seemed to have been built by a set designer for Star Trek... In Uhuru Park the trees... "; Pg. 371: "'Personally, I don't think so. They've rescheduled the Gene Rodenberry launch, which is Mission 86...' "
science fiction - Star Trek California 1964 Rasmussen, J. R. "Research " in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds II (Dean Wesley Smith, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 239. "Our trip to 1964 to talk to the Great Bird of the Galaxy was the most exciting day of my life. He adapted or adopted almost everything we suggested. Genius. Pure genius. Mostly on his part.

...Bungee jumping through the twenty-third and twenty-fourth centuries, bringing back details of the future . . . it's a story right out of a hack sci-fi novel. Maybe I'll pitch it to a television network for a series. I'll leave out the Star Trek parts, of course. Don't want to infringe on the franchise. "

science fiction - Star Trek California 1988 Koontz, Dean R. Lightning. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1988); pg. 166. Pg. 166: "'Exotic news, Shane.'

'Mystery.'

'Wonder.'

Laura gave her the three-finger greeting from Star Trek.

Thelma laughed. ";

Pg. 203: "'You're crazy about Star Trek, Star Wars, Batters Not Included, all that stuff, so maybe what I've got here is the kind of background expert I seek when I'm writing a novel. You're my resident expert in the weird.' "

science fiction - Star Trek California 1993 Simmons, Dan. The Hollow Man. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 200. "Fractals had been those clever things applied mathematicians had used for their computer graphics--the brief scene in one of those Star Trek films Gail had dragged him to... "
science fiction - Star Trek California 1995 Bonta, Vanna. Flight. San Diego, CA: Meridian House (1995); pg. 84. "Six fans suddenly surrounded him and plopped themselves onto the carpet at his feet. 'A quest!' one dressed as a Romulan exclaimed eagerly.

'Give me a quest!'

'A quest!' chimed in the others.

Mendle stepped over and through them, mumbling he would have to think about it. 'I'm in the middle of another book,' he excused himself. 'I'm working, it's going on.' He gestured to his temples.

'Say no more, sire,' said the elf.

'Quite logical,' a Trekkie wearing Spock ears said. "

science fiction - Star Trek California 1995 Bonta, Vanna. Flight. San Diego, CA: Meridian House (1995); pg. 85. Pg. 85: "The costumes ranged from Godzilla and Buck Rogers to Ferengi and the Borg. "; Pg. 86: "Panel discussions every hour covered topics ranging from Picard's favorite French cuisine to superstrings. "
science fiction - Star Trek California 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 50. "They'd even been planning to exchange presents; Frank had bough Clete a trio of pewter starships from the Frankling Mint--a classic Enterprise, an original Klingon battle ship, and a Romulan Bird of Prey. Together, they'd cost six hundred dollars; far too much, really, but it had made Frank feel good to order them. "
science fiction - Star Trek California 1999 Rasmussen, J. R. "Research " in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds II (Dean Wesley Smith, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 239. "To: The Producers, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine
From: J.R.
Re: Take this job and . . .

Dear Most Powerful Ones,
The expense claim for my final research trip is attached. Two doctors' bills will arrive in a few days; the studio's insurance should cover most of it... As of right now . . . I'd cite day and date but I'm hazy from the temporal transport . . . You are minus one researcher. I'm staying in the twentieth century until New Year's Day takes it away from me.

So what if I'm the world's only time-traveling researcher? I can't list it on my resume. It won't buy a mug of raktajino at Quark's. " [This is apparently a self-referential story of some sorts.]

science fiction - Star Trek California: Berkeley 1996 Sawyer, Robert J. Frameshift. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1997); pg. 280. "'Damn it, Pierre, who are you going to finger next? Ross Perot? He's got jug ears, after all. Or Patrick Stewart? There's a suspicious-looking bald buy...' "
science fiction - Star Trek California: Los Angeles 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 81. "'Okay, so who do we want [on the jury]? Space buffs?'

'I wish. But you can bet the prosecution will get those eliminated.'

'Star Trek fans? Science-fiction fans?'

'They'd probably be good, but, again, too obvious--the other side will strike them.' "

science fiction - Star Trek California: Los Angeles 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 85. "'What makes you think I'm not going to win this time?'

'Are you kidding? Your buddy Mr. Spock offed one of TV's most popular personalities. This is Simpson in reverse: a celebrity stiff and a no-name defendant.'

'Hask [the alien accused of the murder] is famous as hell.'

'Hask is going to hell.' "

science fiction - Star Trek California: Los Angeles 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 111. "Which of the following TV series have you watched regularly now or in the past? For those that you have seen, indicate whether you agreed with, disagreed with, or had no opinion about the portrayal of alien lifeforms:

ALF
Babylon 5
Lost in Space
Mork & Mindy

Any Star Trek series

The X-Files

Members of LASFS, the Los Angeles Science Fiction Society, helped in putting together a series of questions. Apparently anyone who agreed with the ALF, Star Trek or Mork & Mindy portrayals of aliens would be biased in favor of the defense, whereas those who liked the Babylon 5, Lost in Space or X-Files portrayals would be biased toward the prosecution. " [More of the questions for potential jurors.]

science fiction - Star Trek California: Los Angeles 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 112. "Regardless of which way they leaned, any out-and-out SF fans or space buffs had to be disqualified, hence these questions:

What's the name of Mr. Spock's father?

Do you know what the initials SETI stand for?

Have you ever attended a science-fiction convention?

Have you ever seen a UFO? "

science fiction - Star Trek California: Los Angeles 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 269. "Michaelson moved toward the VCR, ejected the tape the Tosoks had been watching--Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan--and inserted the one he'd brought with him. "
science fiction - Star Trek California: Los Angeles 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 43-44. "'...And I don't think you're a mental case for believing that gods can literally die. Zeus is dead, after all.'

'I thought he was simply doing time for rape.'

She smiled at that and took a sip of her drink. 'His worshippers are gone. Where does a god go then?'

'I think that was dealt with on a Star Trek episide.'

Her eyes twinkled with laughter like northern lights. 'Star Trek and The Twilight Zone both had a sophisticated grasp of theology.'

'Are you old enough to remember them?'

She smiled like a debutante. 'I have them on disc.' "

science fiction - Star Trek California: Los Angeles 2040 Willis, Connie. Remake. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 43. "I forced it back, staring determinedly at the other wall, where a trailer for the new Star Trek movie was flashing, till it receded, and then turned back to Alis. "
science fiction - Star Trek California: Sacramento 1997 Burton, Levar. Aftermath. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. vii. "AUTHOR'S NOTE

...I suppose that's a large part of the reason I found myself so attracted to the world of Star Trek. Gene Roddenberry's vision of the future was definitely about diversity and inclusion. The presence of Nichelle Nichols as Lt. Uhura assured me that not only would people who looked like me be a part of the world of the future, we would play a vital role in the continuing evolution of the human experience. " [More, pg. viii, mentioning Burton's own role as Geordi LaForge on Star Trek: The Next Generation.]

science fiction - Star Trek El Salvador 1981 Shepard, Lucius. "Salvador " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1984); pg. 525. Pg. 525: "Latching his hands around his head, DT began to sing -- a wordless melody. His voice was discordant, barely audible above the rotors; but the tune had a familiar ring and Dantzler soon placed it. The theme from 'Star Trek.' It brought back memories of watching TV with his sister, laughing at the low-budget aliens and Scotty's Actors' Equity accent. "; Pg. 526: "The other two guys were singing their lungs out, and even the kid was getting into the spirit of things... He swayed to the rhythm and essayed a 'la-la' now and again... The singing stopped, and Dantzler saw that the whole platoon was staring at the kid, their expressions slack and dispirited.

'Space!' shouted DT, giving the kid a little shove. 'The final frontier!' "

science fiction - Star Trek France 2030 McAuley, Paul J. Fairyland. New York: Avon Books (1997; c 1995); pg. 195. "Ray's prominent ears are pointed like Mr. Spock's, and the points rise above the knitted watch cap he wears on his bald head. "
science fiction - Star Trek galaxy -4990 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Elven Star. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 286. "'The vessel needs a new name! Something more appropriate to a starship. Apollo? Gemini? Enterprise. Already taken. Millennium Falcon. Trademarked...' "
science fiction - Star Trek galaxy 2374 de Lancie, John & Peter David. I, Q (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 196. "'How do you know that 'God' is in this tent?' he asked. 'What does God need with a tent?' " [Picard, in Peter David's novel, here recapitulates a line that Kirk spoke in the movie Star Trek V, when Kirk confronts a being who claims to be God and asks "What does God need with a ship? "]
science fiction - Star Trek galaxy 2432 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 321. "I knew what you were supposed to say in a situation like this [waking up from suspended animation]; I'd seen Khan Noonien Singh do it. 'How long?' I asked.

'More than four centuries,' replied Hollus. 'It is now the Earth year 2432.' "

science fiction - Star Trek Hawaii 2009 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 236-237. Pg. 236: "'...And someone who's a real good shot broke Lucas's Enterprise... How'd you like it if someone came over to your house and broke your Enterprise, eh?... You act so tough. But this wasn't tough, this was cowardice... So you came, you and your yellow, cowardly... friends. They all got away, but you didn't. We got you and you're going to pay for every broken window and Lucas's Enterprise and Jennifer's vase...' "; Pg. 286: "Earl did replace the Enterprise with a model so large Earl couldn't get his arm around the box. When finished, the thing looked spectacular... "
science fiction - Star Trek Illinois 1989 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 52. "'Did you make the models?' asked Baedecker. Shelves were filled with gray plastic dreadnoughts from Star Wars, Star Trek, and Battlestar Galactica. Two large space shuttles hung from dark thread in a corner. "
science fiction - Star Trek Illinois: Chicago 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 91. "This was something Rebecca had never considered, never allowed into her thoughts. Even as a girl, watching reruns of Star Trek, she had been deeply offended--though she had not been sure why, then--by the episode that proposed the Greek gods to have been space travelers, that suggested Apollo might be alive, out there, somewhere in the Universe. "
science fiction - Star Trek Luna 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 109. "In the recreational lounge of one of the dome-capped caverns of Von Braunville at Censorinus, three of the moondozer operators at the O2 plant were watching a tape of the premier show of the 1981-1982 season of Star Trek, the fifteenth straight year that Captain Kirk, Mr. Spock, and the multinational and multispecies crew of the starship Enterprise had carried out their five-year mission 'to boldly go where no man has ever gone before'--at least on network television.

Air Force Major Gordon Vear, selenologist and ferry-shuttle pilot, stood in the rear of the loung watching the tired 'dozer jockes watching their huge video screen. Spock, who for the past three seasons had been wearing a Vulcan earclip on his right ear, told Kirk that unless their new engineer, and eight-foot-tall Alpha Crucian by the name of Traz, coaxed more power from their engines, their refitted ship would... " [1 more page of refs. to Star Trek.]

science fiction - Star Trek Luna 1994 Kotani, Eric. Death of a Neutron Star (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. -3. "INTRODUCTION

Gene Roddenberry Crater on Mars

At the 42nd triennial General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union (IAU), held in The Hague in 1994, a Martian crater was named in honor of Gene Roddenberry.

The Roddenberry crater is located at Martian latitude -49.9 degrees and longitude 4.5 degrees, in Quad MC26SE on Map I-1682. [Quad defines the name of the map on which it appears and 'Map' is the USGS number of the map.] Its diameter is approximately 140 km or about 87 miles. Photograph courtesy of NASA. " [This, apparently, is true, although what it actually has to do with the novel is unclear.]

science fiction - Star Trek Massachusetts 1997 Lobdell, Scott & Elliot S. Maggin. Generation X. New York: Berkley (1997); pg. 22. "'Don't get your floppy fingers caught in the time machine door, Skin,' Everett called up to Angelo. 'Find yourself in the Middle Ages and your extremities dribbling off aboard the Starship Enterprise or something.' "
science fiction - Star Trek Metropolis 1993 Stern, Roger. The Death and Life of Superman. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 58. "Flip gazed appreciatively out past the windscreen and patted the padded dash. 'Not to put her down, but she does look like a cross between a grand prix racer and somethin' outta Star Trek. We're gonna attract attention wherever we go.' "
science fiction - Star Trek Missouri: St. Louis 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 32. "A few Vulcans, Wookiees, and other assorted TV/film aliens also were represented... Little children were dressed in miniature Galactic Defense Alliance or Star Trek costumes, snoozing in the arms of their similarly attired parents. "
science fiction - Star Trek Missouri: St. Louis 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 37. "'What's the status of the 'Starship Stowaway' movie... I believe it's still in what is technically known as the rumor stage... If you want there to be one, you must write to your fan clubs and say so--that's how Star Trek survived into a next generation and beyond!...' "
science fiction - Star Trek Missouri: St. Louis 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 41. "Nearby, one dealer had in a display case a child's lunch kit with likenesses of the principal characters of the original Star Trek silk-screened on it. An old memory stirred; Trick's youngest sister, now in her late thirties, had had such a lunch kit in junior high school. Who would keep such a thing after its usefulness had passed?

'What are you asking for the lunch box?' Trick asked the dealer who stood nearby.

'It's not for sale,' said the man... He was wearing a red T-shirt styled after the original Star Trek uniforms stretched tight across his round belly. 'None of the stuff in the case is for sale. Just for show.'

...Trick nodded, and made a mental note to ask Mary Rose if she still had any of her old Star Trek memorabilia... That's a profit, sure, but it's not like the Trek and Doctor Who and other stuff from the same era... "

science fiction - Star Trek Missouri: St. Louis 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 65. "If he didn't already have all the attention he could stand, Trick might have considered purchasing one of the handsome red and black costume uniforms from Star Trek: The Next Generation; if it could make a sex symbol out of the bald actor who shared his first name, what might it do for him? "
science fiction - Star Trek Missouri: St. Louis 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 68. "...diametrically opposed radio hosts Howard Stern and Rush Limbaugh. Their jokes were lame, but the audience rewarded them with laughter and applause... 'Rush' had been a fixture in the dealer's room, costumed as Star Trek's 'Scotty'--the rotund motion-picture version.

...'This is dedicated to the memory of Gene Rodenberry.' In a surprisingly beautiful, if breathy, soprano voice she sang 'Somewhere Over the Rainbow' so tenderly that trick could hear sniffles from the audience. Even he had to swallow a bit of a lump in his throat, despite his lack of knowledge of the identity of Gene Roddenberry . . . someone with something to do with science fiction, he guessed. "

science fiction - Star Trek Missouri: St. Louis 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 69. "He sang (to the tune of 'Yankee Doodle Dandy'):

'Oh, I'm the famous Benjy Bentley...

Just let me off at the Alpha Centaur,
I'll catch a lift to Deep Space Nine,
I've had enough of old Courageous,
Get me back to London--
Boring old Earth suits me fine! "

science fiction - Star Trek Missouri: St. Louis 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 73. "'Aye, ye're a miracle worker,' she said with a Scottish burr which Trick now recognized as a Star Trek trademark. "
science fiction - Star Trek New York 1975 Lyons, Steve. "Welcome to the X-Men, Madrox " in X-Men: Legends (Stan Lee, ed.) New York: Berkley Boulevard (2000); pg. 51. "Xavier had saved Jamie from the Fantastic Four. He had brought him here, to the mansion that housed his School for Gifted Youngsters. He had introduced him to a man named Doctor McCoy (like the character from Star Trek), who had blue fur. McCoy had repaired Jamie's malfunctioning containment suit so that it no longer caused him pain. "
science fiction - Star Trek New York 2000 Roman, Steven A. X-Men/Doctor Doom: The Chaos Engine. New York: BP Books (2000); pg. 194. "Her smile broadened as she leaned close to whisper in his ear. 'As a wise man once said: 'The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few.' '

' 'Or the one,' ' Scott said, completing the quote. He turned to look at Jean, a half smile playing at his lips. 'Since when did AMC start running The Wrath of Khan?'

'They didn't,' Jean replied. 'Star Trek movie marathon on the Sci-Fi Channel. I caught it just before we left to help Roma.'

Scott shook his head in mild disbelief and leaned forward to kiss her... "

science fiction - Star Trek New York: New York City 1953 Barnes, Steven. Far Beyond the Stars (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 107. [1] "Oh, in earlier stories he had written about a strange and strangely heuristic universe of the future, filled with creatures that had names vaguely familiar and simultaneously strange. He had written of adventures on far planets and several tales of a Captain named Kirk who, bolder than most, went into the jaws of danger beside his crew, buckling every swash in sight. When readers complained that a real captain wouldn't place himself in such constant danger, he made a shift, wrote of another starship, where the captain and the captain's primary officer shared responsibility, and these stories found an even greater audience.

And he had, upon occasion slipped in a man or woman of his own skin color. A communications officer. A blind ensign. Even a wise woman of seemingly endless empathy. And he loved those scenes. But always, and ever, the primary responsibilities lay with those white people who captained the ship. "

science fiction - Star Trek New York: New York City 1953 Barnes, Steven. Far Beyond the Stars (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 107. [2] "Now, for the very first time, he was writing a tale about a man who looked like him, and the difference was startling. He had loved Kirk, and Picard--but he was Sisko. He could feel this man's pain, he could share his dreams. Sisko's triumphs and struggles called to the very deepest parts of Benny, made him consider every word in a manner he had never done before, made him strive to have every action, every thought and sensation not just honest but unique to both character and situation. " [More about Sisko, as Benny Russell, writing about Sisko, which is the central plot element of this novel.]
science fiction - Star Trek New York: New York City 1984 Delany, Samuel R. "The Tale of Plagues and Carnivals " in Flight from Neveryon. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press (1994; c. 1984); pg. 187. "AIDS is like unto a Scourge of Satan, the Wrath of Khan, and the most awfullest thing that can happen not only to the sniveling faggot... "
science fiction - Star Trek New York: New York City 2002 Friesner, Esther M. Men in Black II. New York: Ballantine (2002); pg. 45. "It looked so easy when Mr. Spock did that Vulcan mindmeld thing on Star Trek! But that was TV; this was real. "
science fiction - Star Trek New York: New York City 2002 Millar, Mark. Ultimates Vol. 1: Super-Human. New York: Marvel Comics Group (2002) [Graphic novel reprint of The Ultimates #1-6]; pg. Chap. 2, pg. 22. Nick Fury: "I said shut up and crack open that bottle of Champagne you've been saving for the next season of Star Trek, Doctor Banner. The answer to your prayers has just been answered... "
science fiction - Star Trek North Dakota 1996 McDevitt, Jack. Ancient Shores. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 257. "'Let me tell ya,' he said... 'even if they could do that Star Trek thing and walk into a booth here and come out in Bismarck, it'll never replace a Blazer. I don't care what anybody says.' "
science fiction - Star Trek Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 14. "After he closed the planetarium, the building was rented out for a commercial Star Trek exhibit, with a mockup of the classic bridge set inside what had been the star theater. As much as I like Star Trek, I can't think of a sadder comment on Canadian educational priorities. A variety of other private-sector concerns had subsequently rented the space, but it was currently empty. "
science fiction - Star Trek Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 16. "Lots of movies are made in Toronto, and, for some reason, an enormous number of science-fiction TV series, including over the years such fare as Gene Roddenberry's Earth: Final Conflict, Ray Bradbury Theater, and the revived Twilight Zone. " [Gene Roddenberry is best known as the creator of 'Star Trek.']
science fiction - Star Trek Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 197. "'...Although math may confound them [the Wreeds], thinking about philosophical questions, about the meaning of life, about ethics and morality, confounds us. We have an intuitive sense of right and wrong, but every theory of morality we come up with fails. You showed me those Star Trek movies . . .'

I had indeed; he'd been intrigued enough by the episodes we'd looked at to want to watch the first three classic Trek films. 'Yes,' I said.

'There was one in which the impossible hybrid died.'

'The Wrath of Khan,' I said.

'Yes. In it, much was made of the notion that 'the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, or the one.' We Forhilnors have similar sentiments. It is an attempt to apply mathematics--something we are good at--to ethics, something we are not good at. But such attempts always fail us. In the film in which the hybrid was reborn--'

'The Search for Spock,' I said. "

science fiction - Star Trek Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 198. "'The Search for Spock,' I said. "

His eyeballs clicked together. 'In that one, we learn that the first formulation was flawed, and in fact 'the needs of the one outweigh the needs of the many.' It seemed intuitively right that the fellow with the fake hair and the others should have been willing to sacrifice their lives to save one unrelated comrade, even though it defied mathematical logic. And yet this happens all the time: many human societies and all Forhilnor ones are democratic; they are committed to the principle that each individual has identical worth. Indeed, I have seen the great phrase devised by your neighbors to the south: 'We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.' And yet the people who wrote those words were slave owners, oblivious to the irony--to use a word you have taught me--of that fact.'

science fiction - Star Trek Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 52. Pg. 51: "'...I can show you some better samples.' [of TV/movies about aliens]... 'Abdus, can you nip out to Blockbuster and get some videos for me?'... I told him what I wanted, and he scurried off. "; Pg. 52: "First up was 'Arena,' an episode of the original Star Trek series; I immediately froze the image on a picture of Mr. Spock. 'See him?' I said. 'He's an alien--a Vulcan.'

'He' 'looks' 'like' 'a' 'human' 'being,' said Hollus; he could eat and talk at the same time.

'Notice the ears.'

Hollus's eyestalks stopped weaving in and out. 'And that makes him an alien?'

'Well,' I said, 'of course it's a human actor playing the part--a guy named Leonard Nimoy. But, yeah, the ears are suppose to suggest alienness; this show was done on a low budget.' I paused. "

science fiction - Star Trek Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 52. "'Actually, Spock there is only half-Vulcan; the other half is human.'

'How is that possible?'

'His mother was a human; his father was a Vulcan.'

'That does not make sense biologically,' said Hollus. 'It would seem more likely that you could crossbreed a strawberry and a human; at least they evolved on the same planet.'

I smiled. 'Believe me, I know that. But wait, there's another alien in this episode.' I fast-forwarded for a time, then hit the play button again.

'That's a Gorn,' I said, pointing to the tailless green reptile with compound eyes wearing a gold tunic. 'He's the captain of another starship. Pretty neat, huh? I always loved that one--reminded me of a dinosaur.'

'Indeed,' said Hollus. 'Which means, again, that it is far too terrestrial in appearance'

'Well, it's an actor inside a rubber suit,' I said.

Hollus's eyes regarded me as if I were again being Master of the Bleeding Obvious. "

science fiction - Star Trek Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 53. "We watched the Gorn stagger around for a bit, then I ejected the tape and put in 'Journey to Babel.' I didn't fast forward, though; I just let the teaser unfold. 'See them?' I said. 'Those are Spock's parents. Sarek is a full-blooded Vulcan, and Amanda, the woman there, is a full-blooded human.'

'Astonishing,' said Hollus. 'And humans believe such cross-breeding is possible?'

I shrugged a little. 'Well, it's science fiction,' I said. 'It's entertainment.' I fast-forwarded to the diplomatic reception. A stocky snout-nosed alien accosted Sarek: 'No, you,' he snarled. 'How do you vote, Sarek of Vulcan?'

'That's a Tellarite,' I said. Then, remembering: 'His name is Gav.'

'He looks like one of your pigs,' said Hollus. 'Yet again, too terrestrial.' "

science fiction - Star Trek Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 53. "I fast-forwarded some more. 'That's an Andorian,' I said. The screen showed a blue-skinned, white-haired male humanoid, with two thick, segmented antennae emerging from the top of his head.

'What is his name?' asked Hollus.

It was Shras, but for some reason I was embarrassed that I knew that. 'I don't remember, I said, then I put in another tape... "

science fiction - Star Trek Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 98. "'...There are practical engineering constraints on how weird life can get, after all, even'--and here he raised one of his six-fingered hands and did a Vulcan salute--'if your filmmakers seem incapable of coming close to the variety possible.' "
science fiction - Star Trek Tennessee: Memphis 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 110. "'How much did the success of Star Trek influence the creators of Starship 'Stowaway'?' asked the woman...

'Hardly at all,' answered Truitt. 'Oh, certainly much of the technospeak was borrowed from Trek, because there were no rocket scientists among the original writers of Stowaway. Most of you know that Gene Roddenberry was actually an Air Force pilot, and his knowledge of navigation and propulsion and all that mishmash gave much credibility to his creation. No, we actually borrowed more from the success of the BBC's Doctor Who, which pre-dated Star Trek by three or four years...' "

science fiction - Star Trek Tennessee: Memphis 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 137. "Casey's filk was sung to the tune of Rick Nelson's 'Travelin' Man':

...The empathic lass out on Betazed sensed my heart wasn't pure;
And the Ewok girl out on old Endor had such gorgeous fur! "

science fiction - Star Trek Texas 1994 Anthony, Patricia. Happy Policeman. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1994); pg. 191. "He awoke to daylight streaming in the window. A cardinal was perched on the sill; a blood spot in the blue of the sky. Someone, probably Delsey, had moved a television and VCR into the room. Star Trek, The Movie was playing to an empty chair.

Light from the window made a glare on the screen. DeWitt closed his eyes and listened to the voice of William Shatner. "

science fiction - Star Trek Texas: Fort Worth 1995 Martin, Lee. Bird in a Cage. New York: St. Martin's Press (1995); pg. 74. "'I'm not that much of a contortionist and I don't know anybody who is. It takes about four hours of sitting very still, which explains why Whoopie Goldberg on Star Trek wore that great big hat. It was to cover her hair so she didn't have to get it redone before and after each day's filming, since we can't assume cornrowing will still be in style three hundred or so years from now.' Trish actually looked quite a lot like Whoopie Goldberg herself, except for her height of less than five feet. "
science fiction - Star Trek United Kingdom 1994 Holdstock, Robert. The Hollowing. New York: Roc (1994); pg. 51. Pg. 50: "'You look and sound as if you've just beamed down from the Starship Enterprise.'

'Isn't that a neat show? I miss it. I miss a lot of TV. Did you ever see The Twilight Zone?' ";

Pg. 51: "'Pre-morphs?' She looked puzzled.

It wasn't the right word. 'Proto-gamma-morphs?' he suggested hesitantly.

'Proto gamma morphs? You have been watching too much Star Trek. No. It means nothing . . .' "

science fiction - Star Trek United Kingdom 1999 Willis, Connie. "Adaptation " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 124. "Dickens' story, A Christmas Carol... we have nineteen, including Mickey's Christmas Carol, The Muppet Christmas Carol... and an audiotape on which Captain Picard of the American television series Star Trek: The Next Generation takes all the parts. "
science fiction - Star Trek United Kingdom: London 1995 Ryman, Geoff. 253. New York: St. Martin's Press (1998); pg. 90. "Mrs Mary Al-Masud... A bigamist. A Kuwaiti businessman simply made Mary his second wife. They met at a Star Trek convention. He was dressed as Spock. She kept the ears as a souvenir. "
science fiction - Star Trek United Kingdom: London 1995 Ryman, Geoff. 253. New York: St. Martin's Press (1998); pg. 148. "Mrs Emma Christie... Clandestine author of slash fiction, for which she publishes a monthly fanzine. Slash is written almost exclusively by women. It describes in livid physical and romantic detail, love affairs between male television characters. Bodie and Doyle from The Professionals, or Sulu and Chekov from Star Trek. "
science fiction - Star Trek United Kingdom: London 1995 Ryman, Geoff. 253. New York: St. Martin's Press (1998); pg. 245. "It really is extraordinary how fast they have become collectors'' items: Star Trek phonecards, Disney phonecards... "
science fiction - Star Trek United Kingdom: Scotland: Muir Isle 1985 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 28: "Soulwar ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (June 1985); pg. 13. Jack Wayne: "--But how do we get inside?! [the dome]. "; Doug/Cypher: "Y'know, there's this classic Star Trek episode, where the Captain's been kidnapped and his crew are trying to rescue him, only their weapons have no effect, even at full power. Thing is, the phasers worked all along, it's just that the villains, who were telepaths, wouldn't let the crew see that. "; Charles Xavier: "Most perceptive, Douglas. We, too, face a telepath, Jack. and his dome remains a barrier... only if we let it. "
science fiction - Star Trek USA 1943 Bishop, Michael. Brittle Innings. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 308. "'Well, Jumbo my chum, congratulations,' said the President, this time deliberately using the mike. 'I haven't seen a shot carry that far since the U.S.S. Enterprise showed off her guns for me.' " [Actually, this appears to refer to the naval ship, not the 'Star Trek' starship.]


science fiction - Star Trek, continued

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