Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to science fiction - H. G. Wells, Venezuela

science fiction - H. G. Wells, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
science fiction - H. G. Wells Virginia 1998 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 309. "'It may not matter whether I publish a novel or if my son becomes a physicist, because the idea's out there already. So what are you going to do? Go back to 1898 and kill H.G. Wells? You can, if you really want to, but what's to prevent another writer from coming up with the same concept? Or maybe you stop Einstein from developing the theory of relativity. You might, but does that necessarily prevent Stephen Hawking or Kip Thorne or someone else from investigating the same problems?' "
science fiction - H. G. Wells Washington, D.C. 1960 Pohl, Frederik. "Let the Ants Try " in L. Ron Hubbard Presents The Best of Writers of the Future (Algis Budrys, ed.) Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (2000; c. 1949); pg. 383. "'Well, the War Department had a name for it--a name they borrowed from H. G. Wells. They called it the Time Machine.' He met de Terry's shocked, bewildered stare calmly. 'A time machine,' he repeated... "
science fiction - H. G. Wells Washington, D.C. 1993 Anthony, Patricia. Brother Termite. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1993); pg. 52. "Tali was glaring down at the traffic below as though he wished he were an alien from an old science fiction movie and the scene they were playing with the humans was from 'War of the Worlds.' "
science fiction - H. G. Wells Washington, D.C. 1993 Anthony, Patricia. Brother Termite. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1993); pg. 54. "Near the kitchen was new graffiti.

AT GROVER'S MILL.

BRING CHICKEN POX.

'War of the Worlds,' Reen whispered.

'Huh?'

'I'm not fond of fiction, but I felt I should study all fictionalized aliens. Whoever wrote the graffiti has heard about the radio play War of the Worlds. That should give you a clue about who is doing this.' " [It's likely there are other references to this H. G. Wells classic novel. All refs. by name are in DB, but probably allusions are not in DB.]

science fiction - H. G. Wells world 1896 Matheson, Richard. Bid Time Return. New York: Viking Press (1975); pg. 161. "Einstein is a teen-ager in Switzerland. Lenin is a young lawyer, his revolutionary days far ahead of him. Franklin Roosevelt is a Groton student, Gandhi a lawyer in Africa, Picasso a youth. Hitler and De Gaulle schoolboys. Queen Victoria still sits on the throne of England. Teddy Roosevelt has yet to charge up San Juan Hill. H. G. Wells has only recently published The Time Machine. "
science fiction - H. G. Wells world 1942 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Upsetting the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1996); pg. 190. "Porlock, Groves reflected, should have been named Morlock, after one of the subterranean creatures in The Time Machine. Then he shook his head. Morlocks were machine tenders; they would have had a proper appreciation for the uses of technology, no matter how lamentable their taste in entrees had grown over the millennia. "
science fiction - H. G. Wells world 1964 Asimov, Isaac. "Introduction " in The Rest of the Robots. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1964); pg. xii. "In the 1920s science fiction was becoming a popular art form for the first time, and no longer merely a tour de force I the hands of an occasional master such as Verne and Wells. "
science fiction - H. G. Wells world 1973 Sagan, Carl. Cosmic Connection: An Extraterrestrial Perspective. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2000; c. 1973); pg. 162. "...it is possible that on Mars there are pathogens, organisms which, if transported to the terrestrial environment, might do enormous biological damage--a Martian plague, the twist in the plot of H. G. Wells's War of the Worlds, but in reverse. "
science fiction - H. G. Wells world 1973 Sagan, Carl. Cosmic Connection: An Extraterrestrial Perspective. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2000; c. 1973); pg. 244. Caption: "Illustration after H. G. Wells's The Time Machine. From Classics Illustrated. "; Text within comic book-style illustration:

"The Time Machine
H. G. Wells

Scientific people know very well that time is only a kind of space. We can move forward and backward in time just as we can move forward and backward in space.

To prove this theory, I invented a machine to travel through time. If you pressed one lever, the machine went back into the past. If you pressed the other lever, the machine glided forward into the future. With this machine, I set out to explore time. "

science fiction - H. G. Wells world 1973 Sagan, Carl. Cosmic Connection: An Extraterrestrial Perspective. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2000; c. 1973); pg. 245. "One of the most pervasive and entrancing ideas of science fiction is time travel. In The Time Machine, the classic story by H. G. Wells, and in most subsequent renditions, there is a small machine, constructed usually by a solitary scientist in a remote laboratory. One dials the year of interest, steps into the machine, presses a button, and presto, here's the past or the future. "
science fiction - H. G. Wells world 1983 Zelazny, Roger. Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983); pg. 67. [Introduction to Zelazny to 'Go Starless in the Night'] "This next one [story] came by a request. It came when Fred Saberhagen was putting together a collection called A Spadeful of Spacetime. The ground rule was that each tale had to provide a novel means of getting at the past--excluding the old Wellsian standby of simple time travel. "
science fiction - H. G. Wells world 1995 Bradbury, Ray. "Dorian in Excelsus " in Quicker Than the Eye. New York: Avon Books (1996; c. 1995); pg. 128. "'It's been written that H. G. Wells attracted women with his breath, which smelled of honey. Then I learned that such breath comes with illness.' " [This is also mentioned pg. 130.]
science fiction - H. G. Wells world 1997 Burton, Levar. Aftermath. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. 275. [Quote on the last page of book.] "'It is possible to believe that all the past is but the beginning of a beginning, and that all that is and has been is but the twilight of the dawn. It is possible to believe that all the human mind has ever accomplished is but the dream before the awakening.'

--H. G. Wells "

science fiction - H. G. Wells world 1998 Brin, David. Heaven's Reach. New York: Bantam (1998); pg. 431. [Author's Afterword] "This is certainly not the fist time an author speculated about the possibility of genetically altering nonsapient animals. Examples include The Island of Dr. Moreau, Planet of the Apes, and the Instrumentality series of Cordwainer Smith. " [Island of Dr. Moreau, by H. G. Wells.]
science fiction - H. G. Wells world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 60. Pg. 60-68, more.
science fiction - H. G. Wells world 2000 Cox, Greg. X-Men & the Avengers: Gamma Quest: Book 3: Friend or Foe?. New York: Berkley Boulevard (2000); pg. 123. "Curiously, the villain's bulbous green skull reminded her somewhat of Leech, the young Morlock child currently residing at Professor Xavier's School for Gifted Youngsters. Would Leech look like the Leader when he grew up? Storm hoped that, if nothing else, the orphaned Morlock would acquire a far less sinister mien than the smirking fiend who now stood before them. " [In the X-Men comics, the Morlocks are a group of mutants who lived under the streets of Manhattan. They were named after the Morlocks from H. G. Wells' novel The Time Machine.]
science fiction - H. G. Wells world 2025 Gunn, James E. The Listeners. New York: Signet (1974; c. 1972); pg. 39. Pg. 39: Paragraph-long quote by H. G. Wells; Other quote, pg. 224-225
science fiction - H. G. Wells world 2030 Sawyer, Robert J. Flashforward. New York: Tor (2000; c. 1999); pg. 304. "And before him now--

Before him now was the far, far future [in a vision].

When he'd been young, Lloyd had read H. G. Wells's The Time Machine. And he'd been haunted by it for years. Not by the world of the Eloi and the Morlocks; even as a teenager, he'd recognized that as allegory, a morality play about the class structure of Victorian England. No, the world of A.D. 802,701 had made little impression on him. But Wells's time traveler had made another journey in the book, leaping millions of years ahead to the twilight of the world, when tidal forces had slowed the Earth's spin down so that it always kept the same face toward the sun, bloated and red, a baleful eye upon the horizon, while crab-like things moved slowly along a beach.

But what was before him now seemed even more bleak... "

science fiction - H. G. Wells world 2135 Dick, Philip K. Our Friends From Frolix 8. New York: Ace Books (1970); pg. 82. "'We're not going to be able even to get all the Under Men, and these aliens may be like the Martians in H. G. Wells' THE WAR OF THE WORLDS; they'll eat Switzerland in one big bite.' "
science fiction - Heinlein California 1972 Dick, Philip K. The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1972); pg. 90. "Bob Heinlein "
science fiction - Heinlein California: Sacramento 1997 Burton, Levar. Aftermath. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. vii. Pg. vii: "AUTHOR'S NOTE

I'm a big fan of the science fiction genre... the masters in the field. Asimov, Clarke, Heinlein... "

science fiction - Heinlein Darwath 1996 Hambly, Barbara. Mother of Winter. New York: Ballantine (1996); pg. 14. "Gil had gained quite a reputation among the Guards as a spinner of tales, passing along to them recycled Kipling and Dickens, Austen and Heinlein... "
science fiction - Heinlein Florida 1967 Grimwood, Ken. Replay. New York: Arbor House (1986); pg. 15. "...and above it shelves of boxes stuffed with all his old comic books and Heinlein novels... "
science fiction - Heinlein Gaea 2025 Varley, John. Titan. New York: Berkley (4th ed. 1981; 1st pub. 1979); pg. 126-127. "Bill, who had read a great deal of science fiction, could make a dozen theories about any aspect of Gaea. He was partial to the ever-reliable plague mutation: something that came out of nowhere and killed enough builders to leave Gaea in the hands of automatic safety devices.

'She's a derelict, I'll bet on it,' he told them. 'Just like the ship from Heinlein's Orphans in the Sky. A lot of people set out in Gaea thousands of years ago and lost control on the way. The ship's computer put it in orbit around Saturn, shut down the engines, and is still up there keeping the air pumping and waiting for more orders.' "

science fiction - Heinlein galaxy 2269 Cox, Greg. Assignment: Eternity (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 36. "...a pack of spearmint gum, loose change and subway tokens, tickets to an upcoming Bob Dylan concert, nail clippers, and a paperback copy of Stranger in a Strange Land... "
science fiction - Heinlein galaxy 2269 Cox, Greg. Assignment: Eternity (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 177. "Lord knows she'd read enough about strange alien beings with advanced mental abilities. The only problem was, she didn't know what book Seven had dropped her into here. Was this Stranger in a Strange Land or The Puppet Masters? "
science fiction - Heinlein galaxy 2293 Crispin, A. C. Sarek (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1994); pg. 73. "There was a mint-condition volume of Wuthering Heights, a slightly battered edition of Have Spacesuit, Will Travel [by Heinlein], a collection of Edgar Allen Poe's poetry, and... "
science fiction - Heinlein Illinois 1940 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: In the Balance. New York: Ballantine (1994); pg. 12. "...who got out his Astounding and started to read. The newest Heinlein serial had ended the month before, but stories by Asimov, Robert Moore Williams, del Rey, Hubbard, and Clement were plenty to keep him entertained. "
science fiction - Heinlein Mars 2094 Sladek, John. Tik-Tok. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1985; 1st printed 1983); pg. 87. "We found ourselves, like anthropologists in pursuit of a lost tribe, trying to reconstruct the Martians we'd never met from all available information, even from fiction. One old novel claimed that Martians shared water [Heinlein's Stranger in a Strange Land]; we knew they shared nothing. "
science fiction - Heinlein Mars 2094 Sladek, John. Tik-Tok. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1985; 1st printed 1983); pg. 89. [In this passage, 'grok', a word introduced by Heinlein's Stranger in a Strange Land, is used.]

FIRST MARTIAN: Grok, brudda. (Hello, fellow Martian.)

SECOND MARTIAN: Grokola, marty-brud. My parsnip is fraughter nor a dead skate's greep, ow you? (Hello, I could use a drink, how about you?)

FIRST MARTIAN: Too wry, nuncle. Not schlepped the old barg-bag since the old snap jived earthside, curd shore use a spew and a pinter pipi. (Right. I haven't dined out since my firl left me, so I could sure use a meal and a beer.)

SECOND MARTIAN: Bow-wow. There is no ankle-grine without some wallop a frigstore ending. Me got brakes, let's scop the joot so snaffle a couple pinters. (Fine. Every stone must have its well. I've got a car, let's ?? the road and grab two beers.) "

science fiction - Heinlein Mars 2094 Sladek, John. Tik-Tok. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1985; 1st printed 1983); pg. 91. "Deacon Cooper marched towards them, holding out a fistful of pamphlets. 'Grok, bruddas! Your parsnip must be fraughter nor a dead skate's greep, so snaffle a coupla pinters, yo?' "
science fiction - Heinlein Mars 2110 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 74. "...finding names for... new formations [on Mars]... Next came authors who had been associated with the planet--Wells, Burroughs, Weinbaum, Heinlein, Bradbury. And then... "
science fiction - Heinlein New York: New York City 1953 Barnes, Steven. Far Beyond the Stars (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 121. "'It's the best thing I've read since 'The Puppet Masters.' ' She paused, and he had the feeling that she was being almost apologetic. 'I read a lot of science fiction,' she finally said. "
science fiction - Heinlein New York: New York City 1976 Silverberg, Robert. Dying Inside. New York: Ballantine (1976; c. 1972); pg. 142. "...in the fantasies of Bradbury, Heinlein, Asimov, Sturgeon, Clarke. "
science fiction - Heinlein New York: Westchester County 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 21: "Slumber Party ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Nov. 1984); pg. 15. Pg. 15: Roberto: "How is it you know so much about meteors? "; Sam: "Ah read science fiction. Love the stuff. Heinlein's my favorite. Ah'm readin' 'Door into Shadow.' "; Pg. 27: Danielle: "Remember how you felt your first weeks here--a stranger in a strange land, alone and confused, ignorant of the language and customs? "
science fiction - Heinlein United Kingdom: England 1615 Ramirez, Frank. "The Merchant of Stratford " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982; 1st pub 1979 in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine); pg. 296. "'And while you're at it send some Asimov too. Can't get enough through channels. I've got almost all of Heinlein's books, but let me see if there's something you...' "
science fiction - Heinlein United Kingdom: England 1615 Ramirez, Frank. "The Merchant of Stratford " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982; 1st pub 1979 in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine); pg. 297. [The first time traveller is talking to William Shakespeare.] "'...But what happened centuries after its birth? Let me see if I can find my copy of that variorum edition of The Martian Chronicles. Now you've got me sounding like a Heinlein character.' "
science fiction - Heinlein USA 1964 Dick, Philip K. "Waterspider " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1964); pg. 227. "'Is Bob Heinlein here?' Anderson asked Tozzo... 'I understand he and Mildred Clingerman went off somewhere to talk about cats and nobody has seen them come back.' "
science fiction - Heinlein USA 1982 Straub, Peter. Koko. New York: E. P. Dutton (1988); pg. 479. "The shelves provided a graph of his reading--from Grimm's Fairy Tales and Babar to Robert Heinlein and Isaac Asimov. "
science fiction - Heinlein USA 1987 Ing, Dean. "Firefight 2000: A Report on Advanced Small Arms Concepts " in Firefight 2000. New York: Baen (1987); pg. 21. "I left Battelle with some heady visions of future small arms systems, not knowing which ones will see a production line. But one panelist kept us from feeling too cocky. He reminded us that writer Robert Heinlein described many of those concepts years ago in Starship Troopers--but then, Heinlein himself is an Annapolis-trained engineer. That's fitting. "
science fiction - Heinlein USA 1999 Willis, Connie. "Newsletter " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 226. "'The man on the plane next to me was wearing a hat. So were most of the other people on the flight. Did you ever see The Puppet Masters? The parasites attached themselves to the spinal cord and took over the nervous system,' he said. 'This morning here at work I counted nineteen people wearing hats...' " [Also, pg. 230-231, 248.]
science fiction - Heinlein USA 1999 Willis, Connie. Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 320. Robert A. Heinlein's Have Spacesuit Will Travel
science fiction - Heinlein USA 2025 Cool, Tom. Infectress. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 82. "'...Not like brother Mike.'

'Who's Mike?'

'A fictitious character. Have you ever read The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert Heinlein?'

'No.'

'Mike was a computer that came alive. He--or she, in its persona of Michelle--had a childish sense of humor. Listen, I'd like to talk some more, but this conversation is using a lot system time that's needed right now. I'm going to spool a copy of Heinlein's novel to your terminal. You can read that until I need some more help. Thanks. Don't wander off. Bye.'

The text of the first page of The Moon is a Harsh Mistress filled the monitor. " [The first paragraph from the book follows. More about 'Mike', not in DB.]

science fiction - Heinlein USA 2040 Dick, Philip K. "Orpheus with Clay Feet " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1963); pg. 293. "'When I was in college... getting my M.A. in English lit, I had to read a god deal of twentieth century science fiction, of course. Of the greats there were three writers who stood out. The first was Robert Heinlein with his future history. The second, Isaac Asimov with his Foundation epic series. And-- The man I did my paper on. Jack Dowland...'

...'And last year a client of Muse Enterprises, Miss Julie Oxenblut of Kansas City, Kansas asked to be permitted to inspire Robert Heinlein in his future history . . . was it Heinlein you said, Mr. Slade?'

'No,' Slade said, 'it was Jack Dowland, the greatest of the three. Heinlein was great, but I did much research on this, Mr. Manville, and Dowland as greater.' "

science fiction - Heinlein Washington, D.C. 1998 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 20. "Islands in the Sky... a nearby branch library, where he found more sophisticated fare: I, Robot, Double Star [written by Heinlein], Needle in a Timestack, Way Station, and other classics of the genre. "
science fiction - Heinlein Washington, D.C. 2314 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 66. "hadn't this sort of thing happened once before?

Yes, it had. back in 1944, at the height of World War II, when a writer . . . who was it again? Digging at his memory, Murphy absently snapped his fingers. Heinlein? Asimov? Maybe Hal Clement or Jack Williamson . . .?

No. Now he remembered. It was Cleve Cartmell... "

science fiction - Heinlein world 1970 Tucker, Wilson. The Year of the Quiet Sun. New York: Ace (1970); pg. 4. "DEDICATION:
For the Fifteen and their mates, who are looser because they grok a lot. " [The author here uses the word 'grok,' coined in Heinlein's Stranger in a Strange Land.]
science fiction - Heinlein world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 14-16. "As early as April 21, while Simon an Mary Lou listened to Clark Kent and His Supermen and George Dorn... Frodo Baggins... Strangers in a Strange Land... the Incredible Hulk... "
science fiction - Heinlein world 1985 Ing, Dean and Leik Myrabo. "The Future of Flight: Comes the Revolution " in Firefight 2000. New York: Baen (1987; c. 1985); pg. 105. "When Robert Heinlein wrote of a huge spacecraft with a complete ecological system in his 1941 story 'Universe'--well, everybody knew science fiction people were a little strange. "
science fiction - Heinlein world 1997 Anthony, Patricia. Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997); pg. 247. [Introduction to "Guardian of Fireflies "] "When I was eight years old or so I remember being afraid to turn over in bed, lest I fall into some dreaded Other Dimension. This kind of stuff, plus the fiction of Ted Sturgeon and Ray Bradbury, marked me for life.

I know you'll ask, so I'll just say it straight out: I hated Heinlein. Yes. Even the juveniles. "

science fiction - Heinlein world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 83. "Among the most popular or critically acclaimed SF authors of the postwar years I can think of very few who have not wrestled once or twice with the angel of apocalyptic dread, but there are two who were preeminent in that arena. One was Robert Heinlein, whom a majority of fans would unhesitatingly name as the greatest SF writer of the century. Indeed, Heinlein was regularly voted 'best all-time author' in polls of SF readers. His work has compelled the admiration not only of fandom but of critics who deplore his views and lament his influence. " [Much more on Heinlein, pg. 83-87, elsewhere.]; Pg. 178: "Government should not be trusted with such a vital mission, and [Newt] Gingrich explains why in terms of strict Heinleinean orthodoxy: "; Pg. 183: "Not all SF of a military stamp is of the School of Heinlein with its insistence on the evolutionary superiority and inevitability of a warrior ethos. "
science fiction - Heinlein world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 139. "A number of SF writers have commanded their on small legion of true believers: L. Ron Hubbard, most conspicuously, but also Robert Heinlein, Theodore Sturgeon, Phil Dick, J. G. Ballard, and Frank Herbert. "
science fiction - Heinlein world 2008 McDonald, Ian. Evolution's Shore. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1995); pg. 375. "'Robert A. Heinlein's coming down early because of the storm.' " [A spacecraft named after the author. Also mentioned pg. 378.]
science fiction - Heinlein world 2038 Jones, Gwyneth. White Queen. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 105. "'...Can you grok that in its fullness?...' "
science fiction - King Kong California 2000 Schow, David J. "Blessed Event " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000); pg. 229. "...He also helped forge those so-called 'vintage' movie posters in a year where a big King Kong sheet could snare sixty thousand dollars at a perfectly reputable auction at Christie's.' "
science fiction - King Kong California: Hollywood 1955 Bradbury, Ray. A Graveyard for Lunatics. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1990); pg. 6. Pg. 6: "My love of films had gone on too many years. It was like having an affair with Kong, who fell on me when I was thirteen; I had never escaped from beneath his heart-beating carcass. "; Pg. 18: Kong; Son of Kong [More, pg. 6-7, 18, 59, 166.]
science fiction - King Kong California: Los Angeles 1984 Bear, Greg. "Book One: The Infinity Concerto " (c. 1984, substantially rewritten for this edition) in Songs of Earth & Power. New York: Tor (1996; 1st ed. 1994); pg. 10. "...and the soundtrack albums for the original King Kong, Star Wars and Citizen Kane. "
science fiction - King Kong California: Los Angeles 2040 Willis, Connie. Remake. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 62. "Thelma Ritter in Rear Window... King Kong... East of Eden... "
science fiction - King Kong Colorado 1986 Willis, Connie. "Chance " in Impossible Things. New York: Bantam (1994; story copyright 1986); pg. 272. "Tib was King Kong. It had taken her forever to figure it out. 'Am I tall?' she asked.

'Compared to what?' Elizabeth had said.

She stuck her hands on her hips. 'I don't know. The Empire State Building.' "

science fiction - King Kong Gaea 2025 Varley, John. Titan. New York: Berkley (4th ed. 1981; 1st pub. 1979); pg. 308. "...partly embedded in the ground like a robot King Kong after the fall. "
science fiction - King Kong galaxy 2029 Quick, William T. Planet of the Apes. New York: HarperCollins (2001); pg. 45. "When he was able to focus again he looked up, expecting to see the alien King Kong coming at him to finish the job, the giant animal, evidently having satisfied himself that Davidson was no longer a threat, had turned his attention toward the rest of the fleeing humans. "
science fiction - King Kong Italy 1974 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 52. Pg. 52: "Not that she was alone, exactly. Takagi's silent partner, the Son of Kong, was only a couple of yards away... " [Called 'the Son of Kong' in jest because the man is large and physically ape-like.]; Pg. 73: "...wished once again that she knew what had become of King Kong. "
science fiction - King Kong Italy 1996 Knight, Damon. Humpty Dumpty: An Oval. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 285. "When we got to the narrow part of the spire we had to climb like Kong, fingers and toes in the stone filigree. "
science fiction - King Kong Metropolis 1978 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Last Son of Krypton. New York: Warner Books (1978); pg. 35. "'...I figured the chicks'd be climbing the walls like King Kong to get next to me.' "
science fiction - King Kong New York: New York City 1975 Russ, Joanna. The Female Man. New York: G. K. Hall (1977; 1975); pg. 135. "King Kong is male. "


science fiction - King Kong, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus
Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.