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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs, Oregon

science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs Solar System 2276 Clarke, Arthur C. Imperial Earth. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1976); pg. 166. "'Probably the sound track of an old Tarzan movie.' "
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs United Kingdom 1940 Lupoff, Richard (writing as Ova Hamlet). "God of the Naked Unicorn " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 308. "At this very moment there rest in the clutches of this brilliant maniac [Moriarty] both Sherlock Holmes and Sir John Clayton, Lord Greystoke, the man known to the world at large as--Tarzan of the Apes!'

'Holmes and Greystoke? At one time? And very nearly yourself as well, Doc Savage?' I exclaimed. 'Who can this devil be...'

...Captain John Carter took up the narration. 'A woman of protean nature whose admirers have identified her variously as the Princess Dejah Thoris of Helium--as Joan Randall, daughter of the commissioner of the interplanetary police authority... Margo Lane... the Shadow... Jane Porter Clayton, Lady Greystoke--and as Miss Evangl Stewart of New York City's bohemian quarter Greenwich Village...' "

science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs United Kingdom 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 14-15. "'Ah, science fiction's my food and drink... after all of Spenser's musty hates, the collected works of H.G. Wells, Arthur C. Clarke, and Edgar Rice Burroughs?' "
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs USA 1950 Williams, Walter Jon "Witness " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 136. Pg. 136: "My picture career had died years ago and I was broke. I went to NBC with an idea for a television series.

Tarzan of the Apes ran for four years. I was executive producer, and on the screen I played second banana to a chimp. I was the first and only blond Tarzan. I had a lot of points and the series set me up for life. ";

Pg. 137: "Eventually the reign of terror ended, just as Earl said it would. While I was swinging my jungle vines as Tarzan, John and Robert Kennedy killed the blacklist... "; Pg. 139: "When I was making Tarzan, people were calling me well-preserved. "

science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs USA 1962 Martin, George R. R. "Shell Games " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 193. "'...They all went to jail or got shot or something, didn't they? Except for the... snitch, whatsisname.' He snapped his fingers. 'You know, the guy in Tarzan.'

'Jack Braun,' Tom said... "

science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs USA 1982 Knight, Damon. "Tarcan of the Hoboes " in One Side Laughing. New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; 1982); pg. 36. [Author's introduction] "I was driving with my son Jonathan one day in late December when he noticed two hoboes with a Christmas tree beside the tracks. That started me thinking about hobo jungles, and from there it was only a step to this impudent and reprehensible retelling of Edgar Rice Burroughs. " [The story is a very different retelling of "Tarzan, " with similarly named characters, including "Professor Clayton " and his daughter "Jane ", with "Tarcan of the Hoboes " standing in for "Tarzan of the Apes. "]
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs USA 1988 Martin, George R. R. & John J. Miller. Wild Cards VII: Dead Man's Hand. New York: Bantam Books (1990); pg. 220. "'and the chairman of Hartmann's California delegation, ace Jack Braun. The controversial Braun, who starred in feature films and TV's Tarzan was better known as Golden Boy... "
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs USA 1991 McCammon, Robert R. Boy's Life. New York: Pocket Books (1992; c. 1991); pg. -3. [Frontispiece]

"We were going to the stars,
to Mars we'd make round trips.
We swung on vines like Tarzan,
and flashed Zorro's keen blade. "

science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs USA 1991 McCammon, Robert R. Boy's Life. New York: Pocket Books (1992; c. 1991); pg. 9. Pg. 9: "...and out in the woods that came up behind our house I helped Tarzan call the lions and shot Nazis down in a solitary war. "; Pg. 32: "...surrounded by the screaming hordes as Tarzan--Gordon Scott, the best Tarzan there ever was--plunged his knife into a crocodile's belly... " [More about Tarzan, pg. 32-34, 37-38, 121, 573, etc.]
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs USA 1991 McCammon, Robert R. Boy's Life. New York: Pocket Books (1992; c. 1991); pg. 320. "He said he used to have all the Doc Savage magazines and the Tarzan and John Carter of Mars book sand the Shadow and Weird Tales and boxes of Argosy... "
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs USA 1991 McCammon, Robert R. Boy's Life. New York: Pocket Books (1992; c. 1991); pg. 573. "She knows Vincent Price and Peter Cushing, the films of Hammer, the works of Poe, the chronicles of Mars and the town called 'Salem's Lot. "
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs USA 1998 Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin (1986); pg. 38. "The woman handed me one of the magazines. It had a pretty woman on it, with no clothes on, hanging from the ceiling by a chain wound around her hands. I looked at it with interest. It didn't frighten me. I thought she was swinging, like Tarzan from a vine, on the TV. "
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs USA 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 198. "The remarkable thing is that Card's flair for storytelling is such that even sophisticated readers can be engaged by his inventions. He is the Edgar Rice Burroughs of Generation X. "
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs USA 2047 Bear, Greg. Queen of Angels. New York: Warner Books (1994; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 100. "...a good literary upbringing, books no vids: Kazantzakis Cavafi in original Greek Joyce Burroughs both Edgar Rice and William and Shakespeare Goldstern Remick Randall Burgess... "
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 1973 Leiber, Fritz. The Three of Swords. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1973); pg. 3. [Author's Introduction] "This is Book One of the Saga of Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser, the two greatest swordsmen ever to be in this or any other universe of fact or fiction, more skillful masters of the blade even than Cyrano de Bergerac, Scar Gordon, Conan, John Carter, D'Artagnan, Brandoch Daha, and Anra Devadoris. " [John Carter of Mars, by Burroughs]
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 1973 Sagan, Carl. Cosmic Connection: An Extraterrestrial Perspective. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2000; c. 1973); pg. 43. "Thus, the hoary science-fiction standby of the sexual love between a human being and an inhabitant of another planet ignores, in the most fundamental sense, the biological realities. John Carter could love Dejah Thoris, but despite what Edgar Rice Burroughs believed, their love could not be consummated. And if it could, a viable offspring would not be possible. "
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 1973 Sagan, Carl. Cosmic Connection: An Extraterrestrial Perspective. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2000; c. 1973); pg. 102. "In my boyhood, I was lucky enough to come upon a set of turgidly written novels with names like Thuvia, Madi of Mars, the Chessman of Mars, The Princess of Mars, The Warlords of Mars, and so on. They were, needless to say, about Mars. But they were not about our Mars--the Mars revealed by Mariner 9.

At least I don't think our Mars is like the Mars of these novels by Edgar Rice Burroughs, the inventor of Tarzan. His Mars has Percival Lowell's Mars--a planet of ancient sea bottoms, working canals and pumping stations, six-legged beasts of burden, and men (some headless) of all colors, including green. hey had names like Tars Tarkas. Possibly the most remarkable hypothesis proposed by Burroughs in these novels was that human beings and inhabitants of Mars could produce live offspring--a biologically impossible proposition if the Martians and we are imagined as having separate biological origins. "

science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 1973 Sagan, Carl. Cosmic Connection: An Extraterrestrial Perspective. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2000; c. 1973); pg. 102. "Burroughs wrote decorously of the infertility of a Virginian miraculously transported to Mars and Dejah Thoris, the princess of a kingdom with the improbable name of Helium. I have little doubt that the precedent of a kingdom called Helium led directly to the planet called Krypton home of the comic-book hero Superman. There is here a rich vein of untapped literary lore. The future may hold planets, stars, or even entire galaxies named Neon, Argon, Xenon, and Radon--the remaining noble gases.

But the name invented by Burroughs that has haunted me across the years is the name he imagined the Martians gave to Mars: Barsoom. And it was one phrase of his more than any other that captured my imagination: 'The hurtling moons of Barsoom.' " [More.]

science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 1980 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Miracle Monday. New York: Warner Books (1981); pg. 54. [Listing people and their hobbies.] "Lord Greystoke [Tarzan] learned languages, human and otherwise. "
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 1984 Farmer, Philip Jose. "A Scarletin Study " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 190. "Its canvas bears, among other things, the images of Sherlock Holmes, Christ coming from the tomb, Tarzan, a waistcoat, the Wizard of Oz in a balloon... "
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 1992 Snodgrass, Melinda M. Wild Cards X: Double Solitaire. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 82. "'Oh, come on, man. You want it so bad. This is it, Burroughs and Clarke, 'Doc' Smith, remember like we talked that night . . . The Lensmen?' "
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 1996 Bradbury, Ray. "Exchange " in Quicker Than the Eye. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 214. "'Tarzan of the Apes. You borrowed it . . .'

'Three dozen times! John Carter, Warlord of Mars, four dozen...' "

science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 1996 Bradbury, Ray. "That Woman on the Lawn " in Quicker Than the Eye. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 92. "'...When I was twelve I read Burroughs' Mars novels. John Carter used to stand under the stars, hold up his arms to Mars, and ask to be taken. And Mars grabbed his soul, yanked him like an aching tooth across space, and landed him in dead Martian seas. That's boys, that's men.' "
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 1997 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 427. "One young man a few dozen feet above Edward had enough energy to beat his chest and let loose a Tarzan cry of dominance. Then he grinned foolishly and waved.

'Me Jane, him nuts,' Betsy commented. "

science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 1997 Ing, Dean. Flying to Pieces. New York: Tom Doherty Associates (1997); pg. 52. "'...I, for one, need to get in shape if we're to be Tarzanning about on jungle vines, ducking natives who want our heads on poles.' "
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 109. Tarzan
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 239. [Footnotes] "12. In this regard, I cannot resist passing along a perhaps apocryphal tale concerning the creator of Tarzan and John Carter. In Burrough's sunset years, the woman who had for many years known herself to be the designated heir of his considerable estate made the mistake of referring to his fictions as escapist nonsense, supposing that he regarded them in the same light. He did not, and she was cut out of his will. Burroughs believed in his wish-fulfilling tales as fervently as Card believes in his. It is the secret of their success. "
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 2002 Bear, Greg. Vitalis. New York: Ballantine (2002); pg. 204. "He had written and directed three: White Lion, about a software engineer who imagines he's Tarzan... "
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 2008 McDonald, Ian. Evolution's Shore. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1995); pg. 236. "Beyond the discontinuity the terrain changes as abruptly as those old Tarzan movies where Johnny Weissmuller runs from Sahara sand straight into tropical jungle. "
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 73. "When he was a boy, Don Merriam had read The Gods of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs. In that romance of science fantasy, John Carter, greatest swordsman of two planets, had escaped with his comrades from the vast, volcanic subterranean cavern-world of the Black Pirates of Barsoom and their hideous Issus-cult by racing a Martian flyer straight up the miles-long narrow shaft leading to the outer world, instead of rising slowing and cautiously by the bouyancy of the flyer's ray tanks. The latter had been the normal and only sane course, but John Carter had been found salvation for himself and his companions in sheer blinding speed, steering vertically for a star visible at the top of the well-like shaft. "
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 73. "...The Gods of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs... Perhaps the Gods of Mars were the arbiters of all Don Merriam's actions at this point. At any rate, he suddenly felt around him... the ghostly presences, in their jeweled harness, of Xodar the Black renegade, Cathoris the mysterious Red Martian, Matai Shang the sinister Father of Holy Therns, and his brave, beautiful, lovestruck, infinitely treacherous daughter Phaidor. "
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 2025 Varley, John. Titan. New York: Berkley (4th ed. 1981; 1st pub. 1979); pg. 76. "There was an astonishing amount of freedom in climbing a tree with no clothes on. Her nudity, until now, had been a nuisance and a a danger. Now she loved it. She felt the rough texture of the tree under her toes, and the supple flex in the tree limbs. She wanted to yodel like Tarzan. "
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 2050 Soukup, Martha. "Living in the Jungle " in Writers of the Future: Volume III (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 72. [Year estimated.] "I don't know where I got it from--maybe an old Tarzan sound track--but the noise was the best part of the image. "
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 2106 May, Julian. The Many Colored Land in The Many-Colored Land & The Golden Torc (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1981); pg. 58. "...the travelers... As was to be expected, many of the applicants were narcissistic and addicted to fantasy. These people were apt to appear at the auberge in the guise of Tarzan or Crusoe or Pocahantas or Rima, or else costumed as throwbacks to every conceivable Old World era and culture...'
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 2160 Clarke, Arthur C. The Fountains of Paradise. New York: Ballantine (1980; 1st ed. 1978); pg. 295. "There seemed to be a continuous spectrum between absolute fantasy and hard historical facts, with every possible gradation between... At the other extreme were Zeus and Alice and King Kong and Gulliver and Siegfried and Merlin, who could not possibly have existed in the real world. But what was one to make of Robin Hood and Tarzan and Christ and Sherlock Holmes and Odysseus and Frankenstein? Allowing for a certain amount of exaggeration, they might well have been actual historic personages. "
science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 2166 Farmer, Philip Jose. "Riders of the Purple Wage " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1967); pg. 636. "'I call this The Pellucidar Breakthrough. Pellucidar is the hollow interior of our planet, as depicted in a now forgotten fantasy-romance of the twentieth-century Edgar Rice Burroughs, creator of the immortal Tarzan.'

Ruskinson moans and feels faint again. 'Pellucid! Pellucidar! Luscus, you punning exhumist bastard!'

'Burroughs' hero penetrated the crust of the Earth to discover another world inside. This was, in some ways, the reverse of the exterior, continents where the surface seas are, and vice versa. Just so, Winnegan has discovered an inner world, the obverse of the public image Everyman projects. And like Burroughs' hero, he has returned with a stunning narrative of psychic danger and exploitation.

'And just as the fictional hero found his Pellucidar to be populated with stone-age men and dinosaurs, so Winnegan's world is, though absolutely modern in one sense, archaic in another...' " [Many uses in story of the word 'Pellucid' and 'Pellucidar']

science fiction - Edgar Rice Burroughs world 2182 Cowper, Richard. "Out There Where the Big Ships Go " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 119. "He sat down... then flipped open the back of the cabinet and ran his eye down the familiar index. Nelson, Camelot, Kennedy, Pasteur, Alan Quartermain, Huck Finn, Tarzan, Frodo, Titus Groan... "
science fiction - fairy tales Africa 2008 McDonald, Ian. Evolution's Shore. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1995); pg. 61. Pied Piper
science fiction - fairy tales Arizona 1987 Murphy, Pat. "Rachel in Love " in Future on Fire (Orson Scott Card, ed.) New York: Tor (1991; story copyright 1986); pg. 40. "The rain lets up. The clouds rise like fairy castles in the distance and the rising sun tints them pink and gold and gives them flaming red banners. Rachel remembers when she was young and Aaron read her the story of Pinocchio, the little puppet who wanted to be a real boy. At the end of his adventures, Pinocchio, who has been brave and kind, gets his wish. He becomes a real boy. "
science fiction - fairy tales Australia 2025 Egan, Greg. "Cocoon " in Isaac Asimov's Detectives (Gardner Dozois and Sheila Williams, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1994); pg. 74. Humpty Dumpty
science fiction - fairy tales Brazil 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 81. [Sister Carlotta jokes with Bean.] "'You are an arrogant impossible boy.'

'But Geppetta, I'm not a real boy.'

'You're certainly not a puppet, or not my puppet, anyway. Go outside and play now, I'm busy.' "

science fiction - fairy tales California 1967 Koontz, Dean R. Lightning. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1988); pg. 66. "Gad, I've got the lead in Cinderella! "
science fiction - fairy tales California 1971 Matheson, Richard. Bid Time Return. New York: Viking Press (1975); pg. 32. [Character is reading books about 'Elise McKenna', i.e. Latter-day Saint actress Maude Adams.] "Then came 1897 and the critics as well as the public enveloping her in what O'Neil describes as 'an endless embrace.'

Barrie adapted his novel The Little Minister for her. Later, he wrote Quality Street for her, then Peter Pan, then What Every Woman Knows, then A Kiss for Cinderella. " [The play A Kiss for Cinderella also mentioned pg. 46.]

science fiction - fairy tales California 1989 Koontz, Dean R. Lightning. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1988); pg. 266. Rumplestiltskin
science fiction - fairy tales California: Los Angeles 1993 Shiner, Lewis. Glimpses. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 167. "'Career women, intellectuals. It's like this Cinderella Complex thing. No matter how great your career, no matter what degree you have or how great a physical shape you're in, women in our culture are brought up to believe they're nothing without a . . . a Grand Passion.' "
science fiction - fairy tales California: Los Angeles 2023 Platt, Charles. The Silicon Man. Houston, TX: Tafford Pub. (1993); pg. 85. The Three Bears; Little Red Riding Hood
science fiction - fairy tales California: Los Angeles 2048 Bear, Greg. Queen of Angels. New York: Warner Books (1994; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 163. "to put Humpty Dumpty back together again "
science fiction - fairy tales California: San Francisco 1906 Baker, Kage. "Son Observe the Time " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 583. Pg. 583: "CHILDREN!
Come see the Grand Fairy Extravaganza BABES IN TOYLAND
Music by Victor Herbert
Book by Glen MacDonough
...Biggest Musical Production San Francisco Has Seen In Years! " [Many other refs. to Toyland in story.];

Pg. 584: "Mother Goose... Tom the Piper's Son, Bo Peep, Contrary Mary, and Red Riding Hood " [More here, and elsewhere in story.]

science fiction - fairy tales California: San Francisco 1977 Leiber, Fritz. Our Lady of Darkness. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1977); pg. 87. Pied Piper
science fiction - fairy tales California: San Francisco 1991 Blaylock, James P. The Paper Grail. New York: Ace Books (1991); pg. 31. Pg. 31, 36-38, 47, 70: Humpty Dumpty [More elsewhere]
science fiction - fairy tales Canada 2000 Quan, Andy. "Hair " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000); pg. 312. Rapunzel
science fiction - fairy tales Deep Space 9 2370 ab Hugh, Dafydd. Fallen Heroes (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1994); pg. 191. "'Up,' demanded Molly... She stared solemnly at Quark. 'Gaijin.' she declared, nodding.

'No,' said Jake, 'that's Uncle Quark. He's Nog's uncle, too.'

'Gaijin. He's an old gnome, like Rumplestiltskin.'

"

science fiction - fairy tales Deep Space 9 2370 Cox, Greg & John Gregory Betancourt. Devil in the Sky (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 121. "Like the an [sic] inhuman Pied Piper, or the legendary Marching Goddess of Daffodon IX, Odo led the Hortas back toward the habitat ring. "
science fiction - fairy tales Deep Space 9 2370 Friesner, Esther. Warchild (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1994); pg. 53. "'...sending the children some additional supplies. Staples, yes, but something extra, something special: Books. Stories. Fairy tales.' He looked at Kira. 'Do you have anything like fairy tales on Bajor?'

...'I know what you're talking about... I dropped by the school a few times and overheard Keiko... reading to a group of the younger children. It was a story about a poor girl who was given many gifts by a woman even more powerful than the Kai, including a pair of glass shoes. When she lost one of them, she had to get married.'

'That's definitely a new way of looking at 'Cinderella,' Major.' Sisko was amused.

'My mother used to tell me stories like that, especially nights when I was too hungry to sleep...' " [More.]

science fiction - fairy tales Europe 1897 Stoker, Bram. Dracula. New York: Bantam (1981; c. 1897); pg. 360. "'...Nay, like the 'Ugly Duck' of my friend Hans Andersen, he be no duck-thought at all, but a big swan-thought that sail nobly on big wings, when the time come for him to try them...' "
science fiction - fairy tales France: Paris 1738 Suskind, Patrick. Perfume: The Story of a Murderer. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1986; c. 1985); pg. 24. "...on the cord of wood like a wooden puppet, like Pinocchio, as if dead, until after a long while, perhaps a half hour or more, he gagged up the word 'wood.' "
science fiction - fairy tales galaxy 2200 Silverberg, Robert. Starborne. New York: Bantam (1997; co. 1996); pg. 145. "The people of Earth are accustomed to success. For them, he thinks, this voyage is a sort of fairy-tale adventure, and fairy tales are supposed to have benign outcomes, even though the occasional wicked witch may be met with along the way. "
science fiction - fairy tales galaxy 2268 Gilden, Mel. The Starship Trap (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 22. "'Captain, I know of no Earth proverb concerning the dropping of houses.'

Kirk smiled and said, 'Tell him, Uhura.'

'It's not a proverb, Mr. Spock. The captain was referring to a classic children's novel called The Wizard of Oz. In it the heroine arrives in a fantasy world aboard her farmhouse, which falls out of the sky onto a wicket witch.'

'Fascinating,' Spock said with amazement.

'I believe it is based on a Russian fairy tale,' Chekov said thoughtfully. 'It concerns a tractor falling out of the sky onto an evil commisar.' "

science fiction - fairy tales galaxy 2365 Lorrah, Jean. Metamorphosis (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1990); pg. 137. "'Where did we first meet?'

'On the Enterprise holodeck.'

'What song were you singing?'

'I was not singing; I was trying to whistle 'Pop Goes the Weasel.' '

'You told me about wanting to be human. What did I say?' Riker said.

Human or android, Data would never forget his feelings when he accessed the reference. 'You said, 'Nice to meet you, Pinocchio,' and I knew that I had been right to tell you. You understood then. Please understand now.'

Riker stared at him a moment longer. Then he said, 'Captain, I can't imagine how it could be done . . . but it appears our Pinocchio has become a real, live boy.'

'Or someone,' Worf growled, 'has accessed all of Data's memory banks.'

'No,' Troi said. 'This is definitely an organic being. It would not be possible to transfer an android's entire memory into an organic brain.' "

science fiction - fairy tales galaxy 2366 Gilden, Mel. Boogeymen (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1991); pg. 7. "Data was an android, but he had been around humans for so long he could not help acquiring their habits. As a matter of fact, he worked hard at learning them. Like Pinocchio, Data wanted to be a real boy. "
science fiction - fairy tales galaxy 2368 David, Peter. Once Burned (Star Trek: New Frontier; "The Captain's Table " Book 5 of 6). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 198. "James Kirk wrote an autobiography, you know. Much of it was dismissed by critics as a collection of tall tales. Some believed that Kirk had a penchant for exaggerating. Outrageous stories of planets of sorcery, or confrontations with Greek gods or Abraham Lincoln, or the removal of his first officer's brain... Many felt that the reason Kirk's legend w so phenomenal was that he himself took great pains to build it. Some referred to him as the Baron Munchausen of space, and the fact that his friends and officers backed him up was written off as simple personal loyalty.

I never believed that... Because space is vast and unknowable... "

science fiction - fairy tales galaxy 2368 Ferguson, Brad. The Last Stand (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 124. [1] "'...I recall especially well their story of how Pinocchio's nose grew during his time inside the whale.'

Both Troi and Worf nodded. It was helpful that both of them had been raised by at least one Earth parent, and so each had a working knowledge of some of that faraway world's most celebrated myths and legends.

'Yes,' Troi said. 'It grew quite long, didn't it?'

Worf nodded. 'It had been given many reasons to do so.' The Klingon thought hard for a moment. 'Do you believe that Pinocchio had a taste for missionary stew? he asked after a moment.

Picard thought about it. 'No, I don't think so, Mr. Worf--at least, not as an appetizer. As I understood it, Pinocchio was quite a player of the game of cat and mouse.'

'Pinocchio had friends, though,' Worf said.

'Yes, and Aladdin needed exactly that kind of friend to patrol his harem, too,' Troi said with a studied contempt. 'Pinocchio called all the shots, believe me.' "

science fiction - fairy tales galaxy 2368 Ferguson, Brad. The Last Stand (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 125. [2] "'I wonder whatever happened to Gapetto,' Picard said. 'I wish they'd told us that part of the story.'

'It would be useful to know,' Troi agreed. 'John Wilkes Booth at the theater, perhaps--or maybe Hirohito in his bedchamber.'

'Snow White and the apple,' Picard put in. 'Just as feeling.'

'I think that was the way it worked,' Worf confirmed. 'That seemed to me to be the way Pinocchio went about things.'...

...Presider Hek and Drappa were listening closely to the conversation between Picard, Troi, and Worf.

'What is this gibberish?' Hek fumed. 'Pinocchio? What in hull is a Pinocchio? Aren't these people ever going to talk about anything important?'

'...they've assumed they're being monitored and are speaking in a kind of code.'

'Fine, then. Break it.'

'....we're trying... best cryptographers are already working on it--but they have no chance of success... The code clearly depends on cultural references with which we are not familiar--' "

science fiction - fairy tales galaxy 2373 David, Peter. Into the Void in Star Trek: New Frontier (omnibus). New York: Pocket Books (1998; c. 1997); pg. 44. "'...to employ a sort of reverse psychology. Like in the old Earth story you once mentioned to me, about the rabbit begging not to be thrown into the briar patch, he figured that by telling me not to use you, I would then turn around and do so.' " [Brer Rabbit]
science fiction - fairy tales galaxy 2373 Golden, Christie. Marooned (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 68. "'I get it,' said Paris. 'Hansel and Gretel and the trail of breadcrumbs.'

'Precisely,' smiled Janeway. Tuvok looked from one to the other of them impassively.

'There are times when I truly to not understand human behavior,' said Tuvok. "



science fiction - fairy tales, continued

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