Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to science fiction - Asimov, USA

science fiction - Asimov, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
science fiction - Asimov USA 1982 Straub, Peter. Koko. New York: E. P. Dutton (1988); pg. 479. "The shelves provided a graph of his reading--from Grimm's Fairy Tales and Babar to Robert Heinlein and Isaac Asimov. "
science fiction - Asimov USA 1990 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 2. "...sci-fi authors Arthur C. Clarke, Ray Bradbury, and Isaac Asimov, and singer John Denver. "
science fiction - Asimov USA 2040 Dick, Philip K. "Orpheus with Clay Feet " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1963); pg. 293. "'When I was in college... getting my M.A. in English lit, I had to read a god deal of twentieth century science fiction, of course. Of the greats there were three writers who stood out. The first was Robert Heinlein with his future history. The second, Isaac Asimov with his Foundation epic series. And-- The man I did my paper on. Jack Dowland...' "
science fiction - Asimov Utah 2051 Rucker, Rudy. Freeware. New York: Avon (1998; c. 1997); pg. 33. "Dr. Pride left Randy alone with the Heritage House uvvy, and Randy logged into the Council's central machine, a huge asimov slave computer located under a mountain Salt Lake City, Utah, just like the Mormons' genealogy computer. "
science fiction - Asimov Utah 2051 Rucker, Rudy. Freeware. New York: Avon (1998; c. 1997); pg. 104. "'I'm not a Heritagist, Randy Karl,' said Jenny. 'I'm a software simmie created for a certain loonie moldie who's also called Jenny. For fast Earth contact, I need to live down here on a serious machine. So I'm working for the Heritagists just to like pay the rent for my space on their machine. I'm living on the Heritagists' big underground asimov computer in Salt Lake City--but, um, Randy I could move? With a client like you, I could be a freelance agent for both you and moldie Jenny from the Moon. I could buy myself a proprietary hardware node in Studio City.' " [Other refs. to 'asimov computers', not in DB., e.g., pg. 105, 108.]
science fiction - Asimov Washington, D.C. 1998 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 20. "That sent him straight to his elementary school library, where he discovered, tucked in among more conventional fare like The Wind in the Willows and Johnny Tremain, a half dozen lesser-known books: Rocket Ship Galileo, Attack from Atlantis, Islands in the Sky, and the Lucky Starr series by someone named Paul French [a pseudonym for Asimov]. He read everything in a few weeks, then reread them a couple of more times, before finally bicycling to a nearby branch library, where he found more sophisticated fare: I, Robot [written by Asimov], Double Star, Needle in a Timestack, Way Station, and other classics of the genre. "
science fiction - Asimov Washington, D.C. 1998 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 22. "It didn't take very long--only a couple of dozen reject slips, garnered not only from Analog but also Asimov's, Omni, and F&SF--for him to realize that... he had no talent for creating [science fiction]. "
science fiction - Asimov Washington, D.C. 2314 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 66. "hadn't this sort of thing happened once before?

Yes, it had. back in 1944, at the height of World War II, when a writer . . . who was it again? Digging at his memory, Murphy absently snapped his fingers. Heinlein? Asimov? Maybe Hal Clement or Jack Williamson . . .?

No. Now he remembered. It was Cleve Cartmell... "

science fiction - Asimov world 1959 Campbell, Jr., John W. "'What Do You Mean . . . Human?' " in Analog: Readers' Choice: Vol. 2 (Stanley Schmidt, ed.) New York: David Publications (1981; story copyright 1959); pg. 171. "Science fiction, however, by its very existence, has been asking one question that belongs in the 'Let's agree not to discuss it at all' category--of course, simply by implication, but nevertheless very persistently. To wit: 'What do you mean by the term 'human being'?'... The point that science fiction has elided very deftly is . . . how do you tell a robot what a human being is?... How am I, Robot, to distinguish between the following entities: 1. A human idiot. 2. Another robot. 3. A baby. 4. A chimpanzee. " [Other refs. not in DB. Story refers to Isaac Asimov's Three Laws of Robotics.]
science fiction - Asimov world 1979 Card, Orson Scott. A Planet Called Treason. New York: St. Martin's Press (1979); pg. -7. [Author's dedication.] "To
MaryJo, who turned me onto Bradbury,
Laura Dene, who loaned me the Foundation Trilogy... " [written by Asimov]
science fiction - Asimov world 1992 Snodgrass, Melinda M. Wild Cards X: Double Solitaire. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 107. "'I read them all . . . Clarke, Asimov, 'Doc' Smith...' "
science fiction - Asimov world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 34. "The figure of the robot run amok... a figure made memorable in Arthur Clarke's 2001 and Isaac Asimov's I, Robot stories... " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
science fiction - Asimov world 2008 McDonald, Ian. Evolution's Shore. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1995); pg. 114. Pg. 114: "He looked like the photographs of that old science-fiction writer her dad had liked: Isaac Asimov. Gaby had never been able to read more than ten pages of his stuff. "; Pg. 363: "'Launcher separation successful,' the man with the ear radio said. 'Isaac Asimov is climbing into transfer orbit...' "
science fiction - Asimov world 2012 Clarke, Arthur C. The Ghost from the Grand Banks. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 21. "Edith Craig belonged to the small pantheon of famous women programmers that began with Byron's tragic daughter Ada, Lady Lovelace, continued through Rear Admiral grace Hopper, and culminated with Dr. Susan Calvin. " [Susan Calvin is a character from Asimov's robot stories.]
science fiction - Asimov world 2500 Philbrick, Rodman. "The Last Book in the Universe " in Tomorrowland: 10 Stories About the Future (Michael Cart, ed.) New York: Scholastic Press (1999); pg. 22. [Author's Note] "After all, I came of age reading authors like Ray Bradbury, Isaac Asimov, and Ursula Le Guin... "
science fiction - Asimov world 3001 Clarke, Arthur C. 3001: The Final Odyssey. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 218. "In the battle of wits between man (seldom woman, despite such role models as Lady Ada Lovelace, Admiral Grace Hopper, and Dr. Susan Calvin) and machine, the machine almost invariably lost. " [Dr. Susan Calvin is a character from Asimov's robot stories.]
science fiction - Bradbury Africa 2008 McDonald, Ian. Evolution's Shore. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1995); pg. 71. "Among Gaby's father's library of home-videoed old movies was a tape of The Illustrated Man. Five hours a day it had taken to make Rod Steiger up for the role. The most complex skin job in cinema history, but the effect had been breathtaking. "
science fiction - Bradbury California 1972 Dick, Philip K. The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1972); pg. 17. Pg. 17: "Frank Herbet, Poul Anderson, Harlan Ellison, Ray Bradbury. Bob Silverberg... "; Pg. 72: Ray Bradbury
science fiction - Bradbury California 1980 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Miracle Monday. New York: Warner Books (1981); pg. 91. [1] "The Magic Castle was a private club in Hollywood... The doorman was not unaccustomed to people in capes and odd costumes and simply did not believe the man was who he claimed to be. For a moment Superman considered telling the man the contents of his wallet, but he saw a friend inside who turned out to be a member of the club.

'Ray!' Superman called. 'Ray, do you care to rescue this gentleman from an unforgivable invasion of his privacy?'

Year ago, when he was fifteen years old, Clark Kent had read The Martian Chronicles. Clark was so impressed that Superboy flew off that afternoon to meet Ray Bradbury, the man who had written the book. What Superboy found was a man who had never flown in an airplane, who wrote stories about rocket ships, a Californian who did not know how to drive a car, a man relatively unconcerned with politics who was, at least that day, obsessed with the idea of convincing Walt Disney to run for mayor of Los Angeles. "

science fiction - Bradbury California 1980 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Miracle Monday. New York: Warner Books (1981); pg. 92. [2] "Bradbury had a lifetime pass to Disneyland, which was where he and Superboy spent the rest of the day. Superboy had never been there before, and no one there believed he was really Superboy anyway. Children were more interested in getting an autograph of Mickey Mouse, and adults were confused by his presence since they thought that only Walt Disney characters paraded through these streets in costume.

Bradbury's wife drove them to the amusement park in Anaheim. Bradbury utterly refused to allow the boy to fly him there, and neither of them had a driver's license. Walt Disney, whom Superboy and Ray Bradbury found in his secret apartment overlooking the main entrance of Disneyland, again refused to run for mayor, but had his chauffeur drive the novelist home. Superboy flew back to the Smallville Public Library and read everything that Bradbury had ever had published. " [Present day is 1980, the story here is a flashback to when Clark Kent/Superman was 15 years old.]

science fiction - Bradbury California 1980 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Miracle Monday. New York: Warner Books (1981); pg. 92. [3] "'Hey Supes,' Bradbury called from the vestibule of the Magic Castle, 'is that the real you? What do Walt Disney and John C. Fremont have in common?'

'Neither of them ever ran for mayor of Los Angeles,' Superman responded.

'It is you,' and Bradbury told the gatekeeper to let the costumed man in as his guest. 'It's not really him,' the storyteller whispered to the doorman, 'but you know how these method actors are.' He pointed to his head and turned back to the hero. 'we're late, Supes. There's this great mentalist act going on in the main hall. Ever hear of a guy named Max Maven?' "

science fiction - Bradbury galaxy 2371 Taylor, Jeri. Pathways (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1999; c. 1998); pg. 273. "The Starfleet ship hailed him.

'U.S.S. Bradbury to unidentified shuttle. Please respond... U.S.S. Bradbury to unidentified shuttle. Respond or we will take you in tow.'

...He punched a control to open the comm, carving his mind into halves as he spoke to the Bradbury while simultaneously entering a complex series of instructions into his console.

...'Sorry, my comm system is malfunctioning... Could you repeat?'

'This is the U.S.S. Bradbury. State your purpose in this space.' " [More about this ship, pg. 274-275.]

science fiction - Bradbury Iowa 1760 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 33. "In 1970, Ralph Gershon was twenty-five years old. He had grown up on a farm in Iowa, surrounded by near poverty and toil, dreaming of flight. As a kid he'd gone to Mars with Weinbaum and Clarke and Burroughs and Bradbury... "
science fiction - Bradbury Mars 2110 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 129. "'You remember that Bradbury story we looked up--the one where those barbarians from Earth used the beautiful crystal cities for target practice?'

'Of course. 'And the Moon be still as bright.' I couldn't help noticing that he set it in 2001. A little too optimistic, wasn't he?' "

science fiction - Bradbury Mars 2110 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 74. "...finding names for... new formations [on Mars]... Next came authors who had been associated with the planet--Wells, Burroughs, Weinbaum, Heinlein, Bradbury. And then... "
science fiction - Bradbury Mars 2200 Hawke, Simon. The Whims of Creation. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 3. "...guided the ship toward Mars. As it passed the red planet... It was minus 20F on a late summer afternoon in Bradbury City, near Solic Lacus... "
science fiction - Bradbury Mars 2323 Strickland, Brad & Barbara Strickland. Nova Command (Star Trek: TNG: Starfleet Academy). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 45. "The teams would be flown from the Academy to Bradbury Orbital Base, the Martian orbiting station where they would undergo a week of simulation training. " [Also pg. 78, 87.]
science fiction - Bradbury Mars 2372 Shimerman, Armin & David George. The 34th Rule (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 334. "At least, he [Sisko] had known that. Had known that, one day, he would have a house there and still be within the confines of the federation. Home had once been New Orleans and then San Francisco on Earth, and then Bradbury Township on Mars... "
science fiction - Bradbury Mars 2373 Mangels, Andy & Michael A. Martin. Rogue (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 157. Pg. 157: "Compared to the point-three-eight Earth-normal gravity he'd grown up with in Bradbury City... "; Pg. 356: "A leather-bound copy of The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury--the colony's namesake--was displayed proudly... " [More, pg. 351-360, where Picard visits Bradbury City.]
science fiction - Bradbury New York 2000 Roman, Steven A. X-Men/Doctor Doom: The Chaos Engine. New York: BP Books (2000); pg. 91. "Located in New York's Westchester County, about an hour's drive from Manhattan, Salem Center had always been a quiet, suburban village--the kind of place Norman Rockwell immortalized in paintings of small town America, and Ray Bradbury waxed poetic about in short stories that spoke of the magic of childhood, and the wonders that could be found right outside one's front door. "
science fiction - Bradbury New York: New York City 1976 Silverberg, Robert. Dying Inside. New York: Ballantine (1976; c. 1972); pg. 142. "...in the fantasies of Bradbury, Heinlein, Asimov, Sturgeon, Clarke. "
science fiction - Bradbury Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 16. "Lots of movies are made in Toronto, and, for some reason, an enormous number of science-fiction TV series, including over the years such fare as Gene Roddenberry's Earth: Final Conflict, Ray Bradbury Theater, and the revived Twilight Zone. "
science fiction - Bradbury USA 1964 Dick, Philip K. "Waterspider " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1964); pg. 222. "Ray Bradbury's first textbook to be serialized, he realized as he examined the journal. The Fisher of Men, it was called, and in I the great Los Angeles pre-cog had anticipated the ghastly Gutmanist political revolution which was to sweep the inner planets. Bradbury had warned against Gutman, but the warning had gone -- of course -- unheeded. Now Gutman was dead and the fanatical supporters had dwindled to the status of random terrorists. But had the world listened to Bradbury -- " [Also pg. 225.]
science fiction - Bradbury USA 1990 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 2. "...sci-fi authors Arthur C. Clarke, Ray Bradbury, and Isaac Asimov, and singer John Denver. "
science fiction - Bradbury USA 1991 McCammon, Robert R. Boy's Life. New York: Pocket Books (1992; c. 1991); pg. 497. "From Dad I received a paperback book. It was titled The Golden Apples of the Sun, by a writer named Ray Bradbury. 'You know, they sell books at Big Paul's, too,' Dad told me. 'Got a whole rack of 'em. This fella who works in the produce department says that Bradbury is a good writer. Says he's got that book himself and there're some fine stories in it.' "
science fiction - Bradbury USA 1993 Bova, Ben. "Conspiracy Theory " in Twice Seven. New York: Avon Books (1998; c. 1993); pg. 63. "'We even had one writer stumble onto the truth, back in the late forties. Someone named Burberry or Bradbury or something like that. We had o wipe his memory.'

'My god!'

'It wasn't entirely effective. We've learned how to do it better since then.' "

science fiction - Bradbury world 1979 Card, Orson Scott. A Planet Called Treason. New York: St. Martin's Press (1979); pg. -7. [Author's dedication.] "To
MaryJo, who turned me onto Bradbury,
Laura Dene, who loaned me the Foundation Trilogy... " [written by Asimov]
science fiction - Bradbury world 1997 Anthony, Patricia. Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997); pg. 247. [Introduction to "Guardian of Fireflies "] "When I was eight years old or so I remember being afraid to turn over in bed, lest I fall into some dreaded Other Dimension. This kind of stuff, plus the fiction of Ted Sturgeon and Ray Bradbury, marked me for life.

I know you'll ask, so I'll just say it straight out: I hated Heinlein. Yes. Even the juveniles. "

science fiction - Bradbury world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 81. Pg. 81: "Once again, it is Ray Bradbury (a lifelong child impersonator of a stature equal to that of Pee-Wee Herman) who created the defining image in his 1951 story from the Saturday Evening Post, 'The Fog Horn,' which became the film The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms (1953): a slumbering dinosaur, awakened by a nuclear blast... " [More on Bradbury, pg. 73, 78, 82, 98, elsewhere.]
science fiction - Bradbury world 2500 Philbrick, Rodman. "The Last Book in the Universe " in Tomorrowland: 10 Stories About the Future (Michael Cart, ed.) New York: Scholastic Press (1999); pg. 22. [Author's Note] "After all, I came of age reading authors like Ray Bradbury, Isaac Asimov, and Ursula Le Guin... "
science fiction - Dante Africa 2008 McDonald, Ian. Evolution's Shore. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1995); pg. 311. "You could drop all seven of Dante's circles of hell, and all other hells of the great hell describers, into that pit and never see them again. "
science fiction - Dante Alabama 1988 Simmons, Dan. "Vanni Fucci Is Alive and Well and Living in Hell " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1988); pg. 75. Pg. 75: "'Have you read the Comedy?' asked Vanni Fucci.

...'Comedy?' said Brother Freddy... "; Pg. 76: "'He called it his Comedy,' said Vanni Fucci. 'Later generations of sycophants added the Divine.' He frowned at Brother Freddy, an impatient teacher waiting for a slow child to respond.

'I'm sorry . . . I don't . . .' began Brother Freddy...

'Alighieri?' prompted Vanni Fucci. 'A dirty little Florentine who lusted after an eight-year-old girl? Wrote one readable thing in his entire miserable life?' He turned toward the guests on the divan. 'Come on, come on, don't any of you read?'

The five Christians on the couch seemed to shrink back.

'Dante!' shouted the handsome foreigner. 'Dante Alighieri. What's the deal here, gentleman? To join the Fundamentalists Club you have to park your brains at the door and stuff your skull your hominy and grits, is that it?'

'Just one minute . . .' said Brother Freddy, rising. "

science fiction - Dante Alabama 1988 Simmons, Dan. "Vanni Fucci Is Alive and Well and Living in Hell " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1988); pg. 77. "'Alighieri did it,' said Vanni Fucci... 'The man was a mental midget with the imagination of a moth, but he did it because no one before him did it.'

'Did what?' asked Brother Freddy...

'Created Hell,' said Vanni... 'Let me tell you about an experiment performed in 1982... at the University of Paris-South. A group of quantum physicists... tested the behavior of two photons... The conclusion drawn from this is obvious, is it not?... It confirms in the physical world what we in Hell have known for some time. Reality is shaped by the first great mind which focuses on measuring it. New concepts create new laws and the universe abides. Newton created universal gravity... And Dante Alighieri--that neurotic little...--created the first comprehensive map of hell and Hell came into existence to appease the public perception.' " [This is the main point of the story, that Dante created Hell. Many Dante refs. throughout story, other refs. not in DB.]

science fiction - Dante Alabama 1988 Simmons, Dan. "Vanni Fucci Is Alive and Well and Living in Hell " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1988); pg. 79. "'My crime was political,' said Vanni Fucci, 'even though that Short Eyes Florentine put me in the Bolgia reserved for thieves. Yes, yes, I know what I'm talking about. In those days the political battles between we Blacks and the dogspittle Whites were of great importance--a third of Dante's damned Inferno is filled with it--but I realize that today no one even knows what the parties were, any more than people seven hundred years from now will remember the Republicans or Democrats.

'In 1293 two friends and I stole the treasure of San Jacopo in the Duomo of San Zeno to help our political cause. The Duomo was a church. The treasure included a chalice. But I didn't go to Dante's Hell just because of one little robbery... No. I have prime billing in the Seventh Bolgia of the Eighth Circle because I was a Black and because Dante was a White and the unfairness of it all pisses me off.' "

science fiction - Dante California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 110. -
science fiction - Dante California 1975 Dick, Philip K. "Man, Android and Machine " in The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1975); pg. 208. "True orthogonal time is rotary, but on a vaster scale, much like the Great Year of the ancients; much, too, like Dante's idea of the time rate of eternity which you find expressed in his Comedy. "
science fiction - Dante California 1975 Dick, Philip K. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. New York: Timescape Books (1982); pg. 146. "And I am not much different, I realized; I, who graduated from the English Department at U.C. Berkeley--Tim and I are of a kind. Has it not been the final canto of Dante's Commedia that struck off my identity when I first read it that day when I was in school? Canto Thirty-three of Paradiso, for me the culmination, where Dante says:

'I beheld leaves within the unfathomed blaze
Into one volume bound by love, the same
That the universe holds scattered through its maze.
Substance and accidents, and their modes, became
As if fused together, all in such wise
That what I speak of is one simple flame.'
" [More, pg. 146-149, 189-190, 210, 242-243.]

science fiction - Dante California 1975 Dick, Philip K. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. New York: Timescape Books (1982); pg. 147. "I did not read Howard the Duck or The Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers or Snatch Comix that night; I read Dante's Commedia, from Inferno through Purgatorio... " [More.]
science fiction - Dante California 1981 Dick, Philip K. The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1981); pg. 237. "Also, these are the three realms or levels of Dante's Divine Comedy. Hell is machine thinking, a world of determinism; then... "
science fiction - Dante California 1993 Shiner, Lewis. Glimpses. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 266. "There was no wind or heat or shade. Just this rocky, vast plain. Like something out of the Inferno. "
science fiction - Dante California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 9. "The mantel over the fireplace was white now took, but the old black bust of Dante still stood on it, the only relic of his parents' previous taste in furnishings. Dante Allah Hairy, he used to think its name was.

Kootie leaned out of his chair and switched on the polelamp. Off to his left, his blue nylon knapsack was slumped against the front door, and ahead of him and above him Dante's eyes were gleaming like black olives. Kootie hiked himself out of the chair and crossed to the fireplace.

He knew that he wasn't allowed to touch the Dante. He had always known that, and the rule had never been a difficult one to obey. He was eleven now, and no longer imagined that the black-painted head and shoulders were just the visible top of a whole body concealed inside the brick fireplace-front--and he realized these days that the rustlings that woke him at night were nothing more than... and not the Dante whispering to itself all alone in the dark living room... "

science fiction - Dante California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 10. Pg. 10: "...but he wouldn't be committed to running away until he broke the bust of Dante.

Broke it and took away whatever might be inside it. He hoped he'd find gold--Krugerrands, say, or those little flat blocks like dominoes.

It occurred to him, now, that even if the bust was nothing but solid plaster all through, as useless as Greenstreet's black bird had turned out to be, he would still have to break it. The Dante was the . . . what, flag, emblem, totem pole of what his parents had all along been trying to make Kootie into. "

;Pg. 11: "...and at certain times of the year--Christmas, for example, and Halloween, which was only about a week away--his mother would knit little hats and collars for Dante. " [More about the bust of Dante in novel.]

science fiction - Dante California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996) [Book jacket:] "Young Koot Parganas is growing up in Los Angeles in the 1990s, but his parents won't let him do anything normal. His weirdo parents venerate the spirits of dead Mahatmas. At the age of eleven, Koot has disobeyed his parents, broken into a plaster bust of Dante, stolen a small glass vial concealed inside it, and set in motion events that will change his own life, and everyone else's.

For trapped in the vial was the preserved ghost of Thomas Alva Edison, and there is no telling what power the possession of that ghost could confer. "

science fiction - Dante California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 201. "'...A lot of drunks and bums used to come around demanding to talk to somebody named Dante or Don Tay.'

'That would have been the mask... They kept it in a hollowed-out copy of The Divine Comedy or something.' "

science fiction - Dante California: San Francisco 1977 Leiber, Fritz. Our Lady of Darkness. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1977); pg. 127. "...like something out of Dore's illustrations of Dante's Inferno. "
science fiction - Dante Colorado 1974 Disch, Thomas M. Camp Concentration. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1968); pg. 18. "...this circle of my new hell, the first circle, if I am to go through them in a proper, Dantean order--Limbo--and he, stretching the analogy a bit further, would be the Homer of this dark glade. "
science fiction - Dante Colorado 1974 Disch, Thomas M. Camp Concentration. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1968); pg. 77. "'The wages of sin is death, but death is likewise the wages of virtue. So you'll need a better bugaboo than that. Hell, perhaps? Why, this is hell, nor am I out of it! Dante has no frights for the inmates of Buchenwald...' " [Also pg. 149. Other refs. to Dante, not in DB.]
science fiction - Dante Europe 1478 C.E. Ford, John M. The Dragon Waiting. New York: Timescape Books (1983); pg. 96. "He always loved Dante's puns on Pluto's cave, and Plato's. " [More.]
science fiction - Dante Europe 1567 C.E. Dukthas, Ann. A Time for the Death of a King. New York: St. Martin's Press (1995; c. 1994); pg. 115. "Segalla had to steady himself in the saddle: the stench, the crowd, the brutal swiftness of the executions reminded him of scenes from Dante's Inferno. At last the punishments were ended. "
science fiction - Dante Europe 1855 Baxter, Stephen. Anti-ice. New York: HarperCollins (1993); pg. 22. "...the town--though wrecked--is a little less like a scene from the 'Divine Comedy,' and the harbor is beginning to function. "
science fiction - Dante France 1916 Simmons, Dan. "The Great Lover " in Lovedeath. New York: Warner Books (1993); pg. 219. "...through which I can see the Golden Virgin are the words 'PER ME SI VA NE LA CITTA DOLENTE, PER ME SI VA NE L'ETTERNO DOLORE, PER ME SI VA TRA LA PERDUTA GENTE.' Sister Paul Marie tells me that the nuns leave it there because the officer who scribbled it told them that it was a poem attesting to the gentleness of care at this place. Obviously none of the nuns known neither Italian nor their Dante.

The quote is from the Inferno, of course, and reads--'THROUGH ME THE WAY INTO THE SUFFERING CITY, THROUGH ME THE WAY TO THE ETERNAL PAIN, THROUGH ME THE WAY THAT RUNS AMONG THE LOST.' "

science fiction - Dante galaxy 2050 Blish, James. A Case of Conscience. New York: Ballantine (1979; c. 1958); pg. 64. "Neshek was the lending of money at interest, once a sin called usury, for which Dante had put men into Hell. And now here was Mike, not a Christian, arguing that money itself was a form of slavery. "
science fiction - Dante galaxy 2050 Blish, James. A Case of Conscience. New York: Ballantine (1979; c. 1958); pg. 170. "...was the face of the avenging, the jealous God--the God Who made hell before He made man, because He knew that He would have need of it. That terrible truth Dante had written down; and in the black face with the protruding tongue which rolled beside Ruiz-Sanchez' knee, he saw that Dante had been right, as every Catholic who reads the Divine Comedy knows in his heart of hearts. "
science fiction - Dante galaxy 2084 Disch, Thomas M. "Things Lost " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 593. "Then I must decide where to hang the Rauschenberg litho (Inferno, Canto XII)... "
science fiction - Dante galaxy 2300 Zelazny, Roger. "Angel, Dark Angel " in Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983; story c. 1967); pg. 188. [Year estimated.] "'...High at the top and somewhat to the left, the two figures ascending the ziggurat toward the rise are Dante and Virgil, the Classic and the Christian, joined together and departing the Middle Ages into a new freedom...' "


science fiction - Dante, continued

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