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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to science fiction - Arabian Nights, Washington, D.C.

science fiction - Arabian Nights, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
science fiction - Arabian Nights Washington, D.C. 2015 Bova, Ben. "Remember, Caesar " in Twice Seven. New York: Avon Books (1998; c. 1997); pg. 241. "And decked in the stealth suit, a cloak of invisibility, just like the magic of old Baghdad in the time of Scheherazade and the Thousand and One Nights. "
science fiction - Arabian Nights Washington: Seattle 1993 Busby, F. M. The Singularity Project. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 10. "'Somebody named Elihu Coogan is trying to sell Aladdin's lamp to Howard Hughes, junior...' " [Also, pg. 25, 226, 277.]
science fiction - Arabian Nights world 1944 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Striking the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1996); pg. 327. "Otto Skorzeny had a way of materializing out of thin air, like a genie from the Arabian Nights. "
science fiction - Arabian Nights world 1991 Anthony, Piers. Virtual Mode. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1991); pg. 24. "Colene had taken her mother's pills from cabinet, one sniff of which, as an Arabian Nights tale put it with suitable hyperbole, could make an elephant sleep from night to night. "
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 107. "A sufficiently advanced technology would seem to us to be a form of magic; Arthur C. Clarke has pointed that out. "
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke California 1975 Dick, Philip K. "Man, Android and Machine " in The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1975); pg. 213. "'I feel the dream, the dokos, lifting; I feel Maya dissolving: I am waking up, He is waking up: I am the Dreamer: we are all the Dreamer.' One thinks here of Arthur Clarke's Overmind. "
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke California: Orange County 2065 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Pacific Edge. New York: Tor (1990); pg. 148. "'Humanity lands on the fabled red planet, and we celebrate this feat by wandering in the dark like savages. It's 2001 run backwards. Ow!' "
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke California: Sacramento 1997 Burton, Levar. Aftermath. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. vii. Pg. vii: "AUTHOR'S NOTE

I'm a big fan of the science fiction genre... the masters in the field. Asimov, Clarke, Heinlein... "

science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke Deep Space 9 2370 Pedersen, Ted. Space Camp (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 49. "'There was a writer who lived in my country [Sri Lanka] several centuries ago,' Missy told him. 'His vision of space still survives, even if it is a bit technically out of date. His books inspired me to work on getting into Starfleet.'

'Arthur C. Clarke,' Jake said. 'I've read his books myself.' "

science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke Iowa 1760 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 33. "In 1970, Ralph Gershon was twenty-five years old. He had grown up on a farm in Iowa, surrounded by near poverty and toil, dreaming of flight. As a kid he'd gone to Mars with Weinbaum and Clarke and Burroughs and Bradbury... "
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke New Jersey 1974 Morrow, James. Only Begotten Daughter. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1990); pg. 36. Pg. 36: "'Not God God, I mean GOD God. The God beyond God.' Georgina splayed her fingers, ticking off her pantheon. 'The Spirit of Absolute Being, the World Mother, the Wisdom Goddess, the Overmind, the Primal Hermaphrodite.' "; Pg. 37: "Aberrant or not, this was the child that was his, no other, this one, whether she came from a cabbage patch, the Overmind, or the brow of Zeus. " [The 'Overmind' is apparently a reference to Clarke's novel Childhood's End]
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke New York: New York City 1969 Cox, Greg. Assignment: Eternity (novel excerpt) in Star Trek: Adventures in Time and Space (Mary P. Taylor, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 445. "How do you relate to a guy whose ancestors have been trained by aliens for six thousand years? 'Say, that 2001 film is still playing a few blocks away. I haven't seen it yet.' Had Seven... ever gone to the movies? She had no idea. 'Maybe we can hit a matinee sometime?' "
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke New York: New York City 1969 Cox, Greg. Assignment: Eternity (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 9. Pg. 9: "How do you relate to a guy whose ancestors have been trained by aliens for six thousand years? 'Say, that 2001 film is still playing a few blocks away. I haven't seen it yet.' Had Seven... ever gone to the movies? She had no idea. 'Maybe we can hit a matinee sometime?' ";

Pg. 275: "'A movie sounds great,' she enthused... 'But how 'bout we hit Funny Girl instead of 2001? After the trip we just took, I'm afraid it won't live up to the real thing!' "

science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke New York: New York City 1976 Silverberg, Robert. Dying Inside. New York: Ballantine (1976; c. 1972); pg. 142. "...in the fantasies of Bradbury, Heinlein, Asimov, Sturgeon, Clarke. "
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke New York: Westchester County 1986 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 36: "Subway to Salvation ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Feb. 1986); pg. 15. Pg. 14: Karma: "Sam, mon brave--what has happened to you both? "; Illyana: "Something--wonderful! "; Pg. 15: Sam/Cannonball: "Guys--In Mr. Arthur C. Clarke's novel Childhood's End, a race called the Overlords came to Earth to help humanity . . . Join with a universal consciousness named the Overmind. "; Illyana: "That's what the Beyonder wants. He's kind of like Overlord and Overmind combined. "; Danielle: "Whether we want to or not, huh? Nice guy. Well, the heck with him... "
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke Solar System 2200 Hawke, Simon. The Whims of Creation. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 2. "An astronaut's glove from one of the Gemini flights was still in orbit, tumbling from its original shove centuries before. The high Clarke orbits, the geosynchronous ellipses which Arthur C. Clarke envisioned long before the age of space began, were filled with communication and television relays, giant antennas for contacting distant probes, linking the cities on Mars and the stations near Jupiter and Saturn... "
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke United Kingdom 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 40. "'An audience beyond science books. Dabbling in science fiction.'

'Not dabbling. I've read science fiction since I was a lad in Somerset. Arthur Clarke was born in Somerset, you know...' "

science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke United Kingdom 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 14. "'...the collected works of H.G. Wells, Arthur C. Clarke, and Edgar Rice Burroughs?' "
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke United Kingdom: England 1615 Ramirez, Frank. "The Merchant of Stratford " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982; 1st pub 1979 in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine); pg. 296. "'...but let me see if there's something you... I remember now!' he brightened. 'See if you can find me that issue of Galaxy from the summer of 1973. I've been dying to read the end of that Clarke novel.'

'Who are all these people?'

'Science fiction writers,' he said with reverence. "

science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke USA 1963 Grimwood, Ken. Replay. New York: Arbor House (1986); pg. 130. "Even to Jeff's eyes it [Starsea, a non-existent movie which plays a significant role in the novel] was years ahead of its time in theme, look, special effects; like an undersea version of Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey, yet with the warmth and humanity of Truffaut at his best. " [More, pg. 155.]
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke USA 1967 Grimwood, Ken. Replay. New York: Arbor House (1986); pg. 72. "'You seen 2001 yet?'

'Yeah, but I didn't know what it was all about, and it was kind of draggy up to the end. I liked Petulia better; you know, with Julie Christie?' "

science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke USA 1978 Nurse, Patricia. "One Rejection Too Many " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982; 1st pub 1978 in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine); pg. 480-482. "Dear Miss Morrison:
   I am very confused by your letter. Who is Isaac Asimov? I have checked with several publishers and none of them has heard of Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, although the address on the envelope was correct for this magazine.
   However, I was very impressed with your story and will be pleased to submit it for our next issue. Seldom do we receive a story combining such virtues as a well-conceived plot, plenty of human interest, and a delightfully subtle brand of humor.

Yours truly,
George H. Scithers,
Editor,
Arthur C. Clarke's Science Fiction Magazine " [This entire story, two excerpts of which are in this DB, is told in letter form. Asimov repeatedly rejects successive revisions of the story submitted, and the time traveler changes history to eliminate Asimov, and get his story accepted by Clarke.]

science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke USA 1979 Vonnegut Jr., Kurt. "The Big Space F--- " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 246. "It was a rocket ship with eight-hundred pounds of freeze-dried... in its nose. It was going to be fired at the Andromeda Galaxy, two-million light years away. The ship was named the Arthur C. Clarke, in honor of a famous space pioneer. " [Also pg. 247-248, 250.]
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke USA 1989 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 154. "'for a literate man, Richard, you're incredibly poorly versed in the classics. You do remember Stanley Kubrick, don't you?'

'How could I forget him?' said Baedecker. 'You dragged me to see 2001: A Space Odyssey five times the year it was at the Cinerama theater in Houston.' It was not an exaggeration. Muldorff had been obsessed with the movie and had insisted on his crewmates repeatedly seeing it with him. Before their flight, Dave had talked enthusiastically about smuggling an inflatable black monolith along only to 'discover it' buried under the lunar surface during one of their EVAs. A shortage of inflatable black monoliths had frustrated their plan so Dave had contented himself with having Mission Control awaken them at the end of each sleep period by playing the opening chords of Also Sprach Zarathustra. Baedecker had thought it mildly amusing the first few times. "

science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke USA 1989 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 247. "The quickly changing lines of data reminded Baedecker of the Pan Am passenger shuttle with its flashing cockpit graphics in 2001: A Space Odyssey. Dave had insisted they see that movie a dozen times during the winter of 1968... " [More.]
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke USA 1990 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 2. "...sci-fi authors Arthur C. Clarke, Ray Bradbury, and Isaac Asimov, and singer John Denver. "
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke USA 1993 Bova, Ben. "Conspiracy Theory " in Twice Seven. New York: Avon Books (1998; c. 1993); pg. 59. "...Schmidt replied, 'I think it was Sherlock Holmes who pointed out that when you have eliminated all the possible answers, then the impossible answer is the correct one. Or was it Arthur C. Clarke?' "
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 80. "He stared at the headlines which were pinned to a cork-covered wall in his office... THE TRUTH ABOUT MARS: WHAT THE CIA DOESN'T WANT YOU TO KNOW, heralded another. A third revealed: '2001' MONOLITH MAY BE A REALITY, NEW LUNAR SURVEY SAYS--HOW MUCH DID AUTHOR CLARKE REALY KNOW? "
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 273. "'...And I'm gonna make a big comeback concert at midnight of January first, 2000.

'No, 2001,' Gallagher corrected. 'Remember, Elvis always opened his shows with the theme from the movie 2001. You know, bwam, bwam, bwaaaaah--'

Alan was unimpressed by Gallagher's singing. 'I never saw that show,' he said.

'Unimportant. Just remember 2001.'

'I started to watch it once, on HBO. I thought it was supposed to be about spaceships. It was about gorillas hitting each other with sticks.'

Gallagher rolled his eyes. 'Your phenomenal comeback tour is when?'

'Midnight, January first, 2001.' "

science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke Washington: Seattle 1993 Busby, F. M. The Singularity Project. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 49. "After dinner, Dauna and I ran into an old movie on cable, 2001, it was. She watched it; I kept going to sleep. That film certainly takes a long time to do not much of anything.

Pretty, though . . . "

science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke world 1973 Sagan, Carl. Cosmic Connection: An Extraterrestrial Perspective. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2000; c. 1973); pg. 66. Pg. 66: "As Arthur C. Clarke remarked, it is difficult to imagine even the most fervent of nationalists not reconsidering his views as he sees the Earth fade from a faint crescent to a tiny point of light, lost among millions of stars. "; Pg. 75: The enormous popularity of science and of such movies as 2001: A Space Odyssey is indicative of the unexplored scientific enthusiasm. "
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke world 1973 Sagan, Carl. Cosmic Connection: An Extraterrestrial Perspective. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2000; c. 1973); pg. 182. "My friend Arthur C. Clarke had a problem. He was writing a major motion picture with Stanley Kubrick of Dr. Strangelove fame. It was to be called Journey Beyond the Stars, and a small crisis in the story development had arisen... " [More about the development of 2001: A Space Odyssey, pg. 182-185.]
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke world 1976 Matheson, Richard. What Dreams May Come. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1978); pg. 75. "I sighed and looked around the room. It, too, looked completely real. I smiled, recalling the French Provincial room in Kubrick's 2001. Was I being held captive by some alien being? I had to chuckle at the thought. "
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke world 1978 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Last Son of Krypton. New York: Warner Books (1978); pg. 197. Pg. 197: "An idea in a fictional story by an astronomer named Arthur C. Clarke was not new. The concept of supplying oxygen to a spaceship with plants that breathed carbon dioxide and gave off oxygen was as old as the first fanciful plans for space stations and family-sized space arks. And when unimaginative little Arthur Allen wrote it down in one of his daily reports, Luthor winced at not having thought of it himself. "; Pg. 198: "It all came down to Arthur Clarke's idea of lining all unused surface space inside the bulb of the craft with green vegetation... "
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke world 1989 Anthony, Mark. "A Walk by Moonlight " in Writers of the Future: Volume V (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1989); pg. 281. "The skyscrapers of downtown were beginning to loom over him, onyx sentinels that kept making Nick think of the monolith in 2001... "
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke world 1992 Snodgrass, Melinda M. Wild Cards X: Double Solitaire. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 82. Pg. 82: "'Oh, come on, man. You want it so bad. This is it, Burroughs and Clarke, 'Doc' Smith, remember like we talked that night . . . The Lensmen?' "; Pg. 107: "'I read them all . . . Clarke, Asimov, 'Doc' Smith...' "
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke world 1995 Foster, Alan Dean. The Dig. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 245. "The resurrection was not a miracle, only a phenomenon so far beyond the ability of Earthly science as to seem like one, an in vivo validation of Clarke's law. " [Any technology sufficiently advanced is indistinguishable from magic.]
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 34. "The figure of the robot run amok... a figure made memorable in Arthur Clarke's 2001 and Isaac Asimov's I, Robot stories... " [Also pg. 68. Many other refs., not in DB.]
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 68. "This defining moment in the history of SF is not without precedent. Besides Madame Blavatsky's insistence on such a future evolutionary leap into the sublime, there is a more obvious precedent, found in Clarke's own novel of 1953, and his first enduring contribution to the genre, Childhood's End, at the conclusion of which the children of Earth 'evolve,' in one planet-annihilating blast of 'inconceivable metamorphosis,' and unite with the cosmic 'Overmind.' " [More.]
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke world 2000 Cox, Greg. X-Men & the Avengers: Gamma Quest: Book 3: Friend or Foe?. New York: Berkley Boulevard (2000); pg. 128. "The antiseptic white corridor, reminiscent of something from Kubrick's 2001, became a battleground. "
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke world 2008 McDonald, Ian. Evolution's Shore. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1995); pg. 214. Pg. 214: "It looked like three of those romantically impractical wheelie space stations from 2001 stacked on top of each other, turning slowly in dark green cyberspace. "; Pg. 367: "...and expedition team of Mission 88, the HORUS Arthur C. Clarke.' " [More about this spacecraft, pg. 367, 388.]
science fiction - Arthur C. Clarke world 2025 Varley, John. Titan. New York: Berkley (4th ed. 1981; 1st pub. 1979); pg. 15. "Ringmaster resembled another spaceship: the fictional Discovery, the Jupiter probe from the classic movie 2001: A Space Odyssey. It was not surprising that it should. Both ships had been designed from similar parameters, though one sailed only on celluloid. Cirocco was EVA to remove the last of the solar reflection panels which ... "
science fiction - Asimov Argo 2179 Sawyer, Robert J. Golden Fleece. New York: Time Warner (1990); pg. 172. "This had not occurred to me. Of course, a true Tenth Generation system such as myself does not want to die: Asimov's 'must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First and Second law,' and all that--not that my behavior is defined by anything as pedestrian as the Laws of Robotics. "
science fiction - Asimov California 2009 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 251. "As the show's theme song played, Miranda had a sudden thought and looked at the monitor of herself and tried to see what books were showing in the background. A Brief History of Time. Good. Wonderful Life. Appropriate. Origin of Species. Excellent. A tattered paperback copy of The Human Brain by Isaac Asimov, a book she had read a long time ago and that perhaps had gotten her started on this long trail. Chuck Amuck. Oops. So that's where that silly book wen . . . too late now. . . . "
science fiction - Asimov California: Sacramento 1997 Burton, Levar. Aftermath. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. vii. Pg. vii: "AUTHOR'S NOTE

I'm a big fan of the science fiction genre... the masters in the field. Asimov, Clarke, Heinlein... "

science fiction - Asimov Connecticut 1960 King, Stephen. Hearts in Atlantis. New York: Scribner (1999); pg. 65. "Bobby felt there were a billion science-fiction novels alone in the adult section that he wanted to read. Take Isaac Asimov, for instance. Under the name of Paul French, Mr. Asimov wrote science-fiction novels for kids about a space pilot named Lucky Starr, and they were pretty good. Under his own name he had written other novels, even better ones. At least three of them were about robots. Bobby loved robots. Bobby the Robot in Forbidden Planet was one of the all-time great movie characters, in his opinion... and Mr. Asimov's were almost as good. Bobby thought he would be spending a lot of time with them in the summer ahead. (Sully called this great writer Isaac Ass-Move, but of course Sully was almost totally ignorant about books.) "
science fiction - Asimov Darwath 1996 Hambly, Barbara. Mother of Winter. New York: Ballantine (1996); pg. 14. "'Asimov wrote a story like that,' she said.

' 'Nightfall.' ' Ingold paused to smile back at her. 'Yes.' "

science fiction - Asimov galaxy 2200 Hawke, Simon. The Whims of Creation. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 109. [Dr. Penelope Seldon: a significant character named in part after Hari Seldon of Foundation fame.] "'...Her primary specialty was Artificial Intelligence...' "
science fiction - Asimov galaxy 3000 Burkett Jr., William R. Blood Lines. New York: HarperCollins (1998); pg. 67. "...the ancient Japanese concept of the Zen robot? The sacred tool of civilization. The samurai's blade, the poet's quill. Of course you are much more. You are a sentient being--a consciousness. We modestly aspire here to one day raise our machines to that estate. In the endeavor, we adhere to Hasegawa's seven rules of robots, more complex and comprehensive than Asimov's three.' "
science fiction - Asimov Illinois 1940 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: In the Balance. New York: Ballantine (1994); pg. 12. "...who got out his Astounding and started to read. The newest Heinlein serial had ended the month before, but stories by Asimov, Robert Moore Williams, del Rey, Hubbard, and Clement were plenty to keep him entertained. "
science fiction - Asimov Japan 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 143. "But Aum does have a specific SF connection in the work of Isaac Asimov, whose Foundation series provided a crucial element of the Aum mythology. In Aum's version, Asahara takes on the role of Asimov's Hari Seldon, a genius who discovers the laws of 'psychohistory,' which predicts, infallibly, that 'interstellar wars will be endless. Interstellar trade will decay; population will decline; worlds will lose touch with the main body of the Galaxy.' The answer to this threat is a secret society of subsidiary geniuses to act as guardians of civilization's flame during the destined dark ages.

'The similarities [of Asimov's Foundation] to Aum and its guru's quest were remarkable,' note David Kaplan and Andrew Marshall, in an authoritative history of the cult. 'In an interview, Murai [one of Aum's inner circle] would state matter-of-factly that Aum was using the Foundation as the blueprint for the cult's long-term plans. " [More]

science fiction - Asimov Mars 2094 Sladek, John. Tik-Tok. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1985; 1st printed 1983); pg. 181-182. Pg. 181: "Here ends the manuscript of Tik-Tok's autobiography, published on teletext as Me, Robot. The following chapter appears only in later editions, published after 2094. "; pg. 182: "His laughter sounded like rapid snoring. 'No arguing with a best seller, Tik. And Me, Robot is not only selling well, it's hitting the public hard...

'A second factor is, as I mentioned already, the popular appeal of Me, Robot. You're a folk hero...' " [Fictional book named after Asimov's I, Robot]

science fiction - Asimov New York: New York City 1956 Knight, Damon. "A Likely Story " in The Best of Damon Knight. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976; c. 1956); pg. 219. Pg. 219: "He saw me and waved hello, and then went on talking to Asa Akimisov, Ph.D. (A-K-I-M-I-S-O-V, please and never mind the Akimesian, or Akimsiov.)... Akimisov got up on the platform, with his neck sticking out of his collar like a potted palm (he had lost forty pounds, again) and began telling jokes. Ace is the second funniest man in Medusa... Akimisov, who writes nothing but the most heavily thoughtful fiction in the business, bubbles with humor all the time, a poor man's Sam Levenson. ";

Pg. 220: "Akimisov, as m.c., delivered the final words. He bowed, straightened, and his pants fell down. " [More.]

science fiction - Asimov New York: New York City 1976 Silverberg, Robert. Dying Inside. New York: Ballantine (1976; c. 1972); pg. 142. "...in the fantasies of Bradbury, Heinlein, Asimov, Sturgeon, Clarke. "
science fiction - Asimov New York: New York City 1979 Asimov, Isaac. "The Backyard Look " in Isaac Asimov's Detectives (Gardner Dozois and Sheila Williams, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1979); pg. 167. [An self-referential passage.] Pg. 167: "'And what do you want to write?' said Halsted.

Peterborough hesitated and said, with a trace of defensiveness in his voice, 'Well, I've always been a science fiction fan. Since I was nine, anyway.'

'Oh, God,' muttered Rubin, his eyes rolling upward in mute appeal.

Gonzalo said instantly, 'Science fiction? That's what your friend Isaac Asimov writes, isn't it, Manny?'

'He's not my friend,' said Rubin. 'He clings to me out of helpless admiration.' ";

Pg. 168: "'...It seems that Lester del Rey--'

Rubin interrupted. 'Who?'

'Lester del Rey. He's a science fiction writer.'

'Another one of those?' said Rubin. 'Never heard of him.'

'Well, he's no Asimov,' admitted Peterborough, 'but he's all right. Anyway, the way he got started was once when he read a science fiction story and thought it was terrible. He said to his girl, 'Hell, I can write something better...' "

science fiction - Asimov North Carolina 1995 Lisle, Holly & Chris Guin. Mall, Mayhem and Magic. New York: Baen (1995); pg. 7. "...next to a signed and slipcased leather Asimov Forward the Foundation... "
science fiction - Asimov Pennsylvania 1970 Panshin, Alexei. "How Can We Sink When We Can Fly? " in Farewell To Yesterday's Tomorrow. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1975; c. 1971); pg. 111. "'Well,' said Rob. 'How badly are you stuck?'

'Stuck,' I said. 'I'm doing a story based on an idea of Isaac Asimov for an anthology of new stories.'

'You're a hack,' said Rob. 'You work for money.'

'Right,' I said. 'I work to live, and live to work. No, my problem is that I want to respect Asimov's idea without following it to the letter. I guess the problem is that I can't see any way to get from our now to his future. When I listen to the news, I wonder about any future at all. So I sit in front of the typewriter, but i don't write. I'll find the story, I'll see the way, but right now I'm still trying to find my beginning.'

'Don't brood about it,' said Leigh. 'Sit down and write it the simplest way.' Kind advice, because in spite of what Leigh may sometimes say about her own work, that's not the way she writes. " [Other refs. to trying to write an s.f. story, not in DB.]

science fiction - Asimov Pennsylvania 1970 Panshin, Alexei. "How Can We Sink When We Can Fly? " in Farewell To Yesterday's Tomorrow. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1975; c. 1971); pg. 113. "'...I pick one or the other up in the morning, read a paragraph or a page, and then I think about the [Isaac] Asimov story.'

'Oh, you lucky writers,' Leigh said. 'Your time is your own.'

Rob finally let me off the hook. 'Let me see what Asimov wrote when we get to your place. Maybe we can talk it out.' " [This story is about an author, Panshin himself, considering how to fulfill Isaac Asimov's request for a story for a new anthology. Other refs. to Asimov by name: pg. 118, 120.]

science fiction - Asimov Pennsylvania 1970 Panshin, Alexei. "How Can We Sink When We Can Fly? " in Farewell To Yesterday's Tomorrow. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1975; c. 1971); pg. 118. "I handed him the Asimov proposal. 'Here, read. This is the relevant part.' "
science fiction - Asimov United Kingdom: England 1615 Ramirez, Frank. "The Merchant of Stratford " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982; 1st pub 1979 in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine); pg. 296. "'And while you're at it send some Asimov too. Can't get enough through channels. I've got almost all of Heinlein's books...' "
science fiction - Asimov USA 1964 Dick, Philip K. "Waterspider " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1964); pg. 225. "'I wonder,' Gilly said, 'if Doctor Asimov is here.'

We can ask, Tozzo decided. He made his way over to one of the young women wearing a blond wig and green leotards. 'WHERE IS DOCTOR ASIMOV?' he asked clearly in the argot of the times... " [More refs. to Asimov. This story refers to him, as well as other major s.f. writers.]

science fiction - Asimov USA 1978 Nurse, Patricia. "One Rejection Too Many " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982; 1st pub 1978 in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine); pg. 480-482. "Dear Dr. Asimov:
   Imagine my delight when I spotted your new science fiction magazine on the newsstands. I have been a fan of yours for many, many year, and I naturally wasted no time in buying a copy. I wish you every success in the new venture.
   In your second issue I read with interest your plea for stories from new authors. While no writer myself, I have had a time traveler living with me for the past two weeks (he materialized in the bathtub without clothes or money, so I felt obliged to offer him shelter), and he has written a story of life on earth as it will be in the year 5000.
   Before he leaves this time frame, it would give him great pleasure to see his story in print--I hope you will feel able to make this wish come true.
     Yours sincerely,
     Nancy Morrison (Miss) "
science fiction - Asimov USA 1978 Nurse, Patricia. "One Rejection Too Many " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982; 1st pub 1978 in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine); pg. 480-482. "Dear Miss Morrison:
   I am very confused by your letter. Who is Isaac Asimov? I have checked with several publishers and none of them has heard of Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, although the address on the envelope was correct for this magazine.
   However, I was very impressed with your story and will be pleased to submit it for our next issue. Seldom do we receive a story combining such virtues as a well-conceived plot, plenty of human interest, and a delightfully subtle brand of humor.

Yours truly,
George H. Scithers,
Editor,
Arthur C. Clarke's Science Fiction Magazine " [This entire story, two excerpts of which are in this DB, is told in letter form. Asimov repeatedly rejects successive revisions of the story submitted, and the time traveler changes history to eliminate Asimov, and get his story accepted by Clarke.]

science fiction - Asimov USA 1982 Knight, Damon. "Azimuth 1, 2, 3 . . . " in One Side Laughing. New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; 1982); pg. 23. [This entire story, pg. 23-27, may be a comical riff about Isaac Asimov.] Pg. 23: Author's introduction to story: "I have disguised the real identity of the central figure in this story, but not so well, I'm afraid, that an assiduous reader cannot find it out. (Actually, I had two people in mind, neither one of whom is or ever was named Azimuth Backfiler.) The story is one of my favorites because of its good-humored malice toward an old friend, and also because, like certain works of Jorge Luis Borges, it is a review of an imaginary book. "; Pg. 23: "The recently published memoirs of Azimuth Backfiler provide a fascinating glimpse into the life of a little-known genius. The son of an eccentric experimental educator, Azimuth graduated from MIT at the age of seven and obtained his first doctorate when he was nine. While still in his teens, he invented the steam-powered crossbow... and the edible typewriter. "
science fiction - Asimov USA 1982 Norden, Eric. "The Curse of Mhondoro Nkabele " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 162. Pg. 162: Dr. Asimov; Pg. 174: Isaac Asimov; Pg. 176-178: three-page fictional letter 'written by' Isaac Asimov; Pg. 177: Isaac Asimov's Guide to the Wit and Wisdom of All Human History; Pg. 178: Isaac Asimov's Guide to Health, Happiness and Regularity through Self-Negation


science fiction - Asimov, continued

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