Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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science fiction, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
science fiction world 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 245. "One of my favorite movies is Inherit the Wind--the original version, with Spencer Tracy, Frederic March, and Gene Kelly in the roles modeled after Clarence Darrow, William Jennings Bryan, and H. L. Mencken. There's also been a couple of made-for-TV remakes; I'll never understand why they remake good movies. Why doesn't somebody go back and remake bad ones, correcting the mistakes? I'd love to see a decent version of Dune or V. I. Warshawski--or The Phantom Menace, for that matter. But they did remake Inherit the Wind, first with Jason Robards, Kirk Douglas, and good old Darren McGavin, The Night Stalker's Carl Kolchak himself--in fact, come to think of it, Mencken and Kolchak are pretty darn similar . . . except for the vampires. "
science fiction world 2001 Barnes, John. Kaleidoscope Century. New York: Tor (1995); pg. 9. "I feel a rush of memory, much of it confusing, little of it useful. I thought at first that I recognized low gravity because I read so much sci-fi when I was a kid. I don't seem to remember anything reliably after I was about twenty or so, though all sorts of things lurk at the edge of memory. "
science fiction world 2002 Bear, Greg. Vitalis. New York: Ballantine (2002); pg. 204. Pg. 204: "He had written and directed three: White Lion, about a software engineer who imagines he's Tarzan... The Big Stick, a historical fantasy about early German U-bats challenging Teddy Roosevelt's Great White Fleet. "; Pg. 249: "He wore a windbreaker and a faded E.T. cap. "
science fiction world 2003 Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles. New York: Bantam (2000; c. 1958); pg. 94. "'Glad to hear that. Because you know what's up on that planet Mars? There's monsters with big raw eyes like mushrooms! You seen them pictures on those future magazines you buy at the drugstore for a dime, ain't you? Well! Them monsters jump up and suck marrow from your bones!' "
science fiction world 2005 Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles. New York: Bantam (2000; c. 1958); pg. 105. "'Does the name Usher mean nothing to you?'

'Nothing.'

'Well, what about this name: Edgar Allan Poe?'

Mr. Bigelow shook his head.

'Of course.' Stendahl snorted delicately, a combination of dismay and contempt. 'How could I expect you to know blessed Mr. Poe? He died a long while ago, before Lincoln. All of his books were burned in the Great Fire. That's thirty years ago--1975.'

'Ah,' said Mr. Bigelow. He and Lovecraft and Hawthorne and Ambrose Pierce and all the tales of terror and fantasy and horror and, for that matter, tales of the future were burned. Heartlessly. They passed a law. Oh, it started very small. In 1950 and '60 it was a grain of sand. They started by controlling books of cartoons and then detective books and, of course, films, one way or another...' "

science fiction world 2005 Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles. New York: Bantam (2000; c. 1958); pg. 106. "...Oh, the word 'escape' was radical, too, I tell you!'

'Was it?'

'It was! Every man, they said, must face reality. Must face the Here and Now! Everything that was not so must go. All the beautiful literary lies and flights of fancy must be shot in mid-air. So they lined them up against a library wall out Sunday morning thirty years ago, in 1975; they lined up St. Nicholas and the Headless Horseman and Snow White and Rumpelstiltskin and Mother Goose--oh, what a wailing!--and shot them down, and burned the paper castles and the fairy frogs and old kings and the people who lived happily ever after (for of course it was a fact that nobody lived happily ever after!), and Once Upon a Time became No More! And they spread the ashes of the Phantom Rickshaw with the rubble of the Land of Oz; they filleted the bones of Glinda the Good and Ozma and shattered Polychrome in a spectroscope and served Jack Pumpkinhead with meringue at the Biologists' Ball! "

science fiction world 2005 Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles. New York: Bantam (2000; c. 1958); pg. 106. "'...The Beanstalk died in a bramble of red tape! Sleeping Beauty awoke at the kiss of a scientist and expired at the fatal puncture of his syringe. And they made Alice drink something from a bottle which reduced her to a size where she could no longer cry 'Curiouser and curiouser,' and they gave the Looking glass one hammer blow to smash it... away!'

He clenched his fists... His face was red and he was gasping for breath.

As for Mr. Bigelow, he was astounded at this long explosion. He blinked and at last said, 'Sorry. Don't know what you're talking about. Just names to me. From what I hear, the Burning was a good thing.'

'Get out!' screamed Stendahl. 'You've done your job, now let me alone, you idiot!'

...'I came to Mars to get away from you Clean-Minded people, but you're flocking in thicker every day... I'm going to teach you a fine lesson for what you did to Mr. Poe on Earth. As of this day, beware. The House of Usher is open for business!' "

science fiction world 2005 Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles. New York: Bantam (2000; c. 1958); pg. 107-108. "'You know the law. Strict to the letter. No books, no houses, nothing to be produced which in any way suggests ghosts, vampires, fairies, or any creatures of the imagination.'

'You'll be burning Babbits next!'

'You've caused us a lot of trouble, Mr. Stendahl. It's in the record. Twenty years ago. On Earth. You and your library.'

'Yes, me and my library. And a few others like me. Oh, Poe's been forgotten for many years no, and Oz and the other creatures. But I had my little cache. We had our libraries, a few private citizens, until you sent your men around with torches and incinerators and tore my fifty thousand books up and burned them. Just as you put a stake through the heart of Halloween and told your film producers that if they made anything at all they would have to make and remake Earnest Hemingway. My God, how many times have I seen For Whom the Bell Tolls done! Thirty different versions! All realistic. Oh, realism! Oh, here, oh, now, oh hell!' "

science fiction world 2005 Knight, Damon. Why Do Birds. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 159. "The holo was called Flash Gordon on the New World. It started out like the old flatfilm, with the planet Mongo approaching the Earth and about to destroy it. In a violent storm, Dr. Zarkov, Flash Gordon, and Dale Arden took off in Zarkov's experimental spaceship. The strange planet loomed nearer. They landed, and then it was all different. " [More.]
science fiction world 2008 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 65. "'...Our own government had prepared an elaborate [landing] site [for the alien visitors] at Edwards Air Force Base where access could be controlled despite pleas from scientists, New Agers, UFO believers, science fiction writers, and the Dalai Lama...' "
science fiction world 2008 McDonald, Ian. Evolution's Shore. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1995); pg. 193. Pg. 193-194: "'We're blue-skying. What-if-ing. Probing the outer limits. Entering the Twilight Zone. Opening the X-files.'

'So, what have you found out in the Twilight Zone?' Gaby asked.

'That maybe the stars are not our destination,' Depak Ray said... " [References to 'The Outer Limits' TV show, and the novel The Stars My Destination by Bester.]; Pg. 195: "'You Americans, you must always have your dreams of the frontier,' Depak said. 'The place beyond that draws you on. 'The Stars Our Destination': the nobility...' "; Pg. 380: "...no better place to watch the Ursula K. Le Guin come down out of orbit. " [a spacecraft]; Pg. 397: "It was the classic sci-fi cliche: 'The door dilated.' "; Pg. 398: Hollywood sci-fi movie "; Pg. 403: Postface: quote from Triton by Samuel R. Delany

science fiction world 2009 Sawyer, Robert J. Flashforward. New York: Tor (2000; c. 1999); pg. 182. "Why couldn't he just go ahead and commit to this woman. He did love her. Why couldn't he just ignore what he'd seen? Millions of people were doing just that, after all--for most of the world, the idea of a fixed future was ridiculous. They'd seen it a hundred times in TV shows and movies: Jimmy Stewart realizes that it's a wonderful life after watching the world unfold without him. Superman, incensed at the death of Lois Lane, flies around the Earth so quickly that it spins backwards, letting him return to a time before her demise, saving her. Caesar, son of the chimpanzee scientists Zira and Cornelius, sets the world on a path of interspecies brotherhood, hoping to avoid Earth's destruction by nuclear holocaust. "
science fiction world 2011 Baxter, Stephen. Manifold: Time. New York: Ballantine (2000); pg. 272. "Why the hell the suits should be silver she didn't know--she looked like a cross between John Glenn and Buck Rogers... "
science fiction world 2011 Baxter, Stephen. Manifold: Time. New York: Ballantine (2000); pg. 301. "'My God, what a Faustian bargain...' "
science fiction world 2011 Baxter, Stephen. Manifold: Time. New York: Ballantine (2000); pg. 306. "And so it would go on, like building that bridge in Apocalypse Now, a battle of stubbornness between the kids and their adult keepers, until the kids were forced--or sometimes chose--to move on to something else . . . "
science fiction world 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 35. "'...Professional scientists like Bernal and philosophers such as Stapledon have theorized about traveling planets, not to mention authors like Stuart and [E.E 'Doc'] Smith.' "
science fiction world 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 37. "'Why, I think it's romantic being patched up that way, just like the old soldiers that run the space academies in the Heinlein and E.E. Smith stories.' "
science fiction world 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 42. "'It looks like an old Amazing cover. Dad, I think your Wanderer's roved this way--only the Greeks didn't grow 'em this big. I think it's a planet.' "
science fiction world 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 128. "'Tiger!' yelled Harry McHeath. Doc heard and his mind threw out, as uncontrollably as a pair of honest dice, the thought: My God, the second Buck Rogers Sunday page! The Tiger Men of Mars! "
science fiction world 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 136. "Several comparisons flashed through his mind. The Japanese art of rock arrangement on a gigantic scale. Science-fiction book covers of the sort that show an endless floor covered with abstract sculptures looking half alive. "
science fiction world 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 156. "'Do you think the saucer actually had an intertialess drive--like E. E. Smith's bergenholms or something?' Harry McHeath asked Doc.

'Have to, I'd think, the way it was jumping around like this, science fiction is our only guide...' "

science fiction world 2015 Sullivan, Tricia. Someone to Watch Over Me. New York: Bantam (1997); pg. 134. "...having had a mother who made him stay away from windows, televisions, and all electrical appliances during storms (especially after she'd seen the movie Poltergeist and began to believe in the transmigration of souls). "
science fiction world 2015 Willis, Connie. "Even the Queen " in Impossible Things. New York: Bantam (1994; story copyright 1992); pg. 81. "There was even the same drawing of the fallopian tubes I remembered from my middle-school movie, a drawing that had always reminded me of Alien in the early stages. "
science fiction world 2025 Varley, John. Titan. New York: Berkley (4th ed. 1981; 1st pub. 1979); pg. 141. "She also wanted adventure. It had driven her all through her life, from the first comic book she opened, the first space documentary she had watched as a wide-eyed child, the first old black and white flat-screen swashbucklers and full-color westerns she saw. The thirst to do something outrageous and heroic had never left her. It had pushed her away from the singing career her mother wanted, and the housewife role everyone else thrust at her. She wanted to swoop down on the base of the space pirates, lasers blazing, to slink through the jungle with a band of fierce revolutionaries for a night raid on an enemy stronghold, to search for the Holy Grail or destroy the Death Star. She had found other reasons, as an adult, to slog her way through college.. Beneath it all, nevertheless, it was the itch to travel and see strange places and do tings no one else had done that landed her on the decks of Ringmaster. "
science fiction world 2027 Gunn, James E. The Listeners. New York: Signet (1974; c. 1972); pg. 85. "The vast distances between solar systems may be a form of divine quarantine: they prevent the spiritual infection of a fallen species from spreading; they block it from playing the role of the serpent in the Garden of Eden. . . .

--C. S. Lewis, Mid-Twentieth Century "

science fiction world 2028 Gunn, James E. The Listeners. New York: Signet (1974; c. 1972); pg. 213. "Spurred by the urgency of her tone, he went crashing outside. He found Molly standing rigid, trying to cram both her fists in her mouth at the same time. And at her feet was a man with silver-gray skin and a broken arm, who mewed at them. . . .

--Theodore Sturgeon, 1946

Pg. 218: Quote by Clifford Simak; Pg. 229: Quote by Murray Leinster

science fiction world 2030 Bell, M. Shayne. "Jacob's Ladder " in Writers of the Future: Volume III (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 21. "Seventy-six presidents, prime ministers and dictators were Up Top, with members of twelve royal families, the Sao Paulo Symphony, actors from all seven continents, and twenty-three science fiction writers flown to Macapa to inaugurate the story of the century: the elevator to space. "
science fiction world 2030 Bova, Ben. "Life As We Know It " in Twice Seven. New York: Avon Books (1998; c. 1995); pg. 94. "They were all there, all the Grand Old Men of the field: McKay, Kliest, Taranto--even Sagan, little more than an ancient husk in his electric wheelchair. But the fire still burned in his deep, dark eyes. " [A few other refs. to Carl Sagan, not in DB, included in this story not as an s.f. writer, but a cosmologist.]
science fiction world 2030 McAuley, Paul J. Fairyland. New York: Avon Books (1997; c 1995); pg. 20. "He tells Alex he wants to call it Mortal Kombat, after some old computer game he played when he was a kid, although it will be mortal only for the dolls. They will be armed with laser tag guns, while the punters will have the real thing.

'Mortal Kombat would be a keen name, but my... uncles are calling it after some old film.'

'The Killing Fields,' Doggy Dog offers. "

science fiction world 2036 Besher, Alexander. Mir: A Novel of Virtual Reality. New York: Simon & Schuster (1998); pg. 270. "'Everyone knows that science fiction is dead, Trevor,' Nelly said... 'It's just something that people write these days to describe the past.'

'That's what they said about the Book of Genesis, honey, but it's still selling, isn't it?' "

science fiction world 2039 Jones, Gwyneth. White Queen. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 170. "The neighbor star that goes nova and floods earth with killer radiation, the giant asteroid on a collision course, the new and unstoppable mutated virus, the Night Of The Living Dead . . . This was the world that had abandoned movie-drama and stayed away in droves from the holo-films. Animation, cartoon emotion, was the favored artistic expression. Dramatic realism was too slow, too ordered: completely unlike nature. "
science fiction world 2050 Wolfe, Gene. "The Fifth Head of Cerberus " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1972); pg. 338. [Year estimated.] "...a lone copy of Monday or Tuesday leaning against a book about the assassination of Trotsky, and a crumbling volume of Vernor Vinge's short stories that owed its presence there, or so I suspect, to some long-dead librarian's mistaking the faded v. Vinge on the spine for 'Winge.' "
science fiction world 2069 Clarke, Arthur C. The Fountains of Paradise. New York: Ballantine (1980; 1st ed. 1978); pg. 73. "The whole spectrum of possibilities was argued, ad nauseam, in all the media of communications, all the parliaments of man. Every plot that had ever been used in science fiction, from the arrival of benevolent gods to an invasion of bloodsucking vampires, was disinterred and solemnly analyzed. "
science fiction world 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 64. Pg. 64: "He was smiling. It was the most unpleasant smile she had ever seen. All at once it reminded her of the hungry smile of Bela Lugosi, leering from the dark corridors of an ancient 2-D video she had viewed once. "
science fiction world 2093 Kube-McDowell, Michael. The Quiet Pools. New York: Ace (1990); pg. 53. "Malena returned the book that she had been reading--a fantasy about the vengeful return of the Inca gods. Reading was the best way to forget where she was, to absorb the minutes remaining before her first appointment. Reading demanded her full attention. At times it was hard work. Unlike with dynabooks and vids, she had to build her own pictures from the author's sketchy words... Distractions from life, Mother Caroline called them. But Malena thought that she had every right to her distractions. "
science fiction world 2093 Kube-McDowell, Michael. The Quiet Pools. New York: Ace (1990); pg. 169. "Sasaki's predecessor had announced the Tau Ceti system as the provisional choice for prime rendezvous eleven years ago, and Sasaki had reconfirmed the choice three years later, long before staff and community selection had begun. The Tau Ceti of New Moon Over Barridan and other popular fictions was well ingrained in the public mind. "
science fiction world 2094 Sladek, John. Tik-Tok. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1985; 1st printed 1983); pg. 140. "...I was sold at a government contraband auction to a small-town doctor named Hekyll. It's hard to describe Dr. Hekyll's character. In fact, though I worked in his office for nearly a year, I hardly ever met the man... " [More about this character... Appears to be named after Dr. Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde.]
science fiction world 2094 Sladek, John. Tik-Tok. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1985; 1st printed 1983); pg. 155. "...all fiction mentioning robots, from the latest TV episode of Meatless Friday to the ancient stories of Hephaestus, building golden women to help him at his forge. "
science fiction world 2110 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 16. [Epigraph] "'Meteorites don't fall on the Earth. They fall on the sun--and the Earth gets in the way.'

--John W. Campbell "

science fiction world 2110 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 69. "As soon as good photographs of the planet [Mars] starting coming back from the first space probes, finding names for all the thousands of new formations became a major problem. Some choices were obvious--famous astronomers, scientists, and explorers, such as Copernicus, Kepler, Columbus, Newton, Darwin, Einstein. Next came authors who had been associated with the planet--Wells, Burroughs, Weinbaum, Heinlein, Bradbury. And then... "
science fiction world 2110 May, Julian. The Many Colored Land in The Many-Colored Land & The Golden Torc (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1981); pg. 76. "'...I am going to be a Jack-of-all-trade. Scottish-style Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court!...' " [More about Twain's novel.]
science fiction world 2110 May, Julian. The Many Colored Land in The Many-Colored Land & The Golden Torc (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1981); pg. 144. Pg. 142: "The knight errant came running over to them with a tragic expression. 'Is Aslan on his way? Have you seen him, good Sister? Perhaps this warrior-maid is of his entourage! Aslan must come or we be doomed!'

'Oh, piss off,' muttered Felice.

Claude took the knight by one mailed elbow and led him to a bunk near the other door. 'Stay here and watch for Aslan.' ";

Pg. 144: "The knight gave a shout. 'They're starting to saddle the faerie steeds! We'll soon be on our way to Narnia!' " [References to fantasy novels by C.S. Lewis. Some other refs., not in DB.]

science fiction world 2110 May, Julian. The Many Colored Land in The Many-Colored Land & The Golden Torc (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1981); pg. 98-99. "'King Arthur would dub you Sir Boss at first sight,' Elizabeth said, explaining to Bryan: 'He plans to set himself up as a Pliocene Connecticut Yankee.'

'You wouldn't have to bother with Twain's solar eclipse to gain attention,' the anthropologist conceded. 'Th suit alone is enough to overawe the peasantry. but isn't it rather conspicuous if you want to spy out the land?'

'The big pocket on my back has a chameleon poncho.'

Bryan laughed. 'Merlin won't have a prayer.'

Aiken watched the Lyon city lights dim and disappear as the approaching storm curtained the valley with rain. 'The Connecticut Yankee had to content against Merlin in the story, didn't he? Modern technology versus sorcery. Science against the superstition of the Dark Ages. I can't remember too much about the book. Read it when I was thirteen there on Dalriada and I know I was disappointed with Twain for wasting so much space on half-baked philosophy instead of action. How did it end?...' "

science fiction world 2160 Clarke, Arthur C. The Fountains of Paradise. New York: Ballantine (1980; 1st ed. 1978); pg. 295. "There seemed to be a continuous spectrum between absolute fantasy and hard historical facts, with every possible gradation between... At the other extreme were Zeus and Alice and King Kong and Gulliver and Siegfried and Merlin, who could not possibly have existed in the real world. But what was one to make of Robin Hood and Tarzan and Christ and Sherlock Holmes and Odysseus and Frankenstein? Allowing for a certain amount of exaggeration, they might well have been actual historic personages. "
science fiction world 2182 Cowper, Richard. "Out There Where the Big Ships Go " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 119. "He sat down... then flipped open the back of the cabinet and ran his eye down the familiar index. Nelson, Camelot, Kennedy, Pasteur, Alan Quartermain, Huck Finn, Tarzan, Frodo, Titus Groan... "
science fiction world 2199 Clarke, Arthur C. & Gentry Lee. Rama II. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 324. "'I remember reading a science fiction novel when I was at the university,' Nicole said a few seconds later, 'in which an extraterrestrial species learned about human beings solely from our earliest television programs. When they finally met us, they offered cereal boxes and soaps and other objects the aliens had seen on our television commercials. The packages were all properly designed, but the contents were either nonexistent or absolutely wrong.' "
science fiction world 2200 Arnason, Eleanor. A Woman of the Iron People. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 350. "I frowned, looking toward the shore. It was a grey line now. 'Do you mean the policy of nonintervention?'

'No. It is a term invented by writers. American writers, I think. Prime something.'

'The Prime Directive.'

'Agopian told me about it. He is full of information about America and science fiction.' "

science fiction world 2200 Arnason, Eleanor. A Woman of the Iron People. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 457. "'God is great.' She laughed. 'That's what I kept thinking. Allah akbar.'

' 'O brave new world, that has such people in it,' ' said Eddie.

...'That line reminds me of Shakespeare,' Eddie said. 'I know it from Aldous Huxley. His novel Brave New World.'

'You've read it?' I asked.

'I've taught it--in my survey course on the collapse of Western civilization.' "

science fiction world 2200 Arnason, Eleanor. A Woman of the Iron People. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 406-407. "'...I knew the names of all their favorite shows, and I had seen most of them at least once. War and Peace. crossing the Urals. Deep Ocean Adventure. The Potato Cosmonauts....'...We had two astrogators. I asked them questions when I got into trouble with the learning program.

'One of them read science fiction. She told me the cook had a remarkable personal collection. He was from Siberia. A huge man. He talked in grunts, and I hadn't been sure he was entirely human. After he realized that I read science fiction, he began to use full sentences. He loaned me his books. We talked about them and about Siberia...' "

science fiction world 2210 Asimov, Isaac & Robert Silverberg. The Positronic Man. New York: Doubleday (1992); pg. 133. "A brief prologue sufficed to deal with the concepts of the robot in history and literature--the metal men of the ancient Greek myths, the automata imagined by clever storytellers like E. T. A. Hoffmann and Karel Capek, and other such fantasies... "
science fiction world 2500 Philbrick, Rodman. "The Last Book in the Universe " in Tomorrowland: 10 Stories About the Future (Michael Cart, ed.) New York: Scholastic Press (1999); pg. 22. [Author's Note] "When I was asked to submit a story for this anthology, I knew at once that the tale would take place in the future. After all, I came of age reading authors like Ray Bradbury, Isaac Asimov, and Ursula Le Guin, who wrote about future worlds in a way that made me want to be an author when I grew up. "
science fiction world 1000004000 Anderson, Poul. Genesis. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 158. "'I did read a good deal, especially on space missions. And especially poetry. Homer, Shakespeare, Tu Fu, Basho, Bellman, Burns, Omar Khayyam, Kipling, Millay, Haldeman--' " [Haldeman here probably refers to s.f. author Joe Haldeman.]
science fiction Wyoming 1998 York, J. Steven. Generation X: Crossroads. New York: Berkley (1998); pg. 135. "...while the kids took the Xabago to Devils Tower National Monument, or as Jubilee called it, 'that Close Encounters place.' "
science fiction - Alice in Wonderland Australia 1987 Bryant, Edward. "Down in the Dreamtime " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 259. "'But what is this?' She felt as if she were listening to Auntie Alice on Radio Wonderland. 'What's all this about?' "
science fiction - Alice in Wonderland Australia 2050 Egan, Greg. Permutation City. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 86. "'Don't knock tautology. Better base a religion on tautology than fantasy.'

'But it's worse than tautology. It's . . . redefining words arbitrarily, it's like something out of Lewis Carroll. Or George Orwell. 'God is the reason for everything . . . whatever that reason is.' So what any sane person would simply call the law of physics you've decided to rename G-O-D . . . "

science fiction - Alice in Wonderland California 1966 Geary, Patricia. Strange Toys. New York: Bantam (1989; c. 1987); pg. 19. "Firmly back to books: Alice in Wonderland, my best fairy tale book, the one with 'Bluecrest' and 'Green Snake,' and the white Bible... "
science fiction - Alice in Wonderland California 1966 Geary, Patricia. Strange Toys. New York: Bantam (1989; c. 1987); pg. 22. "I only read the ending once, and after that I always skipped it. Likewise, in the book Alice in Wonderland, the caterpillar is not a nice guy. He's cruel and sinister, and he has no sympathy for Alice. In the Disney version, he is charmingly suave, a worm version of David Niven. In fact, the books were much more like the games we used to play... " [More, pg. 30-31, 74.]
science fiction - Alice in Wonderland California 1975 Dick, Philip K. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. New York: Timescape Books (1982); pg. 12. "That is how you calculate wisdom: by who pays. I teach this. I should instruct the Sufis, and the Christians as well, especially for the Episcopalian bishops with their funds. Front me a hundred bucks, Tim. Imagine calling the bishop 'Tim.' Like calling the pope 'George' or 'Bill' like the lizard in Alice. I think Bill descended the chimney, as I recall. It is an obscure reference... "
science fiction - Alice in Wonderland California 1995 Powers, Tim. Earthquake Weather. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 319. Pg. 319: "...the bread-and-butter-flies from Through The Looking Glass "; [Other refs., pg. 37, 39, 216.]
science fiction - Alice in Wonderland California: Hollywood 1955 Bradbury, Ray. A Graveyard for Lunatics. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1990); pg. 14. "'...You think I haven't seen you ducking around corners at the studio, pretending to be the White Rabbit at the commissary...' "
science fiction - Alice in Wonderland California: Los Angeles 1993 DeChance, John. MagicNet. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 116. -
science fiction - Alice in Wonderland California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 9. [Note: This book has 46 chapters, and the epigraph at the beginning of EVERY chapter is a quote from either Alice in Wonderland or the associated books Through the Looking-Glass and Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Only the epigraph for the first chapter is in DB.]

Chapter 1 epigraph, pg. 9: "'But I don't want to go among mad people,' Alice remarked.

'Oh, you can't help that,' said the Cat: 'we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.'

'How do you know I'm mad?' said Alice.

'You must be,' said the Cat, 'or you wouldn't have come here.'

--Lewis Carroll,
Alice in Wonderland "

science fiction - Alice in Wonderland California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 14. Chapter 2 epigraph, pg. 14: "''. . . when she next peeped out, the Fish-Footman was gone, and the other was sitting on the ground near the door, staring stupidly up into the sky.'

--Lewis Carroll,
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland ";

Chapter 3 epigraph, pg. 17: "'. . . Just look along the road, and tell me if you can see either of them.'

'I see nobody on the road,' said Alice.

'I only wish I had such eyes,' the King remarked in a fretful tone. 'To be able to see Nobody! And at that distance too! Why, it's as much as I can do to see real people, by this light!'

--Lewis Carroll,
Through the Looking-Glass ";

Chapter 4 epigraph, pg. 24: "It was all very well to say 'Drink me,' but the wise little Alice was not going to do that in a hurry. 'No, I'll look first,' she said, 'and see whether it's marked 'poison' or not' . . .

--Lewis Carroll,
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland ";

[Etc.]

science fiction - Alice in Wonderland California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 44. "'I . . . was keeping your plant watered,' she said. 'In most gardens they make the beds too soft--so that the flowers are always asleep.'

Sullivan recognized the line as something from the Alice in Wonderland books. So many of them had read and somehow remembered them. Sukie had always said that the Alice books were the Old and New Testaments for ghosts--which Pete had never understood; after all, Lewis Carroll hadn't been dead yet when he'd written them.

...'Are you animal, vegetable, or mineral?'

That was what the Lion had asked Alice, in Through the Looking-Glass. 'It's a fabulous monster!' he called back, quoting what the Unicorn had answered about Alice. "

science fiction - Alice in Wonderland California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 303. "'He doesn't want to talk to you actually. You're just going to have to be a little soldier about this. Lewis Carroll wasn't dead, but he knew a little girl who did die--he had taken photographs of her, and he caught her ghost in a Leyden jar, just like Ben Franklin used to do. She told Lewis Carroll all those stories, and he wrote 'em down.' "


science fiction - Alice in Wonderland, continued

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