Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to science fiction, world

science fiction, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
science fiction world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 14-16. "As early as April 21, while Simon an Mary Lou listened to Clark Kent and His Supermen and George Dorn... Frodo Baggins and His Ring, the Mouse That Roars...Strangers in a Strange Land... the Incredible Hulk... the Time Machine... "
science fiction world 1975 Zelazny, Roger. "Some Science Fiction Paramaters: A Biased View " in Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983; story c. 1975); pg. 210. "True epics of course are few and historically well spaced, but that slightly more mundane ingredient, the speculative impulse, be it of Classic, Christian or Renaissance shading, which ornamented Western literature with romances, fables, exotic voyages and utopias, seemed to me basically the same turn of fancy exercised today in science fiction... " [Entire essay, of course, is about science fiction.]
science fiction world 1975 Zelazny, Roger. "Some Science Fiction Paramaters: A Biased View " in Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983; story c. 1975); pg. 212. "I feel that because of this, science fiction is the form of literature leas affected by Aristotle's dicta with respect to the nature of the human condition, which he saw as immutable, and the nature of man's fate, which he saw as inevitable.

Yet science fiction is concerned with the human condition and with man's fate. It is the speculative nature of its concern that required the abandonment of the Aristotelian structures involving the given imponderables. Its methods have included a retention of the higher modes of character... a sensation capable, at its best, of matching the power of that experience of recognition which Aristotle held to be the strongest effect of tragedy. " [More. Olaf Stapledon mentioned.]

science fiction world 1978 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Last Son of Krypton. New York: Warner Books (1978); pg. 196. "Luthor had an entire employee whose job it was to read huge quantities of published material and make daily lists of ideas that Luthor had not yet come up with. His name was Arthur Allen, and he was the most successful graduate of the Evelyn Wood School of Reading Dynamics in the year 1971, raising his reading speed from 630 to about 30 thousand words per minute... Allen read not only every science fiction story published--before publication, if possible--but every popular how-to-publication, every professional journal, and every trade magazine he knew of. "
science fiction world 1978 Tucker, Wilson. The Year of the Quiet Sun. New York: Ace (1970); pg. 54. "'midrash... it's Hebraic, and it means fiction, religious fiction. Compare it to whatever modern parallel you like; historical fiction, soap opera, detective stories, fantasy; the ancient Hebrews liked their midrash It was their favorite kind of fantasy... "
science fiction world 1979 Card, Orson Scott. A Planet Called Treason. New York: St. Martin's Press (1979); pg. -7. [Author's dedication.] "To
MaryJo, who turned me onto Bradbury,
Laura Dene, who loaned me the Foundation Trilogy,
Dale and Maria, who made me read the Chronicles of Narnia,
and the four thousand people who urged me to read Tolkien:
It's all your fault. "
science fiction world 1979 Clarke, Arthur C. "The Songs of Distant Earth " in The Sentinel. New York: Berkley Books (1983; c. 1979); pg. 198. [Author's introduction.] "And that was not the only thing bugging me. I had just seen two spectacular and high successful space movies--Star Wars, Close Encounters of the Third Kind--and Star Trek was still doing reruns all over the planet. They were well done and I greatly enjoyed them, but hey all had one thing in common. They were not, in the strictest sense, science fiction, but fantasy. " [More.]
science fiction world 1979 Ing, Dean. "Fleas " in Firefight 2000. New York: Baen (1987; c. 1979); pg. 6. "He had known a feeder, an academic like himself, who read so much Huxley he tried to substitute carp viscera for the only true prescription. "
science fiction world 1981 Knight, Damon. "Forever " in One Side Laughing. New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; 1981); pg. 224. Aldous Huxley
science fiction world 1982 Asimov, Isaac. "Introduction " in Dragon Tales. New York: Ballantine (1982); pg. 13. "On the other hand, the gift of nonexistence is this: We can, if we wish, make our dragons bumbling, well-meaning creatures, or even entirely kindly. There is Walt Disney's Pete's Dragon, in which the dragon is rather an overgrown puppydog; and The Reluctant Dragon, which only wants to be left in peace; and the altogether kindly and ill-used Puff, the Magic Dragon of the affecting ballad. "
science fiction world 1982 Jeppson, J. O. "A Pestilence of Psychoanalysts " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982); pg. 281. "'Listen, I remember that you're a sci-fi buff,' he began.

'S-F!'

'Whatever. Do you believe in that stuff about ESP and dreams that come true and mysterious extraterrestrial beings and whatnot?'

'I'm still waiting for the hard evidence.' "

science fiction world 1982 MacDow, Gerald. "The Stunning Science Fiction Caper " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982); pg. 358-360. "I walked into the littered office of Stunning Science Fiction and said to the woman who was checking galley proofs behind a battered desk, 'All right. Where is he?' "; Pg. 360: "'Competition was rough in the thirties,' May went on. 'We figured, some mags have house writers . . . you know . . . a phony name several writers used, only the name was the property of the magazine.'

'So why no use a house editor?' Randy sniffed.

'So we invented this guy with all sorts of scientific qualifications, and a degree, and . . .'

'Jonas M. MacLeb was a figment?' I snorted, 'that's one for TeeVee.'

'It's the truth,' she said. 'We made him up out of whole cloth.'

'What about those editorials?' I said. 'The hotshot ones about the philosophy of science, and empiricism, and the rest?'

'We hired an IBM machine to turn them out... MacLeb, the colossus of modern science fiction, is nothing but our imagination plus an IBM semantic analyzer.' "

science fiction world 1983 Sladek, John. Tik-Tok. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1985; 1st printed 1983); pg. 5. [Dedication] "To Tik-Tok of Oz, Talos of Crete, the Golem of Prague, Olympia of Nuremberg, Elektro of Westinghouse, Robby of Altair, Talbot Yancy of America and to all decent, law-abiding robots everywhere. "
science fiction world 1984 Delany, Samuel R. "The Tale of Plagues and Carnivals " in Flight from Neveryon. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press (1994; c. 1984); pg. 181. [Frontispiece] Quote from the introduction to Inferno, by Allen Mandelbaum: "ours, too, is an age of allegoresis . . . "; Quote from Extra(Ordinary) People by Joanna Russ: "'If you believe that,' the tutor remarked, 'you'd believe anything! No, it wasn't like that at all! . . . "
science fiction world 1985 Ing, Dean and Leik Myrabo. "The Future of Flight: Comes the Revolution " in Firefight 2000. New York: Baen (1987; c. 1985); pg. 101. Pg. 101: Gernsback's Wonder Stories in 1932; Pg. 106: "American engineers like Stine and [J.E.] Pournelle "
science fiction world 1986 Clarke, Arthur C. The Songs of Distant Earth. New York: Ballantine (1986) [Author's Note] "This novel... this version was directly--and negatively--inspired by the recent rash of space-operas on TV and movie screen...

Please do not misunderstand me: I have enormously enjoyed the best of Star Trek and the Lucas/Spielberg epics, to mention only the most famous examples of the genre. But these works are fantasy, not science fiction in the strict meaning of the term. It now seems almost certain that in the real universe we may never exceed the velocity of light. Even the very closest star systems will always be decades or centuries apart; no Warp Six will ever get you from one episode to another in time for next week's installment... there has also been a significant, and rather surprising, change in the attitude of scientists toward the problem of Extraterrestrial Intelligence. The whole subject did not become respectable (except among dubious characters like the writers of science fiction)... "

science fiction world 1986 Vonnegut, Kurt. Galapagos. New York: Delacorte Press (1985); pg. 70. "I just want to add that my father, who was a science fiction writer, once wrote a novel about a man whom everybody laughed at because he was building sports robots. He created a golf robot who could make a hole in one every time, and a basketball robot who could hit the basket every time, and a tennis robot who served an ace every time, and so on.

At first, people couldn't see any use for robots like that, and the inventor's wife walked out on him, the way Father's wife, incidentally, had walked out on him--and his children tried to put him into a nuthouse. But then he let advertisers know that his robots would also endorse automobiles or beer or razors or wristwatches or perfume or whatever. He mad a fortune, according to my father, because so many sports enthusiasts wanted to be exactly like those robots.

Don't ask me why. " [Other refs. to his s.f. writer father, including pg. 82-83.]

science fiction world 1986 Vonnegut, Kurt. Galapagos. New York: Delacorte Press (1985); pg. 219. "I was the ghost of a ghost ship. I am the son of a big-brained science fiction writer, whose name was Kilgore Trout. "
science fiction world 1990 Egan, Greg. "Learning to Be Me " in Immortals (Jack Dann & Gardner Dozois, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1990); pg. 151. "...a social club that might as easily have been for divorcees, to a paranoid, paramilitary 'resistance front,' who thought they were living out Invasion of the Body Snatchers. "
science fiction world 1990 Turtledove, Harry. A World of Difference. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 236. "'...They'd have to be ready back home, then, in case we had something' happen out of Invaders from Minerva.'

In spite of herself, Sarah giggled. 'Stupid damn movie,' she said, having watched it on TV at least two dozen times since she was a kid. A late-fifties low-budge sci-fi classic turkey, it featured 'Minervans'--who looked nothing like real Minervans--remarkable chiefly because the zippers in their costumes were visible in several scenes. Every so often, coming up with something silly like that, Emmett could surprise her and remind her that he was human, too. "

science fiction world 1992 Snodgrass, Melinda M. Wild Cards X: Double Solitaire. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 128. "Two of the Viand were carrying laden plates to a table. Nesfa and several of her crew were inspecting elegant handguns in the window of a nearby gunnery. " [The alien character 'Nesfa' may be named for NESFA, the New England Science Fiction Association.]
science fiction world 1992 Snodgrass, Melinda M. Wild Cards X: Double Solitaire. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 82. Pg. 82: "'Oh, come on, man. You want it so bad. This is it, Burroughs and Clarke, 'Doc' Smith, remember like we talked that night . . . The Lensmen?' "; Pg. 107: "'I read them all . . . Clarke, Asimov, 'Doc' Smith...' "
science fiction world 1992 Tepper, Sheri S. Sideshow. New York: Bantam (1993; c. 1992); pg. 48. "Dwarfs and midgets were merely little people who could take the roles of Munchkins or Time Bandits or small furry spear-carrying Ewoks in Star Wars epics. "
science fiction world 1993 Anthony, Patricia. "Born to Be Wild " in Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997; c. 1993); pg. 235. "...Mother Aerobics was leading the old folks in sit-down calisthenics. All over the room lumpy, pale arms were raised like deformed sheaves of what.

'Night of the Living Dead,' Tammy said as they passed.

Neither Monique nor Jeff turned around.

'The original, not the remake,' Tammi explained. 'All black and white and grim. That's what this damned place reminds me of.' "

science fiction world 1994 Bradbury, Ray. "No News, or What Killed the Dog? " in Quicker Than the Eye. New York: Avon Books (1996; c. 1994); pg. 131. "'You rave on about that, your school lectures, or during dinner. Can openers? Science fiction. Automobiles. Radio, TV, films. Everything! So science fiction!' "
science fiction world 1994 Bradbury, Ray. "Unterderseaboat Doktor " in Quicker Than the Eye. New York: Avon Books (1996; c. 1994); pg. 1. "The incredible event occurred during my third visit to Ustav Von Seyfertitz, my foreign psychoanalyst.

I should have guessed at the strange explosion before it came.

After all, my alienist, truly alien, had the coincidental name, Von Seyfertitz, of the tall, lean, aquiline, menacing, and therefore beautiful actor who played the high priest in the 1935 film She.

In She, the wondrous villain waved his skeleton fingers, hurled insults, summoned sulfured flames, destroyed slaves, and knocked the world into earthquakes.

After that, 'At Liberty,' he could be riding the Hollywood Boulevard trolley cars as calm as a mummy, as quiet as an unwired telephone pole. "

science fiction world 1994 Brust, Steven. Five Hundred Years After. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 443. "Paarfi: As you wish. Name some of your favorite writers, please.

Brust: Well, Alexander Dumas--

Paarfi (ironically): I should never have suspected.

Brust: Twain, Shakespeare-- ...You mean contemporary writers?

Paarfi: If you please.

Brust: Oh. Well. Zelazny, Yolen, Wolfe, and Shetterly, to start at the back of the alphabet, or maybe Bull, Crowley, Dalkey, Dean, Ford, and Gaiman to start at the front... I'm awful fond of Patrick O'Brian and Robert B. Parker. Diana Wynne Jones is wonderful. I shouldn't mention Megan Lindholm, because I've written a book with her, but-- "

science fiction world 1995 Foster, Alan Dean. The Dig. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 231. "It looked more like a crab than a spider, she decided, though in appearance it partook a little of both. It would have been perfectly at home in a cheap 1950s horror film, except that it smelled atrocious and its contorted... a horrid jerking motion that was beyond the reach of cheap cinematic artifice. "
science fiction world 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 133. "Rogers conjured up a few science fiction movies he had seen. He had never been a big fan of science fiction movies. Most of his buddies had enjoyed Aliens when they watched it on a VCR just out of boot camp. He tried to forget about that one. "
science fiction world 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 297. "The Andrew Kearney Show (Syndicated Home Info Systems Net), December 19, 1996; guest appearance by science fiction writer Lawrence Van Cott:

Kearney: Mr. Van Cott, you've written sixty-one novels and seven works of nonfiction, or rather, it says here, speculative nonfiction. What is that?'

Van Cott: Science fiction without characters. Non-fact articles.

Kearney: We've been hearing for the last couple of months about the means by which the President's aliens will destroy the Earth. We've heard about things falling from the sky near the Philippines and in the Atlantic, passing into the Earth's interior. Two such objects have been sighted so far. Last night I interviewed Jeremy Kemp himself. He says that we have evidence the objects are causing a ruckus inside the Earth, below the crust.

Van Cott: From what I've heard, you should be interviewing Walter Samshow and David Sand. They saw one of the objects first. "

science fiction world 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 298. [Andrew Kearney Show interview with s.f. writer Lawrence Van Cott, continued.]

"Kearney Leaning forward): What could these objects be? You're a science fiction writer; perhaps you can speculate in ways scientists won't, or can't.

Van Cott: It's a serious subject. I don't think speculation is what we need right now. I'd prefer to wait and see what the experts think.

Kearney: Yes, but you have degrees in physics, mathematics... I'd say you're as much an expert as anyone, if we assume you've kept up on reports. Have you?

Van Cott: I've heard or listened to all that's made public.

Kearney: Out of professional interest?

Van Cott: I'm always interested when reality catches up with me.

Kearney: Surely you have some theories.

Van Cott...: All right... If these objects are as heavy as we think, they should be very big. But when they hit the ocean, they didn't make much of a splash. So... " [2 pages of scientific physics speculation.]

science fiction world 1996 Carey, Diane. Flashback (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 260. [Epigraphs with quotes from 'Star Trek' movies and episodes.] Pg. 43: Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan; Pg. 75: Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country; Pg. 93: 'Under Article 184 of your Interstellar Law, I'm placing you under arrest. You are charged with assassinating the Chancellor of the High Council.' --Klingon General Chang, charging Captain James T. Kirk and Dr. Leonard H. McCoy with the murder of Chancellor Gorkon; Pg. 125: Star Trek VI; Pg. 176: Star Trek III: The Search for Spock; Pg. 246: Star Trek VI; Pg. 258: Star Trek: Day of the Dove [an original series episode]; Pg. 275: Star Trek VI
science fiction world 1996 Frakes, Jonathan & Dean Wesley Smith. The Abductors: Conspiracy. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 119. [Epigraphs] Pg. 119: "Eliminate the impossible. Then if nothing remains, some part of the 'impossible' must be possible.

--Anthony Boucher
From Rocket to the Morgue ";

Pg. 208: "It is a rare mind indeed that can render the hitherto nonexistent blindingly obvious.

--Douglas Adams
From Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency "

science fiction world 1996 Fry, Stephen. Making History. New York: Random House (1996); pg. 10. "...I suddenly goggle, with Roger Rabbit starting eyes to the accompaniment of a loud klaxon, at a small speck on the title page... "
science fiction world 1996 Fry, Stephen. Making History. New York: Random House (1996); pg. 61. "Overall, a huge heat sat like a throttling fog. The day outside was searingly hot, the sky a sinister, cloudless sci-fi blue... "
science fiction world 1996 Fry, Stephen. Making History. New York: Random House (1996); pg. 206. "Johnny Mnemonic . . . Keanu Reeves... "
science fiction world 1996 Fry, Stephen. Making History. New York: Random House (1996); pg. 253. "'...The force may be with you, young Skywalker, but you are not a Jedi yet... The Truth Is Out There. Hasta la vista, baby. Catch-22... The name's bond, James Bond... Beam me up, Scotty. I shall return...' "
science fiction world 1996 Fry, Stephen. Making History. New York: Random House (1996); pg. 359. "...Scott Bakula in Quantum Leap... "
science fiction world 1996 Skolnick, Evan. "Order from Chaos " in The Ultimate X-Men (Stan Lee, ed.) New York: Berkley (1996); pg. 249. "'I believe it's an American archaeologist named Damian Sharpe,' Alia answered.

'Damian? Ooh, that's a bad Omen,' Jubilee joked half-heartedly. "

science fiction world 1997 Anthony, Patricia. Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997); pg. 247. [Introduction to "Guardian of Fireflies "] "When I was eight years old or so I remember being afraid to turn over in bed, lest I fall into some dreaded Other Dimension. This kind of stuff, plus the fiction of Ted Sturgeon and Ray Bradbury, marked me for life.

I know you'll ask, so I'll just say it straight out: I hated Heinlein. Yes. Even the juveniles. "

science fiction world 1997 Barton, William. Acts of Conscience. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. -5. [Dedication, to a deceased science fiction author, with reference to his 'Fuzzy' series of novels.]

"to
H. Beam Piper
fuzzy logic of a sort "

science fiction world 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 1. "The lieutenant shrugged. 'It's in the middle of the Atlantic, sir--international waters. The cruise ship has as much right to be here as anyone else.'

'The Love Boat meets Lost in Space,' muttered Frank. "

science fiction world 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 2. "He was forty years old, thing, gangly, jug-eared, and redheaded--not quite Ichabod Crane, but close. "
science fiction world 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 15. "How to proceed? Frank thought for a moment about making the hand sign from Close Encounters--and that thought gave him a better idea. "
science fiction world 1997 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. -5. "This book is for Jack Vance, our finest creator of worlds. It is also dedicated to the memory of Dr. Carl Sagan, scientist, author, and teacher... "
science fiction world 1998 Brin, David. Heaven's Reach. New York: Bantam (1998); pg. 431. [Author's Afterword] "This is certainly not the fist time an author speculated about the possibility of genetically altering nonsapient animals. Examples include The Island of Dr. Moreau, Planet of the Apes, and the Instrumentality series of Cordwainer Smith. " [More.]
science fiction world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998) [As the title indicates, this entire non-fiction book is about science fiction. Excellent analysis by Disch about the influence of s.f. on contemporary society. Highly recommended. Individual s.f., literature, movie, television refs. are not in DB.] Book jacket: "From one of science fiction's most acclaimed novelists comes this engrossing journey through the books, movies, and television programs that have shaped our perspective of both the present and the future. In an uncompromising, often irreverent survey of the genre from Edgar Allan Poe to Philip K. Dick to Star Trek, Thomas M. Disch analyzes science fiction's impact on technological innovation, fashion, lifestyle, military strategy, the media, and much more.

An illuminating look at the art of science fiction (with a practitioner's insight into craft), as well as a work of pointed literary and cultural criticism [this book] reveals how this 'pulp genre' has captured the popular imagination... "

science fiction world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 44. "SF is a lumpen-literature. That can be a strength, but it is usually the genre's Achilles' heel. Poe, in the tale's second sentence, anticipates his critics by saying. 'Those who doubt are your mere doubters by profession--an unprofitable and disreputable tribe.' So say legions of UFO abductees. So say, as well, other SF true believers of various faiths--those who believe we must terraform Mars, those who've slid from science fiction into Scientology, those who have psychic powers but, even so, low-paying jobs. Poe had the same problem. "
science fiction world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 139. Pg. 139: "A number of SF writers have commanded their on small legion of true believers: L. Ron Hubbard, most conspicuously, but also Robert Heinlein, Theodore Sturgeon, Phil Dick, J. G. Ballard, and Frank Herbert. "; Pg. 140: "But fandom is only peripherally a system of apprenticeship. Fandom is a way of life. Indeed, there is another fannish coinage, fiawol, that is simply an acronym of that holy truth. As a way of life, fandom offers many of the benefits of disorganized religion--religion, that is to say, of the New Age variety, emphasizing self-fulfillment at the expense of doctrinal orthodoxy or a code of ethics, without tithing, pricey churches, or official hierarchies, but a religion, even so, whose gospel is preached at conventions and in fanzines. " [Much more on this subject. The author recognizes that science fiction is a religion.]
science fiction world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 140. "The first tenet of fandom is that SF is the true and only literature. 'Mundane' fiction, which professes to mirror the real world, is a deceitful heresy; SF is visionary, a map of the future by means of which fans have a private view of the millennium--which fans shall inherit. In SF's infancy, this gospel existed mostly in an uncodified form in the hearts of the faithful, but it became official doctrine in [work of] critics Alexei & Cory Panshin, whose fannish manifesto, SF in Dimension (1976) proclaimed... 'mimetic fiction'--all fiction that is not SF--is 'a negative drag of literature' and that even 'SF which rejects its freedom to be positive is as [negative] as mimetic fiction.' SF's mission is nothing less than to present a vision of the 'future selves imminent within us,' when men shall transcend their moral coils and be as gods. Outside of science fiction there is no salvation--not simply in a literary sense but with respect to the Fate of All Mankind. "
science fiction world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 141. "The second tenet of fannish faith is that fans are a breed apart, elevated above the uncircumsized by a mysterious, inherent difference. For the young (as most fans are) this will present no difficulty. Any teenager with a modicum of self-esteem knows this of himself already. For those who have been relegated to the category of nerd in high school years, however, there can be comfort in the assurance that despite being members of the chess club rather than the football team, they will have the last laugh--as indeed many will, as they parlay their brains into scholarships to MIT or similar elite institutions.

Yet there will be those... whose capabilities don't gibe with their aspirations... How is one to reconcile, in such cases, the discrepancy between a grandiose self-image and the steady encroachments of mundane reality?

The usual answer has been religion in one form of another... " [more about science fiction as the religion of SF fans]

science fiction world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 141. "In its ideal form (say, as a Carthusian monk) such a philosophy may promote a saintly existence, but in practice it often leads to a vindictive resentment of those outside one's own small fold and to daydreams of millenarian revenge, when the legions of the anti-Christ will be incinerated by one's ally on high. Recently, this malignant form of millennialist, quasi-religions SF [science fiction] reached its apotheosis in the outrages perpetrated by Japan's Aum Shinrikyo cult, when members released the nerve gas sarin in Tokyo's subways on March 20, 1995... Aum's minions were the children of Godzilla. They had grown up watching cartoons like Space Battleship Yamato... They'd graduated to the gegika, book-length comics featuring gung-ho tales of rape and murder against Bladerunner-esque backdrops... " [More]
science fiction world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 144. "Fortunately, a hunger for divine retribution is not the dominant element of most religious faiths. Fear of death and mortal illness usually bulk much larger. Religion's traditional answers to this has been the promise of an afterlife in which such intolerable truths will be transcended. This has also been the answer of those like Alexei Panshin, for whom SF serves as a religion, that can be traced back to Poe's 'Mesmeric Revelation' and 'The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar.'

Poe was too devoted to his literary fame to undertake the hard word of founding a new religion, but that task was undertaken, not long after his demise, by two extraordinary women... "

science fiction world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 179. "For the SF faithful, though, the important thing is to have a fantasy that is sufficiently persuasive and brightly colored. The future is a theme park that allows us to enter our favorite SF movies and have cheerful adventures. And that's no metaphor: "
science fiction world 1998 Wilson, Robert Charles. "Divided by Infinity " in Starlight 2 (Patrick Nielsen Hayden, ed.). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 42. "'I rather like the idea--when they explain it--of my memoirs circulating through the terrestrial past, appearing fragmented and unintelligible among the night terrors of Neanderthals, Cro-Magnons, Roman slaves, Chinese peasants science fiction writers, drunken poets. "
science fiction world 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 14. "'...The subject is Timothy Truitt, legal name Timothy James Stebbins, a Caucasian male age 45; citizenship and legal residence, Great Britain; profession, entertainer. The subject is currently engaged by GalctiCon Production of New York City as a guest speaker at conventions for science fiction fans, and has been on a speaking tour of the United States and Canada since 2 January this year.

'On 15 February, as the guest of honor at a gathering of science fiction fans at the Genesse Hotel in Ithaca, New York, Truitt failed to appear at a scheduled late-night chat session with the fans...' " [Many other refs., not in DB. Truitt is the main character.]

science fiction world 1999 Banks, Iain. The Business. New York: Simon & Schuster (1999); pg. 43. "She also gave the impression of having a combined Transporter Room and Tardis buried somewhere in the house at her command, as she seemed to possess the gift of materialising at will wherever and whenever she wanted. The only difference was that in Star Trek or Doctor Who there was a cheesy sound effect and a vaguely human-shaped shimmer--or the sudden appearance of a Metropolitan Police box--to give you a few seconds' warning; Miss H had perfected the art of arriving instantly and without a sound. "
science fiction world 1999 Banks, Iain. The Business. New York: Simon & Schuster (1999); pg. 341. Man from U.N.C.L.E.
science fiction world 2000 Barnes, John. "Upon Their Backs, to Bite 'Em " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 312. [In John Barnes' story, he brings a character from his own novels into the Draka universe created by S. M. Sterling. Excerpt here is from Sterling's introduction to this story. Refs. from within the story to Barnes' other fiction are not in DB.] "One of the great things about a multiverse of alternate timelines is that if anything possible happens, virtually everything will, somewhere.

So Mark Strang takes time off from the war against the closes--sadistic descendants of the Carthaginians who rule a million timelines, all of them badly--to meet the gene-engineered Draka.

The Closers love to torment their helpless, hating slaves. To the Draka, that would seem crude; they consider making their subjects love them the ultimate domination. Mark Strang isn't enchanted with either approach, and shows it . . . "

science fiction world 2000 Barnes, John. "Upon Their Backs, to Bite 'Em " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 318. "Buck Rogers science, storybook settings, desperate quests, mad tyrants, unspeakable crimes, ineffable beauty... "
science fiction world 2000 Cox, Greg. X-Men & the Avengers: Gamma Quest: Book 3: Friend or Foe?. New York: Berkley Boulevard (2000); pg. 81. "...Iron Man estimated that the saucer was about one-and-a-half times larger than the quinjet. Not exactly an Imperial Star Destroyer, perhaps, but an impressive sight nonetheless.

Gaps rose from the passenger area, proving that his fellow heroes could see the gleaming saucer as well. 'Klaatu birada nikto!' the Beast exclaimed. 'Where in the sainted name of Carl Sagan did that come from?'

...The saucer looked like an escapee from a 1950's sci-fi movie, but Iron Man recognized the design immediately. 'That's a Skrull ship!' he said... "

science fiction world 2000 Cox, Greg. X-Men & the Avengers: Gamma Quest: Book 3: Friend or Foe?. New York: Berkley Boulevard (2000); pg. 114. "Humanoid heads and limbs were scattered like chaff, falling bloodlessly onto the pavement. 'Yahoo!' Iceman crowed excitedly. 'Just all me Bobby, the Humanoid Slayer!' " [An apparent reference to the television show 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer.']
science fiction world 2000 Cox, Greg. X-Men & the Avengers: Gamma Quest: Book 3: Friend or Foe?. New York: Berkley Boulevard (2000); pg. 139. "'Holy cow!' the Beast gasped, taken aback by the sight of Cap's shield gone astray. 'That never happens to "Xena!'

No student of nineties pop culture, Cap missed the allusion. 'Thena?' he said, sounding puzzled. 'Of the Eternals?'

There was no time to explain... "

science fiction world 2000 Cox, Greg. X-Men & the Avengers: Gamma Quest: Book 3: Friend or Foe?. New York: Berkley Boulevard (2000); pg. 220-219. "Better put him under wraps before we get caught up in a rumble with E.T. here. "
science fiction world 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 238. "I should show him The Seventh Seal--either that, or Bill and Ted's Bogus Journey. "


science fiction, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus
Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.