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Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to science fiction, USA

science fiction, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
science fiction USA 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. 35. "'Well then, you can see how it would have taken all the joy out of inventing Wookies and such when the Hefn turned up, big as life.'

'And twice as ugly,' Phoebe muttered aside to Matt.

Matt perked up. 'I saw an article a couple weeks ago by a famous sci-fi author who was making exactly that point. She said a devastating crisis of morale had swept through the field. The writers are all confused, they don't know what to do. She said they were sure to get back on their feet eventually, because they're such inventive people, but right now they'll all still immobilized and demoralized by the overwhelming reality of the Hefn. Or words to that effect.'

Liam's father stirred in his chair. 'Why don't they write about the Gafr? Nobody knows anything about them.'

Carrie rolled her eyes. "

science fiction USA 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. 35. "'Anyway, Pam, cyberpunk posited an ultra-urban near future--the present, now!--that would be dominated by computer networking and drug-related crime. Very fast-paced, lots of excitement, lots of action. Lots of hackers plugging programs into their brains, or becoming programs or being engraved on microchips. It was quite a craze for a while. It would have a wildly outmoded feel to it now, and not just the idea of computer hackers running the world, instead of the Hefn--think how computers themselves have changed since the Directive.'

'Science fiction was never supposed to be predictive,' Terry Carpenter said quietly. 'Life overtook it, ninety-nine percent of the time.' "

science fiction USA 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. 34-35. "'Presumably they don't intend to implant a socket in your brain, and plug the time transceiver into the socket, like in all those B-grade sci-fi movies I used to go to when I was a kid!'...

'No, no, no, this is a much more subtle interface--no Frankenstein surgery or cyberpunk stuff. 'Transcendental' is what Humphrey calls it.'

'What's cyberpunk?' Pam asked, and almost at once regretted breaking the silence...

Then Carrie crossed her legs and smiled, answering so naturally that Pam wasn't' sure she had imagined the momentary tension. 'Cyberpunk was a kind of science fiction that was popular for a while about twenty-five years ago. Have you ever read or seen any science fiction?'

'I saw Star Wars.'

Carrie nodded. 'Well then, you can see how it would have taken all the joy out of inventing Wookies and such when the Hefn turned up, big as life.' "

science fiction USA 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. 36-37. "'Honey, you didn't say anything wrong before. The reason we all acted so funny is, Terry had a son called Jeff, who was Liam's best friend... Jeff died in the Peach Bottom disaster several years ago. He was a great science fiction reader. The only reason the rest of us know what cyberpunk is, is that Jeff used to talk about it. See? Your question made us all remember how he used to go on about it, all excited. He really admired the cyberpunk writers, old-fashioned though the were.' She sighed. 'We miss Jeff a lot...' "
science fiction USA 2040 Dick, Philip K. "Orpheus with Clay Feet " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1963); pg. 293. "'When I was in college... getting my M.A. in English lit, I had to read a god deal of twentieth century science fiction, of course. Of the greats there were three writers who stood out. The first was Robert Heinlein with his future history. The second, Isaac Asimov with his Foundation epic series. And-- The man I did my paper on. Jack Dowland. Of the three of them, Dowland was considered the greatest. His future history of the world began to appear in 1957, in both magazine form -- as short stories -- and in book form, as complete novels. By 1963, Dowland was regarded as--'

...'...Leo Parks... went back and inspired A. E. van Vogt to avoid love stories and westerns and try science fiction...' " [Many more refs. to science fiction writers, not in DB. Operatives (clients?) from Muse Enterprises go back in time and inspire various writers.]

science fiction USA 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 48. "In some areas of the country, actual primitive tribes had taken over, calling themselves Saxons, Huns, Cimmerians, Celts, or Picts, and in many respects they did resemble their historic models... the Cimmerians seemed to be derived from the former fans of fantasy adventure novels. "
science fiction USA 2094 Sladek, John. Tik-Tok. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1985; 1st printed 1983); pg. 141. "Then came the case of Reverend Humm, leader of a sect called the Tachyonites. The Tachyonites, or to give them their proper name, the Assembly of Time Saints, were one of the more stiff-necked little groups our century has thrown up. One of their founders must have stumbled across some scientific textbook or even some science fiction story in which there is speculation about tachyons and time travel. "
science fiction Utah 1987 Budrys, Algis (ed.) Writers of the Future: Volume III. Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987). [Introduction to "On My Way to Paradise ", by Dave Wolverton.]; pg. 366. [Factual information about the author in introduction to a short story.] "Dave Wolverton is at Brigham Young University studying to become an editor... He is the editor for The Leading Edge, a Provo-based semiprofessional SF magazine of high caliber. "
science fiction Utah 2055 Dick, Philip K. Now Wait for Last Year. New York: Manor Books (1976); pg. 185. "'What year?'

The cab said, 'Are you a Mr. Rip Van Winkle or something, sir? It's 2055. And I hope it satisfied you.' "

science fiction Utah: Kanab 2000 Gates, John. Brigham's Day. New York: Walter & Co. (2000); pg. 60. "'...She was probably a looker, once, but the body Snatchers got her.'

Bybee squinted at him... 'What are you talking about?'

'The Mos got her,' Watters said. 'You never seen that movie? You nod off; you drop your guard and wham! The Body Snatchers got you. It's called conversion, my friend.' "

science fiction Venezuela 1947 Bear, Greg. Dinosaur Summer. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 151. "For the first time, they looked upon the ancient landscape that Professor George Edward Challenger and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle had called the Lost World. "
science fiction Virginia 1865 Heideman, Eric. "Time and Chance " in Writers of the Future: Volume III (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 311-312. Pg. 311-312: "On a clear, bright Indian Summer afternoon in the August of 1865... Richmond, Virginia... standing behind her and before a bust of Dante, the unmistakable figure of Edgar Allan, humorist, editor of the Stylus, poet laureate of the Confederacy... Though the eyes of both were gray, those of the visitor were sharp, piercing, tinged with blue, while the eyes of Edgar Allan were large, soft, and dark... "; Pg. 314: "...busts of Dante and portraits of General Lee and Benjamin Franklin. "; Pg. 321: "They who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape they who dream by night. In their grey visions they obtain glimpses of eternity, and thrill, in awakening, to find that they have been upon the verge of the great secret.

Poe's 'Eleanora.' " [Edgar Allan Poe is a main character in this story. There are many refs. to him, most not in DB. Of course, Edgar Allan Poe isn't usually classified as a science fiction writer.]

science fiction Washington 1905 Gloss, Molly. Wild Life. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000); pg. 24. [A character named Lewis, after C. S. Lewis. The narrator's child is named Jules, after Jules Verne.]
science fiction Washington 1999 Gloss, Molly. Wild Life. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000); pg. 18. Pg. 18: "We could say Charlotte was apparently planning to use her 'great adventure'--searching for little Harriet Coffee--as the basis for a novel, a metaphysical (metaphorical?) adventure-fantasy, maybe, which was certainly popular in those days. "; Pg. 91: "...and even the Twin Falls man looked up from his reading to wave a hand to those left behind. His book, I saw, was The Ghostly Galleon: A Tale of the Steel-Arm Detective. "
science fiction Washington, D.C. 1985 Bishop, Michael. No Enemy But Time. New York: Timescape (1982); pg. 282. "This Christmas the most prominently displayed paperbacks in the open storefront were a series of photo-novels devoted to the exploits of Count Stanislaw Stodt, a vampire in the employ of the CIA. A boxed set of five of these adventures as being touted as this year's most popular stocking stuffer. Joshua sidled past these displays to the hardcover tables, where management had laid out its inventory of serious fiction: hauntings, space operas, espionage thrillers, movie tie-ins, political biographies, and the complete works of Wilkie Collins, now enjoying a renascence in updated abridgments by Stephen King. "
science fiction Washington, D.C. 1993 Anthony, Patricia. Brother Termite. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1993); pg. 52. "Tali was glaring down at the traffic below as though he wished he were an alien from an old science fiction movie and the scene they were playing with the humans was from 'War of the Worlds.' He stared down at the pedestrians and the cars like Godzilla, wanting to crush them all. "
science fiction Washington, D.C. 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 41. Pg. 41: Murnau's Nosferatu; Pg. 231: "...by a few bars of the Bernard Herrmann score for Jason and the Argonauts "; Pg. 232: "...and watching The Brave Little Toaster "; Pg. 294: "...synth-pop version of the theme from Gigantor. "
science fiction Washington, D.C. 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 25. "Frank, meanwhile, would be flown by fighter jet direct from the Kitty Hawk to Washington, where he'd brief the president, who was already miffed that the meeting was taking place at the UN rather than on the White House lawn, as fifties SF films had predicted. "
science fiction Washington, D.C. 1998 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 15. "...he noticed a copy of the February issue of Analog resting before him. Not only that, but Ordmann and Cuminski also had copies. The very same science fiction magazine currently on sale in bookstores and newsstands across the country which, along with new stories by Michael F. Flynn, Paul Levinson, and Bud Sparhawk and book reviews by Tom Easton, also featured a nonfiction article by one David Z. Murphy: 'How to Travel Through Time (And Not Get Caught).' " [A major plotline in the novel involves Murphy, a NASA researcher and lifelong science fiction fan who writes nonfiction articles for Analog. One article, the one about time travel, attracts an unusual amount of attention from, among other people, a person impersonating award-winning science fiction writer Gregory Benford.]
science fiction Washington, D.C. 1998 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 20. "Like so many physicists, David Zachary Murphy fell in love with science by reading science fiction.

His love affair began when he was ten years old and saw Star Trek on TV. That sent him straight to his elementary school library, where he discovered, tucked in among more conventional fare like The Wind in the Willows and Johnny Tremain, a half dozen lesser-known books: Rocket Ship Galileo, Attack from Atlantis, Islands in the Sky, and the Lucky Starr series by someone named Paul French. He read everything in a few weeks, then reread them a couple of more times, before finally bicycling to a nearby branch library, where he found more sophisticated fare: I, Robot, Double Star, Needle in a Timestack, Way Station, and other classics of the genre. "

science fiction Washington, D.C. 1998 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 21. Pg. 21: Look; Analog; Gordon R. Dickson, Wolfling; Anne McCaffrey, 'A Womanly Talent'; Frank Kelly Freas; Galaxy, If, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Vertex; Pg. 22: Asimov's, Omni; Pg. 27: Astounding; Pg. 29: "gaze lingered on the cover art, a Vincent Di Fate painting of an astronaut spacewalking outside a large spacecraft. " [Many other refs. to Analog, e.g. pg. 22-25, 28-29.]
science fiction Washington, D.C. 1998 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 37. "'Dr. Murphy, this is Gregory Benford. I'm a professor of physics at the University of California-Irvine. I also write science fiction on occasion.'

Murphy's mouth dropped open. 'Yes, of course I've heard of you.' He sat up straight in his chair. 'I'm a big fan of your work.'

Which was the unvarnished truth. One of the SF authors whom he admired the most was Gregory Benford; not only did he have a superb imagination, but he was also one of the small handful of writers whose novels and stories possessed a high degree of scientific plausibility. " [A person impersonating Gregory Benford calls the novel's main character, Murphy. The imposter even has lunch with Murphy. The imposter looks and sounds exactly like Benford, but when he doesn't seem to remember some of his own books, Murphy suspects it might not be the real Benford. He calls a friend who obtains Benford's phone number, and calls his office, and briefly talks to the real Benford. See pages 37-40, 48-57, 293-295.]

science fiction Washington, D.C. 1998 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 50. "So this was Greg Benford. The author of 'Doing Lennon,' the story which caused him to blow a high-school chemistry exam because he preferred to read it behind his textbook when he should have been paying attention to a review session, and In the Ocean of Night, which made him forget that he was supposed to take Karen Dolen to the freshman mixer, and Artifact, which he read during his honeymoon vacation in England, and . . . " [More with Benford, pg. 50-57, 62-68, elsewhere.]
science fiction Washington, D.C. 1998 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 51. Pg. 51: "'...I just took it a step further. Ask the next question, as Theodore Sturgeon used to say.' ";

Pg. 52: "'Have you read Philip Klass's work? He's been debunking UFO sightings for a long time.'

'And I don't argue with any of it.' Murphy chuckled. 'Believe me, I'm not a UFO buff of any sort. I think Klass is on the right track...' ";

Pg. 53: Heart of the Comet by Benford; Pg. 55: Washington Science Fiction Society; Pg. 66: Analog; Pg. 78: Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America

science fiction Washington, D.C. 1998 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 54. "'Really, I was just doing the same thing that science fiction writers do . . . throwing out ideas, playing with crazy notions. It doesn't necessarily mean that I think UFOs are time machines. It's just . . . well, it's just something to think about.' "
science fiction Washington, D.C. 1998 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 57. Pg. 56-57: "He had just met someone who looked exactly like Gregory Benford, who sounded just like Gregory Benford, but who was not only ignorant of one of the most common mathematical denominators in theoretical physics, but had also forgotten that he had coauthored a best-selling novel with another physicist, David Brin. Sure, all this might be explained by travel fatigue. Yet Gregory Benford would never be amnesiac of the fact that he had written Timescape, a novel which was not only regarded as one of his best-known works, and a Nebula winner as well . . .

But also a time-machine story.

Yet the Greg Benford with whom he had just shared lunch claimed never to have written a time-machine story.

And now, however briefly, Murphy had spoken with a Gregory Benford whose voice was absolutely identical, yet who was in his office on the other side of the country... What the hell was going on here? "

science fiction Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 36. [Outside the White House.] "...he saw the figure approaching. It was a man, and he would have been hard to miss... given the shiny suit he was wearing.

Lorenzo rolled his eyes... Interestingly enough, the man did not stop at the guard shack. He walked straight to the red-and-white barrier and paused to look at it, as if calculating the best way to get around it.

Lorenzo watched him for a moment. Occasionally, when there was a science-fiction convention in town, someone would pull a prank like this.

The man looked up. There was something wrong with his face. He reminded Lorenzo of someone with Down's syndrome, but the face wasn't quite right.

'Sir, the President has already received a courier from the cosmos. So why don't you soar off to save another small and insignificant plant?' "

science fiction Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 37. "Lorenzo bit his lip. Not another one! If there was anything worse than science-fiction conventions, it was the UFO conventions... "
science fiction Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 39. "Maybe he could do something like Alex had done in that old movie, A Clockwork Orange.

Yo.

Now there was one righteous dude who was way past cool.

A Clockwork Orange was Ghost's favorite movie. he had first seen it years ago, when he was just starting to run for the local clockers. He'd been over at the house of a friend when it had come on the cable, and was shocked by the sight of bare breasts and phallic statuary. But he was galvanized by the violence.

And he knew right then. That was the life he wanted to live.

Two weeks later, at the macho age of fourteen, he had taken off a local video store. He and three dudes in a stolen van had hit the place for $23,000 worth of tapes, laser discs, and players, then fenced it all for ten cents on the dollar.

Everything except a Sony TV and laser-disc player, and the disc of A Clockwork Orange. In the three years since, he had watched it hundreds of times. "

science fiction Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 39. "...A Clockwork Orange... And while he disdained the bowler hat, mascara and white codpiece that made up Alex's costume, everything else Ghost had done with his life had been an effort to emulate what he thought Alex would do--right down to listening to classical music. This music had brought him nothing but scorn, however, so he retreated from it, changing to hard-core metal and rap. But deep inside, he maintained a love for that music, and he treasured it above anything else he was exposed to.

...He knew what Alex [main character in the film] would do. There was an instructional scene in the movie where he stomped his gang just to prove he was still boss.

Ghost would love that. He would love to stomp Shark. The problem was, he wasn't sure he wanted to take on the others. He wasn't sure it was necessary. Besides, Alex's gang had gotten their revenge later in the movie. He didn't need any of that. "

science fiction Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 42. [Refers to A Clockwork Orange] ; Pg. 42: "Ghost dropped his arm down and rotated his shoulder. The metal rod he kept hanging under his arm dropped neatly into his outstretched palm. It was a move he had practiced ever since he had first seen Alex wail on his entire gang armed only with a cane. "; Pg. 44: "It was the end of his life he was looking at. Alex was going to prison. It was full of faggots. And now there was AIDS. " [Other refs. to this film, not in DB.]
science fiction Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 185. "Remember the old tale of the monkey's paw? It was about a magical talisman that could make wishes come true in a literal way, and the moral of the story was that you should be careful what you wish for because you might just get it. "
science fiction Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 198. "Human capture of an extraterrestrial intelligence. A close encounter of the fifth kind. "
science fiction Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 224. "Over the man's shoulder he saw something that looked like a scene out of a sci-fi-film--a bunch of police officers being rounded up by a small handful of men in these black uniforms. "
science fiction Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 233. "'Come on. I'm no scientist, but I've watched enough of the Sci-Fi Channel to recognize some huge holes in your story. If your world is that far away from us, even at light speed it would take you millions of years to get here.' He shook his head. 'I'm not buying this.' "
science fiction Washington, D.C. 2011 Zubrin, Robert. First Landing. New York: Ace Books (2002; c. 2001); pg. 85. The Andromeda Strain
science fiction Washington, D.C. 2029 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. Crescent City Rhapsody. New York: Tor (2001; c. 2000); pg. 226. "'...Kind of like in a Kurt Vonnegut novel...' "
science fiction Washington, D.C. 2314 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 66. "hadn't this sort of thing happened once before?

Yes, it had. back in 1944, at the height of World War II, when a writer . . . who was it again? Digging at his memory, Murphy absently snapped his fingers. Heinlein? Asimov? Maybe Hal Clement or Jack Williamson . . .?

No. Now he remembered. It was Cleve Cartmell, a writer almost completely forgotten today were it not for one particular story he had written for Astounding.

Titled 'Deadline,' it was otherwise negligible save for one important detail: in it, Cartmell accurately described an atomic weapon, one which used U-235 as its reactive mass. He even went so far as to say that two such bombs, if dropped on enemy cities, could end the fictional war depicted in his story. An innocuous novelette in the back of a pulp SF magazine, yet within a few days of its publication in Astounding, its editor, John W. Campbell, Jr., was visited at his New York office by a military intelligence officer... " [More, pg. 67.]

science fiction Washington: Seattle 1998 York, J. Steven. Generation X: Crossroads. New York: Berkley (1998); pg. 35. "As they descended, the walls changed from painted drywall to some kind of soft material tacked down with a covering of chicken wire. 'Soundproofing,' he explained. 'Kind of James Bond, I know, but we're trying to keep a low profile here...' "
science fiction world 1900 Williamson, Barbara. "The Thing Waiting Outside " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 112. "'You know now, don't you, that you did not really see and speak to the people in the books. They were only here in your imagination. You did not see the Lilliputians or talk to the Red Queen. You did not see the cave dwellers or watch the tiger eat one of them... You know that now, don't you?' "; Pg. 116: "Very soon, he promised himself, he would read The Hound of the Baskervilles again. " [Other refs. to literature, not in DB.]
science fiction world 1929 Asimov, Isaac (ed.) The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. x. [Introduction] "I call myself an old-timer because I started reading science fiction in 1929. Now this was only three years after Hugo Gernsback had inaugurated what is known to all True Believers as the Age of Science Fiction. "
science fiction world 1944 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Striking the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1996); pg. 193. "The third showed a Lizard spaceship and some weird creatures who weren't Lizard. Goldfarb wondered if it was fact or the alien version of Buck Rogers or Flash Gordon two-reelers. "
science fiction world 1947 Bear, Greg. Dinosaur Summer. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 323. [Author's explanatory section: "What's Real, and What's Not "] "Sir Arthur Conan Doyle set his novel The Lost World on a tepui in Venezuela, and the tepuis are real, but they are much smaller than either Doyle or I have described them, and none of them has dinosaurs...

Professor George Edward Challenger is Doyle's invention, as is Maple White. "

science fiction world 1947 Waldrop, Howard. "Thirty Minutes Over Broadway! " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 34. "a horror film called Isle of the Dead with Boris Karloff... "
science fiction world 1950 Barton, William. "Home is Where the Heart Is " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 229. "Apu said, 'Like's Rossum's machines, eh, Hans?'

I wondered where Karel Capek is now. Escaped to America? Slaving on a plantation somewhere? Or just dead?

Apu said, 'They hardly look human.' " [Capek is the science fiction writer who coined the word 'robot'.]

science fiction world 1956 Sheckley, Robert "Protection " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982; c 1956); pg. 204. "'Is that the referent? Refraction index. Creature of insubstantiality. The Shadow knows. Did I pick the right one?'

...'...I am the Spirit of Christmas Past. The Creature from the Black Lagoon. The Bride of Frankenstein. The--' "

science fiction world 1962 Asimov, Isaac (ed.) The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. xi. [Introduction] "It was a love affair on the spot. It was a tight union of a common interest unshared by the Philistines. The next step was a determined search for still other brethren, and the founding of a club. At weekly gatherings, the momentous issues of the day (Would Astounding adopt smooth edges? Was E. E. Smith's latest serial the equal of his immortal 'Skylark of Space'?) were thrashed out.

The club grew larger and more active. Inter-city leagues of clubs were founded. Then, in 1939, the inevitable climax was reached. It was decided to hold a World Science Fiction Convention.

It was held in New York. Two hundred eager teen-agers attended, some coming from as far away as California. Editors attended and were astonished at the ardor and enthusiasm... " [Much more material illustration how, sociologically, science fiction functions as a distinct religion.]

science fiction world 1963 Waldrop, Howard. "Thirty Minutes Over Broadway! " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 13. "'...He showed up at four A.M.--lammed out of the orphanage to do it. They came out to get him. But of course Professor Silverberg had hired him, squared it with them.'

'Silverberg's the one the Nazis bumped off? The guy who made the jet?'

'Yep. Years ahead of everybody, but weird. I put together the plane for him, Bobby and I built it by hand. But Silverberg made the jets--damnedest engines you ever saw...' " [Character is probably named after s.f. writer Robert Silverberg. More refs. to this character.]

science fiction world 1964 Asimov, Isaac. "Introduction " in The Rest of the Robots. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1964); pg. xii. Pg. xii: R.U.R. by Karel Capek; "In the 1920s science fiction was becoming a popular art form for the first time, and no longer merely a tour de force I the hands of an occasional master such as Verne and Wells. Magazines devoted exclusively to science fiction appeared and 'science fiction writers' made their appearance on the literary scene. "
science fiction world 1964 Pronzini, Bill. "Dry Spell " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982; 1st pub Amazing Stories, 1970); pg. 504-505. "It would be a science fiction/fantasy story, he thought, probably a novella if he worked it properly. " [In this story a writer thinks up a science fiction story about aliens who have infiltrated Earth and have a machine that monitors the thoughts of humans to make sure that nobody clairvoyantly stumbles upon their plan. The author, planning to write such a story, thinks that such aliens would, if they sensed somebody thinking about their plan, use their machine to eradicate all such thoughts. Then the author's mind goes blank. The punchline is that the story he was thinking about is actually true, and happens to him.]
science fiction world 1965 Vonnegut, Kurt. Slaughterhouse-Five. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1969); pg. 132. Pg. 132: "Maniacs in the Fourth Dimension, by Kilgore Trout.. One thing Trout said that Rosewater liked very much was that there really were vampires and werewolves and goblins and angels and so on, but that they were in the fourth dimension... " [More.]; Pg. 138: The Gospel from Outer Space, by Kilgore Trout
science fiction world 1968 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 189. "The sanctification of the number 5 antedates Atlantis itself and goes back to the intelligent cephalopods who infested Antarctica about 150,000,000 years before humankind appeared on earth; see H. P. Lovecraft's work of 'fiction,' At the Mountains of Madness (Arkham House, 1968), in which it is suggested that 5 was sacred to these creatures because they had five tentacles or pseudopods. "
science fiction world 1969 Cox, Greg. Assignment: Eternity (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 156. "All this covert infilatration reminded him of that time he and Isis had attempted to liberate a former British intelligence agent from the artificial village where he was being held captive as part of an elaborate psychological conditioning experiment. That mission had ended badly, he remembered, primarily because he had underestimated the forces arrayed against them. " [An apparent reference to The Prisoner TV series.]
science fiction world 1972 Dick, Philip K. The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1972); pg. 8. "What is it about s-f writers that so turns off the establishment, and also the criminals of the gutter. We are universally distrusted. As Kathy told me once, 'It's because they can't figure you out; you're a very unusual person.' "
science fiction world 1972 Zelazny, Roger. The Guns of Avalon in The Chronicles of Amber, vol. 1. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (c. 1972); pg. 310. "Then I left Ganelon to shift for himself for a time, since he had thrown himself into his tourist role in a true Stanislavskian fashion. " [Reference to Stanislaw?]
science fiction world 1973 Leiber, Fritz. The Three of Swords. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1973); pg. 3. [Author's Introduction] "This is Book One of the Saga of Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser, the two greatest swordsmen ever to be in this or any other universe of fact or fiction, more skillful masters of the blade even than Cyrano de Bergerac, Scar Gordon, Conan, John Carter, D'Artagnan, Brandoch Daha, and Anra Devadoris. "
science fiction world 1973 Morrison, David. "Epilog to Carl Sagan's Cosmic Connection " in Carl Sagan's Cosmic Connection: An Extraterrestrial Perspective. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2000; c. 1973); pg. 289. Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke's 2001: A Space Odyssey; Steven Spielberg's ET: The Extraterrestrial; Star Wars; Star Trek; Alien; Sagan's Contact; Ellie Arroway
science fiction world 1973 Sagan, Carl. Cosmic Connection: An Extraterrestrial Perspective. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2000; c. 1973); pg. 24. "Editorials in science-fiction magazines also took the government to task. The idea of government censorship of the Pioneer 10 plaque is now so well documented... " [Also pg. 37.]
science fiction world 1973 Sagan, Carl. Cosmic Connection: An Extraterrestrial Perspective. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2000; c. 1973); pg. 77. "I receive a great deal of mail, all kinds of mail... and some from advocates of various arcane disciplines such as astrology, ESP, UFO-contact stories, the speculative fiction of von Danniken, witchcraft, palmistry, phrenology, tea-leaf reading, Tarot cards, the I-Ching, transcendental meditation, and the psychedelic drug experience. "
science fiction world 1974 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 35. Pg. 35: "Her initial gut response to this whole gene-tampering business had been one of wary skepticism; messing around with people's DNA sounded a little too close to Brave New World for comfort, and Gary Seven's dubious attitude toward the venture... had only heightened her suspicion that maybe genetic engineering was one of those things that mankind was meant to leave alone, like nuclear missiles and streaking. "; Pg. 122: "...still had problems with Chrysalis's whole Brave New World agenda, despite her hosts' persuasive sales pitches. "
science fiction world 1975 Heinlein, Robert A. "Requiem " in Analog: Readers' Choice: Vol. 2 (Stanley Schmidt, ed.) New York: David Publications (1981; story copyright 1967); pg. 55. "'Look at this, George.'--'Huh?' Hmm, interesting, but what of it?'--'Can't you see? The next stage is to the Moon!'--God, but you're a sucker, Delos. The trouble with you is, you read too many of those trashy magazines. Now I caught my boy reading one of 'em just last week, Stunning Stories, or some such title, and dressed him down proper. Your folks should have done you the same favor.' "
science fiction world 1975 Heinlein, Robert A. "Requiem " in Analog: Readers' Choice: Vol. 2 (Stanley Schmidt, ed.) New York: David Publications (1981; story copyright 1967); pg. 58. "'No, I just wanted to live a long time and see it all happen. I wasn't unusual; there were lots of boys like me--radio hams, they were, and telescope builders, and airplane amateurs. We had science clubs, and basement laboratories, and science-fiction leagues--the kind of boys who thought there was more romance in one issue of the Electrical Experimenter than in all the books Dumas ever wrote. We didn't want to be one of Horatio Alger's Get-Rich heroes either, we wanted to build space ships. Well, some of us did.' "
science fiction world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 45. "'You know'--Harry waved... 'doing this, like a science-fiction movie. You've just got us in an abandoned hotel somewheres...' "
science fiction world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 81. "...from my peyote visions and Osiris and enormous female breasts and Spider Man and the Tarot Magus and Good Old Charlie Brown and Bugs Bunny with a Tommy gun and Jughead and Archie and Captain America and Hermes Thrice-Blessed and Zeus and Athene and Zagreus and his lynxes and panthers and Micky [sic] Mouse and Superman and Santa Claus and Laughing Buddha Jesus and a million million birds... "
science fiction world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 148. "'...And you have to make Yog Sothoth into a carbon copy of Satan. You haven't progressed one iota beyond the Judeo-Christian myth with that highfalutin' science-fiction story.' "


science fiction, continued

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