Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to science fiction, United Kingdom

science fiction, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
science fiction United Kingdom 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 14-15. "'You worry about her too much,' Robert countered sharply, 'reading a veritable vomit of science fiction.'

'Ah, science fiction's my food and drink--well, anyhow, my food. Vomit, now--you were maybe thinking of the book-vomiting dragon Error in The Faerie Queene and fantacying her spewing up, after all of Spenser's musty hates, the collected works of H.G. Wells, Arthur C. Clarke, and Edgar Rice Burroughs?'

Hillary's voice grew astringent. 'Science fiction is as trivial as all artistic forms that deal with phenomena rather than people...'...

'Be damned to Loner, that Yankee anachronism! he's most likely drowned and feeding the fishes. But the Americans write fine science fiction and make moon-ships almost as good as the Russkies'....' "

science fiction United Kingdom 2015 Willis, Connie. "Cat's Paw " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 184. [Playing a guessing game.] "'King Kong,' Nurse Parchtry said.

There was an embarrassed silence.

'I think perhaps we should avoid any references to primates,' Lardy Charlotte said finally.

We finally decided on R2D2, who was both mineral and animal (the actor inside him)... "

science fiction United Kingdom 2030 McAuley, Paul J. Fairyland. New York: Avon Books (1997; c 1995); pg. 75. "'LGM?'

...Milena is eager to explain. 'Little Green Men. You know, like flying saucers. Right brain visions. There's one strain, the Streiber, that gives you a complete abduction experience, even with fuzzy false memories of a rape. It's amazing what you can pack down inside a bunch of metal-doped super-conducting buckyballs.'

'Klaatu barada nikto,' Alex says, and isn't surprised to see that she doesn't get it. She's probably the intense serious type who listens to Bach... "

science fiction United Kingdom: England 1615 Ramirez, Frank. "The Merchant of Stratford " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982; 1st pub 1979 in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine); pg. 293-300. Pg. 296: "'Is the best you could do?'

I replied, 'It was selected by our English department.'

'Figures,' he said. 'Next time you come, bring some Zelazny.'

Zelazny? Who was -- He must have read my face.

'Haven't heard of him?' he asked. 'And while you're at it send some Asimov too. Can't get enough through channels. I've got almost all of Heinlein's books, but let me see if there's something you... I remember now!' he brightened. 'See if you can find me that issue of Galaxy from the summer of 1973. I've been dying to read the end of that Clarke novel.'

'Who are all these people?'

'Science fiction writers,' he said with reverence. 'You fool,' he added with derision.

'You like science fiction?'

One would have thought I'd cursed the Queen and spit on the Bible by the look he gave me. " [This is a story of Shakespeare's appreciation of science fiction. Also mentioned: Martian Chronicles; Ellison; Brunner.]

science fiction United Kingdom: England 1615 Ramirez, Frank. "The Merchant of Stratford " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982; 1st pub 1979 in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine); pg. 293-300. [The first time traveller is talking to William Shakespeare.] Pg. 297: "'You like science fiction?'

...'Of course I do. It reminds me of my work.'

'I'm afraid I don't understand.'

'Well, it's honest, for one thing. I wrote plays, and was looked down upon by my contemporaries for doing so. I didn't write was considered literature. I wrote to entertain and to make a little money. The same thing was true for sf. But what happened centuries after its birth? Let me see if I can find my copy of that variorum edition of The Martian Chronicles. Now you've got me sounding like a Heinlein character.' "

science fiction United Kingdom: England 1810 Powers, Tim. The Anubis Gates. New York: Ace (1983); pg. 120. "'Yes,' Doyle wondered how much of this Lovecraftian fantasy could be true... "
science fiction United Kingdom: England 1944 Holdstock, Robert. Mythago Wood. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1984); pg. 70. "...it was the same haunting, terrifying feeling that one gets when seeing a Boris Karloff film, or listening to a ghost story on the Home Service. "
science fiction United Kingdom: England 1972 Blish, James & Judith Ann Lawrence. "Getting Along " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 555. [The story "Getting Along " is comprised of letters which parody (pay homage to) the writing of famous genre writers. The writers parodied are not identified in the body of the story, but are identified on page 555 in the introduction:

1. John Cleland
2. Bram Stoker
3. Mary Shelley
4. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
5. John Colier/Lord Dunsany
6. A. Merritt
7. H. G. Wells
8. Victor Appleton
9. H. P. Lovecraft. "

science fiction United Kingdom: England 1976 Amis, Kingsley. The Alteration. New York: Viking Press (1976); pg. 21-22. "Its name [the name of TR--Time Romance--i.e., science fiction] was the subject of unending debate among its followers, many of whom would point to the number of stories and novels offered and accepted as TR in which time as such played no significant part. The most commonly suggested alternative, Invention Fiction, made a beguiling acronym, but was in turn vulnerable to the change that invention was no necessary ingredient of TR. (Science was a word and idea considered in private: who would publish a bawdy pamphlet under the heading of Disgusting Stories?) CW, or Counterfeit World, a class of tale more or less at the present date, but portraying the results of some momentous change in historical fact, was classified as a form of TR by plenty of others besides Decuman, if on no firmer grounds than the writers of the one sometimes ventured into the other. "
science fiction United Kingdom: England 1985 Bear, Greg. Blood Music. New York: Arbor House (2002; c. 1985); pg. 339. The wardrobe door creaked and she turned to look at it, half expecting to see Narnia behind the clothes. (She had liked the apartment--the flat-- right away, because of the wardrobe.)
science fiction United Kingdom: London 1989 Campbell, Ramsey. Ancient Images. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1989) [Book jacket:] "In Ancient Images, Campbell focuses his nightmarish vision on a long-forgotten 1930s Boris Karloff/Bela Lugosi film, Tower of Fear. For reasons blurred by history, powerful forces suppressed the film and destroyed the prints. Nobody now living had seen the finished film until film researcher Graham Nolan's two-year search unearthed the sole surviving print.

Graham invites colleague Sandy Allan, a film editor at London's Metropolitan Television, to view Tower of Fear, but before the screening, the film disappears and the cycle of death begins. " [Many refs. to horror films and filmmakers in novel, not in DB.]

science fiction United Kingdom: London 1989 Campbell, Ramsey. Ancient Images. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1989); pg. 21. Pg. 21: "'What sort of film would that be?'

'An old horror film with Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi?'

'Is that all? Why, I'd let my daughter's watch that.' He sounded relieved on Sandy's behalf. "; Pg. 36: "'...the last film Nolan tried to find wouldn't have been worth finding even if it existed. Even Karloff and Lugosi didn't want to own up to it, and anyway someone owns the rights, so if Nolan had really had a copy he would have been breaking the law. I say let him rest in peace now. He earned it.' " [More about Karloff and Lugosi and their film together, throughout novel. This is the central plot element. Other Karloff/Lugosi refs. not in DB.]

science fiction United Kingdom: London 1989 Campbell, Ramsey. Ancient Images. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1989); pg. 95. "'...He seems particularly put out that in their 'Horror Boys from Hollywood' routine the Ritz Brothers burlesqued Laughton, Karloff, and Lorre, and didn't even think of him. If he and Karloff spend so much time complaining when they are in Hollywood, it is no wonder they have to come here to find work...' "
science fiction United Kingdom: London 1995 Ryman, Geoff. 253. New York: St. Martin's Press (1998); pg. 64. Pg. 54: G. K. Chesterton; Pg. 64: "Reading Clive Barker's Books of Blood. "; Pg. 243: "With stately calm, reads Jeff Noon's Vurt. "; Pg. 267: Ryman's The Child Garden
science fiction United Kingdom: London 2002 McDonald, Ian. Evolution's Shore. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1995); pg. 30. "Trapped in gray London, she wished she were the Hundred-Foot Woman who could push the dirty buildings apart... "
science fiction United Kingdom: London 2075 Ryman, Geoff. The Child Garden; or A Low Comedy. New York: St. Martin's Press (1989); pg. 222. "'A Space Opera?'

...'No one's thought of it before!' he explained. "

science fiction USA 1869 Bethke, Bruce. Wild Wild West. New York: Warner Books (1999); pg. 101. "West hesitated a moment, then decided Ichabod Crane there wouldn't mind, and slipped the revolver into his left holster. "
science fiction USA 1941 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Tilting the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1995); pg. 9. "Till a few months ago, his closest brush with scientists had been with the near-supermen who populated the pages of Astounding. "
science fiction USA 1942 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Upsetting the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1996); pg. 162. "Yeager thought of all the pulp science-fiction stories he'd read where an inventor had an idea one day, built it the next, and mass-produced it the day after that, generally just in time to save the world from the Martians. He'd always taken those with a grain of salt about the size of the Great Salt Flats outside Salt Lake City. Real life didn't work that way. " [Also pg. 308.]
science fiction USA 1946 Williams, Walter Jon "Witness " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 106. "We decided to keep David's powers a secret. We spread a story that he was some kind of sneaky superman, like The Shadow on radio, or that he was our scout. "
science fiction USA 1947 Bear, Greg. Dinosaur Summer. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 17. "Peter... had been waiting for this moment, however, to open the thick, heavy book with all of its pictures: The Lost World, by Sir George Edward Challenger, as told to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Doyle had written the Sherlock Holmes books and many novels. Peter had read The Lost World when he had been eight or nine. Now he had his own copy instead of one from the library, and this one was the deluxe illustrated edition. The bookseller at the Strand had told them it had been out of print for more than five years. People were not very interested in dinosaurs anymore.

Peter scanned the glossy pictures first. He flipped past portraits of the explorers and their Indian guides, stiffly posed in the fashion of 1912, and stopped when he came to a sepia-toned picture of an overgrown marsh with a lake beyond. Looming over the lake were the highland mesas that formed a barrier to the wind on the northern edge of El Grande, the Grand Tepui. " [Much more.]

science fiction USA 1947 Bear, Greg. Dinosaur Summer. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 17-18. Pg. 17: "Like most young people, he had grown up hearing about El Grande, biggest of Venezuela's ancient sandstone plateaus. Twenty miles north of Brazil's Monte Roraima, El Grande rose as high as eight thousand feet... "; Pg. 18: [passage from Doyle's The Lost World] "Peter was a quick reader, and in the next hour he re-lived the 1912 journey of Edward Challenger and his crew and Indian porters up the Caroni River to the Grand Tepui, called Kahu Hidi by the Indians... " [More from the book. Doyle's book is mentioned many time, but in Greg Bear's alternative history novel Dinosaur Summer, Doyle's book was true, and dinosaurs really were discovered. In his "What's Real, and What's Not " section at end of book (pg. 323), Bear makes it clear that he set his novel in the fictional world described by Doyle.]
science fiction USA 1947 Bear, Greg. Dinosaur Summer. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 79. "'...All he talks about is writing.'

'Is he good?' Peter asked.

'Pretty good,' Ray said. 'He says you have to do what you love, or you're going to end up dead inside, a grotesque, like someone in a Sherwood Anderson story.' "

science fiction USA 1947 Bear, Greg. Dinosaur Summer. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 324. [Author's explanatory section: "What's Real, and What's Not "] "Cooper, Schoedsack, and O'Brien made a film called King Kong, and OBie did indeed animate the dinosaurs in the early silent version of The Lost World, based on Doyle's novel.

Released in 1933, without the interference of dinosaur circuses, King Kong became a huge hit and inspired generations of young people. One of those youngsters was Ray Harryhausen, who realized his dreams and animated dinosaurs, creatures from Venus, mythical monsters, and quite a few skeletons. Harryhausen in turn inspired later generations of moviemakers--and not just moviemakers, but dinosaur experts and paleontologists around the world. He inspired me, as well. "

science fiction USA 1955 McDonald, Ian. Evolution's Shore. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1995); pg. 142. Pg. 142: "...was nothing other than a classic B-movie sci-fi 1950s McCarthy-paranoia flying saucer. "; Pg. 362: "...a T-shirt with Fort Lauderdale in '10: World SF Convention printed on the front. "
science fiction USA 1956 Dick, Philip K. "Orpheus with Clay Feet " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1963); pg. 294. Pg. 294: Fantasy & Science Fiction; Pg. 297: A. E. van Vogt; Pg. 297: "'Because there's going to be a hydrogen war. The future's black. Who wants to write about it? Keeerist.' He shook his head. 'And anyhow who reads that stuff? Adolescents with skin trouble. Misfits. And it's junk. Name me one good science fiction story, just one. I picked up a magazine on a bus once when I was in Utah. Trash! I wouldn't write that trash even if it paid well, and I looked into it and it doesn't pay well...' "
science fiction USA 1959 Bison, Terry. Fire on the Mountain. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 155. "'It's a white nationalist fantasy, and somewhat overdone...'

...Harriet shivered and threw another stick onto the fire. 'That's why I don't like science fiction. It's always junk like that. I'll take the real world, thanks.'

'The funny thing is, it doesn't make them happy,' Grissom said. 'The Mericans, I mean. Having taken over the world, they turn on each other. They gorge on fat. They eat their own children. For a white supremacist fantasy the book has a certain grim honesty. It ends in this hideous. . . .'

'Please,' Yasmin said. 'I think I'll pass. John Brown the traitor, huh?'

'Worse; a madman. A murderous fanatic. Lincoln, on the other hand, is a hero. The great emancipator.'

'Who does he emancipate?'

'Me,' Grissom laughed. 'He emancipates the whites from having to give up any of the land they stole. From having to join the human race.' "

science fiction USA 1963 Grimwood, Ken. Replay. New York: Arbor House (1986); pg. 19. "In many ways, the reality he'd grown used to had more in common with movies like Blade Runner than it did with the sunny naivete of early 1963. "
science fiction USA 1963 Grimwood, Ken. Replay. New York: Arbor House (1986); pg. 134. Close Encounters; E.T.; Raiders of the Lost Ark; Spielberg
science fiction USA 1964 Dick, Philip K. "Waterspider " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1964); pg. 219. [Extensive s.f. refs.] Pg. 219: "But he, too, liked his superior's idea. And, in addition, he looked forward to seeing face to face one of the famous twentieth century pre-cogs. Theirs had been one brief, glorious period--sadly, long since ended.

Or not so brief, if one dated it as starting with Jonathan Swift, rather than with H. G. Wells. Swift had written of the two moons of Mars and their unusual orbital characteristics years before telescopes had proved their existence. And so today there was a tendency in the textbooks to include him. ";

Pg. 220: "...in August of 1955 in a pre-cog journal called If.... The article was titled Night Flight, and it ran only a few thousand words... "; Pg. 221-222: extended passage about real-life science fiction writer Poul Anderson, a major character in this story. [More, pg. 227-243.]; Pg. 222: If [s.f. magazine]

science fiction USA 1964 Dick, Philip K. "Waterspider " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1964); pg. 224. Pg. 224-225: A. E. van Vogt; World of Null A; Pg. 225: "'That enormous, genial-looking man seated over there; that's Howard Browne, who edited the pre-cog journal Amazing at this time-period.' "; Murray Leinster; Pg. 226: early Gernsback publications; Jack Williamson; Legion of Time; Evelyn Paige; Margaret St. Clair; The Scarlet Hexapod; Robert Block; Galaxy; Sabbatical; Pg. 229: Astounding' Space Science Fiction; The Variable Man; If; Pg. 230: "...your article Night Flight in the August 1955 If "; "'Take the first article in the January 1953 Galaxy... The Defenders . . . about the people living beneath the surface and the robots up above, pretending to fight the war but actually not, actually faking the report so interestingly that the people--' "; Pg. 243: Howard Browne
science fiction USA 1965 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 19. From a saddlebag she produced The Radio Amateur's Handbook and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. After a moment's hesitation she decided on the latter. Twain's hero had been conked on the head and awakened in Arthurian England. Maybe it was all a dream or a delusion. But maybe it was real. Was it possible to travel backwards in time? Her chin on her knees, she scouted for a favorite passage. It was when Twain's hero is first collected by a man dressed in armor who he takes to be an escapee from a local booby hatch. As they reach the crest of the hill they see a city laid out before them:

" 'Bridgeport?' said I . . .

" 'Camelot,' said he. "

She stared out into the blue lake, trying to imagine a city which could pass as both nineteenth-century Bridgeport and sixth-century Camelot... "

science fiction USA 1965 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 82. "'About the time the science fiction world was coming of age, in the mid- and late 60's, your military closed their Project Blue Book, which was their ongoing investigation of UFO phenomena...' "
science fiction USA 1969 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 23. "'Going to Mars is a beautiful idea,' York said. 'But it's science fiction. Isn't it?' "
science fiction USA 1969 Milan, Victor. "Transfigurations " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 264. "'It's time you came out of your shell, Mark. Out of this wombroom of yours. Before you turn something from Night of the Living Dead.' "
science fiction USA 1970 Panshin, Alexei. "How Can We Sink When We Can Fly? " in Farewell To Yesterday's Tomorrow. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1975; c. 1971); pg. 121. "'...Or putter in the garden.'

'Do you really have a garden?'

'Of course,' I said. 'Tom Disch tells me that a half hour in the garden every day keeps the soul pure.' Tom's another writer. We tend to pass basic tips like this around our little circles. 'I'm going to try it and see what good it does me.' "

science fiction USA 1970 Zelazny, Roger. Nine Princes of Amber in The Chronicles of Amber, vol. 1. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (c. 1970); pg. 23. "He wore orange and yellow and brown and reminded me of haystacks and pumpkins and scarecrows and the Legend of Sleepy Hollow. "
science fiction USA 1972 Blish, James & Judith Ann Lawrence. "Getting Along " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 568. "'Here ee weary topside bigfella past competent journalist Bergen Record,' Sam squeaked through the trumpet. 'Callself allsame J. R. Transistor, wantee mohtal gaslight explohah infinite storm.'

But no, no one would own to a friend named J. R. Transistor, or even a relative of that name. But at the same moment there emerged from the cabinet an astonishing vision, wrapped from moorcock to gernsback in a coating of ectoplasm "

science fiction USA 1972 McCullough, Ken. "Chuck Berry, Won't You Please Come Home " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 467. "...and strange bad fantasy flashes of Them, The Beginning of the End, The Tick Who Sucked-Off Brooklyn, Tomorrow the World! "
science fiction USA 1974 Dick, Philip K. Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said. New York: Doubleday (1974); pg. 153. "'...He also has a good collection of Weird Tales, and he loves baseball...' "
science fiction USA 1975 Jones, Raymond F. Renegades of Time. Don Mills, Ontario: Laser Books/Harlequin (1975); pg. 14. "He felt of his face uncertainly. His beard--or lack of it--was the same. He hadn't arrived suddenly with a Rip Van Winkle appearance. "
science fiction USA 1975 Plauger, P. J. "Child of All Ages " in Immortals (Jack Dann & Gardner Dozois, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1975); pg. 97. "Jekyll and Hyde looked like twins compared to the personality changes May had witnessed in fifteen years of counseling. "
science fiction USA 1978 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 158. "'...Here's something for you, Ralph; I know you're a sci-fi buff. Gene Roddenberry has said he's scraping the treatment he'd prepared for a new Star Trek series. It was going to be like the first, with the huge space cruiser Enterprise with massive phaser banks, bigger and more powerful than anything they're likely to encounter. But he's changed his mind; he's been inspired by you guys, apparently. Now, Roddenberry says he's aiming for something called Star Trek: Explorer, about a small, pioneering band of humans and aliens in their fragile craft, going much farther than anyone has gone before . . . How about that, guys. Science fact changing the face of science fiction. It says here.' "
science fiction USA 1978 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 181. "'This is astronaut country, remember. You're thinking of I Dream of Jeannie....' "
science fiction USA 1978 Effinger, George Alec. "The Pinch Hitters " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982; 1st pub. 1979 in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine); pg. 341-349. Pg. 345: "But no. I had a responsibility to the science fiction world. After all, science fiction might do well without me (just let it try), but Norris and Jim and Dick and Larry were here too, and I had to help my friends, if I could. But could I? Why were we here, what had zapped us more than twenty years into the past? "; Pg. 348: "When we realized how violent our passions were growing we changed the subject to 'The Future of Science Fiction,' and then 'Science Fiction and the Media,' and then 'Academia and Science Fiction.'... We talked about 'The Short Fiction Market,' and two wild young women dressed like characters from a trilogy of novels came in to fill the bathtub with some viscous fluid... We talked about 'Science Fiction as a Revolutionary Weapon,' and two writers & an agent & four more fans came in... " [This story is about science fiction & baseball. It mentions 'famous science fiction writers' Norris Page, Larry Shrader, Dick Shrader, Jim Benedetti.]
science fiction USA 1978 Nurse, Patricia. "One Rejection Too Many " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982; 1st pub 1978 in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine); pg. 480-482. "Dear Dr. Asimov:
   Imagine my delight when I spotted your new science fiction magazine on the newsstands. I have been a fan of yours for many, many year, and I naturally wasted no time in buying a copy. I wish you every success in the new venture.
   In your second issue I read with interest your plea for stories from new authors. While no writer myself, I have had a time traveler living with me for the past two weeks (he materialized in the bathtub without clothes or money, so I felt obliged to offer him shelter), and he has written a story of life on earth as it will be in the year 5000.
   Before he leaves this time frame, it would give him great pleasure to see his story in print--I hope you will feel able to make this wish come true.
     Yours sincerely,
     Nancy Morrison (Miss) "
science fiction USA 1978 Nurse, Patricia. "One Rejection Too Many " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982; 1st pub 1978 in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine); pg. 480-482. "Dear Miss Morrison:
   I am very confused by your letter. Who is Isaac Asimov? I have checked with several publishers and none of them has heard of Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, although the address on the envelope was correct for this magazine.
   However, I was very impressed with your story and will be pleased to submit it for our next issue. Seldom do we receive a story combining such virtues as a well-conceived plot, plenty of human interest, and a delightfully subtle brand of humor.

Yours truly,
George H. Scithers,
Editor,
Arthur C. Clarke's Science Fiction Magazine " [This entire story, two excerpts of which are in this DB, is told in letter form. Asimov repeatedly rejects successive revisions of the story submitted, and the time traveler changes history to eliminate Asimov, and get his story accepted by Clarke.]

science fiction USA 1978 Rosenbaum, Karen. "Hit the Frolicking, Rippling Brooks " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1978); pg. 85. "Spread all over the kitchen table is my Sunday school lesson. It'll probably take the whole day and most of the night. All my favorite resource books are heaped up on the end--stories that high school sophomores might respond to--they like best the struggling-across-the-plains stories, J. Golden Kimball anecdotes, and retold tales from the C. S. Lewis science fiction trilogy. I wish fervently the pioneers had spent another forty years crossing the plains, that J. Golden Kimball could squawk down a few reports from the Celestial Kingdom, that C. S. Lewis hadn't rudely gone and died. Those stories have a kind of sanction that the Sunday school presidency, marching in and out of classes and solemnly nodding--hey, I want to shout, this is not a job I'm seeking tenure for--approve of. I use other stuff too--Mishima's suicide story, Vonnegut's 'Harrison Bergeron'--that jiggles them a little. I have to. What's the point without a picture? "
science fiction USA 1979 Bear, Greg. "The White Horse Child " in The Wind from a Burning Woman. Sauk City, WI: Arkham House (1983; story copyright 1979); pg. 54. "The airport was something out of a TV space movie. It went on forever, with stairways going up to restaurants and big smoky windows that looked out on the screaming jets, and crowds of people... "
science fiction USA 1979 Martin, George R. R. "Prologue " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 1. Pg. 1: "Years later, when I saw Michael Rennie come out of that flying saucer in The Day the Earth Stood Still, I leaned over to my wife and said, 'Now that's the way an alien emissary ought to look.' I've always suspected that it was Tachyon's arrival that gave them the idea for that picture, but you know how Hollywood changes things around. I was there, so I know how it really was... His ship, well, it certainly wasn't a flying saucer, and it didn't look a damn like our captured V-2s or even the moon rockets on Werner's drawing boards... "; Pg. 2: "Michael Rennie, now, he looked right in that silvery-blue spacesuit of his, but Tachyon looked... I don't mind telling you, all of us were pretty scared driving out, the rocketry boys and eggheads just as much as the GIs. I remembered that Mercury Theater broadcast back in '39, when Orson Welles fooled everybody into thinking that the Martians were invading New Jersey. "
science fiction USA 1981 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 335. "'It's kind of like the calendar they had in When Worlds Collide. Do you remember that, Bella? When they were building a rocket ship to get off the Earth? . . . ' "
science fiction USA 1981 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 702. "He had lectured at Columbia and other universities on the peculiar and perverse strain of modern violence in such books and movies as The Exorcist, The Omen, and innumerable imitations, going back to Rosemary's Baby. "
science fiction USA 1981 Zelazny, Roger. "Recital " in Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983; story c. 1981); pg. 40. "Let's call her [the main character] Mary. I don't know that much about her yet, and the name has just occurred to me. I'm Roger Z, and I'm doing all of this on the spot, rather than in the standard smooth and clean fashion. This is because I want to watch it happen and find things out along the way. So Mary is a character and this is a story... " [In this experiment in narrative form, the author here refers to himself. 'Roger Z' is Roger Zelazny.]
science fiction USA 1982 Norden, Eric. "The Curse of Mhondoro Nkabele " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 151. [Editor's introduction to this story:] "Here is a welcome addition to the small and not entirely serious body of science fiction stories about . . . science fiction! I do, in fact, have a golden retriever (named Howard, not Jenny, and who--last time I looked--was alive and well...). But nothing else in this incredible and incredibly funny gathering of editorial correspondence bears any resemblance to reality, past or future. I hope. " [As stated here, this story is about the science fiction community. Specifically it is about a fictional African writer and his correspondence to Edward L. Ferman, editor of the Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, getting his stories published, with the help of some traditional African curses. "
science fiction USA 1982 Norden, Eric. "The Curse of Mhondoro Nkabele " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 151. "...his lifetime collection of s-f, over five hundred magazines, ranging from the marvelous Thrilling Wonder Stories, Famous Fantastic Mysteries, Super Science Stories and Planet to the more intellectual journals such as Startling and Amazing Stories and dating from 1936 to 1952... Robert Moore Williams, E. E. 'Doc Smith, Nelson Bond, Ray Cummings, Eric Frank Russell, P. Schuyler Miller, Raymond Z. Gallun, the revered Stanley G. Weinbaum, L. Ron Hubbard and the magnificent Richard Shaver, so brilliantly discovered by my favorite editor, Ray A. Palmer of Amazing Stories... "
science fiction USA 1982 Norden, Eric. "The Curse of Mhondoro Nkabele " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 159. "...the most significant contribution to the corpus of science fiction since Stanley G. Weinbaum... P.S. Ms. Markowitz, who is conversant with such matters, points out that the only prominent black writer of s-f today is Samuel 'Chip' Delany, and wonders if your obtuseness could be motivated by racialism. "
science fiction USA 1982 Norden, Eric. "The Curse of Mhondoro Nkabele " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 181. Pg. 181: Omni, Science Fiction Writers of America, Nebula Awards; Pg. 182: Hugos at the World Convention
science fiction USA 1982 Norden, Eric. "The Curse of Mhondoro Nkabele " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 157-158. [Entire story about science fiction. Will not include quotes/excerpts in DB, but will attempt to list all the s.f. names and publications mentioned. Page numbers provided are the first appearance. May be more.] Pg. 151: Edward L. Ferman, editor of the Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction; Pg. 155: "Harlan Ellison's two Dangerous Visions anthologies and the annual collection of Nebula Award stories... 1940s 'space opera.'... English-language s.f. "
science fiction USA 1982 Norden, Eric. "The Curse of Mhondoro Nkabele " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 161-178. Pg. 161: Stanislaw Lem, Judith Merrill; Pg. 162: Dr. Asimov; Pg. 166: "the Golden Age of science fiction ", Theodore Sturgeon, Thrilling Wonder Stories, Barry Malzberg, "Stanley G. Weinbaum, the Great Master himself " [other refs.]; And these women, Ursula LeGuin and Joanna Russ, they should be beaten with stout sticks! I would not give one hamstrung goat for the pair of them. "; Kilgore Trout's Venus on the Half Shell; Pg. 167: Harlan Ellison [extensive]; Stanley G. Weinbaum; Pg. 174: Edmund Burke; Isaac Asimov; Fritz Lieber; Pg. 175: M.R. James' The Casting of the Runes; Conjure Wife; Pg. 176-178: three-page fictional letter 'written by' Isaac Asimov; Pg. 176: Murder at the A.B.A.; Haldane's Law; Malzberg; Pg. 177: Isaac Asimov's Guide to the Wit and Wisdom of All Human History; Pg. 178: Isaac Asimov's Guide to Health, Happiness and Regularity through Self-Negation
science fiction USA 1985 Knight, Damon. "A Fantasy " in One Side Laughing. New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; 1985); pg. 222. "'You're right!' the little man shrieked. 'For one hundred dollars! Congratulations, Mr.--'

'Knight,' I said, as he pressed a crisp new bill into my hand.

'Mr. Knight, how did you happen to know the answer to that question?'

'I knew it because my stepson, Richard Wilhelm, found a nineteen twenty-nine issue of Cosmopolitan in a barn and gave it to me... His name is Richard Balmann Wilhelm,' I said.

'Balmann!' cried the little man... 'Oh, you're not going to believe this, folks. 'Balmann' is the third secret word, and you, Mr. Knight, have just won a trip around the world for two and an income of fifty thousand dollars a year for life!'

Thus in the just world, which is hard to find even when you know the way. What the 'real' world is like I need not remind you. " [Damon Knight himself is the main character/narrator of this 2-page story. His stepson is the son of his wife, s.f. writer Kate Wilhelm.]

science fiction USA 1987 Carroll, L. E. "The Very Last Party at #13 Mallory Way " in Writers of the Future: Volume III (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 123. "I ran to the screen to see, in horror, that the Romanian-Latin manuscripts were glittering in front of my daughter's wide eyes...

'Oh, I get it,' she interrupted mercifully, 'Stuff for Mrs. Martin's next novel, huh? Research? Neat.' "

science fiction USA 1987 Heideman, Eric. "Time and Chance " in Writers of the Future: Volume III (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 327. "With every day, and from both sides of my intelligence, the moral and the intellectual, I thus drew steadily nearer to that truth, by whose partial discovery I have been doomed to such a dreadful shipwreck; that man is not truly one, but truly two.
Robert Louis Stevenson, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

The man in black motioned to the sofa, himself sitting down on the bed. 'Edgar Allan! Make no obeisance for me--a mere airy phantasm, an undigested bit of beef as Dickens would have it.

Allan reclaimed his seat and spent some moments in the contemplation of this specter. On such inspection the seediness of Poe's appearance would be seen to owe more to the worn and tattered state of his clothing than to any inherent defect in bearing... "

science fiction USA 1988 Bourne, Mark. "Boss " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 30. "You ever heard of this fella? This Noam Chomsky? Or this one, Bob Woodward? Or Harlan Ellison? No? Yes sir, the Helms Act shut them up real permanent, you betcha. (He chuckles.) yeah. Real permanent. "
science fiction USA 1989 Willis, Connie. "At the Rialto " in Impossible Things. New York: Bantam (1994; story copyright 1989); pg. 444. "'...There's a place near Hollywood and Vine that has the mashed potatoes Richard Dreyfuss made into Devil's Tower in Close Encounters.' "
science fiction USA 1990 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 2. "I am told that there are an estimated one million here with us today, the largest turnout for a launch since Apollo 11. Welcome to all of you. You might like to know that among the celebrities watching the launch today in the VIP enclosure are Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Joe Muldoon, and Michael Collins, cosmonaut Vladimir Viktorenko, along with Liza Minnelli, Clint Eastwood, Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, William Shatner, sci-fi authors Arthur C. Clarke, Ray Bradbury, and Isaac Asimov, and singer John Denver. "


science fiction, continued

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