Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to science fiction, Ohio

science fiction, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
science fiction Ohio 1996 Schimel, Lawrence. "A Stable Relationship " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 196-197. "I graduated from Yale, ready to be a poet, but Mike invited me out to Cincinnati to write a novel with him. He had little patience for such noncommercial pursuits as poetry. 'You've got more contacts than most pro writers twice your age,' he told me. 'It would be a shame to throw it all away.'

The offer was appealing. It seemed a painless way to get a book on the stands in very little time, and I could then go on to the more literary pursuits of my poetry once I had made a bit of a splash... I moved into Mike's guest bedroom, ostensibly for the two months in which we planned to write a novel together. " [Is this story's author 'Lawrence Schimel' really Mike Resnick's son-in-law, or a pseudonym for Resnick himself?]

science fiction Ohio 1996 Schimel, Lawrence. "A Stable Relationship " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 199-200. "To give him an excuse to use it [A Goy's Guide to Yiddish], we wrote two novels together featuring the exploits of a band of Jewish superheroes fighting bad guys and performing mitzvahs. They all had biblical code names that tied into their superpowers. Elijah was invisible and only Solomon, who could read minds, ever knew where he was by pinpointing the location of Elijah's thoughts. Samson was the brawn of the group, a big Russian-immigrant juggernaut who spoke little English, but boy, could he plow through the opposition. Moses was the aquamancer, and in his mundane life ran a bagel store called Manna from Heaven, above which The Jewboys had their secret hideout and corporate offices. It was a fun series whose purpose was nothing more than just that and it sold well, especially around Purim and Chanukah. "
science fiction Oklahoma 1943 Bishop, Michael. Brittle Innings. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 149. Pg. 149: "Politely I wrote: He's a vejiterran. He snores. He gave me this notebook. (Vegiterran--like he came from Vejiterra, a planet in some flaky Flash Gordon universe.) "; Pg. 249: "Thus, I do not anathematise her for claiming unassisted creatorship of one title--The Last Man, fine as it is, does not qualify--that enrolled her among the immortals. "
science fiction Ontario 2002 Sawyer, Robert J. Hominids. New York: Tor (2002); pg. 349. "Invitations sent to Ponter Boddit for all-expense-paid visits received c/o the Sudbury Star: Disneyland; the Anchor Bar and Grill, home of the original chicken wing in Buffalo, New York; Buckingham Palace; the Kennedy Space Center; Science North; the UFO museum in Roswell, New Mexico; Toronto's Zanzibar Tavern strip club; Microsoft headquarters; next world's World Science Fiction Convention; The Neanderthal Museum in Mettmann, Germany; Yankee Stadium. "
science fiction Ontario: Ottawa 1987 de Lint, Charles Jack the Giant Killer. New York: Ace Books (1987); pg. 48. "'Well, I saw Gremlins, but that doesn't mean those little things are real...' " [referring to the movie]
science fiction Ontario: Toronto 1990 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Divide. New York: Doubleday (1990); pg. 74. "Entertainment reading for the post-human: a science fiction novel; The Magic Mountain (the only Mann he'd never looked into); a paperback bestseller. Also a battered Penguin edition of Olaf Stapledon's Odd John--the joke, of course, was on himself.

He had read the Stapledon many times before. It was a classic of English eccentric writing of the thirties, the story of a mutant supergenius born to ordinary humanity. During his adolescence John had adopted the book as a kind of bible. The story was fuzzy-minded, uneven, sometime silly in its literal-mindedness; but he felt a resonance with Odd John's sense of 'spiritual contamination' by mankind, his 'passion of loneliness.' The John of the book sought out others of his kind--telepaths and mutants--and founded a utopian colony which the Great Powers ultimately destroyed. "

science fiction Ontario: Toronto 1990 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Divide. New York: Doubleday (1990); pg. 75. "Two unlikely assumptions there, John thought: that there were others of his kind, and that such people would constitute a perceptible threat to anyone.

But the biggest mistake Stapledon had made, John thought, was his character's self-sufficiency. Stapledon compared his Odd John to a human being among apes. But a human being raised by apes isn't a superior ape. In all the qualities that matter to apes, he's not much of an ape at all. And if he feels contemptuous of the apes, it's only the automatic contempt of the rejected outsider. "

science fiction Ontario: Toronto 1991 Huff, Tanya. Blood Price. New York: DAW Books (1991); pg. 18. Pg. 18: "...and some sort of strap-on claws.

'Like that guy in the movie.'

'That was a glove with razor blades, Celluci.'

'Whatever.'
";

Pg. 247: "'Or David Cronneberg does I Dream of Genie,' "

science fiction Ontario: Toronto 1993 Huff, Tanya. Blood Lines. New York: DAW Books (1993); pg. 75. Pg. 75: "The last thing he wanted was Dr. Shane thinking he was some kind of a nut case who'd gotten his training from old Boris Karloff movies. "; Pg. 117: "She had an image of Inspector Cantree--who did look remarkably like James Earl Jones--dressed as Thulsa Doom, the villain of the first Conan movie... "
science fiction Ontario: Toronto 1998 Wilson, Robert Charles. "Divided by Infinity " in Starlight 2 (Patrick Nielsen Hayden, ed.). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 16. "'I used to read some mysteries. Mostly, though, it was science fiction I liked.'

'Really? You look more like a mystery reader.'

'There's a look?'

She laughed. 'Tell you what. Science fiction? We got a box of paperbacks in last week. Right over there... Just have a look...'

...Fiction is a young man's pastime. I had ceased to be curious about other people's lives, much less other worlds.

Still, the box was full of forty-year-old softcover books, Ace and Ballantine paperbacks mainly, and it was nice to see the covers again, the Richard Powers abstracts, the translucent bubbles on infinite plains, or Jack Gaughan sketches, angular and insectile. Titles rich with key words: Time, Space, Worlds, Infinity. Once I had loved this sort of thing.

And then, amongst the faded jewels, I found something I did not expect--

And another. And another. "

science fiction Ontario: Toronto 1998 Wilson, Robert Charles. "Divided by Infinity " in Starlight 2 (Patrick Nielsen Hayden, ed.). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 18. "'Back when we read these books, Mr. Keller, when we read Heinlein or Simak or Edmond Hamilton, we longed to immerse ourselves in the strange . . . the outre. And now--well--here we are!' He smiled breathlessly and summed up his thesis. 'Immersed in the strange. All it takes is time. Just . . . time. Shall I put these in a bag for you?'... " [Many other references to science fiction literature in this story. The story revolves around the main character's discovery of some mysterious, never-before-known science fiction novels.]
science fiction Ontario: Toronto 1998 Wilson, Robert Charles. "Divided by Infinity " in Starlight 2 (Patrick Nielsen Hayden, ed.). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 20. "I won't describe the books in detail. They looked more or less like others of their kind. What was strange about them was that I didn't recognize the, although this was a genre (paperback science fiction of the 1950s and '60s) I had once known in intimate detail.

The shock was not just unfamiliarity, since I might have missed any number of minor works by minor writers; but these were major novels by well-known names, not re-titled works or variant editions. A single example: I sat down that night with a book called The Stone Pillow, by a writer whose identity any science fiction follower would instantly recognize. It was a Signet paperback circa 1957, with a cover by the artist Paul Lehr in the period style. According to the credit slug, the story had been serialized in Astounding in 1945. The pages were browned at the margins; the glued spine was brittle as bone china. "

science fiction Ontario: Toronto 1998 Wilson, Robert Charles. "Divided by Infinity " in Starlight 2 (Patrick Nielsen Hayden, ed.). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 20. "I handled the book carefully, but I couldn't resist reading it, and in so far as I was able to judge it was a plausible example of the late author's well-known style and habits of thought. I enjoyed it a great deal and went to bed convinced of its authenticity. Either I had missed it, somehow-in the days when not missing such things meant a great deal to me--or it had slipped out of memory. No other explanation presented itself.

One such item wouldn't have worried me. But I had brought home four more volumes equally inexplicable.

...the next morning I thumbed through the yellow pages for a used-book dealer who specialized in period science fiction. After a couple of calls I reached a young man named Niemand who offered to evaluate the books if I brought them to him that afternoon...

Niemand... gave the books a long, thoughtful examination.

'Fake,' he said finally. 'They're fake.'

'Fake? You mean . . . counterfeit?' "

science fiction Ontario: Toronto 1998 Wilson, Robert Charles. "Divided by Infinity " in Starlight 2 (Patrick Nielsen Hayden, ed.). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 17-18. "He eyed the five slender books I'd brought to the cash desk.

'Science fiction!' he said. 'I wouldn't have taken you for a science fiction reader, Mr. Keller.'...

'I haven't been a steady reader for a long time,' I said. 'But I found some interesting items.'

'The good old stuff,' Ziegler gushed. 'The pure quill. Does it strike you, Mr. Keller, that we live every day in the science fiction of our youth?'

'I hadn't noticed.'

'There was a time when science seemed so sterile. It didn't yield up the wonders we had been led to expect. Only a bleak, lifeless solar system . . . a half-dozen desert worlds, baked or frozen, take your pick, and the gas giants . . . great roaring seas of methane and ammonia. . . .'

I nodded politely.

'But now!' Ziegler exclaimed. 'Life on Mars! Oceans under Europa! Comets plunging into Jupiter--!'

'I see what you mean.' "

science fiction Ontario: Toronto 1998 Wilson, Robert Charles. "Divided by Infinity " in Starlight 2 (Patrick Nielsen Hayden, ed.). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 21-22. "'Are they valuable?'

'They're certainly odd. Valuable? Not to me. Tell you the truth, I kind of wish you hadn't brought them in.'

'Why?'

'They're creepy. They're too good. Kind of X-Files.' He gave me a sour grin. 'Make up your own science fiction story.'

'Or live in it,' I said. We live in the science fiction of our youth.

He pushed the books across his cluttered desk. 'Take 'em away, Mr. Keller. And if you find out where they came from--'

'Yes?'

'I really don't want to know.' "

science fiction Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 13. "I know, I know--it seemed crazy that the alien had come to Toronto. Sure, the city is popular with tourists, but you'd think a being from another world head for the United Nations--or maybe to Washington. Didn't Klaatu go to Washington in Robert Wise's movie The Day the Earth Stood Still?

Of course, one might also think it's crazy that the same director who did West Side Story would have made a good science-fiction flick. Actually, now that I think about it, Wise directed three SF films, each more stolid than its predecessor. "

science fiction Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 15. "At the top of the stairs, the alien was again briefly flummoxed. It probably lived in a typical sci-fi world, full of doors that slid aside automatically. It was no facing the row of exterior glass doors; they pull open... "
science fiction Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 16. "Raghubir's brown eyes went wide, but he quickly relaxed. He later said he figured it was a joke. Lots of movies are made in Toronto, and, for some reason, an enormous number of science-fiction TV series, including over the years such fare as Gene Roddenberry's Earth: Final Conflict, Ray Bradbury Theater, and the revived Twilight Zone. He assumed this was some guy in costume or an animatronic prop. "
science fiction Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 172. "Susan once quipped that the only piece of scripture I knew was the Lawgiver's Twenty-ninth Scroll:
Beware the beast Man, for he is the devil's pawn. Alone among God's primates, he kills for sport, or lust, or greed. Yea, he will murder his brother to possess his brother's land. Let him not breed in great numbers, for he will make a desert of his home and yours. Shun him. Drive him back into his jungle lair, for he is the harbinger of death.

It's what Cornelius read to Taylor near the end of Planet of the Apes. Powerful words, and, like Dr. Zaius, I've always tried to live by their injunction. "

science fiction Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 50. "'We have been watching your TV broadcasts for about a year now. But I suspect you have more interesting material than what I have seen. "

'What have you seen?'

'A show about an academic and his family who are extraterrestrials.'

It took me a moment to recognize it. 'Ah,' I said. 'That's 3rd Rock from the Sun. It's a comedy.'

'That is a matter of opinion,' said Hollus. 'I have also seen the program about the two federal agents who hunt aliens.'

'The X-Files,' I said... "

science fiction Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 75. "I addition, I showed him a lot of paintings of dinosaurs as they might have looked while alive, and I had Adbus go get a copy of Jurassic Park on video so Hollus could watch that. "
science fiction Oregon 2011 Brin, David. The Postman. New York: Bantam (1985); pg. 103. "The door bore an ancient, rusted padlock and an engraved plastic sign.

THEODORE STURGEON MEMORIAL CENTER
Dedicated May 1989
Cafeteria Hours
11-2:30
5-8 p.m.
"

[The author has named this hospital after a favorite science fiction author of his.]

science fiction Oregon: Portland 2002 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Lathe of Heaven. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1971); pg. 83. "Haber laughed. 'I wish we could see what goes on out there! We'd feel more involved. But of course those encounters take place at speeds and distances that human vision simply isn't equipped to keep up with. Your version's a lot more picturesque than the actuality, no doubt. Sounds like a good science-fiction movie from the seventies. used to go to those when I was a kid. . . . But why do you think you dreamed up a battle scene when the suggestion was peace?' "
science fiction Pennsylvania 1970 Panshin, Alexei. "How Can We Sink When We Can Fly? " in Farewell To Yesterday's Tomorrow. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1975; c. 1971); pg. 111. "'Well,' said Rob. 'How badly are you stuck?'

'Stuck,' I said. 'I'm doing a story based on an idea of Isaac Asimov for an anthology of new stories.'

'You're a hack,' said Rob. 'You work for money.'

'Right,' I said. 'I work to live, and live to work. No, my problem is that I want to respect Asimov's idea without following it to the letter. I guess the problem is that I can't see any way to get from our now to his future. When I listen to the news, I wonder about any future at all. So I sit in front of the typewriter, but i don't write. I'll find the story, I'll see the way, but right now I'm still trying to find my beginning.'

'Don't brood about it,' said Leigh. 'Sit down and write it the simplest way.' Kind advice, because in spite of what Leigh may sometimes say about her own work, that's not the way she writes. " [Other refs. to trying to write an s.f. story, not in DB.]

science fiction Pennsylvania 1970 Panshin, Alexei. "How Can We Sink When We Can Fly? " in Farewell To Yesterday's Tomorrow. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1975; c. 1971); pg. 118. "I handed him the Asimov proposal. 'Here, read. This is the relevant part.'

Rob read it several times. It said:

The Child as Young God. In this one we picture the society as possessing few children. If the average life expectancy has reached five hundred years, let us suppose, then the percentage of children should be, say, one-twentieth what it is now. In such a society biologic parenthood gives a person immense social prestige but not special rights in the child one has created. All children are children of society in general, with everyone anxious to share in the rights of mothering and fathering. The child is the Golden Boy/Girl of the neighborhood, and there is considerable distress if one of these children approaches adulthood without another child being born to take its place... "

science fiction Pennsylvania 1970 Panshin, Alexei. "How Can We Sink When We Can Fly? " in Farewell To Yesterday's Tomorrow. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1975; c. 1971); pg. 119. "Rob finished, reading [the story proposal], looked up, and said, 'It's like something you've done, isn't it?'

'What's that?'

'Rite of Passage.'

'Rite of Passage was my first novel. It's about a girl, a bright superchild on the verge of adulthood in a low-population future society. Otherwise it's not much the same.'

'Hmm. I guess I see what you mean, but I don't think the similarity has to be close enough to be any problem. The thought of repeating myself is not what's hanging me up...' "

science fiction Pennsylvania 1970 Panshin, Alexei. "How Can We Sink When We Can Fly? " in Farewell To Yesterday's Tomorrow. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1975; c. 1971); pg. 120. "'...I like it--'the child as young god.' That's provocative. It speaks to me. But what a distance to come for nothing. Sibling rivalry? Sibling rivalry? Why write it as science fiction? Why write it at all?'

'What's the matter, Alex?' Rob said. 'Are you yearning for relevance again?'

It's a philosophical contention between us. Rob believes that all a story has to do is be entertaining. "

science fiction Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 17. "'...but remember how fired up we were at first to make this planet into the Brave New World?...' " [Possible reference to Aldous Huxley's novel Brave New World.]
science fiction Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 63. "'...In English they call themselves the People, just like terrestrial primitives used to. No, hrossa comes from a book by an early-twentieth-century Christian writer named C. S. Lewis, an Oxford pal of Tolkien's.' The listeners nodded; they knew Tolkien's work, though neither had heard of Lewis. 'He wrote about an Englishman who gets hijacked to Mars, which he finds populated by friendly Martians that call themselves hrossa--that's the plural proper noun; It's hross for singular and modifier. These Martians look like seven-foot stoats with black fur--a stoat was a kind of skinny predator like a weasel, not like our hrossa at all--but they were amphibious, intelligent creatures with a Stone Age technology, and, I don't know, the name sort of stuck. They quite like it; they love parables and religious myths even when they find them baffling, and Lewis's novel is allegorical apparently...' "
science fiction Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 63. "'...they love parables and religious myths even when they find them baffling... They [the hrossa, the native intelligent species on Pennterra] love to hear episodes from Quaker history, too, though they have a hard time grasping the idea of religious persecution.' "
science fiction Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 174. "The rest of us sat around trying to draw up a list of classical tales that still have power to move us and at the same time seem likely to have some relevance for the hrossa. We thought of Old Testament stories, Greek plays, Shakespeare's tragedies, fairy tales, legends of monsters (Grendel, Dracula)... "
science fiction Pern 3015 McCaffrey, Anne. Dragonsdawn. New York: Ballantine (1988); pg. 188. "'In all my years as a botanist, I never saw a plant symbiont dangerous to humans... Nothing like this has ever been recorded on any of the planets humans have explored. The nearest that has been even imagined were some of the fictional inventions during the Age of Religions...' " [Are the 'fictional inventions' referring to science fiction? Because no religion has man-killing planets. But, if the reference is to science fiction, why mention 'the Age of Religions'?]
science fiction Portugal 2010 Anthony, Patricia. Cold Allies. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1993); pg. 17. "'Yes, sir. And there were all those bodies. I mean, for a minute there I through I had clicked into a Channel 27 rerun of some old John Carpenter film.'

Pelham sighed, shook his head, and said to the manufacturer's rep, 'Sergeant Means here is our resident comics and science fiction expert.'

'How appropriate.' "

science fiction Portugal 2010 Anthony, Patricia. Cold Allies. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1993); pg. 235. "Everyone in this film was dead. That's why it was sad. The world was full of mummies and vampires and zombies. The dead peered out of movie screens. Somewhere Bela Lugosi laughed, a lazy heroin chuckle. And the tall ghost of Christopher Lee strode. "
science fiction Romania 1989 Simmons, Dan. Children of the Night. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1992); pg. 16. Pg. 16: "Shades of Bela Lugosi " (also pg. 135, 211); Pg. 213: "'Did you see John Carpenter's remake of Howard Hawks' The Thing?' "
science fiction Russia 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 159. "To: RusFriend%BabaYaga@MosPub.net
From: VladDragon%slavnet.com
Re: allegiance "

[Part of the e-mail address here is 'Baba Yaga', which was the villain in another book recently published by this book's author: Enchantment.]

science fiction Senegal 1982 Norden, Eric. "The Curse of Mhondoro Nkabele " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 157. "It was also due to Father Devlin that I had my first exposure to science fiction, at the age of eleven. "
science fiction Solar System 2200 Hawke, Simon. The Whims of Creation. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 5. "'...Next time, we'll examine the beginning of interstellar ark starflight, from the first discussion of the concept in J.D. Bernal's 1929 book, The World, The Flesh and the Devil to the earliest Earthbound experiments in closed environmental experiments, including... "
science fiction Solar System 2314 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 34. "Paolo Sanchez had brought Marcel some from his last voyage as captain of the Olaf Stapledon... "
science fiction Solar System 3001 Clarke, Arthur C. 3001: The Final Odyssey. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 64. "Frank Poole had always prided himself on his self-control, and never imagined that as a full-grown adult he would give a cry of pure fright. But like every boy of his generation, he had seen all the Jurassic movies--and he knew a raptor, when he met one eye to eye. "
science fiction Solar System 3001 Clarke, Arthur C. 3001: The Final Odyssey. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 79. "...the dreaming spires over which they now circled could only be Oxford. Aurora confirmed hi guess as she pointed down: 'That's the pub--the inn--where Lewis and Tolkien used to meet their friends, the Inklings...' "
science fiction Switzerland 2009 Sawyer, Robert J. Flashforward. New York: Tor (2000; c. 1999); pg. 20. [People in the year 2009 seeing 21 years into the future.] "'I was in Geneva--over by Le Rozzel... But it was like some science-fiction thing. There were cards hovering by without touching the ground, and--' "
science fiction Switzerland 2009 Sawyer, Robert J. Flashforward. New York: Tor (2000; c. 1999); pg. 146. "'Wait a minute,' said Theo... 'Wait a minute!' Lloyd and della Robbia turned to look at him. 'Don't you see? It's Niven's Law.'

'what is?' said Lloyd.

'Who's Niven?' said della Robbia.

'An American science-fiction writer. He said that in any universe in which time travel is a possibility, no time machine will ever be invented. He even wrote a little story to dramatize it: a scientist is building a time machine and just as he gets finished, he looks up and sees the sun going nova--the universe is going to snuff him out, rather than allow the paradoxes inherent in time travel.'

'So?' said Lloyd.

'So communicating with yourself in the past is a form of time travel--it's sending information back in time. And for those people who try to do it, the universe might block the attempt...' "

science fiction Switzerland 2009 Sawyer, Robert J. Flashforward. New York: Tor (2000; c. 1999); pg. 231. "Michiko dubbed it Operation Klaatu. In the movie The Day the Earth Stood Still, Klaatu, an alien, neutralized all electricity worldwide for thirty minutes precisely at noon Washington time, in order to demonstrate the need for world peace, but he did it with remarkable care, so that no one was hurt. Planes stayed aloft, operating theaters still had power. This time, they were going to try to be as careful as Klaatu, even though, as Lloyd pointed out, in the movie Klaatu was shot dead for his efforts. Of course, being an alien, he managed to come back to life. . . " ['Project Klaatu' is mentioned by name a few other times.]
science fiction Tennessee 2000 Talbott, Anne Marie. "A Walk in the Park " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 288. Pg. 288: "Where . . . where have I seen or heard of . . . no. The idea hits me like a cold rag in the face; am I really going nuts? I must be--they can't be what I think they are. What I think they are doesn't really exist.

A tiny, chill voice in the back of my mind asks, 'Don't they, now?' ";

Pg. 289: "Come on, I say severely to myself. there's no such thing as Draka. God! They're just characters . . not real. Get over it, and tell whoever's holding your shoulder to let the hell go!

...'No, little 'un, you're not goin' anywhere raight now. Not until I know how and why you think we are Draka. That's not what I'd call public knowledge . . .' "

[In this example of recursive science fiction, the main character sees two people who remind her of Draka, from Sterling's science fiction novels. They turn out to actually be Draka. This is the entire story, pg. 285-293.]

science fiction Tennessee 2054 Dick, Philip K. & Ray Nelson. The Ganymede Takeover. New York: Ace Books (1967); pg. 135. "...the fantastic hordes of Percy X began to quarrel among themselves. Frankenstein attacked the Wolfman. Godzilla attacked King Kong. "
science fiction Tennessee: Memphis 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 110-111. "'How much did the success of Star Trek influence the creators of Starship 'Stowaway'?' asked the woman...

'Hardly at all,' answered Truitt. 'Oh, certainly much of the technospeak was borrowed from Trek... No, we actually borrowed more from the success of the BBC's Doctor Who, which pre-dated Star Trek by three or four years. If our program resembled any American science fiction television at all, it would probably have been Lost in Space. Does anybody remember Will and Dr. Smith and that robot left over from Forbidden Planet? Scattered applause betrayed the age of many in the audience... I think that if we do launch a 'Stowaway' movie, it would be a nice inside joke to have one of our chief officers be named Will Robinson!' "

science fiction Texas 1994 Anthony, Patricia. Happy Policeman. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1994); pg. 95. "His gaze fell on his bookshelves, and a collection of sermons by Jonathan Edwards. Doc read godless books full of dark anarchy, books by Dean Koontz and Stephen King. "
science fiction Texas 1994 Anthony, Patricia. Happy Policeman. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1994); pg. 192. "On the third day of the dosage reduction, while he and Delsey were watching The Exorcist... "
science fiction Texas 1996 Leon, Mark. The Unified Field. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 81. "Her response convinced him that it was a wry gesture of humor on her part to make her vessel the image of 1950s science fiction fantasy and phobia. "
science fiction Texas 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994) [Back cover:] "Timothy Truitt once thrilled fans as the teenage hero of the British TV series, 'Starship Stowaway.' Now, decades later, a new generation is celebrating Truitt's glory days of science fiction stardom at fan conventions across America.

But strange things happen to Truitt on his tour: sometimes he disappears when there are lights in the night sky. When he whispers to his loyal fans about encounters with UFOs and aliens, is he merely reliving old episodes of 'Starship Stowaway' . . . or is he telling the truth. " [Clearly, a primary theme of this novel is the science fiction genre on television, and the conventions and fan organizations that spring up around popular shows. References to science fiction as a socio-cultural-religious grouping throughout novel.]

science fiction Texas 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 263. "'...He tried to tell his story, but he got not countenance from Washington, and so he had to do with Hollywood. Same thing happened with Whitley Strieber, the novelist. His horror fiction is so compelling that when he brought out Communion, a book about his own true experiences, it was accepted only as another scary page-turner. I'm afraid that more harm than good is done whenever some truth, however diluted and embellished, is brought forth--the 'debunkers' come out in force. What I'm saying to you is this: before you face your superiors, think before you speak, and pray before you think...' "
science fiction Texas: Dallas 1963 Freedman, Nancy. Joshua Son of None. New York: Delacorte Press (1973); pg. 11. "Genetic engineering was underway at a dozen centers. Much of it could be written off as futurology: ectogenesis, gestation outside the womb in Brave New World tradition; chimeras and cyborgs, man-animal and man-machine hybrids. " [Also pg. 83.]
science fiction Texas: Dallas 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 180. "'Well, I'm impressed.'

'You should be. Science fiction has nothing on current electronic surveillance technology!' "

science fiction Texas: Dallas-Fort Worth 1998 Wood, Crystal. Fool's Joust. Denton, Texas: Tattersall Publishing (1998); pg. 12. "'It sounded to me like one of those 'Dungeons and Dragons'-style role-playing games that can go on for weeks at a time. He'd played them before, but he always got bored with the, so I didn't worry much at first...' "
science fiction United Kingdom 1940 Lupoff, Richard (writing as Ova Hamlet). "God of the Naked Unicorn " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 306-307. "...Personages United in League as Protectors... 'And mine,' the Shadow stated with a sinister chuckle, 'are the playboy Lamont Cranston, the chauffeur Moe Shrevnitz, the communications wizard Burbank, and the near-suicide Harry Vincent!'... " [Other refs. to early late 19th cen. and 20th cen. literary characters, some of which are science fiction-oriented, throughout story. Other refs. not in DB.] Pg. 309: "...Captain John Carter took up the narration. 'A woman of protean nature whose admirers have identified her variously as the Princess Dejah Thoris of Helium--as Joan Randall, daughter of the commissioner of the interplanetary police authority--as Margo Lane, faithful friend and companion of the Shadow...' "
science fiction United Kingdom 1976 Asimov, Isaac. "The Ultimate Crime " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984; copyright 1976); pg. 345. "'...indeed, he [Moriarty] was world famous, in the Sherlockian world--as a mathematician.

'Only two of his mathematical feats are specifically mentioned in the canon. He was the author of an extension of the binomial theorem, for one thing. Then, in the novel The Valley of Fear, Holmes mentions that Moriarty had written a thesis entitled The Dynamics of an Asteroid, which is filled with mathematics so rarefied there wasn't a scientist in Europe capable of debating the matter.' " [More about Holmes, Doyle, Moriarty and astronomy, such things being the focus of this story. Some of Doyle's writing falls well within the science fiction genre.]

science fiction United Kingdom 1994 Holdstock, Robert. The Hollowing. New York: Roc (1994); pg. 173. Pg. 173-174: Conan Doyle; Lost World
science fiction United Kingdom 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 37. "Trevor Hicks... He had founded the British chapter of the Trojans Society, devoted to space exploration and construction of huge orbiting space habitats... he had written twenty-three books, the most recent being Starhome, a novel about first contact... "
science fiction United Kingdom 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 40. "'...perhaps in hopes of finding a wider audience?'

'I beg pardon?'

'An audience beyond science books. Dabbling in science fiction.'

'Not dabbling. I've read science fiction since I was a lad in Somerset. Arthur Clarke was born in Somerset, you know. But to answer your question: no. My novel is not written for the masses, more's the pity. Anyone who enjoys a solid novel should enjoy mine, but I must warn them... it's technical. No ignoramuses admitted. Dust jacket locks tight on their approach.' "

science fiction United Kingdom 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 41. "'Trevor Hicks is a scientist and a science reporter whose most recent book is a novel, Starhome, dealing with the always-fascinating subjects of space colonization and first contact with extraterrestrial beings. Coming next on '90's News...' " [Many other refs. to this character, not in DB.]
science fiction United Kingdom 1999 Willis, Connie. "Adaptation " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 149. "...shoppers who... were cross and tired and angry that we had no more copies of The Outer Space Christmas Carol... "
science fiction United Kingdom 2012 Clarke, Arthur C. The Ghost from the Grand Banks. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 45. "To: The Editor, The London Times
From: Lord Aldiss of Brightfount, O.M.; President Emeritus, Science Fiction World Association " [Followed by 2-page letter from Aldiss about the plan to raise the Titanic.]
science fiction United Kingdom 2012 Clarke, Arthur C. The Ghost from the Grand Banks. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 46. "Far more famous was a man who wrote only one book, A Journey in Other Worlds: A Romance of the Future, which was published in 1894. This somewhat mystical tour around the Solar System, in the year 2000, described anti-gravity and other marvels. Arkham House reprinted the book on its centennial... He was the multi-millionaire John Jacob Astor, sometimes labeled as 'the richest man in the world.' He was certainly the richest writer of science fiction who ever lived--a fact which may well mortify admirers of the late L. Ron Hubbard, should any still exist.

I have the honor to be, Sir,
Yours sincerely,
Aldiss of Brightfount, O.M.
President Emeritus, SFWA "

science fiction United Kingdom 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 159. "And as he approached them with loving deliberation, smiling a wide smile, he began softly and liltingly to read their titles from their spines:

'Old Smuggler . . . by Richard Blackmore. Teachers, by C. P. Snow. The Black and the White, by Stendhal. White Horse, by G. K. Chesterton . . .' "



science fiction, continued

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