Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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science fiction, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
science fiction Mexico 1998 Ing, Dean. The Skins of Dead Men. New York: Tom Doherty Associates (1998); pg. 29. Pg. 29: "'We gotta get my stuff from Las Palmas,' said Al, as they were going through the tunnel. 'Power Rangers and stuff.' "; Pg. 173: Myst
science fiction Minnesota 1991 Douglas, Carole Nelson. Seed Upon the Wind. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 15. "'You seem kind of down.' Mark lowered his voice. 'Why don't we take in a move, Terminator Whatever, at the new downtown movie palace tomorrow night if you're off?...' "
science fiction Missouri: St. Louis 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 32. Pg. 32: "A few Vulcans, Wookiees, and other assorted TV/film aliens also were represented. There was even a Doctor Who Dalek, made out of cardboard boxes and papier-mache, uncomfortably bumping around the perimeter of the seating area. Little children were dressed in miniature Galactic Defense Alliance or Star Trek costumes, snoozing in the arms of their similarly attired parents. "; Pg. 33: "More applause and cheers, and the Dalek cut an awkward buck-and-wing on the sidelines. 'The science fiction art contest has divisions for all ages--deadline to enter is nine o'clock tonight. Of course we'll be screening more 'Stowaway' episodes here in the ballroom, and the Dealer Room is open continuously from now till nine, and all day tomorrow. Same for the Gaming Rooms. Fantasy Writers' Roundtable will be tomorrow at one--if you haven't already submitted your story for evaluation by the Channel Nine writers... "
science fiction Missouri: St. Louis 1998 Wood, Crystal. Cut Him Out in Little Stars. Denton, TX: Tattersall Publishing (revised and reprinted 1998; c. 1994); pg. 41. "After the question-and-answer session, Trick lurked in the corner of a banquet room crammed full of comic books, model spacecraft, videos, old records, posters, T-shirts, and TV/film collectibles. "
science fiction Montana 1998 York, J. Steven. Generation X: Crossroads. New York: Berkley (1998); pg. 90. "...they were climbing into the mountains of Montana... Jono was running through the dial again, scanning for Norman like some Tom Clancy sonar operator... "
science fiction Nem Ma'ak Bratuna 2368 Ferguson, Brad. The Last Stand (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 23. "'First, the term 'starship' is frequently used in, uh, fantastic literature--fiction, I mean to say. Starships are said to be able to travel fast enough, much faster than light, to make interstellar trip possible within a practical period of time. We use the term ourselves when we talk of future design possibilities.'

Major Hassandit snorted. 'Excuse me, First, but do we have to listen to this nonsense? Faster-than-light travel is impossible. This is a waste of time.'

Klerran turned red. 'With all due respect, Major, this may be important. Fantasy is fantasy, but this is reality--and the truth is out there.' He pointed to the screen, where the big crimson disk representing the unknown [the Enterprise] glowed brightly to denote the speed of its approach. "

science fiction Netherlands 1921 Scholz, Carter. "The Amount to Carry " in Starlight 2 (Patrick Nielsen Hayden, ed.). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 149. "Play by Karel Capek, R.U.R., opens in Prague. "
science fiction Nevada 1986 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 333. Pg. 333: Back to the Future; Pg. 337: "'Just think what it would do the balance of power if the Pentagon figured out how these sci-fi doohickeys work!' "
science fiction New Jersey 1991 Morrow, James. Only Begotten Daughter. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1990); pg. 76. Ten Thousand Psychotics; The Garden of Unearthly Delights
science fiction New Jersey 2002 Knight, Damon. Why Do Birds. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 12. "Guardperson Eldon Wiggan, forty-six, anglo, five feed eight, two hundred fifty pounds, took the detainee back to the tank. 'Hey, do you have to grab me that hard?' the detainee asked.

Wiggan slammed him against the wall. 'That hurt?'

'Oh, yeah.' " [Apparently a somewhat cryptic reference to Ender Wiggin, the main character in Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card, and its sequels.]

science fiction New Jersey 2012 Morrow, James. Only Begotten Daughter. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1990); pg. 290. "Zoom in: straw, twigs, logs, gin bottles, cocaine spoons, zotz needles, feminist manifestos, Kurt Vonnegut novels... "
science fiction New Marrakech 3038 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Cale's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 113. "A short, balding man with flowing robes strode toward the three. 'Welcome,' he beamed. 'I'm Dockmaster Blish. I trust you had a comfortable landing?...' " [Perhaps this character is named after s.f. author James Blish.]
science fiction New Mexico 2008 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 22. "'...the... gentleman in the Marvin Martian T-shirt is Dr. Matthew Gunnarson...' " [Marvin Martian, from the Bugs Bunny cartoons.]
science fiction New Mexico 2008 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 24. "'...decide if they are human or alien. If we decide the children are who they claim to be, then the priority is to find out how they got into that state. Brain transplant? Transfer of personality into another organism? Or have the adults been . . . regressed . . . into children?'...

'It sounds a bit unreal,' Constance said.

'It sounds like bad science fiction is what it sounds like,' Miranda said. "

science fiction New Mexico 2008 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 55. "'Piffle!' Dr. Innes exploded... 'Science fiction! Fantasy! You cannot shrink bones and maintain integrity!...' "
science fiction New York: New York City 1940 Barnes, Steven. Far Beyond the Stars (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 102. Pg. 102: "He had had a brief, but brilliant vision that seemed like the Flash Gordon serials he had seen as a boy--only realer. ";

Pg. 234: "The movies? There was a double bill: Gone With the Wind playing with a Flash Gordon chapter play, he thought. The idea didn't appeal to him. But what did?

Flash Gordon. The stars. Something about the stars. "

science fiction New York: New York City 1953 Barnes, Steven. Far Beyond the Stars (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 40. "It was the sixth floor that concerned him, because the sixth floor was the brain center of Incredible Tales of Scientific Wonder, the third most successful science fiction magazine in the world, and the source of most of his income. The walls of the office were lined with blown-up covers of past issues, including several which had been based on his own stories. " [Science fiction writing is a central theme of this novel, which features Captain Benjamin Sisko somehow as Benny (in a dream? a vision?), a science fiction writer bumping up against racism as a pulp science fiction writer in 1950s New York City. Many refs. to science fiction writing throughout novel, most not in DB.]
science fiction New York: New York City 1953 Barnes, Steven. Far Beyond the Stars (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 47. "'That's it. I quit. I'm going over to Galaxy.'

Pabst sneered. 'That rag?'

'I bet that rag knows the difference between a doughnut and a doorstop.'

'You want to go to Galaxy, go ahead. But they're not going to pay you four cents a word for your stories.' " [More about Galaxy magazine, pg. 48.]

science fiction New York: New York City 1953 Barnes, Steven. Far Beyond the Stars (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 52. Pg. 52: "On those occasions, he produced nightmares that looked like they had crawled out of that kid Ellison's mind. " [Presumably Harlan Ellison or Ralph Ellison]; Pg. 87: "...any idea what it was that made his work special and made it, in fact, second only to [Frank] Herbert's in reader popularity. ";

Pg. 97: "But then Benny looked over into the window... The image, in his mind, was not that of Benny Russell, middle-aged Negro science fiction writer. No Ralph Ellison. No Richard Wright. Perhaps a hack, but a sincere hack, and that had to be worth something. "

science fiction New York: New York City 1953 Clarke, Arthur C. Childhood's End. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1981; c. 1953); pg. 17. "The greatest change a suddenly-awakened Rip Van Wrinkle would have noticed was a hushed expectancy... "
science fiction New York: New York City 1956 Knight, Damon. "A Likely Story " in The Best of Damon Knight. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976; c. 1956); pg. 215. Pg. 215: [Damon Knight's introduction to "A Likely Story "] "Many years ago Alfred Bester wrote a story called 'The Unseen Blushers' in which various s-f writers appeared under transparent pseudonyms. Ever since then I had wanted to do the same, and in 1956 I did it. Some of the names of the characters in 'A Likely Story' are anagrams, some are not. "
science fiction New York: New York City 1956 Knight, Damon. "A Likely Story " in The Best of Damon Knight. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976; c. 1956); pg. 218. "The Medusa Club is, loosely speaking, an association of professional science fiction writers. No two of them will agree on what science fiction is--or on anything else--but they all write it, or have written it, or pretend they can write it, or something. They have three kinds of meetings, or two and a half. One is for club politics, one is for drinking, and the third is also for drinking, only more so. As a rule, they meet in people's apartments, usually Preacher Flatt's or Ray Alvarez', but every year at this time they rent a hotel ballroom and throw a whingding. I'm a member in bad standing; the last time I paid my dues was in 1950. " [Refs. to science fiction throughout story. This is a recursive science fiction story. That is, it is a science fiction story about science fiction.]
science fiction New York: New York City 1956 Knight, Damon. "A Likely Story " in The Best of Damon Knight. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976; c. 1956); pg. 218. [Story about science fiction writers features characters based on real-life science fiction writers, using transparent pseudonyms.] Pg. 218: Preacher Flatt; Ray Alvarez; "Rod Pfehl (the P is silent, as in Psmith) "; Tom Q. Jones; Punchy Carrol; Duchamp; Leigh MacKean; "a fan named Harry Somebody "; Dorrance Canning; Pg. 219: "Art Greymbergen, my favorite publisher "; Asa Akimisov [Asimov]; Sam Levenson; Ned Burgeon; L. Vague Duchamp; B. U. Jadrys; Bill Plass; Pg. 220: Larry Bagsby; Pg. 221: H. Drene Pfeiffer; Ray Bolgerish; Will Kubatius; Don W. Gamble, Jr.; Jerry Thaw; Pg. 223: Kosmo Samwitz; Pg. 224: Don Bierce; Balmer and Phog Relapse; "'Or like Lobbard discovering Scatiology?' " [L. Ron Hubbard]; Werner Kley; Pg. 225: Art Greymbergen; Fred Balester; M. C. (Hotfoot) Burncloth; "Burgeon--Kley--Duchamp--Bierce--Burncloth--MacKean--Jibless "; Pg. 228: J. Arthur Rank; Pg. 230: Ham Jibless [Multiple refs. to all these characters.]
science fiction New York: New York City 1975 Russ, Joanna. The Female Man. New York: G. K. Hall (1977; 1975); pg. 136. "Buster Crabbe, who is the former Flash Gordon and a swimming instructor (I think) in real life... "
science fiction New York: New York City 1976 Silverberg, Robert. Dying Inside. New York: Ballantine (1976; c. 1972); pg. 141. "And these are his books... The archaeological strata of his reading can readily be isolated and examined. Jules Verne, H. G. Wells, Mark Twain, Dashiell Hammett at the bottom. Sabatini. Kipling. Sir Walter Scott. Van Loon, The Story of Mankind.... Suddenly, with adolescence, a quantum leap: Orwell, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Hardy, the easier Faulkner... " [H. G. Wells, Jules Verne, and Orwell are all recognized as s.f. authors.]
science fiction New York: New York City 1976 Silverberg, Robert. Dying Inside. New York: Ballantine (1976; c. 1972); pg. 142. "See what you could buy then for only 25 cents! Look at the prurient paintings, the garish lettering! These science-fiction books date from that era too. I gobbled the stuff whole, hoping to find some clues to my own dislocated self's nature in the fantasies of Bradbury, Heinlein, Asimov, Sturgeon, Clarke. Look, here's Stapledon's Odd John, here's Beresford's Hampdenshire Wonder, here's a whole book called Outsiders: Children of Wonder, full of stories of little superbrats with freaky powers. I've underlined a lot of passages in that last one, usually places where I quarreled with the writers. Outsiders? Those writers, gifted as they were, were the outsides, trying to imagine powers they'd never had; and I, who was on the inside, I the youthful mind-prowler (the book is dated 1954), had bones to pick with them. They stressed the angst of being supernormal, forgot about the ecstasy... Catch-22 "
science fiction New York: New York City 1979 Asimov, Isaac. "The Backyard Look " in Isaac Asimov's Detectives (Gardner Dozois and Sheila Williams, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1979); pg. 167. Pg. 167: "'And what do you want to write?' said Halsted.

Peterborough hesitated and said, with a trace of defensiveness in his voice, 'Well, I've always been a science fiction fan. Since I was nine, anyway.'

'Oh, God,' muttered Rubin, his eyes rolling upward in mute appeal.

Gonzalo said instantly, 'Science fiction? That's what your friend Isaac Asimov writes, isn't it, Manny?'

'He's not my friend,' said Rubin. 'He clings to me out of helpless admiration.' " [More about this character's desire to write s.f.];

Pg. 168: "'...It seems that Lester del Rey--'

Rubin interrupted. 'Who?'

'Lester del Rey. He's a science fiction writer.'

'Another one of those?' said Rubin. 'Never heard of him.'

'Well, he's no Asimov,' admitted Peterborough, 'but he's all right. Anyway, the way he got started was once when he read a science fiction story and thought it was terrible. He said to his girl, 'Hell, I can write something better...' " [More about s.f., not in DB.]

science fiction New York: New York City 1984 Delany, Samuel R. "The Tale of Plagues and Carnivals " in Flight from Neveryon. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press (1994; c. 1984); pg. 210. "Placing Benjamin's quotation from Baudelaire in a fantasy context produces a very different effect from placing the same quotation in an SF context. And both effects are distinct from which would result from placing it within an example of the literary genre Todorov called 'the Fantastic'--or, indeed, placing it in a piece of 'scientific' literary naturalism, e.g., Zola, or Sinclair Lewis. " [More.]
science fiction New York: New York City 1984 Delany, Samuel R. "The Tale of Plagues and Carnivals " in Flight from Neveryon. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press (1994; c. 1984); pg. 281. "The problem with the 'suspension of disbelief' theory of fiction in general and of F&SF in particular is that it makes art (however willingly) a kind of cheat. People who want to preserve art's privilege of subversion (and of, yes, shock) have said: 'Fine, lit it be a cheat!' e.g., Picasso: 'Art is the lie that makes the truth bearable.' "
science fiction New York: New York City 1984 Delany, Samuel R. "The Tale of Plagues and Carnivals " in Flight from Neveryon. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press (1994; c. 1984); pg. 342. "Kermit shook his head. 'And I'm still sorry, Leslie. I don't know about this SF or this 'sword-and-sorcery' of yours; but I do know a little about art, literature, and history... "
science fiction New York: New York City 1986 Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission Earth Vol. 6: Death Quest. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1986); pg. 45. "'One of the reasons I brought you to lunch here is because they are having an exhibit of illustrations of imaginary spacecraft. Covers of magazines called 'science fiction.' And they have movie models of what they think spacecraft look like. Some UFOs, too. I'm sure you will be very intrigued. Some of the artists have painted things that really do look like spaceships. And I want to check them to see if our own craft ever get spotted. I'm sure you will find it fascinating...' "
science fiction New York: New York City 1986 Martin, George R. R.; Melinda Snodgrass, et al. Wild Cards III: Jokers Wild. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 345. "The calico and black purred like Rip Van Winkle's snoring.'
science fiction New York: New York City 1988 Martin, George R. R. & John J. Miller. Wild Cards VII: Dead Man's Hand. New York: Bantam Books (1990); pg. 3. "It seemed so real. But it always did. He'd been having the same damn nightmare since he was a kid. When he'd started waking up screaming twice a week, his parents banned H. P. Lovecraft from the bookshelf and threw away his prized collection of E. C. Comics. It didn't help... "
science fiction New York: New York City 1991 Leigh, Stephen. "The Temptation of Hieronymus Bloat " in Wild Cards IX: Jokertown Shuffle (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 2. "You think I really rule this place? You gotta be kidding. Look, I used to play D&D. Most of the time, I ran a character who controlled a little kingdom in the scenario our Dungeon Master had dreamed up. Y'know what? That fantasy's about as real as the 'kingdom' I have here. "
science fiction New York: New York City 1991 Leigh, Stephen. "The Temptation of Hieronymus Bloat " in Wild Cards IX: Jokertown Shuffle (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 161. "I'd never had to run a battle before except when I played D&D. "
science fiction New York: New York City 1991 Shiner, Lewis. "Riders " in Wild Cards IX: Jokertown Shuffle (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 249. "She had even relaxed enough to stop for a drink with them now and again at Close Encounters, a fern bar across the street. " [Other refs. to this place, apparently named after the Steven Spielberg film.]
science fiction New York: New York City 1994 Simons, Walton. "Two of a Kind " in Wild Cards: Book II of a New Cycle: Marked Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Baen (1994); pg. 33. "'I need your jacket, your boots, and your motorcycle.' The accent was perfect. Jerry had been practicing it for months.

'Jesus, Mr. Schwarzenegger?' said the cyclist. His voice was shakey.

Jerry walked around and looked the driver in the eyes. The man looked to be in his early twenties, and was on the thin side. 'Wrong, osshole.'... [More, as this character impersonates Schwarzenegger]

Jerry smiled thinly. 'Hasta la vista baby.'... He accelerated off into the night... "

science fiction New York: New York City 1994 Simons, Walton. "Two of a Kind " in Wild Cards: Book II of a New Cycle: Marked Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Baen (1994); pg. 47. "Lon Chaney Jr.'s wolfman was a sentimental favorite, but he'd seen The Howling recently, and that lycanthrope looked considerably more lethal. Jerry elongated his mouth into a snout and filled it with sharp teeth... "
science fiction New York: New York City 2000 Renado, Trevor. "Get a Lifestyle " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000); pg. 326. Pg. 326: Third Rock from the Sun
science fiction New York: New York City 2001 Castro, Adam-Troy. Spider-Man: Revenge of the Sinister Six. New York: BP Books (2001); pg. 140. "Despite himself, he felt like Inigo Montoya, fighting Westley in The Princess Bride. 'Who are you?' "
science fiction New York: New York City 2002 Friesner, Esther M. Men in Black II. New York: Ballantine (2002); pg. 47. Pg. 94: Third Rock from the Sun; Pg. 152: "...and that they're not trapped in a bad remake of The Mole People. "; Pg. 171: Rocky Horror Picture Show; Pg. 175: Ed Wood; Plan 9 from Outer Space (more, pg. 175-177); Pg. 186: "...after some idiot at headquarters had allowed them to watch both movie versions of The Fly. The Cronenberg one put them off their lunch for fifteen years, and the offer of a Global Translocator was decisively withdrawn. "
science fiction New York: New York City 2002 Friesner, Esther M. Men in Black II. New York: Ballantine (2002); pg. 147. "It didn't matter much which one of them said what. Curiously enough, they didn't talk that way because they belonged to a hive-mind or a collective consciousness or any other cliche from the annals of pop sci-fi. They just had no manners. "
science fiction New York: New York City 2002 Knight, Damon. Why Do Birds. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 85. "He turned pages, handed her the magazine. 'Look at this picture.'

The illustration... showed an insectile monster holding a swooning girl in its arms. Two men, one erect, one on the ground, were looking at it in horror.

'What about it?'

'The bug has a helmet on its head... And look how many arms and legs it's got.'

'Six.'

...Below the monster was a metal cylinder with portholes and a round open door... In the corner was printed:

DARK MOON
A Novelette of Strange
Adventure on a
Mysterious New Satellite

By CHARLES W. DIFFIN

She looked at the spine: it said 'May, 1931.' " [More about this faux science fiction author, and the main character's issue of Astounding Stories, pg. 86-87, elsewhere.]

science fiction New York: New York City 2002 Millar, Mark. Ultimates Vol. 1: Super-Human. New York: Marvel Comics Group (2002) [Graphic novel reprint of The Ultimates #1-6]; pg. Chap. 4, pg. 15. Hank Pym/Giant-Man: "Hold on. You know who would be brilliant as Bruce Banner? The one guy who's really pull of that bug-eyed neuroticism he's turned into an art form? "; Jan Pym/Wasp: "Wait, let me guess; Woddy Allen if he dropped a few pounds? That creepy, little kid from The Sixth Sense? "; Nick Fury: "No, no. That mouse Geena Davis adopted, man. What's-his-name in the golf pants; Stuart Little? "
science fiction New York: New York City 2015 Pohl, Frederik. The Years of the City. New York: Timescape (1984); pg. 119. "His cellmate was a man named Angelo Muzzi, and he was waiting for Harvey. 'Gimme,' said Moots, extending his hand for the copy of God-Emperor of Dune.

Harvey entered the cell warily--you watched yourself with Muzzi. 'You're [messing] up the whole plan,' he pointed out. 'You don't need this.' But he handed the volume over just the same, and watched Muzzi open i to the page where the shard of glass lay.

'It's too... short, a--hole,' Muzzi growled. He wasn't particularly angry. He always talked that way. He ripped a couple of page out of the book, folded them over and wrapped them around the thick end of the glass sliver... 'Too... short,' he repeated fiercely... "

science fiction New York: Westchester County 1962 Kelly, James Patrick. "10^16 to 1 " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 42. "In 1962... Back then, Westchester County wasn't so suburban. Our house was deep in the woods in tiny Willoughby, New York... So I didn't have any real friends. Instead, I had science fiction. Mom used to complain that I was obsessed. I watched Superman reruns every day after school. On Friday nights, Dad let me stay up for Twilight Zone, but that fall CBS had temporarily canceled it. It came back in January after everything happened, but was never quite the same. On Saturdays, I watched old sci-fi movies on Adventure Theater. My favorites were Forbidden Plane and The Day the Earth Stood Still. I think it was because of the robots. I decided that when I grew up and it was the future, I was going to buy one, so I wouldn't have to be alone anymore. "
science fiction New York: Westchester County 1962 Kelly, James Patrick. "10^16 to 1 " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 43. "On Monday mornings, I'd get my weekly allowance--a quarter. Usually, I'd get off the bus that same afternoon down in Ward's Hollow so I could go to Village Variety. Twenty-five cents bought two comics and a pack of red licorice. I especially loved DC's Green Lantern, Marvel's Fantastic Four and Incredible Hulk, but I'd buy almost any superhero. I read all the science fiction books in the library twice, even though Mom kept nagging me to try different things. But what I loved best of all was Galaxy magazine. Dad had a subscription, and when he was done reading them, he would slip them to me. Mom didn't approve. I always used to read them up in the attic or out in the lean-to I'd lashed together in the woods. Afterward, I'd store them under my bunk in the bomb shelter. I knew that after the nuclear war, there would be no TV or radio or anything and I'd need something to keep me busy when I wasn't fighting mutants. "
science fiction New York: Westchester County 1962 Kelly, James Patrick. "10^16 to 1 " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 43. "I remember it was a warm Saturday afternoon in October... I was reading Galaxy. I even remember the story: 'The Ballad of Lost C'Mell' by Cordwainer Smith... "
science fiction New York: Westchester County 1962 Kelly, James Patrick. "10^16 to 1 " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 56. "I had no place to go for answers, not Miss Toohey, not my parents, not the Bible, not the Boy Scout Handbook, certainly not Galaxy magazine. Whatever I did had to come out of me. I watched the news that night. President Kennedy had brought our military to the highest possible state of alert. "
science fiction New York: Westchester County 1962 Kelly, James Patrick. "10^16 to 1 " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 58. "I started thinking of the one who would pull the trigger, the unlikely Ray. What would make the difference? Had he read some story in Galaxy that I had skipped? Was it a problem with Mom? Or Dad? Maybe he had spelled enigma right... "
science fiction New York: Westchester County 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 21: "Slumber Party ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Nov. 1984); pg. 32. Rahne: "Douglas, what're y' doin'?! "; Doug: "Playing with light and sound, like in 'Close Encounters' trying to evolve a common basis for a language, then the language itself, so we can talk to him before it's too late. See, he's answering, replicating my pattern! "
science fiction New York: Westchester County 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 22: "The Shadow Within ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Dec. 1984); pg. 14. [Rahne writes her own fantasy story.] Rahne's thoughts: "I wouldna' mind a quick swim b'fore dinner... but I want t'finish this first. If I stop, I'll lose the thought. What shall I call her?! Och, names are the hardest. It's as if the character doesn't really come alive wi'out a proper name, the one that's just right for her--Ah! Got it! I hope. "; Her writing: "Alystraea lived in an enchanted wood, far from the haunts of men--which was only proper, since she was an enchanted princess. Here, surrounded by friends who loved and cared for her, she was save--her world one of lasting peace and beauty. "; Pg. 15, Rahne's story, continued: "This was washday, but for her it wasn't a chore. She sang as she worked... and always had a moment or three... to tickle a tummy or scratch behind an ear of whomever wee beastie was closest at hand. As usual, Rumblebun tried to help, but the silly rabbit managed instead... " [Story continues, pg. 15-18, not in DB.]
science fiction Nicoji 2200 Bell, M. Shayne. Nicoji. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 171. "It made me think of a Gregg Thorsen movie I'd seen. In it, Gregg tried to save a planetary-survey team trapped in a forest haunted by a demon that came up under the men to chew and claw its way through their feet and legs and bellies to their hearts, and every time, the forest would become absolutely still and all the men would know one of them was about to die. I hadn't though of that movie in two years. "
science fiction North America 1988 Niven, Larry & Jerry Pournelle. The Burning City. New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. xi. "It is not God who kills the children. Not fate that butchers them or destiny that feeds them to the dogs. It's us. Only us. "

--From Watchmen by Alan Moore

science fiction North America 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 200. "'...After Contact, I figured everybody was turned into zombies, it was like a horror movie, Invasion of the Body Snatchers. . . . I just wanted to kick some ass. Show somebody the human race wasn't that easy to knock over...' "
science fiction North Carolina 1986 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 42: "New Song for Old ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Aug. 1986); pg. 12. [Lila Cheney offers Sam a gift. The words are all references to science fiction by Anne McCaffrey's novels.] "What do you think? Since I'm invited to a proper family dinner, I thought I'd thank your mum with this gift. It's singing crystal from Ballybran, out of the Killishandra range, near Dragonhold. So rare it's literally beyond price. I remember you telling me how much she loves to sing--whenever she does, from now on, this will provide an accompaniment the like of which she's never heard, guaranteed to break the heart and uplift the spirit. "
science fiction North Carolina 1995 Lisle, Holly & Chris Guin. Mall, Mayhem and Magic. New York: Baen (1995); pg. 7. Pg. 7: "...next to a signed and slipcased leather Asimov Forward the Foundation and the leather-bound Complete Sturgeon he hoped to have enough money to someday take home. "; Pg. 9: Jim liked everything, and was as happy discussing Gibson or Sturgeon or L'Amour as Keats or Shelley or Wilde... He imagined discussing the themes of transcendence and futility that ran parallel in Clifford Simak's work with her, or spending a happy evening trying to run down the origins of some of the words in Gene Wolfe's Book of the New Sun. He thought she'd like Wolfe--he was literary enough to satisfy even readers of James Joyce, but he told a better story. "; Pg. 62: "...displays of the latest King and Koontz and Krantz novels--was there something magical about the letter K? she wondered... "; Pg. 154: "...the Sci-Fi and Reference sections. "
science fiction North Carolina 1998 Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Holly Lisle. In the Rift. New York: Baen (1998); pg. 107. "'From your letter, you sound ideal. You're a reader, and your familiarity with the fields of SF and fantasy is extraordinary. I was impressed by the fact that you're knowledgeable about mainstream fiction and mysteries, too. You presented yourself well on paper.' "
science fiction North Carolina 1998 Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Holly Lisle. In the Rift. New York: Baen (1998); pg. 217. Pg. 217: I Dream of Jeannie; Barbara Eden
science fiction North Carolina 2000 McDowell, Ian. "Sunflowers " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000); pg. 107. "maybe you should have listened more politely when he said that your next book should be A New Orleans Vampire in King Arthur's Court. "
science fiction North Dakota 1996 McDevitt, Jack. Ancient Shores. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 364. "'Gregory Benford. Astrophysicist and novelist.'

Benford was of medium height, bearded, wearing an oversized hunting jacket that he'd probably borrowed... he waved the chairman forward.

...'Ursula K. Le Guin. Novelist.'

She stood staring at the place where Asquith had fallen. She too was stained with his blood.

'And Carl Sagan. Astronomer.'

Like the others, Sagan seemed angry... " [More about science fiction authors Gregory Benford, Ursula K. Le Guin, and Carl Sagan, actual characters in the novel, pg. 366-369.]

science fiction Ohio 1996 Schimel, Lawrence. "A Stable Relationship " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 197. "There are some writers for whom, though they write together often, each collaboration is a revelation and unique experience, such as Barry Malzberg and Kathe Koja. They work so well together that it does not matter if Kathleen gave Barry the first part of a story to finish, or the other way around, or if they each wrote alternating sections; they shared a vision of the final prose and got there however they could. My collaborations with Mike followed a much stricter form: Mike gave me a plot, I wrote the entire first draft. Mike revised it, and by the time he had printed out the revised copy and walked downstairs to the guest bedroom it was sold in five countries and already wending its way through the various stages of production which a book undergoes. "
science fiction Ohio 1996 Schimel, Lawrence. "A Stable Relationship " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 197. "Mike [Resnick] had complete control of the final product. Some part inside of me felt like I had sold my soul to the devil, but I had to let him have the final say or he wouldn't work with me. It was the price I paid for the opportunity to learn from him. I was disappointed by the way the book emerged from his word processor full of the same kind of shtick as the baby-revision jokes. When I read these words that bore my name my muse recoiled in horror and, almost in desperation, I wrote reams of poetry to placate her temperamental and offended soul... The poetry was why I wrote... But I was fairly content, overall, with the collaboration. I had written the first draft of a novel in two months, which Mike had then taken apart and rewritten in a week. I could hardly believe I could write that much or how little time it had taken us. All the mystery and intimidation of being a novelist had now been debunked for me. " [Many more refs.]
science fiction Ohio 1996 Schimel, Lawrence. "A Stable Relationship " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 199. "So I tolerated the jokes and, in fact, when Mike [Resnick] won the Hugo for best novella in 1995, bought him as a gift A Goy's Guide to Yiddish so he would at least spell the shtick correctly. (It was a special edition that included the wordlist on disk, to add to one's spell-check dictionary.) "
science fiction Ohio 1996 Schimel, Lawrence. "A Stable Relationship " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 205. "So many years of living with and near Mike [Resnick] had taught me a lot, and I used his own tricks against him. I started with Mike's last assignment, taking perverse pleasure in slyly subverting the assignment to my own purposes. I proposed this piece as a joke--Mike Resnick, himself, as tyrant--telling him it was, after all, just fiction, and the highest form of flattery. It also helped me let off some steam before I burst asunder in spleen and rancor, although it let off only enough to keep my eventual purpose straight in my mind: to cut myself free from the ties that held me back, ties of Mike's construction and design.

Mike, of course, edited this story to cast himself in a better light. I had known he would do this, and had given him a placebo story, focusing more on his daughter than himself and very tame... But now, having hacked into Tor's computer system... the night before this book went to press, I have reinstated my unexpurgated original... "



science fiction, continued

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