Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,290 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to science fiction, California: San Francisco

science fiction, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
science fiction California: San Francisco 1977 Leiber, Fritz. Our Lady of Darkness. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1977); pg. 67. "Then his face grew intent gain. The 'Howard' in the entry had to be Howard Phillips Lovecraft, the twentieth-century puritanic Poe from Providence, with his regrettable but undeniable loathing of the immigrant swarms he felt were threatening the traditions and monuments of his beloved New England and the whole Eastern seaboard. (And hadn't Lovecraft done some ghost-writing for a man with a name like Castries? Caster? Carswell?) He and Smith had been close friends by correspondence. While the mention of a Black Pythagoras was pretty well enough by itself to prove that the keeper of the journal had read de Castries's book. And those references to a Hermetic Order and a Grand Cipher (or Fifty-Book) teased the imagination. " [More about Lovecraft, pg. 101, 167.]
science fiction California: San Francisco 1977 Leiber, Fritz. Our Lady of Darkness. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1977); pg. 83. "He perversely wondered what gay sprayed graffiti would have done to the eerie rock-crowned hills in Lovecraft's 'Whispered in Darkness' and 'Dunwich Horror' or 'At the Mountains of Madness,' where the hills were Everests, or Leiber's 'A Bit of the Dark World,' for that matter. "
science fiction California: San Francisco 1977 Leiber, Fritz. Our Lady of Darkness. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1977); pg. 102. "'And of course he found them! Promethean (and Dionysian) Jack London. George Sterling, fantasy poet and romantic idol, favorite of the wealthy Bohemian Club set... Ambrose Bierce, a bitter, becaped old eagle of a man himself with his Devil's Dictionary and matchlessly terse horror tales. "
science fiction California: San Francisco 1977 Leiber, Fritz. Our Lady of Darkness. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1977); pg. 112. "'...Jack London was a Marxist socialist from way back and had written his way through a violent class war in his science-fiction novel The Iron Heel...' " [More.]
science fiction California: San Francisco 1977 Leiber, Fritz. Our Lady of Darkness. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1977); pg. 116. "'You know, Franz, I've always been impressed by how in London's last great novel, The Star Rover, mind triumphs completely over matter. By frightfully intense, self-discipline, a lifer at San Quentin is enabled to escape in spirit through the thick walls of his prison house and move at will through the world and relive his past reincarnations, redie his deaths. Somehow that makes me think of old Castries in the 1920s, living alone in downtown cheap hotels and brooding...' "
science fiction California: San Francisco 1977 Leiber, Fritz. Our Lady of Darkness. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1977); pg. 131. "...thinking in a flash of the binoculars in James's ghost story 'A View from a Hill' that had been magicked to see the past by being filled with a black fluid from boiled bones that had oozed out nastily when they were broken. "
science fiction California: San Francisco 1996 Sawyer, Robert J. Frameshift. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1997); pg. 148. "The old man gestured with a bony hand for the letter. Once he had it, he skimmed its text. ' 'Bioethics,' ' he said contemptuously. 'And 'the human side of the equation.' ' He harrumphed. 'At least he didn't mention Brave New World.'

'Yes, he did. That's what the bit about 'Huxleyian nightmare' refers to.'

'Tell him to go to hell,' said Danielson... "

science fiction California: San Francisco 2015 Russo, Richard Paul. Subterranean Gallery. New York: Tor (1989); pg. 254. "The old standbys were well represented--Huckleberry Finn, Lord of the Flies, Ulysses,... Slaughterhouse-5, To Kill a Mockingbird--but there were others as well, some of which he knew, some of which he'd never hear of before--Dhalgren, The Awakening, Journey to the End of the Night, Going to Neon, The Dead Father, Zoning Assault..., The Female Man, Charred Remains, The Atrocity Exhibition. " [Some of these are s.f. books.]
science fiction California: San Francisco 2046 Besher, Alexander. Mir: A Novel of Virtual Reality. New York: Simon & Schuster (1998); pg. 11. "Dear Nelly, I thought you'd be interested in... Of course, there are all kinds of love--it's a pretty wide-open field. And it's always evolving, isn't it? Just like we are. Talk about the science fiction of the heart! "
science fiction Colorado 1988 Simmons, Dan. "Metastasis " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1988); pg. 166. "'Remember in The Thing? Figure out what kills it and rig it up.' "
science fiction Colorado 1993 Simmons, Dan. "Entropy's Bed at Midnight " in Lovedeath. New York: Warner Books (1993); pg. 10. Pg. 10: Casper; Pg. 11: "..a nervous mouth, long, twitchy fingers, and Ichabod Crane-ish feet in polished Florsheims. "
science fiction Colorado 2000 Bishop, Michael. "A Gift from the GrayLanders " in Future on Fire (Orson Scott Card, ed.) New York: Tor (1991; story copyright 1985); pg. 72. [Year estimated.] "On his cousin's black-and-white TV set, Cory had seen an old movie serial about a strange planet. Some of the planet's people lived underground, and they could step into or out of the walls of rock that tied together a maze of tunnels beneath the planet's surface. They moved through dirt and rock the way that a little boy like Cory could move through water in summer or loose snow in winter. The brave, blond hero of the serial called these creatures the Clay People, a name that fit them almost perfectly, because they looked like monsters slapped together out of wet mud and then put out into the sun to dry. Every time they came limping into view with that tinny movie-serial music rum-tum-tumping away in the background they gave Cory a bad case of the shivers. " [Some other refs. to this show, not in DB.]
science fiction Colorado 2000 Bishop, Michael. "A Gift from the GrayLanders " in Future on Fire (Orson Scott Card, ed.) New York: Tor (1991; story copyright 1985); pg. 78. "A moment or two later, Uncle Martin came storming down the steps in a pair of rope-soled boots that made the whole unfinished structure tremble like a medieval assault tower in an old Tyrone Power movie. "
science fiction Colorado: Boulder 1996 Willis, Connie. Bellwether. New York: Bantam Spectra (1997; 1st ed. 1996); pg. 54. "There was a big display up front for Faerie Encounters of the Fourth Kind.

I went upstairs to the kids' section and more fairies: The Flower Fairies (which had been a fad once before, back in the 1910s); Fairies, Fairies Everywhere; More Fairies, Fairies Everywhere; and The Land of Faerie Fun. Also Batman books, Lion King books, Power Rangers books, and Barbie books. "

science fiction Connecticut 1960 King, Stephen. Hearts in Atlantis. New York: Scribner (1999); pg. 21. Pg. 21: "Bobby... read a couple of old Superman comics... "; Pg. 22: "He had two new books to read, a Perry Mason called The Case of the Velvet Claws and a science-fiction novel by Clifford Simak called Ring Around the Sun. Both looked totally ripsh--, and Miss Harrington hadn't given him a hard time at all. On the contrary: she told him he was reading above his level and to keep it up. "; Pg. 25-26: "The Clifford Simak novel he held longer...

Ted returned Bobby's copy of Ring Around the Sun. 'In this book,' he said, 'Mr. Simak postulates the idea that there are a number of worlds like ours. Not other planets but other Earths, parallel Earths, in a kind of ring around the sun. A fascinating idea.'

'Yeah,' Bobby said. He knew about parallel worlds from other books. From the comics, as well. " [Many more refs. to science fiction reading in this book, some not in DB, but most refs. are thought to be mentioned in DB.]

science fiction Connecticut 1960 King, Stephen. Hearts in Atlantis. New York: Scribner (1999); pg. 37. "the Lord of the Flies was a hell of a book, maybe the best he'd ever read...

'What's it about?'

'Boys marooned on an island. Their ship gets sunk. I think it's supposed to be after World War III or something. The guy who wrote it never says for sure.'

'So it's science fiction.'

'Yeah,' Bobby said. He thought Lord of the Flies was about as far from Ring Around the Sun as you could get, but his mom hated science fiction, and if anything would stop her potentially dangerous thumbing, that would. " [Other references to Lord of the Flies in book, not all in DB.]

science fiction Connecticut 1960 King, Stephen. Hearts in Atlantis. New York: Scribner (1999); pg. 65. "Bobby felt there were a billion science-fiction novels alone in the adult section that he wanted to read. Take Isaac Asimov, for instance... "
science fiction Connecticut 1960 King, Stephen. Hearts in Atlantis. New York: Scribner (1999); pg. 116. Pg. 116: Flash Gordon mentioned. Pg. 118: "Village of the Damned was the greatest movie of Bobby Garfield's childhood... " [Pg. 119 also]; Pg. 119: Lord of the Flies [also pg. 121, 157]; Pg. 120: Invasion of the Body Snatchers (movie); Pg. 122: The Day of the Triffids; The Kraken Wakes; John Wyndham; "'...One nice thing about science-fiction and mystery writers is that they rarely dither five years between books. That is the prerogative of serious writers who drink whiskey and have affairs.' "; Pg. 156: Cosmic Engineers, by Simak [also pg. 225]; The Roman Hat Mystery by Ellery Queen; The Inheritors by William Golding; Pg. 166: H. G. Wells's The Time Machine; The Exorcist (novel)
science fiction Connecticut 1988 Byrne, John L. Fearbook. New York: Warner (1988); pg. 21. "He'd claimed the top of the Greeley house as his own, creating there a maze of computer equipment, science fiction paperbacks, and comic books... "
science fiction Connecticut 1988 Byrne, John L. Fearbook. New York: Warner (1988); pg. 22. "...to display his own artistry. It amounted to several dozen sketchbooks, eight-and-a-half-by-eleven pages crammed with badly muscled barbarians doing gory things to an increasingly disgusting array of demons and dragons. And, occasionally, what passes as Doug Junior's renditions of beautiful women. " [Some other refs. to generic s.f./fantasy in novel, not in DB unless mentioned by name.]
science fiction Connecticut 1999 King, Stephen. Hearts in Atlantis. New York: Scribner (1999); pg. 479. "...but the rehab librarian had given him The Sun Also Rises and Sully had read it avidly, not once but three times. Back then it had seemed very important--as important as that book Lord of the Flies had been to Bobby when they were kids... "
science fiction Cuba 1942 Simmons, Dan. The Crook Factory. New York: Avon Books (1999); pg. 69. "'You might already know her as Ingrid Bergman, Mr. Lucas. Rage in Heaven? Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde? Soon to be in... Tangiers?' "
science fiction Darkover 4012 Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Shadow Matrix. New York: DAW Books (1997); pg. 3. "...and were met by Duncan MacLeod, who was in charge of the stables but did duty as coridom as well. He was a grizzled fellow, his face weathered, and his eyes sharp with suspicion. " [Character has the same name as the title character from "The Highlander " TV series. Other refs. to this character, not in DB.]
science fiction Darwath 1996 Hambly, Barbara. Mother of Winter. New York: Ballantine (1996); pg. 14. "'Asimov wrote a story like that,' she said.

' 'Nightfall.' ' Ingold paused to smile back at her. 'Yes.'

...Gil had gained quite a reputation among the Guards as a spinner of tales, passing along to them recycled Kipling and Dickens, Austen and Heinlein, Doyle and Heyer and Coles... "

science fiction Darwath 1996 Hambly, Barbara. Mother of Winter. New York: Ballantine (1996); pg. 89. "...like an enormous lobster or a Roger Corman-sized crab. "
science fiction Darwath 1998 Hambly, Barbara. Icefalcon's Quest. New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 271. "Rudy, he recalled, had told a tale once, of a king stranded for twenty years on a desert island inhabited by two magical spirits and of the man who came to find him and fall in love with his daughter. 'Cool, punk,' Gil had said. 'I didn't know you'd ever read The Tempest.' 'What tempest?' Rudy had replied, startled. 'I'm talking about Forbidden Planet.' "
science fiction Diaspar 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 10. "Why, for example, did he not fit into the sagas? Of all the thousands of forms of recreation in the city, these were the most popular. When you entered a saga, you were not merely a passive observer... You were an active participant... No one could ever exhaust all the sagas that had been conceived and recorded since the city began. They played upon all the emotions and were of infinitely varying subtlety. Some--those popular among the very young--were uncomplicated dramas of adventure and discovery. Others were purely explorations of psychological states, while others again were exercises in logic or mathematics which could provide the keenest of delights to more sophisticated minds. "
science fiction Egypt 1986 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 34: "With a Little Bit of Luck! ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Dec. 1985); pg. 10. Illyana: "Let's hope the rest of this crazy caper goes as easily. "; Warlock: "Query: FriendIllyana approves of self's disguise? "; Illyana: "Welll--'E.T.'s' was better, but it'll do. " [Referring to the film 'E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial.']
science fiction Egypt 1986 Gerstner-Miller, Gail. "Down by the Nile " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 160. "Father Squid, the kindly pastor of the Church of Jesus Christ, Joker, made Hiram look almost svelte. He was as tall as a normal man and twice as broad. His face was round and gray... He always reminded her of one of Lovecraft's fictional Deep Ones, but he was actually much nicer. "
science fiction Europe 1918 Newman, Kim. The Bloody Red Baron. New York: Carroll & Graf (1995); pg. 116. "'Dr Moreau, you will probably remember me. My name is Charles Beauregard. We met once, many years ago, in the laboratory of Dr Henry Jekyll.' " [More.]
science fiction Europe 1996 Knight, Damon. Humpty Dumpty: An Oval. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 75. Pg. 75: "When I came back, my neighbor was reading a Clive Barker novel, the two fat people were reading Die Zeit... "; Pg. 91: "There's something like that in Chesterton's Man Who Was Thursday, too, but this wasn't a face, it was a planet. "
science fiction Florida 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 21. "Barbara Katz, self-styled Girl Adventurer and long-time science fiction fan, faded back across the lawn, away from the street-globes and the Palm Beach policeman's flashlight, and slipped behind the thick jagged bole of a cabbage palmetto before the cold bright beam swung her way. She thanked Mentor, her science-fiction god, that the long-hoarded, thirty-inch nylon foot-gloves she was wearing below her black playsuit were black, too... "
science fiction Florida 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 299. "In the stormlashed sea somewhere near Florida... Barbara Katz cried out form the cockpit of the 'Albatross'...: 'Thrilling Wonder Stories! Oh, but it's beautiful,'... "
science fiction France 2010 Anthony, Patricia. Cold Allies. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1993); pg. 11. "'Scene One, Act One of Night of the Living Dead.' Gordon whispered, even though he couldn't hear himself talk, even though he knew he was four hundred and fifty miles away.

He trundled on nervously, knowing where there was one gas victim, there were bound to be more... All of Bagneres-de-Luchon was there. The Arab National Army had obviously marched them into the flower-bedecked meadow. And the people had stood and waited, wondering what would come next.

Death had. Only a few, it seemed, had figured out the mystery early enough and tried to flee the helicopter's spray. They lay on the road, they hung over fences, they sprawled loose-limbed in the sweet grass of the roadside ditch. A yellow hound was feeding on a body.

'Woa. Stephen King does France,' Gordon whispered. "

science fiction France 2010 Anthony, Patricia. Cold Allies. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1993); pg. 121. "'Ain't we gonna see some sh-- fly now!' Gordon howled. 'This is the [expletive] Day the Earth Stood Still! This is [profanity] Arabs Versus the flying Saucers!' "
science fiction Gaea 2025 Varley, John. Titan. New York: Berkley (4th ed. 1981; 1st pub. 1979); pg. 105. "Bill considered that for a moment. 'Do you think that's possible? Something in one of the fruits?'

'Huh? You've been reading too much sci-fi, Bill.'

'Listen, you don't knock my reading habits and I won't knock your old black and white flat films.'

'But that's art. Never mind. I guess it's possible we've eaten something that tranquilizes...' "

science fiction Gaea 2025 Varley, John. Titan. New York: Berkley (4th ed. 1981; 1st pub. 1979); pg. 118. "Both Cirocco and Bill looked up at Calvin's mention of giant worms.

'I never did see the whole thing, but I wouldn't be surprised if it's twenty kilometers long. It's just a big, long tube, with a hole at both ends as wide as the whole damn worm. It's segmented, and the body looks hard, like an armadillo shell. It's got a mouth like a buzz saw, teeth on the inside and the outside both... We watched it one of those times.'

There was a worm like that in a book,' Bill said.

'A movie, too,' Cirocco said. 'It was called Dune.'

Calvin seemed annoyed at the interruption, and glanced up to see if the blimp was still close.

'Anyway,' he said, 'I wondered if that worm might be what's giving Mnemosyne such a bad time...' "

science fiction Gaea 2025 Varley, John. Titan. New York: Berkley (4th ed. 1981; 1st pub. 1979); pg. 302. "'A 'Wizard,' she called it. She tends to the romantic. You'd probably like her; she likes science fiction, too.' "
science fiction Gaea 2025 Varley, John. Titan. New York: Berkley (4th ed. 1981; 1st pub. 1979); pg. 126-127. "Bill, who had read a great deal of science fiction, could make a dozen theories about any aspect of Gaea. He was partial to the ever-reliable plague mutation: something that came out of nowhere and killed enough builders to leave Gaea in the hands of automatic safety devices.

'She's a derelict, I'll bet on it,' he told them. 'Just like the ship from Heinlein's Orphans in the Sky. A lot of people set out in Gaea thousands of years ago and lost control on the way. The ship's computer put it in orbit around Saturn, shut down the engines, and is still up there keeping the air pumping and waiting for more orders.' "

science fiction Gaia 2046 Bear, Greg. Eternity. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 60. "On Earth, the Great World-Master had been forced to turn back by his troops, had fallen sick in another location and died in Babylon . . . And there, Patrikia had told her, was the juncture where their two worlds had separated.

Rhita often thought of writing fantastic novels of that other Earth, what her grandmother would have called romances. Perhaps in time she would; she favored literature when she wasn't deep in her studies of physics and math. "

science fiction galaxy 1943 Lewis, C.S. Perelandra. New York: Simon & Schuster (1996; c. 1943); pg. 81. "He was a man obsessed with the idea which is at this moment circulating all over our planet in obscure works of 'scientification,' in little Interplanetary Societies and Rocketry Clubs, and between the covers of monstrous magazines, ignored or mocked by the intellectuals, but ready, if ever the power is put into its hands, to open a new chapter of misery for the universe. It is the idea that humanity, having now sufficiently corrupted the planet where it arise, must at all costs contrive to seed itself over a larger area: that the vast astronomical distances which are God's quarantine regulations, must somehow be overcome. "
science fiction galaxy 2080 McGarry, Mark J. "Acts of Love " in The Edge of Space. New York: Elsevier/Nelson Books (1979); pg. 205. A planet named Stapledon, apparently named for the s.f. author.
science fiction galaxy 2100 Bear, Greg. Anvil of Stars. New York: Warner Books (1992); pg. 4. "Christened Dawn Treader by the children at the outset of their voyage, the ship resembled... " [Name borrowed from Voyage of the Dawn Treader. This name is referred to throughout the novel.]
science fiction galaxy 2100 Bear, Greg. Anvil of Stars. New York: Warner Books (1992); pg. 283. "'Many Smells [an alien] watched some of our movies. We tried to interpret for him.'

'The Longest Day,' Giacomo said. 'Ben-Hur. Patton. He was particularly confused by The Godfather and Star Wars. Jennifer tried to explain The Forever War. He was pretty quiet afterward, and he didn't smell like much of anything.' " [Forever War refers to a predicted movie based on Haldeman's classic novel.]

science fiction galaxy 2100 Varley, John. "The Pusher " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 258-260. "Instead, he cribbed from every fairy tale and fantasy story he could find... It was a wonderful tale he told. It had enchanted castles sitting on mountains of glass, moist caverns beneath the sea, fleets of starships and shining riders astride horses that flew the galaxy. There were evil alien creatures, and others with much good in them. There were drugged potions. Scaled beasts roared out of hyperspace to devour planets... '...This Sorcerer was a dangerous man. One time when someone insulted him he made a spell that turned everyone's heads backwards... Some felt the Sorcerer had held out hope that the Princess might yet live on...' " [Much more, not in DB, about this fantasy/s.f. story told to a child.]
science fiction galaxy 2110 May, Julian. The Many Colored Land in The Many-Colored Land & The Golden Torc (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1981); pg. 34. "The day came at last when he could stand at the dock at Bedford Starport and admire the quarter-klom sleekness of CSS Wolverton Mountain, rejoicing that she was his own. " [Wolverton Mountain mentioned elsewhere pg. 34-35. Given the date of this book's publication, it is unlikely that this mountain is named after s.f. author Dave Wolverton.]
science fiction galaxy 2150 Dick, Philip K. The Divine Invasion. New York: Timescape (1981); pg. 30. "'So you're Catholic.'

'C.I.C., yes. You're using a term that's under ban. As I'm sure you know.'

'It makes no difference to me,' Herb Asher said. 'I have no involvement with the Church.'

'Maybe you'd like to borrow some C. S. Lewis.'

'No thanks.'

'This illness that I have,' Rybys said, 'is something that made me wonder about--' She paused. 'You have to experience everything in terms of the ultimate picture. As of itself my illness would seem to be evil, but it serves a higher purpose we can't see. Or can't see yet, anyhow.'

'That's why I don't read C. S. Lewis,' Herb Asher said.'

She glanced at him dispassionately. "

science fiction galaxy 2150 Dick, Philip K. The Divine Invasion. New York: Timescape (1981); pg. 32. "'I think what I'll lend you first,' Rybys said, 'is C. S. Lewis's The Problem of Pain. In that book he--'

'I read Out of the Silent Planet,' Asher said.

'Did you like it?'

'It was OK.'

Rybys said, 'And you should read The Screwtape Letters. I have two copies of that.'

To himself, Asher thought, 'Can't I just watch you slowly die, and learn about God from that? 'Look,' he said, 'I am Scientific Legate. The Party. You understand. That's my decision; that's the side I found. Pain and illness are something to be eradicated, not understood. There is no afterlife and there is no God, except maybe a freak ionospheric disturbance that's [screwing] up my equipment here on this... mountain...' "

science fiction galaxy 2151 Smith, Dean Wesley & Kristine Kathryn Rusch. By the Book (Enterprise). New York: Pocket Books (2002); pg. 2. Pg. 1-2: "Cutler shook her head in amazement and stared down at her notes. She'd spent a week's worth of her off-duty hours designing this science-fiction role-playing game, trying to come up with good scenarios--and trying to remember the rules. None of the other three crew members had ever played an RPG before, but they wanted to give it a try if she acted as game master. And like a fool, she had agreed.

When she was a kid, Cutler and her friends had played role-playing games, one night after another, their computers linked into a network of make-believe, eating up hours, days, entire weekends with the flights of adventure and fantasy. But now she was dealing with three adults who had only heard of RPGs--and with only her memory for help. The ships' computers just couldn't be used for this kind of recreational activity.

So she had worked out details of a science-fiction role-playing game... " [Much more about this throughout novel, not in DB, pg. 1-12, 23-29, etc.]

science fiction galaxy 2151 Smith, Dean Wesley & Kristine Kathryn Rusch. By the Book (Enterprise). New York: Pocket Books (2002); pg. 7. "Anderson just glowered as the others laughed. For the first time Cutler felt this might have a chance. She led Anderson through his next five rolls, giving his character charisma (another five), dexterity (a four), and luck (another five). She had decided to leave out all the skills relating to magic, since this game was science fiction, and that shortened the character rolling time considerably.

'You'll all start with zero experience points,' she said, 'but you'll acquire them as the game goes on.'

'I get how strength, dexterity, luck, and intelligence help,' Anderson said, 'but I'm not getting the charisma and the experience.' " [More.]

science fiction galaxy 2198 Panshin, Alexei. Rite of Passage. New York: Ace Books (1973; first ed. 1968); pg. 134. "We put on the suits. They were about as similar to the old-time pressure suits described in the novels I liked to read as the Ship is to that silly sailboat I once got so sick in. (In passing I wan to say that it used to strike me as odd the way nobody in the Ship wrote novels at all; nobody had for years and years and years, so that what I read dated from before the Population Wars. Right now I'm not even sure why I liked to read them. Most of them weren't very good by any objective standard. Escapism, maybe. . . .) "
science fiction galaxy 2269 Cox, Greg. Assignment: Eternity (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 34. "Yeah, that's me, Roberta thought. The Girl from U.N.C.L.E. "
science fiction galaxy 2269 Cox, Greg. Assignment: Eternity (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 63. "She had seen movies like 'Fail-Safe' and 'Dr. Strangelove' and even 'Planet of the Apes,' all of which seemed to accept as given that humanity would inevitably destroy itself in a full-scale nuclear war. Yet here was Captain Kirk and his crew... "
science fiction galaxy 2269 Cox, Greg. Assignment: Eternity (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 176. Pg. 176: "'Let me get this straight,' she said. 'You want me to say yes to some sort of Martian ESP thing?' Images from dozens of old Sci-Fi Theater horror flicks raced through Roberta's memory: body snatchers and brain transplants and psychic, mind-controlled zombies. You know, the alien in The Brain Eaters even looked a bit like Mr. Spock. . . . "; Pg. 177: "Lord knows she'd read enough about strange alien beings with advanced mental abilities. The only problem was, she didn't know what book Seven had dropped her into here. Was this Stranger in a Strange Land or The Puppet Masters? "
science fiction galaxy 2367 Duane, Diane. Dark Mirror (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 185. "...a reprint of Glocken's The Stars out of Joint; various others--a book of Restoration poets, Sun Tzu's The Art of War in the long-lost Cordwainer Smith translation, along with Rouse's prose Iliad and Odyssey... a weary, broken-spined trade paperback of Little, Big; and so many others. . . . "
science fiction galaxy 2368 David, Peter. Imzadi (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1992); pg. 25. "'You mean parallel universes,' said Mary Mac. It was clear from the speed with which she picked up on what he was saying that it was something she'd already given thought.

'It's something that has been considered,' said Data. 'That parallel universes are, in fact, alternative time tracks. There was a fascinating paper done recently, expanding upon a notion expressed in, of all things, a newly recovered twentieth-century piece of fiction.'

'The Niven Doctrine,' Blair said. 'I was in the audience when it was presented. Shook up quite a few people.' "

science fiction galaxy 2370 ab Hugh, Dafydd. Balance of Power (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 129. "'I thought you said these inventions were all . . . 'vaporware,' ' grumbled the Klingon, annoyed by Geordi's exuberance.

'They are! But they make wonderful science-fiction stories!' "

science fiction galaxy 2370 ab Hugh, Dafydd. Fallen Heroes (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1994); pg. 157. "At maximum warp, the Thule or the Clifford Simak could be at the station in twenty-eight hours... " [A starship named after s.f. author Clifford Simak.]
science fiction galaxy 2372 ab Hugh, Dafydd. The Final Fury (Star Trek: Voyager/Invasion! #4). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 121. "Dammit, there's a limit to Lovecraftian geometry! she [Janeway] insisted to herself. Evidently, the Furies disagreed. "
science fiction galaxy 2374 de Lancie, John & Peter David. I, Q (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 191. Pg. 191: "'Haaaa haaa haa!' the nagus roared with laughter. 'It was one million and three! You fool! You fell victim to one of the classic blunders! The best known, of course, is never get involved in a land war on Vulcan. but only slightly less well known is this: Never go up against a Ferengi when money is on the line!' ";

Pg. 193-194: "The nagus was shaking his head. 'I, the nagus, outwitted. Inconceivable.'

'I do not think that word means what you think it does,' said Data. " [In these two passages, author Peter David recapitulates, with a few changes in wording, some famous lines from the film The Princess Bride, written by William Goldman based on his own novel.]

science fiction galaxy 2375 Mack, David. "The Star Trek: New Frontier Minipedia " in Excalibur: Restoration (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 402. "Thallon
A disintegrated pile of rubble that was once the capital planet of the Thallonian Empire. It was never harmless. " [An oblique reference to Douglas Adams Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series, in which Earth is described as 'harmless', and later 'mostly harmless.']
science fiction galaxy 2375 Pellegrino, Charles & George Zebrowski. Dyson Sphere (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 199. [Larry Niven's Ringworld is discussed in this afterword to the novel.]
science fiction galaxy 2500 Leigh, Stephen. Dark Water's Embrace. New York: Avon (1998); pg. 128. "I don't know who first collapsed the words 'winged lizards' into 'wizards,' but it's certainly lent me a strange image whenever I read old fantasy novels "
science fiction galaxy 2555 Barton, William. Acts of Conscience. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. 302. "'Look around. That tree over there, branches and leaves forming suggestive shadows against the sky. That's a wizard, isn't it? Gandalf the Gray come to save you? Or shall we run screaming from some creature of Cthulhu? "
science fiction galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 196. "'To oppose something is to maintain it,' James intoned.

'Is that traditional, ser?'

'No. LeGuin, anglo preimmortal writer who understood culture.' "



science fiction, continued



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